Scared Monkeys Discussion Forum

The Monkey Lounge => The Monkey Lounge => Topic started by: klaasend on January 10, 2007, 06:53:50 PM



Title: Australia by Tibrogargan January 2007 - present and 155216+ views later!
Post by: klaasend on January 10, 2007, 06:53:50 PM
Tibro will tell us all about Australia  :wink:


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: mrs. red on January 10, 2007, 08:12:25 PM
Oh.. I would love to hear all about it..... starting with do they welcome American tourists???  It is so high on my lists of places I would LOVE to visit.....


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Carnut on January 10, 2007, 08:44:58 PM
Post about Christmas Snow in Australia:

UNBELIEVABLE! We're not dreamin' anymore. (http://www.roddingroundtable.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=6002)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Dihannah1 on January 10, 2007, 09:54:19 PM
(http://bestsmileys.com/welcome/1.gif)
 
 
New Assue Monkey! Nice to see a new face!
Australia is one place I would just LOVE to see, it's so beautiful....


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 11, 2007, 12:24:45 AM
Thank you all for your interest.  Just let me know what sort of things you are interested in so I can do some research and get my facts straight!
Australia is a very diverse country : from tropical rainforests, mountain snowfields and deserts with everything in between.  We LOVE American and Canadian tourists and have had a lot to do with your countries over the years.  My father was with the RAAF in South West Pacific at a US base during World War 11, my brother and a cousin both went to Vietnam and I have two nephews, one in the RAAF and one in RAN,  both of whom have done their share in Iraq.  All of them came home safely for which we thank God.
I plan to post items about our wildlife and ways of life.  We are not like Crocodile Dundee but certainly have our share of weird characters.  We are very laid back and easy going, in some ways too easy going but that is more of a political topic.  Things have changed a lot here over past few years with the influence of immigrants and we are much more cosmopolitan than when I was young.
Now down to work on my first request.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: mrs. red on January 11, 2007, 12:46:14 AM
Ok, I am a very political monkey...  :oops:

so I guess my questions would be...what kind of immigration are you seeing?  How is changing your political landscape?

Do Australians think this is a worthless battle on terror or do they think that it's a fight that needs to happen?

I will have a gazillion questions... but I will leave you with these for now...and please don't be shy to be frank with me... I love to hear all kinds of thoughts.... and I am not always eloquent even though, I try to be... so if you don't understand a question or I have worded it wrong please let me know...


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 11, 2007, 01:00:09 AM
Legend of the Glasshouse Mountains  An Aboriginal legend published by E G Heap, B.A
It seems that Tibrogargan, the father, and Beerwah, the mother, had many children - Coonowrin (The Eldest) Beerburrum, the Tunbubudia twins, Coochin, Ngun Ngun, Tibberoowuccum, Miketeebumulgrai and Elimbah.  According to the story there was also Round who was fat and small and Wild Horse (presumably Saddleback) who was always straying away to paddle in the sea.
One day, when Tibrogargan was gazing out to sea he noticed a great rising of the waters.  Hurrying off to gather his younger children in order to flee to the safety of the mountains to the westward, he called out to Coonowrin to help his mother, who by the way, was again with child.
Looking back to see how Coonowrin was assisting Beerwah, Tibrogargan was greatly angered to see him running off alone.   He pursued Coonowrin and, raising his club, struck the latter such a mighty blow that it dislocated Coonowrin's neck, and he has never been able to straighten it since.
When the floods had subsided and the family had returned to the plains, the other children teased Coonowrin about his crooked neck.  Feeling ashamed, Coonowrin went over to Tibrogargan and asked his forgiveness: but filled with shame at his son's cowardice, Tibrogargan could do nothing but weep copious tears, which, trickling along the ground, formed a stream which flowed into the sea.  Then Coonowrin went to his brothers and sisters but they also wept at the shame of their brother's cowardice.  The lamentations of Coonowrin's parents and of his brothers and sisters at his disgrace explain the presence today of the numerous small streams of the area.
Tibrogargan then called out to Coonowrin, asking him why he had deserted Beerwah; at which Coonowrin replied that as Beerwah was the biggest of them all she should have been able to take care of herself.  He did not know that Beerwah was again pregnant, which was the reason for her great size.  Then Tibrogargan turned his back on Coonowrin and vowed that he would never look at him again.
Even today Tibrogargan gazes far out to sea and never looks around at Coonowrin, who hangs his head and cries, his tears running off to the sea.  His mother Beerwah, is still heavy with child as it takes a long, long time to give birth to a mountain.

My notes :  The titles above are all names of the mountain group or towns around the area. (They are easier to write than to pronounce)  The Glasshouse Mountains are in the hinterland of  Queensland's Sunshine Coast which is north of Brisbane.  The area is very fertile and has many pineapple and banana plantations.  Also Beerwah is where Steve Irwin's Australia Zoo is located.  I do not have a scanner so cannot load pictures onto this story.   Hope you enjoy and for pictures you could google Glasshouse Mountains..

I'll help you out with some pics (klaasend) :wink:

(http://national.atdw.com.au/multimedia/tq/501364_2.jpg)

(http://www.mrdaytours.com.au/images/glasshouse.jpg)

(http://www.home.gil.com.au/~rkbt/crookneck.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 11, 2007, 01:23:21 AM
Quote from: "mrs. red"
Ok, I am a very political monkey...  :oops:

so I guess my questions would be...what kind of immigration are you seeing?  How is changing your political landscape?

Do Australians think this is a worthless battle on terror or do they think that it's a fight that needs to happen?

I will have a gazillion questions... but I will leave you with these for now...and please don't be shy to be frank with me... I love to hear all kinds of thoughts.... and I am not always eloquent even though, I try to be... so if you don't understand a question or I have worded it wrong please let me know...


When I was young we had a white Australia policy which limited migrants to coming from European countries and most of those came here to work on large electric power dam projects and stations in the Snowy Mountains.  Totally politically incorrect.  Prior to that most of the migrants had been Chinese and similar who worked in the gold fields in our early history.
But when they lifted that policy and it became an open door we got migrants from all countries.  Now we have nothing against most of them and the majority have settled in and assimilated well and proud to become naturalised and call themselves dinkum Aussies and they have bought good things from their cultures especially their varied foods.   Love them!
The problems now come from a very small minority who although they come here for a better way of life than they had in their homelands still bring their political and religious bias and arguments with them.  They expect us to bend out rules and change our way of life to suit them.  Well we are a Christian peace loving country and if they do not want to take us on those terms they would be better returning to their homeland.
As we are so easy going (you could read that as apathetic too) many do not worry too much about terrorism or the wars going on at present.  Not until it directly affects them.  We have compulsory voting in elections here and if we did not it would be interesting to see how many would actually drag themselves out to the polling booths.  Thinking people agree that terrorism needs to be halted somewhere, preferably not waiting until it gets on our doorstep.  Iraq seems to have gone awry and I think it is time the Iraquis started to do something more for themselves and not rely on US and allies for much longer.  Can see it heading into civil war though without some strong leadership.    Rant over!!!


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 11, 2007, 01:26:46 AM
Thank you Klaas.
In the top picture Tibrogargan is on the left of picture, Beerwah in the middle and Coonowrin on the right further in the distance.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Sleuth on January 11, 2007, 01:31:32 AM
G'Day Mate :wink:


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 11, 2007, 01:31:57 AM
BBL Monkey friends


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 11, 2007, 01:33:23 AM
Quote from: "Sleuth"
G'Day Mate :wink:

G'day Sleuth - will you be here for a while?  Have to dash off now but back later   Would love to chat about Koalas and things


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: mrs. red on January 11, 2007, 10:48:00 AM
Tib...

Thanks for your answer!  I appreciate your frankness and it was interesting to hear that as far as immigration y'all seem to face the same problems that we have....

I loved the story... and those pictures are amazing!!

I will just listen to you and Slueth talk... I am sure that y'all will teach us all a lot!  I am looking forward to learning all about your country!!


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: pdh3 on January 11, 2007, 03:31:40 PM
Tib - Welcome to SM! I am among the posters here who are fascinated by Australia. I plan to visit Down Under one day. Americans love Aussies, and we are very fond of the accent!
My question would be about the cattle stations and sheep stations. I just wondered what that way of life truly entails.
I'd also like to know how the Great Barrier Reef is faring.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: sb on January 12, 2007, 09:48:25 PM
The snow on Christmas in the Southern Hemisphere is incredible. I have NEVER had a White Christmas, having grown up in Florida. I understand the reversal of the seasons though and I shake my head at the thought that people in Michigan have no snow, while those in the SUMMER season south of the Equator are getting snow. Wild.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 12, 2007, 11:50:25 PM
Quote from: "pdh3"
Tib - Welcome to SM! I am among the posters here who are fascinated by Australia. I plan to visit Down Under one day. Americans love Aussies, and we are very fond of the accent!
My question would be about the cattle stations and sheep stations. I just wondered what that way of life truly entails.
I'd also like to know how the Great Barrier Reef is faring.


I will have to do a bit of researching into that as I have never lived in the outback - only in towns or outer suburbs of a city.  Will make it my next project.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 13, 2007, 12:01:03 AM
Quote from: "sb"
The snow on Christmas in the Southern Hemisphere is incredible. I have NEVER had a White Christmas, having grown up in Florida. I understand the reversal of the seasons though and I shake my head at the thought that people in Michigan have no snow, while those in the SUMMER season south of the Equator are getting snow. Wild.


Makes you wonder.  We had bad weather here for Christmas weekend and some light snow on the mountains.  I remember about 30 years ago when living in Hobart city area we woke up to heavy snowfall all over the ground which lasted several hours on Christmas day.  Lovely but unseasonal.  We have very changeable weather and can get four seasons in one day.  They always joke that if you don't like the weather come back in half an hour and it will have changed.  

On our west coast which is very rugged with dense forests and some remote mining towns the locals used to say their weather forecast was done by the mountain that hovers over the township of Queenstown :  If you can see top of the mountain it is going to rain, if you can't see it then it is already raining.  You have to have a sense of humour to live over there.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: pdh3 on January 13, 2007, 01:16:49 AM
Tibro - from what I can tell, Aussies have a great sense of humor, and such a zest for life!
Don't worry about researching the Outback if it's a time consuming endeavor. I just have such a huge curiosity about what that life is like.
Australia is the most interesting country on Earth to me. :)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 13, 2007, 06:05:00 PM
Quote from: "pdh3"
Tibro - from what I can tell, Aussies have a great sense of humor, and such a zest for life!
Don't worry about researching the Outback if it's a time consuming endeavor. I just have such a huge curiosity about what that life is like.
Australia is the most interesting country on Earth to me. :)


pdh3 - research was too strong a word     I have ideas of what life must be like on those big cattle runs but just wanted to read a bit to see I was on the right track.  Will post something here soon.  Having computer troubles today so if I am not around for a couple of days that is the reason, not the research  :lol:  :lol:    Thank you for your interest as I am enjoying sharing my lovely country with the Monkeys.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 17, 2007, 12:00:21 AM
Life on an Australian Cattle Station.

In the early 1800s many of the new free settlers were given selections of land which they had to take up then improve and develop within five years of the grant or lose it. I have read that the size of the holdings were determined by the amount of land the prospective owner could ride around by horseback within 24 hours. This is impossible to imagine in the case of the larger stations which measure tens of thousands of acres spread over many hundreds of square miles.

Life in those days was very primitive and hard. As well as the vagaries of nature such as floods, drought and bushfires, they had to contend with life threatening injuries from accidents, illness, isolation and stark loneliness. The isolation would have been less of a problem for the men who spent up to many months in the company of other stockmen (cowboys) on long cattle drives where they had to find and muster their cattle which had such large areas in which to stray and hide. These droving runs gave rise to many of our Australian words : “Smoko” = taking a short break; boiling the billy = making a “cuppa” tea and other expressions of camp life under the stars. This is where mateship originated and is the basis upon which our great Nation was founded and which was cemented into our heritage at Gallipoli with the landing of the Anzac forces now commemorated each year on 25 April, known as Anzac Day.

Women were left at the homestead, which would have often still been just a log hut, with any children still too young to accompany the men on the droving run. The women had to contend with all the above drawbacks as well as having to defend their children and themselves from poisonous snakes, feral animals, wandering aboriginals and any other dubious strangers. These women were usually young and fresh out from the “old country” as they called Great Britain, and their strength, perseverance and stoicism is legendary. Raises questions as to being considered the weaker sex. There was very little contact with their neighbours who lived so far away that it would take several days to journey there by horse drawn buggy. Mostly their only source of mail and human contact was with the Indian hawkers who traveled regularly around the isolated areas with their wares similar to gypsy tinkers. They would have had no idea what their new life would entail but once here had to make the best of it and certainly raised generations of patriotic and tough Aussies. The coming of the pedal wireless and correspondence schools enabled the children access to outside influences in addition to their home schooling and when they reached the higher grades were sent away to the cities and sometimes back to England for boarding school. The “Royal Flying Doctor Service” was set up and brought medical care and advice to the furthest outposts. Then with the advent of the telephone and now satellite communications and of course the internet the isolation has markedly decreased.

Work on these stations with their long, hot and dusty days is still very hard. A working day starts at dawn and continues until dark. Activities include mustering and yarding the cattle, still on horseback or by motor bike, branding, ear marking, de-horning, drenching and vaccinating. Horse care is all important and horse stealing is a very serious crime. Cattle duffing (rustling) is also a crime. Other work around the station include checking and mending many miles of fencing, welding gates, checking the many water bores where the cattle drink, and maintenance work on the building and machinery. Most of these workers boast they can repair anything with a length of fencing wire and a pair of pliers. Now mail and provisions arrive at least once a week often by light aircraft, and travel around the property is by utility truck (pick-up) motor bike, light plane and helicopter.

Homesteads are large buildings and surrounded by many staff houses and other farm out buildings. Looks like a small isolated township from the air. Social life has greatly improved with dances, concerts, picnic races (horse races and sometimes camel races) rodeos, camp drafts and campfire get togethers. Now many your people sign up for 1 or 2 year terms to learn to be a jackaroo or a jillaroo just for the experience. Many of them are from overseas and it must be a culture shock for some of them. It is now said that nearly half the station workers are women.

Life on a sheep station would be much the same except for the obvious differences as in the type of countryside and the yearly advent of the shearing season. All sheep stations have their large shearing shed fully equipped and the traveling bands of shearers make their way around the properties to do the shearing. The “ringer” is the one who shears the most sheep in a days work and it is eagerly contested. They are a tough hard working bunch of people and will easily go on strike or leave the property if the amenities are not up to their standard and they are particularly fussy over the standard of their meals. A good shearers cook is worth his/her weight in gold and is the best recommendation when seeking a cooking job in the towns.

Nowadays more and more of these cattle and sheep stations are offering holidays for tourists where you can enjoy the way of life and in some cases even join in the property chores


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Carnut on January 17, 2007, 12:09:41 AM
Thanks a bunch Tibro, keep it up.

Kinda appears that most of the folks there were straight from Britain instead of from all over Europe.

So except for the aborigines population would be a little more homogeneous than here.

Was wondering how the acreage was handed out, with the stipulations and normal real world economics I imagine some folks were a bit more successful than others and managed to accumulate more property thru purchase or default.

Though even economics probably dosen't really account for the really big 'stations' we've heard of.

Guess there must have been some folks who headed out into the no man's land and took their own property grants as what ever they could manage to hold or something like that.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Lala'sMom on January 17, 2007, 12:24:39 AM
Tibro
I would love to hear about the native wildlife there.  Which are your favorites?  

Tell me about the education system there.  Are there many universities and colleges?  What is your national pastime?  Soccer?  Rugby?  I am afraid I have no idea.   What is your main export?  What city do you live in?  

You will find I often have many questions.   :lol:


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: pdh3 on January 17, 2007, 12:34:02 AM
I know that in-vitro fertilization was developed by an Australian DR. About 25 years ago, a group of Australians came to the University of Alabama in Birmingham ( UAB) and began doing the procedure there. It was called IVF - Australia. They were a fascinating group.
When I was in the 5th grade, I had a classmate who moved to Birmingham from Melbourne while her father studied medicine at UAB. We all thought she had the neatest accent. Bindi Irwin reminds me of that little girl.
Australia has a great healthcare system, and some talented doctors.

Thanks, Tibro, for all the info on cattle and sheep stations. It's so interesting, and you are so gracious. I really want to visit one some day.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: klaasend on January 17, 2007, 12:35:38 AM
Doing a little fix to Tibro's post on her request.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: bleachedblack on January 18, 2007, 11:11:16 PM
What kind of monkey is that in your avatar?.....is he from Australia?


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 18, 2007, 11:37:15 PM
Some answers to your kind questions :

Carnut  Our earliest immigrants would have been Chinese who came to work in the gold fields and were well regarded for their hard work and peaceful lifestyle.  Next of course were the British.  This did not change much until the big Snowy Mountains hydro-electric power scheme where they brought out many Europeans to work building the dam and power station.  This was from the early 1950s onwards.  Then they opened it to other Asians and countries.  We have a large percentage of population from Asia.

I would imagine that land holdings could have been just established because either no one else wanted that particular area or they fought and/or pushed aside the aborigines for the land.  The aborigines in lots of cases became friendly with the settlers and worked for them also.

Marriage and other mergers would have helped to increase holdings and during the depression there would have been takeovers etc.  Since then drought, financial problems and lack of family to carry on (sometimes all the sons would have been killed in the wars and daughters marry and go elsewhere) would mean properties being sold.  Some of the really big stations are now owned by companies or a consortium.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 18, 2007, 11:59:52 PM
BB  My avatar is a Golden Lion Tamarin or Golden Marmoset.  A small monkey native to Brazil.  Said to be one of rarest animals in world with only about 1000 in wild and 500 in captivity.  They are trying to increase their population.
We do not have any monkeys native to Australia.

pdh3  We have some clever medical and scientific Aussies.  Sister Kenny pioneered treatment for polio victims.  A lady doctor recently developed a new treatment for burns patients after the Bali bombings which caused so many horrific burn injuries.  Those are just two I can think of on the spur of the moment.  Bindi Irwin is a real chip off the old block and I am sure Terri will watch her carefully with all the media exposure.
We do have a good government run healthcare system plus private health insurance available so no reason for anyone to lack good medical care.

Lala'sMom  Going to do separate article on our wildlife.  I think I like Koalas best but they are all appealing in their own way.

We have a lot of universities and colleges.  Education is state run and you have choice of state primary and secondary (high) schools or private schools usually set up and run by religious organisations such as Roman Catholics,  Anglican,  Protestant and Quakers.  As for the comparative standards I cannot help but have several friends who are/have been teachers so could source any extra info you may like.

National pastimes ??  Main winter sports are Australian Rules Football, Rugby, and Soccer in that order.   Summer is cricket, tennis and water sports.

Main exports were wool and wheat.  May have changed lately.

I live in Launceston, second largest city in Tasmania, which is an island state south of mainland Australia.  We are near northern coast of the island (Hobart the capital is on southern end).  Also lived in Brisbane, capital of Queensland for many years and travelled around  most of our states except for Western Australia so know a little bit about some of them all.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 19, 2007, 12:59:06 AM
pdh3   Lady doctor I was trying to think of is Dr Fiona Wood.  Originally from England, marries an Aussie and now living here.  Developed a spray on skin grown in lab from patients own good skin cells.
Prof Ian Frazer is a Scot/Aussie and developed cervical cancer vaccine.
Also Prof Graeme Clark perfected multiple channel cochlear implant.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: BTgirl on January 19, 2007, 02:02:03 PM
Tibro

I have a really stupid question, but I'm going to ask it anyway.  :oops:  :lol:

Someone told me that even though koalas are the cutest thing in the world, they smell really bad. Do you know if that's true?

TY


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: MsVada on January 19, 2007, 02:52:52 PM
Australian Rules Football :!:

I am a football nut,  would love to hear more about the Australian Rules,  Is it more along the lines of Rugby?

TIA

Ms.DV


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: LilPuma on January 19, 2007, 06:09:07 PM
Does Australia worry about China and Korea?


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 19, 2007, 06:14:53 PM
Quote from: "BTgirl"
Tibro

I have a really stupid question, but I'm going to ask it anyway.  :oops:  :lol:

Someone told me that even though koalas are the cutest thing in the world, they smell really bad. Do you know if that's true?

TY


Hi BT,

I have cuddled a few Koalas at theme parks and they do not smell bad at all.  In fact they smell a bit like antiseptic from the eucalyptus oil in the gum leaves they eat!  Their fur is very dense and springy not  soft as you would expect.  You have to hold them very firmly and support their bottoms or they will grab onto you to stop from slipping.  They have long sharp claws.  I do not think they bite but have been known very occasionally to pee on people holding them!  One did so on a politician once and the pollie has never lived it down!!
The one animal that can smell really bad is the Tasmanian Devil because they live on flesh and are not fussy how fresh it is.  Also very quarrelsome and noisy little creatures.   In captivity they are kept clean and fed fresh meat so are not so smelly.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 19, 2007, 06:20:36 PM
Quote from: "LilPuma"
Does Australia worry about China and Korea?


Yes - big time.  Also see Indonesia as even more of a threat to us.  All far too close for comfort.   We trade with these countries but many of our political watchers keep a wary eye on them.  The inscrutable Orient.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: LilPuma on January 19, 2007, 06:24:09 PM
Have you ever seen a Tasmanian Devil outside of a zoo?  They seem very much like nasty little badgers and noisy and all heck!


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 19, 2007, 06:58:40 PM
Quote from: "Ms.DarthVada"
Australian Rules Football :!:

I am a football nut,  would love to hear more about the Australian Rules,  Is it more along the lines of Rugby?

TIA

Ms.DV


I will try to explain the game which is the main winter sport in most of our states and is slowly becoming established in the other couple of rugby mad states.  Originally based loosely on Rugby and Gaelic Football the earliest teams can trace their beginnings from 1850s.  A game is played on an oval shaped ground by two teams of 18 players each.  They all have set positions but can move anywhere on the ground depending on the flow of the game.
Games consists of 4 quarters of 20 minutes each with a long break in the middle and the teams change ends each quarter.
There are four posts each end - centre two posts are about 6 metres high and outer two posts are 3 metres high.  Aim is to kick the oval shaped ball through the centre posts of opposition team end to score a goal worth 6 points. If ball goes between one goal post and the outer post that is a behind which is worth 1 point.

                                 l         l
                                 l         l
                       l         l         l          l
                       l         l         l          l

                          B        Goal     B

To start the game the ball is bounced in centre of ground by the main umpire and this is contested by both teams by leaping up and "marking" or grabbing the ball or by punching it out to teammates.   Can be some spectacular marks taken both there and during the play around the ground.  Once possession of the ball is gained it is then kicked or hand passed to a teammate . If the player who has the ball is not tackled he can also run with the ball but has to bounce it every 15 metres.  Aim is of course to get the ball to the oppositions goal end and kick a goal.  If a behind is scored the opposition then gain control and restart the game by kicking the ball from their goal square.  If a goal is scored ball returns to umpire for a centre bounce again.  If ball goes out of bounds (goes over the white line all around the oval playing area) it is thrown in by boundary umpires.  Free kicks to opposing team are awarded for any infringements.
Final scores could look like this :    
Team A   10 goals    5 behinds =  65 points.  
Team B     8 goals  12 behinds =  60 points.      Team A wins!

Hope this helps you understand the game.  I believe there are AFL teams in some parts of the US and also in Canada.
Usually find a impromptu game going wherever there are Aussie troops stationed.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 19, 2007, 07:01:05 PM
Well - my illustration of the goal posts did not come out as intended.  Sorry.
Not sure how else to illustrate it properly so will have to hope the description works OK


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 19, 2007, 07:05:20 PM
Quote from: "LilPuma"
Have you ever seen a Tasmanian Devil outside of a zoo?  They seem very much like nasty little badgers and noisy and all heck!


Yes but they are usually nocturnal and you hear them well before you see them fighting over their kill or carrion.   Have also seen other very shy creatures like wombats and platypus in the wild


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 19, 2007, 07:51:31 PM
Quote from: "pdh3"

I'd also like to know how the Great Barrier Reef is faring.


pdh3 - The health of the Great Barrier Reef is of great concern to all conservationists and ecologists and of course the tourist operators even though they are a great part of the  problem.  There have been government grants and much research going on to rescue and preserve it.  I will take this opportunity to describe some of it for those who are not familiar with what is probably one of our greatest tourist attractions and is the only living organic collective visible from Earth's orbit.  Is is off the east coast (Pacific ocean) of our northern state of Queensland and is the world's largest coral reef ecosystem.  It has been declared a World Heritage area and is scattered with islands, coral cays, over 3000 reefs  and would cover close to 200,000 square miles.  Damage has been caused mainly by pollutants especially spilled fuel from boats and they say the wetlands has halved since European settlement here.  There have been many shipwrecks in the area also.
Coral make up the reefs and cays and support the many sea and animal life.  Coral is really tiny live creatures that join together and form colonies in many interesting shapes such as fans, antlers, brains and plates.   Some types grow fast and others more slowly and these can be hundreds of years old.  They thrive in warm shallow salty water with plenty of light.
The live coral comes in many beautiful colours and dead coral is white.
The Crown of Thorns starfish is a great danger and has been known for past 40 years.  It kills the coral and thus has an impact on bird and sea life.  Also harming the coral is bleaching which is caused by rising water temperatures.   (Global warming?)
Some of the wildlife that live on and around the reef are turtles, dolphins, whales, dugongs, thousand of types of fish and shellfish and birds.   Many of these creatures are protected and fishing is strongly curtailed and totally restricted in some areas.
Tourists are probably the main danger to the reef.  Latest figures show more than 2 million tourists visit the reef in a year and are carried throughout the marine park's reef system by commercial boats.  The income earned and employment created is enormous and many ways are being sought to minimise their impact on this fragile environment while keeping the reef available to visitors.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: BTgirl on January 19, 2007, 07:53:31 PM
Quote from: "Tibrogargan"
Quote from: "BTgirl"
Tibro

I have a really stupid question, but I'm going to ask it anyway.  :oops:  :lol:

Someone told me that even though koalas are the cutest thing in the world, they smell really bad. Do you know if that's true?

TY


Hi BT,

I have cuddled a few Koalas at theme parks and they do not smell bad at all.  In fact they smell a bit like antiseptic from the eucalyptus oil in the gum leaves they eat!  Their fur is very dense and springy not  soft as you would expect.  You have to hold them very firmly and support their bottoms or they will grab onto you to stop from slipping.  They have long sharp claws.  I do not think they bite but have been known very occasionally to pee on people holding them!  One did so on a politician once and the pollie has never lived it down!!
The one animal that can smell really bad is the Tasmanian Devil because they live on flesh and are not fussy how fresh it is.  Also very quarrelsome and noisy little creatures.   In captivity they are kept clean and fed fresh meat so are not so smelly.


Thanks for answering my question, Tibro. I'm so envious that you've been able to hold a koala. That's been a lifelong dream of mine, and I just couldn't believe anything that looked that adorable could smell bad!


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Sleuth on January 19, 2007, 11:58:37 PM
Quote from: "BTgirl"
Tibro

I have a really stupid question, but I'm going to ask it anyway.  :oops:  :lol:

Someone told me that even though koalas are the cutest thing in the world, they smell really bad. Do you know if that's true?

TY


 :shock:  :shock:  :shock:

This koala prefers Victoria Secret's "Heavenly".  Most say it smells nice.  :lol:  :lol:


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 20, 2007, 12:00:47 AM
OK - have worked out a way to keep these goal posts where I meant them to stay:

.............................................l.........l
.............................................l.........l
....................................l........l.........l........l
....................................l........l.........l........l

................................. behind...GOAL...behind


Please try to ignore the dots and you may get the general idea.  No nets as in soccer and no crossbar as in rugby.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Sleuth on January 20, 2007, 12:06:58 AM
Quote from: "BTgirl"
Thanks for answering my question, Tibro. I'm so envious that you've been able to hold a koala. That's been a lifelong dream of mine, and I just couldn't believe anything that looked that adorable could smell bad!


Here is me being held    :wink:  :wink:

(http://i14.photobucket.com/albums/a335/my_photos_/Koalahug.jpg)

Seriously, this is a koala that I held....cute isn't he?


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Sleuth on January 20, 2007, 12:10:53 AM
Tibro - have you see the Royal Flying Dr Service.  It was so interesting.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 20, 2007, 12:20:57 AM
Quote from: "Sleuth"
Tibro - have you see the Royal Flying Dr Service.  It was so interesting.


I have seen their planes at the local airports and heard some of the interesting tales the pilots and doctors tell.  The service is wonderful and many doctors and nurses apply for the experience and the travelling.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 20, 2007, 12:29:34 AM
Quote from: "Sleuth"
Quote from: "BTgirl"
Thanks for answering my question, Tibro. I'm so envious that you've been able to hold a koala. That's been a lifelong dream of mine, and I just couldn't believe anything that looked that adorable could smell bad!


Here is me being held    :wink:  :wink:

(http://i14.photobucket.com/albums/a335/my_photos_/Koalahug.jpg)

Seriously, this is a koala that I held....cute isn't he?


He is such a sweetie and he has a good grip on your jacket!
They are heavier than you would expect for their size and it is so good they are protected and so much research is going into keeping them healthy and making sure their population numbers increase.
The Japanese go crazy over them.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: BTgirl on January 20, 2007, 10:25:55 AM
Quote from: "Sleuth"
Quote from: "BTgirl"
Thanks for answering my question, Tibro. I'm so envious that you've been able to hold a koala. That's been a lifelong dream of mine, and I just couldn't believe anything that looked that adorable could smell bad!


Here is me being held    :wink:  :wink:

(http://i14.photobucket.com/albums/a335/my_photos_/Koalahug.jpg)

Seriously, this is a koala that I held....cute isn't he?


He's gorgeous! They look as if they were made specifically to be cuddled.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: LilPuma on January 20, 2007, 03:00:22 PM
Thanks Tibro.  Interesting country, Australia.  People so much like us in a country so different!  Aside from the beauty and different natrually occurring things in Australia, I think Americans see Aussies as being much like us.  They can be rowdy and boisterous, professional and intelligent, caring and brave and most of all, like Americans, Aussies LOVE THEIR SPORTS!  It's said that there are more natural things that can kill you in Australia than anywhere else in the world.  I guess when you grow up there you learn about these things so you know what to watch for.  So far, there's been no mention of Dingos!


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: pdh3 on January 20, 2007, 04:00:36 PM
Tibro....thanks for so graciously answering our questions.  :)
The Great Barrier Reef is a unique and wonderful gift of nature. I heard the late great Steve Irwin talk about it, and I hope the human impact can be minimized. I know the Aussies are doing all they can to protect it.
Australia does have great medical talent. It's nice to know that when I visit Down Under, I won't have to worry if a medical issue arises. In much of the world, that wouldn't be the case.
What is the top television show right now? And who is Australia's top celebrity?


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 20, 2007, 06:05:38 PM
Hi  LilPuma and  pdh3  Glad to know you are enjoying my posts.  I love this country so much and am enjoying sharing some of it with all the monkeys.

I will work on the wildlife, including dingoes, this coming week - and yes we do have some very nasty creatures so will add them to the list too.

There is a lot of similarity with our two countries and lifestyle.
Sporting heroes are always celebrities and then pop music singers and film/tv actors.  Only occasionally do the ones that really do the important things like medical researchers and carers, teachers and volunteer bushfire fighters etc. get the recognition they deserve.

Our regular TV programmes are all in recess at present as we are in the middle of the long summer break.  Kids are off school until the end of this month and in some cases mid February.  Too long but it suits the teachers.
I know "24" was very popular and also "Prison Break".  I particularly like "Cold Case" (maybe we should send Kathryn Morris to Aruba?) and "The Unit".
Other popular shows are Aussie made "Home and Away", "All Saints" (like ER), "McLeods Daughters" and a few others.  Do you ever get any Aussie shows on TV there?

Today I am going to indulge in a little culture and reprint a poem that was taught to us in school and is often quoted even today.  It is just the best description of Aust and our feelings for this land.  Hope you enjoy.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 20, 2007, 06:16:28 PM
My Country

The love of field and coppice
Of green and shaded lanes,
Of ordered woods and gardens
Is running in your veins.
Strong love of grey-blue distance,
Brown streams and soft, dim skies
I know, but cannot share it,
My love is otherwise.

I love a sunburnt country,
A land of sweeping plains,
Of rugged mountain ranges,
Of droughts and flooding rains.
I love her far horizons,
I love her jewel-sea,
Her beauty and her terror
The wide brown land for me!

The stark white ring-barked forests,
All tragic to the moon,
The sapphire-misted mountains,
The hot gold hush of noon,
Green tangle of the brushes
Where lithe lianas coil,
And orchids deck the tree-tops,
And ferns the warm dark soil.

Core of my heart, my country!
Her pitiless blue sky,
When, sick at heart, around us
We see the cattle die
But then the grey clouds gather,
And we can bless again
The drumming of an army,
The steady soaking rain.

Core of my heart, my country!
Land of the rainbow gold,
For flood and fire and famine
She pays us back threefold.
Over the thirsty paddocks,
Watch, after many days,
The filmy veil of greenness
That thickens as we gaze ...

An opal-hearted country,
A wilful, lavish land
All you who have not loved her,
You will not understand
though Earth holds many splendours,
Wherever I may die,
I know to what brown country
My homing thoughts will fly.

**
©Dorothea MacKellar  (1885-1968)

The second stanza is often quoted and I am sure most Aussies could recite it from memory.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: pdh3 on January 20, 2007, 10:09:55 PM
Tibro.....loved the poem!

We used to get McCleod's Daughters here, but they stopped showing it for some stupid reason. Lots of people complained, but so far it has done no good. I loved that show. I watched it all the time.
Of course, we all watched Steve Irwin. And there are quite a few Aussies who are big over here in TV, movies, and music.
A few years ago, there was also a show called Outback Jack, where this gorgeous Aussie guy met a group of American women and spent time with them in the Outback. He was supposed to pick one of them to marry, and he did. The last I heard, they were still together. His real name was Vadim Dale.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Sleuth on January 20, 2007, 10:32:58 PM
Give me a home among the gum trees....with lots of plum trees....a sheep or two.....a kangroo....a clothesline out the back....and an old rocking chair :wink:


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 20, 2007, 10:59:21 PM
Quote from: "Sleuth"
Give me a home among the gum trees....with lots of plum trees....a sheep or two.....a kangroo....a clothesline out the back....and an old rocking chair :wink:


Click go the shears, boys
click go the shears ..... :wink:  :wink:


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Lala'sMom on January 20, 2007, 11:46:47 PM
Thank you so much for sharing all this info with us.  I have loved every single tidbit.  Since this is about as close to Australia as I will ever get in my lifetime, you have made me feel as if I know a little more than I did last week.  I so look forward to hearing more about your wonderful country.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 21, 2007, 02:46:08 AM
Quote from: "Sleuth"
Give me a home among the gum trees....with lots of plum trees....a sheep or two.....a kangroo....a clothesline out the back....and an old rocking chair :wink:


Thanks Sleuth.
I have been singing this all afternoon   :lol:  :lol:


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Sleuth on January 21, 2007, 02:57:13 AM
Kukaburra sits on an old gum tree. Merry, merry king of the bush is he. Laugh Kukaburra, laugh Kukaburra.  :wink:


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Sleuth on January 21, 2007, 02:58:23 AM
Quote from: "Sleuth"
Kukaburra sits on an old gum tree. Merry, merry king of the bush is he. Laugh Kukaburra, laugh Kukaburra.  :wink:



Growing up we would sing it as:
Kukaburra sits on an old gum tree. Eating all the gumdrops he could see. Laugh Kukaburra, laugh Kukaburra.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Peaches on January 21, 2007, 12:23:30 PM
This is fascinating.  I'm not even going to ask any questions because I think it's going pretty well without my two cents.  Loved the pictures.  Such fabulous scenery.  

Thank you for sharing.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Sue on January 21, 2007, 10:20:26 PM


I have some great pictures I will share of my trip if you would like


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 21, 2007, 10:37:32 PM
Quote from: "Sue"


I have some great pictures I will share of my trip if you would like


Sue I am sure we would all love to see them and they will fit in here nicely.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 21, 2007, 11:21:01 PM
KOALAS

The early European explorers and settlers thought they looked like bears or monkeys!  So they were called Koala Bears and some people still call their favourite food trees "Monkey Gums", but Koalas are tree dwelling marsupials which mean they carry their young in a pouch like Wombats and Kangaroos.
Koala is Aboriginal for "no drink" for they rarely come down out of their trees to drink as they get enough moisture from the eucalyptus leaves they eat.  These gum leaves are 50% water and 5% sugar/starches which is a low energy diet so the koalas sleep about 19 hours a day to conserve strength.
The adults are called bucks or does and the young are called joeys.  They have a 35 days gestation and the joey resembles a small pink jellybean when born.  The males have their own territory and grunt and bellow to defend it from other males.  The southern Koala is larger and has thicker and browner coloured fur believed to be because of the colder climate.  They would weigh almost double the weight of their northern cousins.  A full grown southern male would weigh up to 24 lbs.  Koalas have long strong limbs for climbing trees and scientists say they are the only other animal besides humans that have individual fingerprints.

.............................(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/thn0030.gif)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/koalataxonomy3.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 22, 2007, 12:17:00 AM
KANGAROOS

There are over 45 species of kangaroo and wallaby, ranging from the big red kangaroo to the rat kangaroo.  They are marsupial macropods and live in all habitats ranging from desert, woodland and rainforests.  Large males are called boomers and the young are called joeys.  Joeys remain in their mother's pouches until they are around 9 months old.  The largest are the Red Kangaroos which can weigh up to 180 lbs and be nearly 6 feet tall.  They spend most of their day lying in the shade and are only active early morning and after sundown, when they graze on green grasses.  

Their forepaws are hand like and used for fighting, grooming and holding food.  The powerful hind limbs and large feet enable them to bound over open ground at great speed and the long muscular tail moves up and down like a pump handle to counter balance the body.  When grooming the tail is used as a prop and may be the only limb touching the ground when they are fighting.  We do not have kangaroos in Tasmania but have wallabies.

A kangaroo and an emu appear on the Australian coat of arms.  They were chosen because they are two animals that cannot move backwards.

..............................................Red Kangaroo........(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/roo-red.jpg)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/roo-grey.jpg) Grey Kangaroo

Wallaby..................................................(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/wallabyrn_small.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: nonesuche on January 22, 2007, 12:47:13 AM
I love this thread, thank you for sharing tibrogragan !!!!!!!


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Sleuth on January 22, 2007, 01:17:13 AM
Quote from: "Sleuth"
Quote from: "Sleuth"
Kukaburra sits on an old gum tree. Merry, merry king of the bush is he. Laugh Kukaburra, laugh Kukaburra.  :wink:

Growing up we would sing it as:
Kukaburra sits on an old gum tree. Eating all the gumdrops he could see. Laugh Kukaburra, laugh Kukaburra.


The third verse goes like this (no kidding)

Kookaburra sits on the old gum tree
Counting all the monkeys he can see
Stop Kookaburra, stop Kookaburra
That's no monkey, that's ME!!!



KOOKABURRA
When one thinks of Australian birds, the kookaburra is usually the first that comes to mind. They make loud noises resembling human laughter, often prior to the sun rise. The morning ``laughter'' is to identify territorial boundaries. Kookaburras are powerful, brave, and love to eat meat. It is not unusual to hand feed them.

(http://www.sydneynature.com/birds/small/small_kookaburra2341.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: klaasend on January 22, 2007, 01:19:19 AM
and love to eat meat. It is not unusual to hand feed them.

Eeeek - does that mean they eat hands?  :shock:  :lol:


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Sleuth on January 22, 2007, 01:38:33 AM
RAINBOW LORIKEET

The Rainbow Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus) is a parrot common to the eastern seaboard of Australia, ranging from Queensland to South Australia. It is also found around northwest Tasmania. Its habitat is rainforest, coastal bush and woodland areas.

The larger lorikeets are highly intelligent and make excellent pets for those seeking a playful and energetic bird. All species are strikingly beautiful with their varied colours and stunning glossy plumage. As with any lorikeet species, they have special dietary requirements, and must be provided with nectar and wet/dry mix. The larger lorikeets make excellent talkers but can become extremely noisy and require a committed owner who is willing to provide continuing obedience training. With a very curious nature, the larger lorikeets have a tremendous mimicking ability and will often be heard imitating household appliances such as the telephone or microwave.


We would hand-feed these every day, loved jam and nectar.  They loved green grapes but would actually get angry if we fed them the red ones.    Two (named 'Lori' and 'Keet') were very friendly and accustomed to us.  They even mated right in front of us.  Keet would mimic whistle patterns.  Lori would peek in the windows between the slight crack in the curtain. Both would follow us around constantly when outdoors or would travel from window to window when we were inside.

(http://i14.photobucket.com/albums/a335/my_photos_/Lorikeet.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Sleuth on January 22, 2007, 01:40:26 AM
Quote from: "klaasend"
and love to eat meat. It is not unusual to hand feed them.

Eeeek - does that mean they eat hands?  :shock:  :lol:


They like mice, etc. Needless to say, I was not hand-feeding these    :lol:


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 22, 2007, 05:18:58 AM
This map shows the states and territories with capitals and some main towns.  Canberra is our Federal Capital :


..................................................(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/ausmap.gif)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Sue on January 22, 2007, 03:00:35 PM
I asked Tibro If I could share Pictures Of my trip to Austrailia in 2004
I am  putting together Slide shows here are a few to start,
The First 2 contain pictures from the Sydney Zoo and Featherdale a wildlife reserve
Taronga Zoo is the nation's leading zoological garden, featuring Australia's finest collection of native animals and a diverse collection of exotic species. What makes Taronga something special is its location. It is situated on elevated land along the waterfront, in one of the most beautiful vantage points on Sydney Harbour overlooking Sydney Cove, the Harbour Bridge and the Opera House.

As you zigzag your way along the paths among the animal enclosures, you are able to enjoy magnificent harbour views. The Taronga Zoo has its own jetty and you are able step off the boat and walk directly into the zoo.

It is always best to start your tour of the Zoo from the top entrance. That way you'll be walking downhill facing the harbour. You'll then be continually surprised as you turn a corner and catch a different vista of the horizon. Then, when you reach the bottom you can catch the Zoo Sky Safari chair lift to take you to the top again and begin your downhill trek along a different path.

If you would like to get up close to the animals and have your picture taken, then try the Animal Encounters experience. For a small fee, with the assistance of the rangers, you can enter the enclosures of some of the animals on display and have your picture taken by a professional. Note: You are not allowed in touch or hold Koalas in NSW.

Want to see Australia's unique wildlife in a natural bush setting? At Featherdale, we've gone out of our way to create a unique wildlife experience… within the Sydney metropolitan area!
You can hand feed a kangaroo, wallaby or emu - or enjoy a face-to-face encounter with one of our friendly koalas - amongst one of Australia's largest private collections of Australian native animals and bird life.

http://s62.photobucket.com/albums/h82/BigMouse1925/Australia%20Trip/?action=view&current=1169494168.pbw

http://s62.photobucket.com/albums/h82/BigMouse1925/Australia%20Trip/?action=view&current=1169493728.pbw

you will have to copy the links into search engine to view the slides shows

Once I upload more photos of my trip to this beautiful country I will share them with you

[/b]


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: LilPuma on January 22, 2007, 04:05:58 PM
Why does Australia have a patent on marsupials?  What is it about Australia and pouches?  Evolution, creation, either way, what's with the pouches?  Koalas seem to have been named like Pandas--neither are bears.  Beautiful pictures.   Steve Irwin's final show was on Animal Planet yesterday.  They showed sea snakes, box jelly fish, blue-ringed octupus and rock fish, among other things.  Oh yea, great whites.   :shock:


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: BTgirl on January 22, 2007, 04:17:11 PM
Quote from: "LilPuma"
Why does Australia have a patent on marsupials?  What is it about Australia and pouches?  Evolution, creation, either way, what's with the pouches?  Koalas seem to have been named like Pandas--neither are bears.  Beautiful pictures.   Steve Irwin's final show was on Animal Planet yesterday.  They showed sea snakes, box jelly fish, blue-ringed octupus and rock fish, among other things.  Oh yea, great whites.   :shock:


America has a marsupial too, you know. It's those ugly old possums.  :lol:

Man, I sure wish we could trade those possums for some koalas. :?


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 22, 2007, 04:38:19 PM
Quote from: "BTgirl"
Quote from: "LilPuma"
Why does Australia have a patent on marsupials?  What is it about Australia and pouches?  Evolution, creation, either way, what's with the pouches?  Koalas seem to have been named like Pandas--neither are bears.  Beautiful pictures.   Steve Irwin's final show was on Animal Planet yesterday.  They showed sea snakes, box jelly fish, blue-ringed octupus and rock fish, among other things.  Oh yea, great whites.   :shock:


America has a marsupial too, you know. It's those ugly old possums.  :lol:

Man, I sure wish we could trade those possums for some koalas. :?


We have possums too, so more pouches  :wink:   That is an interesting question.  I will see what I can find out.  I know because the continent has been isolated for millions of years that our wildlife is so different and has evolved the way it has.  This isolation has been a good thing as we do not have rabies and there is a lengthy quarantine for any animals brought here even domestic pets.  Heavy fines and goal terms for anyone trying to smuggle in animals or plants and the same for wildlife trying to be smuggled out.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 22, 2007, 05:33:33 PM
This story is about Harriet the Galapagos Turtle who lived many years at Australia Zoo.  I have seen Harriet several times and although she is an unusual animal there was something very endearing about her.  She would come out to be fed hibiscus flowers and other treats by the keepers and it was very sad news to hear of her passing, only weeks before Steve was killed.

REMEMBERING HARRIET

Tuesday, 27 June  2006


Sad news that Harriet, the much loved tortoise at Australia Zoo, died of a heart attack at the incredible age of 175! Harriet, who held the World Record for the oldest living animal in captivity, is rumoured to have been Sir Charles Darwin’s pet, after he picked her up in 1835 from the Galapagos Islands.

Harriet lived at Fleay's Fauna Reserve at West Burleigh on the Gold Coast for more than 30 years before making the move to Australia Zoo on the Sunshine Coast. Rosemary Thomson from Natural Bridge helped look after Harriet for more than 30 years.

"It's like a death in the family actually", says Rosemary Thompson, "she was very much loved by generations of Queenslanders. She came to us in 1958 when the Brisbane Botanical Gardens collection was disbanded. She roamed on the hills with the kangaroos, emus and wallabies. She was a vegetarian, that says a lot for vegetarian living, although I'm a beef farmer!"

"When you consider Harriet was hatched from an egg before the reign of Queen Victoria it's just astounding. If only she could have talked, she was never mated with another tortoise because they were pretty rare."

It's never been verified she was actually a pet of Charles Darwin, "unfortunately the records from the Botanical Gardens were swept down the Brisbane River on the 1893 flood. It's very sad really," Rosemary says, "my father met Harriet in 1939 when he was on his way to an expedition to New Guinea. He was told she had come to the gardens in 1860."
 
"There were reputed to be three of them named Tom, Dick and Harry. They were about five years of age judging on their size when they went to England on the Beagle, Charles Darwin's vessel. Lt Wickham was on the expedition and he, I think, from letter people have read, took these three animals back to Australia because the English climate didn't suit them. They reach maturity at about thirty years of age. I think they went to Sydney and up to Newstead house where Wickham settled. From there to the gardens. The body of 'Tom' is preserved at the Qld Museum, he died in the 1920s."

"My daughter Jane visited Harriet a week ago with her family, and they said that Harriet hadn't moved from her little shed, and the food hadn't been touched and they were wondering what was wrong with Harriet because she was very fond of her carrots and celery, and vegetarian matter. Hibiscus flowers were a choice item. So they were a bit worried about her when they reported back to us. She must have been ailing, but she had a good spin at 175 years!"

"I'm hoping her body will be preserved for science. There's a possibility Harriet came from Santa Maria island in the Galapagas group, and she would have been the last of her species", Rosemary Thompson.

..........................................(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/0517456500.jpg)[/b]


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: LilPuma on January 22, 2007, 06:38:54 PM
Quote from: "BTgirl"
Quote from: "LilPuma"
Why does Australia have a patent on marsupials?  What is it about Australia and pouches?  Evolution, creation, either way, what's with the pouches?  Koalas seem to have been named like Pandas--neither are bears.  Beautiful pictures.   Steve Irwin's final show was on Animal Planet yesterday.  They showed sea snakes, box jelly fish, blue-ringed octupus and rock fish, among other things.  Oh yea, great whites.   :shock:


America has a marsupial too, you know. It's those ugly old possums.  :lol:

Man, I sure wish we could trade those possums for some koalas. :?


I don't know any possums.  Do possums live north of the Mason-Dixon line?  I didn't know they were marsupials!  I wouldn't know a possum if I saw one.  Excuse me, must google.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: LilPuma on January 22, 2007, 06:49:02 PM
It says that opossums do live north but North American has Opossums, while possums are native to Australia.  

Is a possum and an opossum the same thing?

Yes and no. Throughout America the opossum is often referred to colloquially as a possum (similarly to the way some people refer to a potato as a tater or to a mosquito as a skeeter), but its actual name is opossum. When we refer to it by its colloquial name on this website, we usually add an apostrophe at the beginning to indicate the omission of the initial o: ’possum. But there really is an animal called a possum (without an initial o) that differs significantly from the North American opossum. The true possum is indigenous to Australia and looks quite unlike the American variety. You can see pictures of the Australian possum here, and there are also links to other possum websites on our links page

http://opossum.craton.net/faqs.htm


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 22, 2007, 07:04:51 PM
Brushtail possum.   Also found in New Zealand.

..................................................(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/brushtail_possum.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 22, 2007, 07:31:07 PM
Correction
In above article I referred to Harriet as a Turtle.  She was of course a Tortoise, a land dwelling animal.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 22, 2007, 09:59:42 PM
[/b]EMU

Now to the second animal on the Australian Coat of Arms.

Emus are a flightless bird which stands up to 6 feet tall.  Emu is not an Aboriginal word but is believed to have derived from an Arabic word 'ema' for large bird.  They are found throughout most of the mainland mainly in forests and woodland.  They eat fruits, seeds, plant shoots, insects and small animals.  Depending on food availability they will move hundred of miles and can travel up to 15 mph.  They are not a sociable bird, except for the young birds which stay with their father.  

The male emu performs all the incubation of about 55 days without leaving the nest to eat or drink after chasing away all the other emus including his mate.  The female takes no part in hatching or raising the chicks after laying the dark green eggs.  Chicks are cream coloured with dark brown stripes, ideal for camouflage.  The stripes gradually fade until replaced by dark brown feathers by about 6 months of age.

Emus do not have the option of flying away when threatenend.  If attacked by a wedge-tailed eagle, our largest bird of prey, they will run in a zig zag pattern.  At closer range they will kick with their strong powerful legs. Their calls consist of booming, drumming and grunting.


(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/semustands.jpg)

/IMG]tp://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/semuchicks.jpg[/IMG]

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/semuwalk.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 22, 2007, 10:02:02 PM
Here are the chicks ........(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/semuchicks.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: BTgirl on January 22, 2007, 11:09:16 PM
A Tennessee possum. Not nearly as cute as the Australian one. Trust me, I know. I have a yard full of them.  :lol:

(http://www.possumrescue.com/otherphotos/f.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 22, 2007, 11:18:07 PM
Quote from: "BTgirl"
A Tennessee possum. Not nearly as cute as the Australian one. Trust me, I know. I have a yard full of them.  :lol:

(http://www.possumrescue.com/otherphotos/f.jpg)


They do look quite different.  If you live near the bush here possums can be a pest as they like to get into any gap they can find in the house roofs and they thump around all night on the ceilings.  Or they leap out of trees onto the house roof and thump and slide all about.   Things that go bump in the night!


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: BTgirl on January 23, 2007, 08:00:29 AM
Quote from: "Tibrogargan"
Quote from: "BTgirl"
A Tennessee possum. Not nearly as cute as the Australian one. Trust me, I know. I have a yard full of them.  :lol:

(http://www.possumrescue.com/otherphotos/f.jpg)


They do look quite different.  If you live near the bush here possums can be a pest as they like to get into any gap they can find in the house roofs and they thump around all night on the ceilings.  Or they leap out of trees onto the house roof and thump and slide all about.   Things that go bump in the night!


We have persimmon trees in our yard, and the possums LOVE to climb up there at night and enjoy the persimmons. It drives our dogs nuts!  :lol: Fortunately, we've never found one anywhere in the house yet.  :shock:

Do the Australian ones "play possum," where they roll up into a ball when threatened?


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: pdh3 on January 23, 2007, 11:43:10 AM
Posssums are kinda mean, and they hiss like a cat! I had one in my garage. It tore a hole in the big bag of cat food I had stored there, and it was gorging on cat food. I chased it out with a broom, but I was skeert! I was raised in the city, and we did not have possums in our garage. :lol:
They creep me out. :shock:


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: BTgirl on January 23, 2007, 12:53:27 PM
Pdh3 - I'll try to keep this short and not take over the Australia thread, but I have a funny possum story. Hubby grew up just outside London, so he's certainly a city boy! When we were first married, we found a dead possum beside our mailbox one day. We waited for the dog across the road (Elvis) to take an interest in the possum and drag it away for us, but Elvis shunned our road kill. Finally, hubby said that he knew how to get rid of it without having to bury it. He said there was a house being built down the road, and a pile of brush that smoldered all night. Well, night fell, and hubby skulked out of the house with a shovel and a flashlight. Keeping the flashlight beam pointed low, as if he were a burglar, he scooped up the possum and scurried down the road to the fire. A few minutes later he returned, looking a little sad. He said,"I felt kind of sorry for the poor little thing, lying there in the shovel with it's tongue hanging out, so when I threw it on the fire to cremate it, I said a little prayer over it's body."  :lol:


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: pdh3 on January 23, 2007, 04:20:59 PM
What a sweet man!! Even possums are God's little creatures. :D

I never realized Australia had possums. They are very adaptable, so I guess they'd do well Down Under.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 23, 2007, 06:00:42 PM
BT  What a kind hearted husband you have!

pdh3  Possums do very well here and have almost been given "pest" status as they raid the fruit trees and vegetable gardens.  I have not seen them curl into a ball as I have never been that close to one, but they sure can scuttle up a tree very fast.  All dogs seem to hate them.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 23, 2007, 06:21:21 PM
DINGO
Canus Lupus Dingo

Dingoes have been in Australia up to 5000 years and are believed to be related to Asian and Middle Eastern wolves and brought here to trade with the Aborigines by Asian seafarers.

They are about 18 inches tall and are a yellow brown colour with a bushy tail and pointed ears.  They can have white feet and chest markings.  They have adapted to the many different habitats and in the hot northern tropical areas have a short single coat and in the cool to cold mountain areas further south they have a longer and thicker coat with a double layer of fur.  They will eat almost anything such as reptiles, mammals, insects, carrion and some plants.  They have also adapted well to the   coming of Europeans by hunting and killing the sheep and rabbits brought here by the settlers.

They do not bark but howl to announce their territorial boundaries and have many different sounds to communicate within their small groups or to call any straying pups.  A dingo pair stay together for life and dig a den to house the litters of up to 6 pups.  The pups leave the den at about 3 weeks of age and then are taught to hunt and kill by the parents.  Dingoes will hunt alone or with other dingoes to catch larger prey.

The dingo exclusion fence runs through 3 states : South Aust, NSW and Queensland and it is the longest fence in the world.  Dingoes have been known to stalk and menace people who intrude on their territory and ignore the "Do not feed the dingoes" signs.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/dingo.jpg)

....................................(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/dingohead_s.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 23, 2007, 06:22:42 PM
Dingo and pups ..

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/dingopups.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 23, 2007, 07:46:59 PM
ECHIDNA

Pronounced :  E-kid-na

The echidna and the platypus are the worlds only monotremes which mean they are egg laying mammals.  They can grow up to 20 inches long and weigh about 3 lbs.  In the hotter northern areas they are light brown and get darker with thicker hair further south.  They are black in Tasmania.

They are shy creatures with short stout limbs for digging burrows and searching for food.  Their snout is 3 inches long and stiffened to break up logs and termite mounds.  Their favourite food is termites hence they are sometimes called Spiny Ant Eaters.  They catch their prey with a long sticky tongue and as they have no teeth they have to grind their food between their tongue and the bottom of their mouth.

When frightened they will roll in a ball with snout and legs tucked in and sharp spines sticking out.  Pick one up if you dare!!

During the breeding season the female develops a simple pouch into which she lays a single egg which takes 10 days to hatch.  The baby is carried in this pouch until the spines develop at about 3 months of age.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Echidna_on_KI.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 23, 2007, 07:57:20 PM
WOMBAT

Wombats are very shy nocturnal marsupials with a large blunt head, small eyes and ears, thick soft fur with strong legs and claws designed for digging burrows to live in and foraging for food.  They eat grasses, tree roots and soft mosses, and also raid gardens by knocking down fences which makes them unpopular with farmers.  They can grow up to 4 foot in length and weigh up to 70 lbs and can survive small bushfires by hiding in their burrows.  They can swim but will keep clean with dust baths.  They often sleep on their back with all four feet sticking up in the air.
   
Female wombats have a back opening pouch so that she does not cover her baby with sand and twigs when digging.  They are a close relation to the koala.

...........................................(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/swom.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 23, 2007, 08:56:29 PM
PLATYPUS

The only other monotreme in the world beside the Echidna,  the Platypus is native to the eastern areas of Australia and Tasmania.  Often described as an animal that has been assembled by a committee, the platypus is a unique shy and wary creature with a stream lined body, soft pliable muzzle or duck bill, webbed feet and a broad tail.  Grows up to 2 foot long and can weigh up to 5 lbs.  It is deep brown in colour on upper side of body and limbs with the under side being golden or grey in colour.  It has a dense waterproof outer coat and grey woolly underfur for insulation.  Grooming is very important to the platypus.  Fur on the broad flat tail is coarse and bristly and acts as a rudder when swimming and an aid in diving.

They live in burrows they dig on the banks of freshwater rivers, lakes and streams which are concealed by logs and undergrowth.  The females lay 1 to 3 eggs and incubation is 12 days.  At 6 weeks the kits are furred and their eyes are open.  They are weaned by 4 - 5 months old.

The males have a poisonous spur on each hind limb and it can cause a painful injury to humans.  They make a soft growling sound when disturbed.  The platypus forages on the bottom for food and swim with their eyes, ears and nostrils closed.  They use their electro-sensitive bill to locate and probe for prey.  They eat worms, insects, crustaceans, molluscs tadpoles and larvae which is carried in their cheek pouches to the surface to eat.  (I knew there had to be a pouch somewhere)

The platypus is wholly protected and is threatened by pollution and urban development.


(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/platypus.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Dihannah1 on January 23, 2007, 10:53:53 PM
Oh this is so fascinating.  That's it.   I'm saving some money up and going to Australia!  It's so beautiful and the wildlife is awesome.   Thank you so much for sharing.  I always knew it was beautiful country, but this just proves it.

hhhmmppfff,  why would anybody even consider going to the Caribbean, when there is Australia!

Here in Ohio, possum's are also known to be a nuisance,  my husbands aunt lives on a farm and they are a nightmare for her house and farm.  She would have my husband and his brother (both hunters) go out and shoot them.  :(  Me the city girl, would be upset, but I eventually learned.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 23, 2007, 11:40:46 PM
TASMANIAN DEVIL

The Devil can not be mistaken for any other marsupial, owing to it's spine chilling screeches, black colour and reputed bad temper, which led the early settlers to name it Devil.  Although only the size of a small dog it can sound and look incredibly fierce.  The world's largest surviving carnivorous marsupial, it has a thick-set, squat build, relatively large broad head and short thick tail.  The fur is mostly black but can have white markings on the rump and chest.  It can grow to 12 inches at shoulder and weigh up to 24 lbs.

Fossils have been found on mainland Australia where it is believed Dingoes were to blame for eradicating them and now it is found only in Tasmania.   The mother can carry up to 4 young in her pouch for up to 4 months then the young are left in a simple den or hollow log until they are weaned at 6 months of age.

Devils are scavengers with powerful jaws and teeth enabling it to completely devour it's prey : bones, fur and all.  Wallabies, small animals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and insects are all eaten as prey or carrion.  In farming areas they also eat the carcasses of sheep and cattle.

It is said that the threatening "yawn" and strong odour is the result of fear rather than aggression.  They make a variety of fierce noises, from harsh coughs and snarls to high pitched screeches.  A sharp sneeze is used as a challenge to other devils before a fight or as part of a ritual when feeding communally at a large carcass.

Trapping and poisoning decimated their population and protection was finally introduced in 1941.  Although their numbers then increased they are now listed as vulnerable due to the devastating effect of the Devil Facial Tumour Disease.  Researchers funded by grants from even as far away as Japan are trying to find a cause and a cure for this disease.

Devil "yawning"  (http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/devil.jpg)

........................................(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/redears.jpg) young Devil


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 24, 2007, 05:16:26 PM
Some Wildflowers for you to enjoy

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/eficif.jpg)

Red flowering gum

................Close up of waratah...............................(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/waratahs.jpg)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/New-holland-honeyeater.jpg)

Honeyeater in Waratah.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 24, 2007, 05:25:33 PM
More Wildflowers

Wattle tree.....(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/mb-wattle.jpg)


(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/longifolia_anbg.jpg)
Close-up of  Wattle flowers

................................................................(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Sturt-desert-pea.jpg)..Sturt desert pea



Honey Possum on Bottlebrush.................................................(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/honey.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: pdh3 on January 24, 2007, 11:33:33 PM
Tibro - Thanks for posting all this fascinating information. I look forward to reading your posts, and I have learned so much about Australia!
It is my dream to visit there.

Does Australia manufacture many different types of automoblies, or do you rely on imports?


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: LouiseVargas on January 25, 2007, 02:18:47 AM
Tibrogargan,

Welcome to the Scared Monkey's Forum. I absolutely adore your posts. Thank you for your gorgeous pics.

With Love,
Louise


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 25, 2007, 05:12:17 PM
Dihannah and Louise...Thank you for your kind comments.  I am really enjoying presenting this thread more than I imagined I could.  I have learned some things about our country too, especially how many creatures we have with pouches!  I did not realise that we have the more of them than any other country until LilPuma commented on them.

pdh3 We have three main car manufacturers here : Holden (GMH), Ford and Toyota.  Depending on the model they are either manufactured here or assembled here.  There are several other makers that partly assemble here but these are the top sellers.  We export Toyota Camrys to the Middle East.  We import all the other more exotic cars but there is a big import tax duty on them so they are expensive.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 25, 2007, 05:49:03 PM
AUSTRALIA DAY

Today is our National Day.  On 26 January 1788 Captain Arthur Phillip took formal possession of the colony of New South Wales and became it's first governor.  The fledgling colony soon began to celebrate the anniversary of this date and fifty years later it became a public holiday.  After the Federation of all the states and territories in 1901 it became known as Australia Day.  It is now celebrated with a re-enactment of that first landing, regattas and water sports, race meetings, concerts, family day at the beach or playing cricket, Barbeques and official Naturalisation ceremonies. Aboriginals hold ceremonial corroborees and there is an announcement of Australian of the Year and at night fireworks displays.

AUSTRALIAN FLAG

............................................................(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/au-flag2.gif)

Our flag is an blue ensign with the British Union Jack in the upper corner, a large 7 pointed star called the Commonwealth star which represents one point for each of the six states and one point for all the territories.  There is also a representation of the Southern Cross constellation which can be seen from all our states and territories.  We have two mainland territories and several overseas, including two in Antarctica.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 25, 2007, 05:56:26 PM
And now for all those monkeys who follow the Olympic Games here are the words to our National Anthem so you can learn the first verse and sing along when we win all those gold medals...........

ADVANCE AUSTRALIA FAIR.

Australians all let us rejoice,
For we are young and free;
We've golden soil and wealth for toil;
Our home is girt by sea;
Our land abounds in nature's gifts
Of beauty rich and rare;
In history's page, let every stage
Advance Australia Fair.
In joyful strains then let us sing,
Advance Australia Fair.

Beneath our radiant Southern Cross
We'll toil with hearts and hands;
To make this Commonwealth of ours
Renowned of all the lands;
For those who've come across the seas
We've boundless plains to share;
With courage let us all combine
To Advance Australia Fair.
In joyful strains then let us sing,
Advance Australia Fair.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: pdh3 on January 25, 2007, 05:56:29 PM
Happy Australia Day!!!

Do you have big celebrations like we do on July 4th?


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 25, 2007, 06:04:30 PM
Quote from: "pdh3"
Happy Australia Day!!!

Do you have big celebrations like we do on July 4th?


Thank you.  Yes we do have celebrations.  Each town or district has something happening with both official and informal gatherings.  I think as the world has altered so much over the past few years the spirit of Aussie mateship has become more apparent and it seems we are becoming more patriotic.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: klaasend on January 25, 2007, 06:44:05 PM
(http://www.completecakedec.com.au/australia-day.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 25, 2007, 06:58:43 PM
Thank you Klaasend

That is a very nice emblem too.  I am going to poach it   :lol:  :lol:


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 28, 2007, 05:38:35 PM
Tragic story of the shipwreck coast

The Great Ocean Road south west of Melbourne in Victoria is rated one of the world's most scenic drives but sagas of the sea abound also on a 100 mile shore sector called the Shipwreck Coast.   The rugged coastline has claimed more than 180 ships over the centuries.
One particular wreck was that of the Loch Ard, a three masted square-rigged iron sailing ship, which sailed from England in 1878 with 37 crew and 17 passengers, many of them from an Irish family named Carmichael emigrating to the colonies.
After 13 weeks, on June 1, the ship was within days of arriving in Melbourne when it ran into thick fog.  When the fog lifted about 4 am the Loch Ard was well off course and heading for the jagged cliffs.  Despite all the efforts of the crew the ship struck a reef and sank in 15 minutes.Eighteen year old passenger Eva Carmichael rushed out on deck and found Capt. Gibbs who told her "If you are saved, let my dear wife know that I died like a sailor."  He went down with his ship.
Eva was swept overboard by a huge wave and spent five hours clinging to wreckage before she saw the ship's apprentice Tom Pearce on a small rocky beach - what was later named Loch Ard Gorge.  She yelled to attract his attention and Pearce swam out to her and dragged her ashore, then breaking open a case of brandy to help revive the now unconscious girl.
After the sun rose, Pearce scaled a cliff and following hoofprints, came across two men from a farm a few miles away and raised the alarm.  As Tom and Eva recovered later at the farm it was realised they were the only survivors.
Tom Pearce was hailed a hero and received the first Gold Medal of the Royal Humane Society and a reward from the Victorian Government.  People through the colony saw the situation as romantic and wanted Tom and Eva to fall in love and be married, saying God had brought them together for a reason.  But the couple did not feel the same way and three months later Eva went back to Ireland to be with the only surviving member of her family, a brother named William.  Years later Tom married a woman related to a man who died in the shipwreck and they started a family.
Nowadays when you drive along the Great Ocean Road to Loch Ard Gorge you can see the place where Tom rescued Eva and see the graves where some of the victims were buried.

Loch Ard Gorge ...(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/14_s.jpg)

Aerial view of the Great Ocean Road..(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/03_s.jpg)

Rocky outcrops known as the 12 Apostles...........(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/12_s.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: LilPuma on January 28, 2007, 06:52:54 PM
Thanks for the dingo and t-devil info!  David Letterman had Jack Hannah on once who brought a dingo.  The dingo went to lick Letterman's face or something, which scared him, and occasionally Letterman will still mention the time the dingo tried to bite his face off.   :lol:

I mentioned I watched some of the Aussie Open tennis tournament.  They kept showing pictures of Australia and the things there are to do, especially in Victoria.  So beautiful.  

Reading one of your posts, Tibro, I got confused until I remembered that NORTH for you is warmer, SOUTH is colder.  I have to try to remember that.   :?

Loved the flower pics.  Do you have roses?  Does Australia grow most of their own fruits and vegetables or do you have to import them?


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 28, 2007, 09:05:05 PM
Thanks for reading this LilPuma and all the other Monkeys.   I have seen Jack Hanna on Greta's show and he gets a bit excited sometimes.  He told Greta that baby Kangaroos were called Wallabies so I felt like emailing her to tell her the difference!
I am glad you enjoyed the tennis.  Victoria is a lovely state and not far from Tasmania.  I have the same trouble remembering you are cold in the North and warmer in the South.
We grow roses here and they seem to thrive in all our different climates.
We can grow all types of fruit and vegetables, but they do import some from Asia and use in the canned or frozen mixes.  Big campaign here to support our own farmers and forget the imports.  I do not even support the big supermarkets but buy my fruit and vegetables from a shop run by a local farmer where he has everything straight off his farm and always so fresh.  Tastes better too and you know they have not been sprayed with chemicals to make them last longer.
Tasmania also is the largest grower of opium poppies!  They are very pretty when you see fields of them as they have a pinky mauve colour flower.  They have them well fenced off with electric wiring and big signs and cameras everywhere.
Hope the map of Australia I posted helps you find some of the places I mention but if you are not sure just ask me.  Australia is just a little smaller than the 48 states of America so that will give you an idea of size.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: LilPuma on January 29, 2007, 01:42:53 AM
:shock: I'm watching HGTV's Extreme Homes Down Under.  Some guy in Wellington, NZ built a home on a rocky cliff using shipping containers.   :? Three huge metal shipping containers (like they'd put on a train) piled up on the side of a rocky cliff.  What's in his kiwis?  

Next is some guy named Fritz who lives in a dome home in Kapiti, NZ.  It looks like he dug into the side of a hill so most of the home is within the hill but one side is all glass.  They seem to have a rainforest and pool in the middle of the home.  Solar heated.  It's quite beautiful.  Oooh, there's a guest dome!  

Next is some kind of blimp home in Australia.  Commercial now.  They're showing the rocks you posted.  Uh oh, another one built on a cliff.  They had to use rock climbing equipment and hang from the side of the mountain to frame the house.   :shock: And I thought Americans were weird.   :? THere's a kukaburra (sp?) on the balcony and they threw it some fruit.  There were also some red and black parrot-looking birds.  The whole place is built into the trees and such, so I guess they think it's just part of the landscape.  

Off to the rain forest of Brisbane.  Five-story tower home.  The top tower has glass angled to form prisms so when the sun comes in it gives off different colored light like a rainbow.  The bathroom sink is made of a clamshell.  

Well, next is an underground home in the Outback.  Coober Pedy 130 degrees.  3500 people living underground.  If you need room for a piece of furniture, you get out your pick and chip away.   :lol:

There's a couple more coming up, but I've gotta post this puppy and be gone.  If you get HGTV, it's a very interesting show and it's amazing how beautiful the trees and coastlines are.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 29, 2007, 03:51:26 AM
Yep we have our share of nut cases here and some weird and wonderful homes.  Coober Pedy is unique and the temperatures are so high they live underground to keep cool.  You will be pleased to know that most of us are pretty normal and live in normal houses.  In the tropics (up North) they build the houses on stilts to allow the air to circulate and keep the house cool.  But with air conditioning now most people have built in underneath and turned it into a flat (apartment) or rumpus room (games room).  Some of the designer homes are extreme and must be built more to advertise the architect than for functional living.  The ones built right in the middle of the bush or forest are in danger of bushfires and some of the ones built on the edge of cliffs or headlands especially in New Zealand have been known to slide down the cliff after floods.  Give me a house in a nice suburb any day  :lol:


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 29, 2007, 04:02:24 AM
MORE AUSTRALIAN FLORA

The National floral emblem of Australia is the Wattle and State emblem for New South Wales is the Waratah.  (both on previous postings)
This time I have the Tasmanian emblem which is the Flowering Blue Gum.  Called Blue because of the blue/grey colour of the young leaves and grows very tall so the flowers are rarely seen.

Stand of Blue Gum trees.........(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Ag0851a.jpg)

Close up of Blue Gum Flowers..........(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/bluegum1.jpg)

Western Australia's Floral Emblem :

Kangaroo Paw Bush...(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/990634.jpg)

Close up of Red K. Paw flower......(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/anigozanthos-flavidus.jpg)

Green K. Paw flower close up............................(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/099_2.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: pdh3 on January 29, 2007, 12:39:44 PM
I've seen those HGTV shows on extreme homes Down Under. I find them fascinating.
Thanks again for all the photos Tibro. You are really making Australia come alive for me.  :)

What's an Aussie pub like? Ever been to one?


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: LilPuma on January 29, 2007, 02:23:20 PM
Quote from: "pdh3"
I've seen those HGTV shows on extreme homes Down Under. I find them fascinating.
Thanks again for all the photos Tibro. You are really making Australia come alive for me.  :)

What's an Aussie pub like? Ever been to one?


Tibro should be getting paid by the Australian Dept. of Tourism.  

Aruba could learn something from this.   :wink:


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: pdh3 on January 29, 2007, 04:23:09 PM
You're right Puma. Tibro has been so tireless and nice in answering our questions. Another good thing about Australia is the friendliness of it's people, and Tibro has shown us just how gracious they can be.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 29, 2007, 04:30:52 PM
Thanks monkeys,

Our TV shows both Free to Air and  Pay TV show us homes and tourist places in the US and UK  :lol:

You could say that going to the pub is a national pastime here.  We have all sorts of pubs from trendy bars in upmarket hotels and discos to bistros and corner pubs as well as the famous outback hotels.  Even the smallest  town has at least one local pub and you can get some great meals and meet some real characters as well as having an ice cold beer.  Some pubs are built in the style of a British hotel or an Irish pub.  I particularly like the Irish ones as they have great Irish music and fun times.  So you can see you would never go thirsty here!

Two Famous Outback Pubs :

Birdsville Hotel..(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/r58230.jpg)

Inside the bar at Birdsville Hotel ...(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/r57715.jpg)


Innamincka Hotel...............................(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/innami_hotel_320.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: LilPuma on January 29, 2007, 05:41:27 PM
Quote from: "Tibrogargan"
Even the smallest  town has at least one local pub and you can get some great meals and meet some real characters as well as having an ice cold beer.  





One of the reasons Americans love Aussies over Poms!   :lol:  :lol:

Poms = Brits, right?


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: LilPuma on January 30, 2007, 04:06:55 PM
USA:  

(http://i91.photobucket.com/albums/k304/LilPuma04/eaglenest2.jpg)
The Bald Eagle is our national bird.  It was hunted to the point of being put on the endangered species list but they think it will soon come off that list.  Hopefully not to be hunted again.  The bald eagle can weigh up to 14 pounds, lives about 14 years in the wild and has a wing span of 6 - 8 FEET.  That's taller than me.   :shock:

(http://i91.photobucket.com/albums/k304/LilPuma04/GB_PhotoGallery4_08s.jpg)
Grizzly bears live in both the US and Canada.  Adult females can weigh from 270 to 770 pounds by the age of 8 - 10 years.  Male grizzlies can weigh from 330 -1150 as adults (8-10 years).  

(http://i91.photobucket.com/albums/k304/LilPuma04/whitetaileddeer1sm.jpg)
White Tail Deer.  More commonly seen in forested areas except the southwest, I think.  I've seen many many of them in forest preserves just outside the city.  I did see a mom and her Bambi down by a creek once.  So pretty and hunted extensively in some areas, although I think the hunters like to get the bucks with horns.  More macho or something.  

Off the top of my head, those are the first animals I could think of that are unique to USA-Canada.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 30, 2007, 08:43:43 PM
Thank you LilPuma  I was going to ask if anyone would like to post items or pictures of the American wildlife and the different ways of life in your country as I am so interested and realise we only get a small view of things on the films and TV.  I would think that most of the monkeys that read here are in the US but I am sure they would be just as interested in learning about life in other parts of their own country as it is so vast and varied just like Australia.  I wonder if Klaas thinks this is a good idea and whether we would need to set up a separate thread?
Yes Poms are Brits.  :lol:  :lol:
Also have you caught up with that webcam that Art Colley told us about : www.africam.com.  It is amazing although the best times are a bit out for me, but this morning I saw a lioness come to drink at the waterhole and two large water birds that were there didn't fly away as you would expect - they just glided across the water to the opposite side and continued their foraging for food.  It was near midnight their time and as there was bright moonlight it just looked black and white.  You see these things on TV but it is so exciting to see them as it is happening and the only way I am going to see Africa now.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: LilPuma on January 30, 2007, 10:13:36 PM
It occurred to me that while we were drinking in all the pics and info about Australia, we weren't being very good hosts.  So I tried to think of a few things that I'm pretty sure you don't have down under.  Hopefully others will know some other things that you're not familiar with and share.  Oh, I have a thought; maybe I can find a pic.  bbl


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: LilPuma on January 30, 2007, 10:27:00 PM
We have (from Alaska, USA) the Aurora Borealis (Northern Lights):  

(http://i91.photobucket.com/albums/k304/LilPuma04/aurora3.jpg)

(http://i91.photobucket.com/albums/k304/LilPuma04/aurora1.jpg)

I don't know if you can see from anywhere in Australia the Southern Lights, or Aurora Australis.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on January 30, 2007, 11:20:40 PM
These photos were taken in 2003 not far from where I live.  Given the right conditions the "Southern Lights" or Aurora Australis can be seen as far away as northern New South Wales.  Hope the pictures are not too big.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/aurora1.jpg)


.............................................

(http://i118.photobucket.com/albums/o100/klaasen3/aurora2.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: LilPuma on January 31, 2007, 12:02:14 AM
Yep, you blew the margins, but I haven't seen Lala's Mom here, and I won't tell.   :wink:

Beautiful pics though.  Pretty amazing world we live in.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 02, 2007, 10:55:53 PM
A COUPLE OF ITEMS FROM OUR LOCAL NEWSPAPER TODAY THAT MAY INTEREST SOME OF MY MONKEY FRIENDS.

IRWIN  GRANT

Steve Irwin's environmental legacy will live on with a fellowship giving US high school students the chance to travel to Australia.  The fellowship will enable a US Midwest high school student to travel to Australia for two weeks to work closely with staff at the Irwin family's Australia Zoo on Queensland's Sunshine Coast and at Sydney's Taronga Zoo.

The Examiner 3 Feb 2007


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 02, 2007, 11:14:50 PM
TASSIE SEARCH FOR CIVIL WAR VETERANS
by Fran Voss,  The Examiner Newspaper 3 Feb 2007

Two American Civil War veterans lie in unmarked graves in the north of Tasmania - an oversight that Hobart historian and author Reg Watson wants to redress.  After 15 years of research, Mr Watson has discovered that one veteran lies at Beaconsfield and one in the former Cypress St cemetery in Launceston.  Two others - Henry Wells, at Somerset and James Francis Waters, in Hobart - have markers on their graves.  Mr Watson said that any American veteran buried in an unmarked grave was entitled to have a marker or plaque placed in his honour, courtesy of the US government.
According to Mr Watson's research, the veteran buried in Launceston is Capt.  John Johnston, of ex Company A, 48th Illinois Infantry Regiment.  He died on May 10, 1886. The veteran buried in an unmarked grave at Beaconsfield is Charles Baker, but Mr Watson is unsure of his history.  "He was probably a miner" Mr Watson said.
Yesterday Mr Watson visited the old Cypress St cemetery in Launceston, now playing fields, to determine a suitable site for erecting a plaque for Capt. Johnston.  "Because we don't know the exact location of his grave, the most suitable site is probably the gate" he said.  The tombstones were believed to have been removed from the park in the 1950s.

Mr Watson became interested in the fate of the many American Civil War veterans who emigrated to Australia through his membership of the American Civil War Round Table, a historical group.  "There are hundreds of veterans buried around Australia" he said.
Mr Watson will now apply to the US Department of Veterans Affairs for assistance in erecting a plaque for Johnston and a marker for Baker.
He is also hoping his story will raise community awareness of the project, prompting descendants of the men to come forward with any information about them.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 03, 2007, 12:17:02 AM
BALLARAT AND THE EUREKA STOCKADE

Ballarat began in 1838 as a sheep run with about 70 inhabitants on the shore of Lake Wendouree in the state of Victoria.  The floodgates of settlement opened in 1851 when Thomas Hiscock discovered gold nearby.  People of all nationalities flocked to the diggings in search of riches.  One was a young Irishman named Peter Lalor who rallied rebel miners under the flag of the Southern Cross to protest against the mining licence fees demanded by the authorities and the brutal methods used by the troopers collecting them.  The oath of allegiance was stated by Lalor and sworn by the miners at Bakery Hill on 28 November 1854. On 3 December soldiers stormed the diggers' flimsy barricades at Eureka Stockade.  Twenty two diggers and six soldiers died, scores more were wounded and Lalor lost an arm in the battle, but the iniquitous system was changed.  The rebellion was a short lived revolt and although a military disaster led to political and personal benefits for many Australians.

Ballarat has always had a reputation for its well preserved buildings and beautiful public gardens.  The very rich goldfields petered out eventually and the last mine closed in 1918.

The old Mining Exchange
(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/mining14.jpg)

Some Parks and Gardens in Ballarat :
(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/pkgardens06.jpg)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/helleborous_walk.jpg)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Garden01.jpg)

The Eureka Oath and Flag  (The flag is not an official Australian flag)

We swear by the Southern Cross to stand truly by each other and fight to defend our rights and liberties.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/images.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 03, 2007, 12:48:54 AM
RICHMOND BRIDGE, SOUTHERN TASMANIA

Surrounded by fields of crops and grazing sheep and cattle with a background of  forested hills the small town of Richmond presents a scattering of russet-coloured buildings beside the twisting Coal River. In the 1840s it was an important stopping place on the busy highway between Hobart and Port Arthur.  It was decided the road needed a bridge to ford the river and between 1823-1825 one was built by convict labour.  This bridge is the earliest large stone arch bridge in Australia and has had very little change since it was first constructed.  Richmond town has become a smaller tourist town since other more direct traffic links have been built, but it is noted as a treasure chest of well preserved historic buildings.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/richmond_bridge_tasmania.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 03, 2007, 01:39:30 AM
EVANDALE, NORTHERN TASMANIA

Evandale is a small village not far from where I live.  During the early colonial times the first white men to visit the Evandale district were shepherds.  These pioneers were seeking new grazing lands for the rapidly growing flocks of sheep.  By 1816 formal titles to prescribed areas of land began to replace grazing licences and the farming settlement sprang up in no time.  A grand scheme was evolved to provide a permanent water supply for Launceston from the South Esk River.  The evacuation works were carried out by convicts who laboured to build a huge tunnel through a hill which was intended to link up with a canal which would carry the water the 12 miles to Launceston.  The scheme was eventually abandoned after several convicts died in cave-ins and continual flooding frustrated attempts to line the tunnel.
The countryside around the town was soon supporting the many sheep and wheat and oats were being sown.  But even such a quiet rural community could not escape the brutal convict elements of what was still known as Van Dieman's Land.  Escaped convicts often turned to bushranging (highwaymen) and movement between settlements could be a risky business.  For several years in the 1820-1830s notorious convicts Matthew Brady and Ben Ball and their gangs terrorised travellers on the road to Launceston.  They were eventually betrayed by other escapees and shot by the troopers.
Evandale now is a busy little tourist town and at their yearly village fair hold the famous penny-farthing bicycle races.

Evandale cafe

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/951012485.jpg)

St Andrews Church at sunset

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/3723288476.jpg)

One of the original buildings now used as an art gallery

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/gallery-evandale-tas.jpg)

Penny farthing Race

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/c4.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: LilPuma on February 03, 2007, 06:58:43 PM
Quote from: "Tibrogargan"
A COUPLE OF ITEMS FROM OUR LOCAL NEWSPAPER TODAY THAT MAY INTEREST SOME OF MY MONKEY FRIENDS.

IRWIN  GRANT

Steve Irwin's environmental legacy will live on with a fellowship giving US high school students the chance to travel to Australia.  The fellowship will enable a US Midwest high school student to travel to Australia for two weeks to work closely with staff at the Irwin family's Australia Zoo on Queensland's Sunshine Coast and at Sydney's Taronga Zoo.

The Examiner 3 Feb 2007


Pretty darn cool!  I still get such a feeling of loss when I see his shows on TV.  I wasn't so much a fan of his shows, but the realization that his kinda zany personality brought so much attention and joy to the whole issue of animal care and environmental issues.  Truly a loss to the world.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: LilPuma on February 03, 2007, 07:05:40 PM
Quote from: "Tibrogargan"
TASSIE SEARCH FOR CIVIL WAR VETERANS
by Fran Voss,  The Examiner Newspaper 3 Feb 2007

Two American Civil War veterans lie in unmarked graves in the north of Tasmania - an oversight that Hobart historian and author Reg Watson wants to redress.  After 15 years of research, Mr Watson has discovered that one veteran lies at Beaconsfield and one in the former Cypress St cemetery in Launceston.  Two others - Henry Wells, at Somerset and James Francis Waters, in Hobart - have markers on their graves.  Mr Watson said that any American veteran buried in an unmarked grave was entitled to have a marker or plaque placed in his honour, courtesy of the US government.
According to Mr Watson's research, the veteran buried in Launceston is Capt.  John Johnston, of ex Company A, 48th Illinois Infantry Regiment.  He died on May 10, 1886. The veteran buried in an unmarked grave at Beaconsfield is Charles Baker, but Mr Watson is unsure of his history.  "He was probably a miner" Mr Watson said.
Yesterday Mr Watson visited the old Cypress St cemetery in Launceston, now playing fields, to determine a suitable site for erecting a plaque for Capt. Johnston.  "Because we don't know the exact location of his grave, the most suitable site is probably the gate" he said.  The tombstones were believed to have been removed from the park in the 1950s.

Mr Watson became interested in the fate of the many American Civil War veterans who emigrated to Australia through his membership of the American Civil War Round Table, a historical group.  "There are hundreds of veterans buried around Australia" he said.
Mr Watson will now apply to the US Department of Veterans Affairs for assistance in erecting a plaque for Johnston and a marker for Baker.
He is also hoping his story will raise community awareness of the project, prompting descendants of the men to come forward with any information about them.


Amazing that US civil war vets even got to Australia back then!   :shock: Most Americans say it's too expensive or takes to long to get there, then you lose a few days to jet lag.  I wonder how long it took them to go by boat?  Nice though that they want to give them proper markings.  My mom's side of the family was in the US going back to the civil war, I think, but my Dad's parents came over from Holland.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: LilPuma on February 03, 2007, 07:06:58 PM
Some pretty cool pics, Tibro.  Very pretty, but the one does show that you guys still drive on the wrong side of the road!   :shock:  :wink:  :lol:


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 03, 2007, 09:35:04 PM
Quote from: "LilPuma"
Some pretty cool pics, Tibro.  Very pretty, but the one does show that you guys still drive on the wrong side of the road!   :shock:  :wink:  :lol:

 :lol:  :lol:  :lol:  :lol:

Yes we do drive on the left hand side of the road.

Steve Irwin has done a lot for conservation.  A lot of Aussies thought he was a bit "over the top" and were sure he would be eaten by a crocodile eventually as he seemed to take such risks.  To lose his life by such a freak event was a big shock to all.  

I was surprised that we had Civil War veterans here, too.  I know we have a lot of WW11 US servicemen here who decided to stay or to return here after spending time at bases here or in the Pacific areas during the war.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 03, 2007, 10:16:05 PM
AN ABORIGINAL LEGEND OF HOW THE SUN WAS MADE

For a long time there was no sun, only a moon and stars. That was before there were men on the earth, only birds and beasts, all of which were many sizes larger than they are now.

      One day Dinewan the emu and Brolga the native companion were on a large plain near the Murrimbidgee River. There they were, quarrelling and fighting. Brolga, in her rage, rushed to the nest of Dinewan and seized from it one of the huge eggs, which she threw with all her force up to the sky. There it broke on a heap of firewood, which burst into flames as the yellow yolk spilt all over it, which flame lit up the world below, to the astonishment of every creature on it. They had only been used to the semi-darkness, and were dazzled by such brightness.

      A good spirit who lived in the sky saw how bright and beautiful the earth looked when lit up by this blaze. He thought it would be a good thing to make a fire every day; which from that time on he has done. All night he and his attendant spirits collect wood and heap it up. When the heap is nearly big enough they send out the morning star to warn those on earth that the fire will soon be lit.

      The spirits, however, found this warning was not sufficient, for those who slept saw it not. Then the spirits thought they must have some noise made at dawn of day to herald the coming of the sun and waken the sleepers. But for a long time they could not decide to whom should be given this office.

      At last one evening they heard the laughter of Goo-goor-gaga the laughing jackass ringing in the air.

      "That is the noise we want,"  they said.

      Then they told Goo-goor-gaga that, as the morning star faded and the day dawned, he was every morning to laugh his loudest, that his laughter might awaken all sleepers before sunrise. If he would not agree to do this, then no more would they light the sun-fire, but let the earth be ever in twilight again.

      But Goo-goor-gaga saved the light for the world.

      He agreed to laugh his loudest at every dawn of day; which he has done ever since, making the air ring with his loud cackling, "Goor goor gaga, goo goor gaga, goo goor gaga."

      When the spirits first light the fire it does not throw out much heat. But in the middle of the day when the whole heap of firewood is in a blaze, the heat is fierce. After that it begins to die gradually away until only red embers are left at sunset; and they quickly die out, except a few the spirits cover up with clouds, and save to light the heap of wood they get ready for the next day.

      Children are not allowed to imitate the laughter of Goo-goor-gaga, lest he should hear them and cease his morning cry.

      If children do laugh as he does, an extra tooth grows above their eye-tooth, so that they carry a mark of their mockery in punishment for it, because well the good spirits know that if ever a time comes wherein the Goo-goor-gagas cease laughing to herald the sun, the time will have come when no more Daens are seen in the land; and darkness will reign once more.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 03, 2007, 10:34:08 PM
MORE STATE FLORAL EMBLEMS

Queensland -  Cooktown Orchid

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/dendrobium-bigibbum.jpg)

Victoria -  Common Heath

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/098_2.jpg)


South Australia's emblem -  Sturt's Desert Pea is pictured on page 5 of this thread


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 04, 2007, 01:30:47 AM
SOME TASMANIAN BIRDS

CAPE BARREN GEESE

The birds are grey in colour and about the same size as the domestic geese.  Endangered it lays about 5 eggs in the tussocks where they live and the eggs hatch in the winter which means the babies are ready to fly in the spring.
The birds eat tussocks, herbs and grasses and drink salt water.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/geese.jpg)

FORTY SPOTTED PARDALOTE

One of the smallest and rarest birds found only in eastern Tasmania and is highly endangered.  They live in eucalyptus trees and eat insects and the sweet resin from the white gum trees.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/bird.jpg)

TASMANIAN NATIVE HEN

This bird cannot fly but is a fast runner and can swim.  When in danger it will flick it's tail to warn the others in the flock.  If it is chased it seeks to hide in grasses and reeds, and uses it's short wings for balance.  Ii can run up to 30 miles per hour.  The baby birds eat insects and the adults eat grasses and seeds only feeding at dawn and dusk.  Can be seen most everywhere in Tasmania and has survived so well because it is impossible to eat the tough flesh.  It has been said that to cook them you add a couple of pieces of blue metal to the pot and when the stones are soft the bird will be tender enough to eat.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/native_hen.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Cat on February 05, 2007, 07:45:47 PM
I have met several Aussies at UAB,and one that I admire at ST Judes.I know the Platypus can when they spur you and the snakes are deadly.You might explain the Wallace line to the monkeys.I enjoyed Bryson's Book"In A Sunburned Land"  CAT


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: LilPuma on February 06, 2007, 01:52:41 PM
I thought this was interesting.  We think of swans as being white.  All white.  That's what most of us see when we see swans.  They're known for mating for life.  When I looked them up, I see that the Southern Hemisphere, including Australia and Tasmania, have black swans, who also mate for life.  
Northern:
(http://i91.photobucket.com/albums/k304/LilPuma04/swans.jpg)
Southern:  
(http://i91.photobucket.com/albums/k304/LilPuma04/225px-Black_Swans.jpg)

They're are other swans, some black & white, but these are supposedly the most commonly known.  I couldn't find an explanation for the black v. white in the different hemispheres.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 06, 2007, 07:13:11 PM
Yes LilPuma we do have the white and the black swans.  The black ones are native to here and the white would have been introduced by the Europeans.  
The young birds are a greyish brown colour until they get their glossy black feathers when they are about two years old.  Their wing tips are pure white but you can only see them when they are flying which is very rare.  They are just as graceful on water as the white ones.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: LilPuma on February 06, 2007, 07:53:30 PM
I posted a little blip on the Holloway thread, but the whole post was skipped over  :lol: so I'll repeat it here.  I heard on CNN this morning that a kangaroo was found (and caught by Animal Control) in CALIFORNIA this morning.  I hope they treat this as the criminal act it is and start looking for the poachers.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 06, 2007, 08:15:06 PM
Yep, I saw that post and answered on page 10   :lol:
Maybe the roo was someone's pet or a zoo escapee?  I cannot imagine how else it got thee except for smuggling which carries a heavy penalty if caught.  Always someone trying to smuggle birds and animals out of the country regardless  :cry:


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 06, 2007, 08:17:05 PM
LilPumaCan you get my email address off Klaas sometime?  Just mark it LilPuma or Monkey in the subject line so it does not get eaten by my spam filters.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 06, 2007, 09:25:03 PM
THE WALLACE LINE

The Wallace Line is a boundary that separates the zoogeographical regions of Asia and Australasia. West of the line are found organisms related to Asiatic species; to the east, mostly organisms related to Australian species. The line is named after Alfred Russel Wallace, who noticed the apparent dividing line during his travels through the East Indies in the 19th century. The line runs through the Malay Archipelago, between Borneo and Sulawesi (Celebes); and between Bali (in the west) and Lombok (in the east). Evidence of the line was also noted in Antonio Pigafetta's biological contrasts between the Philippines and the Spice Islands, recorded during the voyage of Ferdinand Magellan in 1521. The limit of Asian flora and fauna is modified by Weber. He moved the line to the east. The limit is not fixed, but determined by the type of flora and fauna. This new line is called "Wallace-Weber".

The distance between Bali and Lombok is small, a matter of only about 35 kilometers. The distributions of many bird species observe the line, as many birds refuse to cross even the smallest stretches of open water. Many volant mammals (bats) have distributions that cross the Wallace Line, but non-volant species are usually limited to one side or the other, with a few exceptions (e.g., rodents [Hystrix]).

Australasia does not conform to a single zoological area since New Zealand's fauna are completely different to those on the Australian continent. Zoologists have suggested a term for the distinct area containing Australia, Tasmania and New Guinea that is dominated by marsupials. Suggestions are Meganesia, Sahul or Australinea.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/walline.gif)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 06, 2007, 09:37:01 PM
Another good explanation of the Wallace Line and our own Aborigines:  

WALLACE'S LINE

by John H. Lienhard

    Today, we cross Wallace's line. The University of Houston's College of Engineering presents this series about the machines that make our civilization run, and the people whose ingenuity created them.

    Physiologist Jared Diamond makes a pilgrimage to Wallace's line -- an imaginary line separating Borneo and Java from the Celebes and other islands to the southeast. "[Crossing] that line," he says, "may have been what made our ancestors truly human."

    Alfred Russel Wallace was the now-almost-forgotten co-discoverer of the theory of evolution. Darwin had pretty well formulated the theory when he learned that Wallace was about to publish a similar idea. When Wallace heard about Darwin, he politely stood aside and let Darwin publish first.

    Among many contributions, Wallace identified the demarcation between species of southeast Asia and completely different species in Australia and New Guinea. There are other such regions. The Sahara is one. A band from northwest India through the Himalayas and Indochina forms another such zone of separation. But Wallace's line has special importance.

    For a long time, we've known that modern humans evolved in Africa 100,000 or so years ago, and that they began making dramatic art and tools in Europe 30 or 40 thousand years ago. But we've paid scant attention to the world southeast of Wallace's line.

    The so-called Java Ape Man fossils make it clear that ancestors of modern humans reached southeast Asia a million years ago. Java Man got as far as Borneo and Java over land links that existed before the glacial epochs. But those links ended there, and he couldn't get to New Guinea and Australia.

    Yet modern humans have occupied Australia for 60,000 years. Somehow, modern humans appeared in Java Man's world, and they managed to go island-hopping all the way to Australia. There they practiced advanced art and technology that rivals what we find in the caves of central Europe. The catch is, they did so much earlier than the European Cro-Magnons.

    And so, Jared Diamond observes, we were the one species that lived on both sides of Wallace's line. The crucible of human creativity might well have been Australia. He believes the art and technology of Australian aborigines slowly trickled back and eventually reached Europe. Diamond thinks that crossing Wallace's line was the giant step that made us into a technological species.

    Eventually, the vast geography and resources of Eurasia allowed the aborigines' cousins to run ahead -- to invent writing and the wheel, to build canons and cathedrals. Eventually, when Dutch and English navigators found their way back to Australia, all they saw were shockingly primitive humans. They had no way to see the sophistication of their survival strategies.

    And they had no idea they should be saying "Thank you" to their ancient teachers.

    I'm John Lienhard, at the University of Houston, where we're interested in the way inventive minds work.

******************************************
 
My note  For those monkeys who wish to read more about this, there is a very good article by a journalist who travelled through these areas but it is a bit too long to print here so I will just give you the link.  I would be interested in your comments on this article.  Thanks in advance.

www.discover.com/issues/aug-97/features/mrwallacesline1198/


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 07, 2007, 04:43:20 PM
This is how most people think of Aussies :

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/midginbilfig.jpg)

One of our prettiest little birds - an Azure Kingfisher.  

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Azure3.jpg)

Looks like the Pumpkin Ale from IBE's party was too much for our friend :

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/koalasleeping.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 08, 2007, 03:22:57 AM
BROOME  AND CABLE BEACH IN WESTERN AUSTRALIA

 The sun is setting over the 22 kilometre stretch of white sand that is Broome’s Cable Beach. A small crowd has gathered to watch as the sun, now a disc of deep red, sinks into the Indian Ocean.

One or two people linger at the water’s edge, refusing to relinquish the day, while a trail of camels stroll along the sand, giving visitors one of Broome’s most famous experiences – a sunset camel ride.  You see them returning from the beach duty in the evening just after sunset.  The leading and last camels carry bike lights and they silently and slowly pad along the side of the ashphalt.

Cable Beach is one of Western Australia’s most popular beaches and one of the most compelling reasons to visit Broome.  The extraordinary 10 metre tides mean the water is sometimes a long walk but a dip in the warm Indian Ocean is worth the effort.

Sitting just 18 degrees from the equator, Broome has a year-round warm and tropical climate, which encourages relaxation and an outdoors lifestyle.
 
 This exotic town was once the pearling capital of the world and drew its population from a range of nations including China, Japan, Malaysia and the Middle East whose people flocked to the shores of Roebuck Bay in the hope of making a fortune. Some did and others weren’t so lucky, but this colourful history has resulted in the multi-cultural feel Broome has today.

At Sun Pictures, the oldest operating picture garden, visitors enjoy a movie from a deck chair under the stars. This open-air cinema has withstood the ravages of war, cyclones and king tides to become a distinctively Broome experience.

The climate has played a major role in the architecture of the town.  Many of the older buildings have wide verandahs, fine latticework, shutters and corrugated iron roofs to allow cooling breezes to flow through, as well as to cope with heavy rains.

Inland from Broome, the rains provide some incredible natural scenery including the thundering power of the waterfalls in the east Kimberley.

The cascading waters of the Mitchell Plateau and King George Falls are perhaps best accessed by air, also the World Heritage listed Bungle Bungle massif in the Purnululu National Park.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/CamelsCableBeach.jpg)

Roebuck Bay

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/au104040.jpg)

Red Sandstone Cliffs

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/au104090.jpg)

Manning Creek

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/au104181.jpg)

Bungle Bungles

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/au394211.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 08, 2007, 03:56:20 AM
CULTIVATION OF PEARLS

The pearl industry has done an about face over the past 120 years.  In the early days, divers in the tropical waters off the Kimberley coast sought the highly prized mother of pearl shell that was used to make buttons, jewellery, hair clips and decorative objects.  Natural pearls were a bonus – a byproduct of the shell harvest.

While plastics killed demand for mother of pearl in the 1900s, Japanese pearl farmer Kokichi Mikimoto had by then perfected the technique for producing cultured pearls and a new industry was born.  The cultured pearl industry began in Broome during the 1950s and today the Australian pearling industry produces some of the world’s finest pearls.  So how do they do it?

Live oysters are gathered from the wild (under a strictly controlled licence system)  High skilled – and highly paid – technicians working under sterile conditions delicately make a slit near the oyster’s reproductive organ and insert a tiny piece of mantle tissue from another oyster followed by a nucleus, a small sphere taken from the shell of an American mussel. Nacre, the same substance coating the interior of the oyster’s shell, is produced in a sac formed by the inserted mantle tissue.  Over time, nacre coats the nucleus to produce pearls.  After at least two years in the deep – many miles off the coast – south sea pearls are harvested.

There are basically four types of pearls  :

CULTURED South Sea Pearls.  These pearls range from 8mm to 18mm and come in many shapes and colours.

KESHI.  Japanese for poppyseed  and these pearls are as close as possible to a natural gem  from a farm environment.  Small and irregular, they are produced without a nucleus being implanted.

MABE.  These are half pearls grown on half nuclei stuck to the inside of the mother of pearl shell.

FRESHWATER.  Grown mostly in lakes and streams in China and India, they are cultivated in mussels – up to 30 in each.  They are 4mm to 8 mm and vary in colour and shape.  

Pearling Luggers

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/au104081.jpg)

Steep Cliffs near Broome

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/au104072.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Peaches on February 08, 2007, 03:42:50 PM
I love this thread.  You have the coolest CONTINENT!  Thanks for sharing.

Now it's my turn.  I adore You Tube.  I found this the other day and thought immediately of you!  And learned more new things about Australia.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=INdjRCNcZj0


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 08, 2007, 04:07:03 PM
Peaches  Thank you!!   That is just such a great video.

You must have read my mind as last night I thought of doing something about Waltzing Matilda as it is so well known everywhere.  Thank you again and I am glad you are enjoying this thread.  I know I am enjoying finding articles and the pictures  to match.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 08, 2007, 09:25:01 PM
SOME OF OUR NASTIER CREATURES

BLUE RINGED OCTOPUS

This is an attractive little creature that lives in the rock pools on the shore.  When threatened it “pulses” luminous bright blue rings on its body.  It’s bite is painless and will only occur if it is handled.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/bites11.jpg)

PORTUGUESE MAN-O-WAR

Also known as Bluebottles, these are found on most beaches around the country and are really a colony of small creatures living as one.  Small stinging cells which when encountered as a group impart a venomous sting.  People susceptible to bee stings are also usually sensitive to the Bluebottle venom.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/bites12.jpg)

RED BACK SPIDERS

This spider with the telltale red or orange mark on its thorax is the female of the species.  The Red-Back spider is common all over Australia, and its preferred habitat is under any old building material, or inside sheds and garages.

The spider’s bite is not generally regarded as fatal, although there are recorded deaths prior to the introduction of the anti-venom. Less than 20% of bites actually result in significant envenomation, but generally, the bite is very painful, and causes distress.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/bites5.jpg)

FUNNEL WEB SPIDERS

The Sydney Funnel Web spider is considered to be the most venomous spider in the world. It is found in the NSW coastal zone from Nelson’s Bay to Nowra. Its habitat is under rocks and houses, in a web-lined burrow. The spider is very aggressive and will attack at the slightest provocation.

Despite its fearsome reputation, there are only 14 recorded deaths due to funnel web spider bite. However, when the spider does inject a dangerous quantity of venom, the effects can be rapid and severe, and death within an hour may occur.

A second type of spider called the Bush (or Blue Mountains) Funnel Web is also recorded as being responsible for fatal bites. Its habitat ranges over most of the NSW coast and the Great Dividing Range. This creature lives in trees behind the bark, or in holes in the trunk. Other types of related spiders such as the Northern and Southern Tree Dwelling species, are suspected of similar venom potency, and are found mostly along the south eastern area of Australia.

There are at least 37 species of funnel web spiders. All are medium to large, robust spiders, mostly dark or black in colour, with stout legs and large fangs. Males search for female mates, a process which may increase the chance of unwanted interaction with people, as they may get underfoot, or into shoes or clothing left on or near the floor.

The funnel web will bite repeatedly if in contact with the skin, and when bitten by the funnel web spider the venom enters the body similarly to that of snakes. Anti-venom is available

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/bites4.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 08, 2007, 11:19:11 PM
MORE CREATURES THAT PEOPLE (AND CATS!) SHOULD NOT HANDLE

BROWN SNAKE
The Brown Snake may be found all over Australia. It has extremely potent venom, and although the quantity of venom injected is usually small, this snake causes more snakebite deaths in Australia than any other. Sudden and relatively early deaths have been recorded.
(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/brownsnake1.gif)

TAIPAN
The taipan may be found mostly along the non-desert areas of north and north-east Australia (from Brisbane to Darwin). It is an aggressive, large, slender snake, and may be coloured any shade of brown but always has a rectangular head (large in proportion to the body) and red eye. Venom output is high and the amount retrieved from just one milking from one taipan is enough to kill many million mice. Paralysis is difficult to reverse unless treated early. Untreated, a good bite will almost certainly be fatal.
(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/taipan.gif)  

TIGER SNAKE
The tiger snake lives in the temperate southern areas of Australia. The characteristic stripes are not seen all year round, and there is a totally black variant found around the Flinders Ranges area of South Australia. Untreated mortality is about 45%
(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/tigersnake.gif)

DEATH ADDER
The death adder has strongly neurotoxic venom; this snake has characteristic appearance and may be striped.
(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/deathadder.gif)

COPPERHEAD
The copperhead is found in Tasmania, Victoria, and the western plains of NSW.  Despite its large venom output, bites are rarely fatal.
(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/copperhead.gif)

REDBELLIED BLACK
The redbellied black snake is found in all eastern non-arid areas. The venom is not as potent as most and no deaths after a redbellied black snake bite have yet been reported.
(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/redbellyblack.gif)

SMALL SCALED SNAKE
The small scaled snake (sometimes called the inland taipan or fierce snake) has the most potent venom in the world, but is restricted to relatively uninhabited areas of south-western Queensland, so, fortunately, not many people get bitten.
(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/smallscale.gif)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Cat on February 11, 2007, 10:40:17 PM
It looks and seems to be a beautiful country.If you see a stray tabby,tickling the ivories at the pub,for grub,it may be me.Cat


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 12, 2007, 05:05:03 AM
A SCIENTIFIC VIEW OF THE EARLY AUSTRALIANS

Aboriginal history is Australian history.  The history of mankind on the Australian continent did not commence when Captain Cook first landed on the eastern coast in 1770 but 40,000 years before that when the ancient predecessors of the Aboriginal people began their sea voyages south. In this long ago time before even North and South America were inhabited, the first small groups of people began arriving here.  At this time the continent had a very different climate and geography as the second last Ice Age was drawing to a close and there were enormous amounts of ice in the North and South Poles of the world.  The ocean was as much as 400 to 600 feet lower than its present levels, the coastline of Australia extended far into what is now ocean, and New Guinea and Tasmania were part of the one great land mass.  This made it quite possible for people to migrate from South East Asia by island hopping by canoe until about ten thousand years ago when the melting ice caused the sea levels to rise and isolate the continent and the people here.

Stone tools have been found at various sites dating to the Pleistocene era.
This history is not lost : it has been retained in the memories of successive generations of Aboriginal people and passed on through the rich oral tradition of song-poetry and legend.  The early history of the Australian Aboriginal people, of their origins and way of life, their laws, social organization and customs can be found in legends and song-cycles.  Aboriginal oral literature provides us with accounts of the geological changes that have occurred over the ages since the first discovery of the continent, accounts of dramatic landscape changes and the activities of great Spirit Beings.

Each Aboriginal group in Australia has its own version of the great stories.  Some legends overlap different tribal areas, some stories are known by many groups, while others are the province of a few people only.   Traditional Aboriginal life was quickly disrupted in the southern areas of the continent after European settlement.  In a growing number of Aboriginal communities the people themselves are setting up their own literature centres where they are recording, transcribing and translating their stories.  In the traditional communities the rituals remain strong and beliefs in the origin of man and the landscape are unaltered.  Here the deeper truths are the province of the older men, and will only be passed on to others as they fulfill their ceremonial obligations.  Names and pictures of their deceased are not permitted to be shown so that their spirits may rest in peace.  Aboriginals now feel the need to explain their history of the continent as understood by them so that their basic beliefs about the formation of the land and its laws are understood and accepted by all Australians as part of the whole history of Australia.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/300px-Endeavour_replica_in_Cooktown.jpg)

A replica of Captain Cook's wooden Bark "Endeavour" - 106 ft and 397 tons.  I have seen this replica and there is no way I would go across the river in a boat this size let alone around the world.  I am no sailor!


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 12, 2007, 05:37:39 AM
Now here is the Aboriginal version of the same events.  I prefer this one!

THE COMING OF THE FIRST AUSTRALIANS – AN ABORIGINAL LEGEND.

 Long ago in the distant past all the animals that are now in Australia lived in another land far beyond the sea and they were at that time in human form.  One day they met together and decided to set out in a canoe in order to find better hunting grounds over the sea.  The whale, who was much larger than any of the rest, had a bark canoe of great dimensions but would not lend it to any of the others.  As the small canoes of the other animals were unfit for use far from the land, they kept watch daily in the hope that the whale might leave his boat, so that they could get it, and start away on their journey.  The whale however always watched it closely and never let his guard down.
The starfish, a close friend of the whale, formed a plan with the other people to take the attention of the whale away from his canoe, and so give them a chance to steal it.  One day the starfish said to the whale : “You have a great many lice in your head; let me catch them and kill them for you”  The whale, who had been much pestered by the parasites, readily agreed to his friend’s kind offer, and tying up his canoe alongside a rock, they sat down.  The starfish immediately gave the signal to some of the others who then assembled on the beach in readiness to sneak quietly into the canoe as soon as the whale was distracted.

The starfish rested the head of the whale in his lap and began to remove the lice from his head.  The whale was lulled into passivity and did not notice the others quickly get into his canoe and push off shore.  Now and then he would ask  “Is my canoe all right?”  The starfish in reply tapped a piece of loose bark near his leg and said “Yes, this is what I am tapping with my hand” and vigorously scratched near the whale’s ears so he could not hear the splashing of the oars.  This continued until the canoe was nearly out of sight, when suddenly the whale became agitated and jumped up.  Seeing the canoe disappearing in the distance, he was furious at the betrayal of the starfish and beat him unmercifully.  Jumping into the water, the whale then swam away after his canoe, and the starfish, mutilated and tattered, rolled off the rock on which they had been sitting, into the water, and lay on the sand at the bottom.  It was this terrible attack of the whale which gave the starfish his present ragged appearance and his habit of keeping on the sea floor.

The whale pursued the canoe in a fury and spurted water into the air through the wound in his head he had received during his fight with the starfish, a practice which he has retained ever since.  Although the whale swam strongly, the forearms of the koala pulled the oars with great strength for many days and nights until they finally sighted land and beached the canoe safely.  The native companion bird, however, could not stay still and stamping his feet up and down made two deep holes in the canoe.  As it was no longer of any use, he pushed it a little way out to sea where it settled and became a small island.  The whale, exhausted after his long swim turned back along the coast.  He still cruises there today with his descendants, spouting water furiously through the hole in his head.

Southern Right Whale Blowing :

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/whaleblowing.jpg)

Starfish :

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/starfish.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 12, 2007, 05:46:52 AM
ABORIGINAL ART  -  CATERPILLAR DREAMING

Lorna Fencer Napurrula is a Senior Warlpiri Custodian, and has been painting since 1986. Lorna was born about 1920 at Yartula Yartula. Nearby is land inherited by Lorna, Yumurrpa located south of the Granites Mine Area in the Tanami Desert, Northern Territory.  Lorna is among a small group of women who collectively produced the first paintings at Lajamanu, and she was among the many Warlpiri people forcibly relocated  to Lajamanu along Hookers Creek, where a government settlement had been established. This country is the traditional land of the Gurindji Aboriginal people. Despite relocation, Lorna retained her cultural identity through ceremony, story telling and painting her art.

Lorna’s work depicts the bush foods of her country originating from Dreaming stories taught to her involving the travels of the Napurrula and Nakamarra skin(or kinship) and some Dreamings from her father’s country of Wapuurtarli.  Her main Dreamings are about the gathering and growth of bush foods such as the Yarla (Yam), Wapirti and Marlujarra. These Dreamings entitle her to paint subjects such as the bush yam (sweet potato), “ngalatji” (little white flower), bush tomato, berry, caterpillar (luju), wallaby, onion, water and particular   mens stories including boomerangs. The Yarla is an important Dreaming for the Warlpiri women, and a staple food source in the Western Desert. Here Lorna renders it in her distinctive expressive style. Along with visually describing the Yarla, some paintings contain information about when to gather this food source and how to find it.

Lorna working on her painting :

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/4eb3_1.jpg)

The finished painting :

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/4835_1.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Cat on February 12, 2007, 12:13:58 PM
What is a Trap door spider?We have Brown recluse spiders,which are quite unpleasant for people and cats.Your snakes are bigger and more deadly.I see possums in my yard,all the time.don't taSte so good .fun to tease CAt


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: mrs. red on February 12, 2007, 01:14:04 PM
thanks for all of this... TIB!!  What a cool place...This is Red's dream to visit... and mine too!


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 12, 2007, 05:11:45 PM
Here you go, Cat :

TRAPDOOR SPIDERS

Most trapdoor spiders but not all are misleadingly named, as not all species make a door for their burrows. These highly camouflaged entrances are almost undetectable, unless the door is open. Common prey items include crickets, moths, beetles and grasshoppers, taken near the entrance to the burrow. Predators of Trapdoor Spiders can include birds, bandicoots, centipedes, scorpions, parasitic wasps and flies.
The female will lay her eggs several months after mating, and protects them within her burrow. When the juveniles have hatched, they remain for several months before dispersing on the ground. They will then make their own miniature burrows. Each time the spider grows bigger, it has to widen its burrow and, in the door-building species, add another rim to the door. In undamaged trapdoors, annual concentric rings can be seen.
Trapdoors have a long life span, between 5 to 20 years, and take several years to reach maturity. Females stay in or near their burrows, whereas males leave their burrows once mature, and go in search of a mate.

Trapdoor Spider's Burrow :

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/misgolas_burrow.jpg)

Trapdoor Spider :

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/trapdoor_spider.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 12, 2007, 05:15:05 PM
Quote from: "mrs. red"
thanks for all of this... TIB!!  What a cool place...This is Red's dream to visit... and mine too!


Glad you are enjoying this thread, Mrs Red.  I enjoy finding the articles and searching for pictures.  Let me know if there is anything in particular you are interested in so I can see what I can find.  It is a lovely place and so diverse.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 12, 2007, 05:22:19 PM
Hey, Cat  You don't see too many of these nasty creatures unless you go looking for them as most of them are shy and keep away from humans unless we get too close or interfere with their habitat.
I have not seen very many snakes in the wild, most of the ones I have seen are in a reptile park.  Poisonous spiders also hide and if you don't go poking around in rubbish or undergrowth you won't see many of them.  Have seen redbacks and house spiders but they can be easily chased away.
You can see a lot of lizards and blue tongue lizards but they do not harm you.
Some lizards do look like snakes until you notice they have legs and run very fast!


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 12, 2007, 09:00:55 PM
DIDJERIDU PLAYER at a Festival.  All Aboriginal ceremonies and dances are seen and photographed at festivals as they rarely allow white people to see their tribal ceremonies.
Note the modern day amplifier :

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/didjeridu.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 12, 2007, 09:05:12 PM
TRADITIONAL DANCE INCLUDING MEN AND WOMEN

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/traddance.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 12, 2007, 09:09:23 PM
CEREMONIAL SHIELDS AND WOMENS DANCING STICKS.
Designs are painted on or stuck on using vegetable down, wild cotton and dyed with red ochre.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/au101301.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 12, 2007, 09:14:58 PM
SOME BUSH TUCKER

BUSH BANANA - Only able to eat the skin as inside is a mass of small seeds.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/bushnana.jpg)

COOKING MUD CRABS :

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/ccokmuddies.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: klaasend on February 12, 2007, 11:40:09 PM
What does the skin of the Bush Banana taste like?


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 13, 2007, 01:48:26 AM
Klaas - I have never tasted this fruit/vegetable.  Stay away from most of these things as allergic to lots of fruits, pollens etc.

Found this description and photo, and this says you can eat the seeds but I don't think the Aboriginal do so - they probably just munch on the skins for moisture.

BUSH BANANA ALSO CALLED BUSH PEAR
Where do some of these early common names come from?! The fruit looks nothing like a pear or banana. I think a more accurate name could be the Giant Wild Pea as that's exactly what the young seed cluster tastes like - beautiful sweet green peas! The pods can grow up to around 10cm, but get  tougher aid more bitter. Best size is 4-5 cm long - when peeled, reveals perhaps the most stunning and intricate looking vegetable on earth. These hardy vines need a trellis, host tree or fence upon which to climb and produce clusters of nectar sweet flowers followed by the fruit. There is also an edible tuber which grows undergound. Unfortunately, more often than not, the plant is destroyed by harvesting. The tuber has a starchy watery texture with a subtle flavour.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/l-aust1s.jpg)

WILD RASPBERRY

This superb fruit has clusters of juicy, pink to bright red lobes which form the berry, some 1-3 cm in diameter. They grow on a bramble thicket with regularly spaced sharp barbs on the stems. Flavour is a superb sharp berry-raspberry, stronger than exotic raspberries.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/r-probs.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: justinsmama on February 13, 2007, 08:08:49 AM
Quote from: "Tibrogargan"
A COUPLE OF ITEMS FROM OUR LOCAL NEWSPAPER TODAY THAT MAY INTEREST SOME OF MY MONKEY FRIENDS.

IRWIN  GRANT

Steve Irwin's environmental legacy will live on with a fellowship giving US high school students the chance to travel to Australia.  The fellowship will enable a US Midwest high school student to travel to Australia for two weeks to work closely with staff at the Irwin family's Australia Zoo on Queensland's Sunshine Coast and at Sydney's Taronga Zoo.

The Examiner 3 Feb 2007


Wow! Justin would love to do this once he is old enough!


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 17, 2007, 09:13:18 PM
Quote from: "justinsmama"
Quote from: "Tibrogargan"
A COUPLE OF ITEMS FROM OUR LOCAL NEWSPAPER TODAY THAT MAY INTEREST SOME OF MY MONKEY FRIENDS.

IRWIN  GRANT

Steve Irwin's environmental legacy will live on with a fellowship giving US high school students the chance to travel to Australia.  The fellowship will enable a US Midwest high school student to travel to Australia for two weeks to work closely with staff at the Irwin family's Australia Zoo on Queensland's Sunshine Coast and at Sydney's Taronga Zoo.

The Examiner 3 Feb 2007


Wow! Justin would love to do this once he is old enough!


It would be a wonderful opportunity for any youngster that was interested in the environment.  Two weeks seems such a short while to learn much but would certainly whet their appetite for more study.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 17, 2007, 09:20:29 PM
HAHNDORF

    Located 28 km south-east of Adelaide, Hahndorf is a major tourist destination. It is a little piece of Silesia, Prussia and Germany in the Adelaide Hills. It is characterised by beautiful shady, tree-lined streets, lots of advertisements and shop signs in Teutonic script, and lots of German tourists being entertained in cafes, bars and restaurants run by the descendants of the town's early German settlers. The town is 330 m above sea level, has a rainfall of 990 mm and promotes itself as 'Australia's Oldest German Town'.

    The history of Hahndorf starts in 1838 when George Fife Angas went to London as a director of the South Australian Company to try and promote colonisation. While he was there he met Pastor August Ludwig Christian Kavel who was trying to organise for Lutherans (who were being persecuted by the King of Prussia, Friedrich Wilhelm III) to emigrate. Angas was moved by the plight of the Lutherans and not only persuaded Kavel that South Australia was a suitable place for emigration but also financially assisted them with a generous £8,000. The first German settlers arrived on 25 November, 1838 at the unfortunately named Port Misery. These settlers were to establish distinctly German villages at Klemzig, Glen Osmond, Lobethal and most famously Hahndorf.

    Hahndorf's history is connected to the arrival at Port Adelaide, on 28 December, 1838 of the 344 ton ship, Zebra, under the control of Captain Dirk Hahn. He was impressed by his passengers to such a point that upon their arrival in South Australia he was determined to help them. Although a Dane it is he who is honoured with his name being the basis of the town's name.

    The ship was carrying 187 German immigrants. For a time the immigrants lived in tents at Port Adelaide then Hahn came to an agreement to rent 150 acres of land (this was the present site of Hahndorf) which would be divided up so there was 38 acres for living quarters and the rest for farming. Later the grant was expanded to 240 acres. A group of twelve men on horseback and some ladies in a carriage travelled to inspect the site and Hahn was so taken by it that he declared 'It seems to me as if nature had lavished her choicest gifts on South Australia, I should like to end my days here and never return to the busy world.'

    The conditions for settlement were generous. The Germans were given provisions for the first year. They were also provided with a preacher and a substantial amount of livestock. All that was required was that they worked hard and produced a reasonable return on the land and livestock.

    Not surprisingly the early settlers worked hard planting crops and grazing the cattle they had been given. They all contributed to the construction of a church which was completed within a year of the settlement. It stood where St Michael's Church now stands.

    Within the first decade the town prospered. Vineyards were established, the women worked as shepherds, the men hired themselves out to the surrounding landowners as cheap labour and slowly substantial houses, many of which still stand, were built.

    The town was struck by intense anti-German feelings during World War I (rather stupid given that most of the residents could trace their origins back to 1839) and the name was changed to Ambleside by a 1917 Act of Parliament. The German Arms Hotel, for example, became the Ambleside Hotel and did not change its name back until 1976.

    Today it is one of South Australia's premier tourist attractions. There are few places in the country where you can drive through typically Australian countryside and, quite suddenly, enter a world which seems to have been lifted from Central Europe.

MAIN STREET OF HAHNDORF ;

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/hahndorf_mainstreet2.jpg)

DIRK HAHN MONUMENT :

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Hahnmonument.jpg)

GERMAN ARMS HOTEL :

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/GermanArmsHotel.jpg)

ST MICHAELS CHURCH :

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/hahndorf_stmichaels.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 17, 2007, 09:25:15 PM
Just outside of Hahndorf there is an original German style house fully preserved.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/paechhaus.jpg)

How would we like to cook like this today on this German Outdoor Oven.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/paech-oven.jpg)

Back in Hahndorf, it is good to see that with all their religious and hardworking history, they still have a sense of humour :

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/hahn-saus.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 18, 2007, 06:21:43 AM
SOME MORE UNUSUAL CREATURES ;

The Goanna, iguana or monitor lizard, can grow to well over a metre in length and is prized as a food source among Aboriginal people.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Goanna.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 18, 2007, 06:23:16 AM
A large Estuarine or saltwater crocodile basks along Yellow Waters Lagoon. These reptiles are dangerous but fully protected.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/SaltwaterCroc.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 18, 2007, 06:24:52 AM
Freshwater Crocodile is not considered dangerous but could give you a nasty bite when protecting its young.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/FreshwaterCroc.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 18, 2007, 06:26:01 AM
The Mountain Devil is a harmless denizen of the desert, despite its fearsome appearance.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/MountainDevil.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 18, 2007, 06:27:51 AM
Bearded Dragons are native lizards from Central Australia.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/BeardedDragons.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 18, 2007, 06:30:17 AM
Pelicans float serenely on Yellow Waters Lagoon at Cooinda, Kakadu National Park, Northern Territory. A boat trip early in the morning is a must here.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Pelicans.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 18, 2007, 06:31:38 AM
The Curtain Fig Tree, its aerial roots like a curtain dropping 15 metres to the ground, 3 km from the small town of Yungaburra on the Atherton Tablelands.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/CurtainFig.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 18, 2007, 06:33:35 AM
Barron Falls or Din-Din, as it was known to the local Djabugay Aboriginal people, on the Barron River near the small town of Kuranda above Cairns. Most of its water is diverted to the power station, but in the wet season it remains a spectacular sight

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/BarronFalls.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 18, 2007, 06:35:54 AM
Cairns taken from the Kuranda Railway in far north Queensland

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Cairns.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 18, 2007, 06:38:41 AM
Beautiful Millaa Millaa Falls on the southern Atherton Tablelands in Far Northern Queensland, during the wet season.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/MillaaFalls.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 18, 2007, 06:40:04 AM
Millstream Falls, Australia's widest waterfall, on the Great Dividing Range near the town of Ravenshoe is a welcome sight for a swim.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/MillstreamFalls.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 18, 2007, 06:42:37 AM
The Blue Mountains National Park, just to the south west of Sydney, offers impressive vistas and great hiking

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/BlueMtns.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 18, 2007, 06:44:58 AM
Port Jackson, Sydney NSW, as seen from Australia Square, looking towards Parramatta, with Gladesville Bridge and the Blue Mountains in the background

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/PtJackson.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 18, 2007, 06:46:36 AM
Magnificent Sydney Harbour as seen from Australia Square, with Sydney Harbour Bridge, Circular Quay and the Sydney Opera House and the suburbs of North Sydney and Manly in the background.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Sydney.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 18, 2007, 06:47:56 AM
The Sydney Harbour Bridge, locally nicknamed the "Coathanger", was opened by Premier Jack Lang on 19 March 1932. It has become an icon of Sydney and these days tourists climb it for a great view.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/SHB.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 18, 2007, 06:49:39 AM
The Sydney Harbour Bridge makes a wonderful setting for Fireworks displays.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/000498.jpg)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/002008.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Leslie on February 18, 2007, 11:13:47 AM
What is Paul Hogan up these days?


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: San on February 18, 2007, 11:24:13 AM
Tibrogargan, thank you for sharing your pictures they are beautiful. :D


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Leslie on February 18, 2007, 11:37:32 AM
Quote from: "Leslie"
What is Paul Hogan up these days?

Bring back the edit option!  I meant to say " what is Paul Hogan up to these days?"  I remember his commercials inviting everyone to Australia and saying "we will put another shrimp on the barbi"  lol


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Cat on February 18, 2007, 12:21:20 PM
beautiful.I hope to see it some day.CAT


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Seamonkey on February 18, 2007, 12:56:17 PM
Wow Tibrogargan!! I waited to read this thread when I could actually just sit and enjoy it. Enjoy it I did!! Totally !!

 I always wanted to go there..and probably will one day. But even if I do I am sure I would not have learned or seen as much as you have so graciously have shared with us.

 I do have a question though in regards to vegemite (which I love). I was told there was an old fable the parents would tell thier children to get them to eat thier vegemite, if I remember correctly it had something to do with an animal..a bear?? it had a name. I do not remember it well at all but do remember how cool of a fable. Do you recall it to share with us ?

 I love folklores from different countries. I wish I could remember this one.

 Thank you SOOoo much for all you are sharing with us. BTW I think Tasmanian Devil babies are so cute!!

Sincerely,
 SeaMonkey :)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Sleuth on February 18, 2007, 05:48:33 PM
Quote from: "Leslie"
Quote from: "Leslie"
What is Paul Hogan up these days?

Bring back the edit option!  I meant to say " what is Paul Hogan up to these days?"  I remember his commercials inviting everyone to Australia and saying "we will put another shrimp on the barbi"  lol


A bit of trivia - Paul Hogan once had a job painting the Sydney Harbour Bridge...


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Sleuth on February 18, 2007, 05:49:41 PM
Quote from: "Cat"
beautiful.I hope to see it some day.CAT


I am currently planning next year's trip!


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Cat on February 18, 2007, 09:34:22 PM
Do your box jelly fish taste good on toast.CAT   and can your cat come out and play


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 18, 2007, 11:15:51 PM
Quote from: "Leslie"
Quote from: "Leslie"
What is Paul Hogan up these days?

Bring back the edit option!  I meant to say " what is Paul Hogan up to these days?"  I remember his commercials inviting everyone to Australia and saying "we will put another shrimp on the barbi"  lol


Paul Hogan lives on your side of the world now.  Think it is Santa Barbara?  Last time I saw him on TV he was almost unrecognisable with botox or face lifts.  Could barely smile and a lot smoother in face where before he looked quite weatherbeaten.  Definitely not aging in the usual sense!
Last week there was an article in the newspapers that he was involved in tax fraud investigation.  Will look up the article and post interesting parts of it.
I always felt sorry for his first wife as she appeared down to earth and very pleasant and was left with the 5 kids.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 18, 2007, 11:23:08 PM
Seamonkey You have caught me on that one.  I do not know of any fable about Vegemite.  Plenty of interesting history about the produce.  May do an article on it.  The Americans were going to ban it but have not gone ahead with that and now our souvenir websites advertise exporting it to the US as one of our icons.
The only thing I can think of as a Aussie fable is the bunyip?  Maybe that is what you remember as it would be similar to the BigFoot and Yeti fables.
Will see what I can find and post as a bit of folklore.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 18, 2007, 11:25:16 PM
Quote from: "Sleuth"
Quote from: "Cat"
beautiful.I hope to see it some day.CAT


I am currently planning next year's trip!

Hope you are including Tasmania!  We have a spare bedroom for monkey friends too.
BTW I love your shamrock camouflage.  Bet they do not taste as good as gum leaves. :lol:


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 18, 2007, 11:27:12 PM
Quote from: "Cat"
Do your box jelly fish taste good on toast.CAT   and can your cat come out and play

You would not be a happy Cat if you tried to eat them.
Are you the handsome tabby that has won my kitty's heart?


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 19, 2007, 05:07:39 AM
Paul Hogan linked to $300m tax fraud case
The Australian Newspaper
By Susannah Moran
February 13, 2007 01:00am

ENTERTAINER Paul Hogan has for the first time been linked to court proceedings involving Australia's biggest tax fraud investigation.
Despite Hogan's repeated denials of problems with the tax office, a string of companies associated with him, his financial adviser Anthony Stewart and his artistic collaborator John Cornell, have been named in Federal Court proceedings relating to the $300 million investigation.
Court documents reveal Hogan, Mr Cornell and Mr Stewart are linked to two Federal Court cases that have been launched to try to stop Australian Crime Commission investigators using seized documents as part of the watchdog's investigations into illegal tax schemes. The documents list 23 companies, including Paul Hogan Enterprises and Stewart Property Trust, that have been subject to investigations by the ACC as part of Operation Wickenby.
The court case has been brought by two men - one described as a financial adviser, and the other as his client, an offshore resident who used to live in Australia.
 Hogan wrote to The Australian last year, following a report that he was being investigated for not disclosing to the Australian Taxation Office that he was holding $40 million in offshore trusts.
"You got me. Almost. The last problem I had with the ATO was in 1972 when they claimed I had fudged the overheads on my earnings from my pub chook raffles," Hogan said.

NOTE: This article has been edited to exclude unnecessary details of other respondents.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 19, 2007, 05:30:58 AM
BUNYIP

A bunyip is a legendary spirit or creature of the Australian Aborigine. Bunyips haunt rivers, swamps, creeks and billabongs. Their main goal in life is to cause nocturnal terror by eating people or animals in their vicinity. They are renowned for their terrifying bellowing cries in the night and have been known to frighten Aborigines to the point where they would not approach any water source where a bunyip might be waiting to devour them.

There are many reports by white settlers who have witnessed bunyips, so cryptozoologists may still be searching for these creatures. They may have some difficulty in locating their prey, though, since Aboriginal tribes do not all give the same visual description of the creature. Some say the bunyip looks like a huge snake with a beard and a mane; others say it looks like a huge furry half-human beast with a long neck and a head like a bird. However, most Australians now consider the existence of the bunyip to be mythical. Some scientists believe the bunyip was a real animal, the diprotodon, extinct for some 20,000 years, which terrified the earliest settlers of Australia.

According to Oodgeroo Noonuccal (Kath Walker) in Stradbroke Dreamtime, the bunyip is an evil or punishing spirit from the Aboriginal Dreamtime. Today the bunyip mainly appears in Australian literature for children and makes an occasional appearance in television commercials.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 19, 2007, 05:45:24 AM
BUNYIPS

Aboriginal rock drawing of a Bunyip

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/bunyip_small.jpg)

Two Australian Stamps showing Bunyips.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/bunyip_stamp_small.jpg)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/bunyip_stamp2_small.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Seamonkey on February 19, 2007, 07:15:07 AM
Hello Tibrogargan :)

 I knew about the bunyip, which I totally love that whole fable,  maybe it was link to vegimite as I was told it too, I can't remember. I almost think it was a bear like creature though. Maybe it was a regional thing?

 I wouldn't understand it if America bans it though, the jar I was given was made by the same company that makes our active bread yeasts. Then again a lot of what the USA bans and restricts have not ceased to amaze me lately. Don't get me wrong, I love my country, but it is slowly turning into a country I find hard to even recognize at times.

 I love everything you are sharing :) Is there anything you would like to know about the North East of the USA ?? Ummm like here is something trivial, only one in a million lobsters (lobstahs, as we "Mainers/Maniacs" pronounce it) are blue, and one in a couple a million are white. The blue ones are actually considered albino. Lobsters that come out of the ocean are generally blackish green to a brownish, they only turn red AFTER being cooked. If you want any technical facts I will have to look it all up, I am posting this from memory. From when I did research on them when I was making sculpted tshirt lobsters to know what colors to make them lol.
 But whenever I have had friends overseas some were amazed they did not come out of the ocean red. I don't assume you didn't know that, I just thought I would share since you are sharing so much too :)

 Sincerely,
 SeaMonkey


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 20, 2007, 04:18:41 AM
Thank you Seamonkey. I am glad you enjoy this thread.  Yes, I would love to know more about your wonderful country.  So much is similar to ours and yet so different in many ways. What do you think about an American thread too?  I am sure that your people in different parts of your country would like to know more about the lifestyle in other areas.  We might ask Klaasend what she thinks about the idea? :wink:  :wink:
I was interested that you have blue Lobsters.  We have Lobsters here but they are freshwater and the salt water ones are called Crayfish, just to be different.  I know some people who see the fresh or "green" prawns here in the markets think there is something wrong with them when they are not red in colour  :lol:  What is a sculpted tshirt lobster?  I guess it is a craft project?

Now for some history on Vegemite :

The uninitiated spread it with abandon  - and then gasp with horror - but to those who have grown up with it, Vegemite on toast tastes like home

By Chris Sheedy     (Story courtesy of Sunday Life Magazine, Sun-Herald 23 Jan 2005)

In every culture, there are foods locals adore and from which outsiders recoil.   The French love escargot.   On Thanksgiving Day, Americans devour candied yams.   Even the most cultured Italian salivates at the thought of tripe in a white wine and tomato sauce.   We Australians have bottled our internationally reviled obsession.   It's a gooey, black substance, similar in appearance to axlegrease, and it sits proudly in eight out of 10 Australian pantries.

The first jar of the product now known as Vegemite was labelled "pure vegetable extract" by food technologist Dr Cyril P. Callister.   The Fred Walker Company, which produced, sold and exported cheese (and eventually became Kraft Foods Ltd), had hired Callister in 1922 to create a foodstuff from waste brewer's yeast obtained from Melbourne's Carlton & United Breweries.   Yeast cells were taken from a beer vat and washed before being broken down by enzymes, allowing vitamins, minerals and proteins to leach out into the liquid.   It was then concentrated into a thick paste and seasoned with salt and vegetable extracts such as onion and celery.

A national naming competition followed, offering 50 pounds to the winner - an enormous amount at the time.   But although it was launched with much fanfare in 1923, Vegemite did not immediately seduce the Australian palate and, in 1928, poor sales convinced Walker  to change the name to Parwill in an attempt to piggyback on the success of Britain's Marmite ("If Marmite, then Parwill").

Thankfully, Walker reverted to the original name and in 1937, after two years of giving away a free jar of Vegemite with other Fred Walker products, the nation was finally hooked.   But Walker, who died of heart failure in 1935, never witnessed Vegemite's success.

During World War II, Australian troops were kept well fed with Vegemite, creating great goodwill towards the brand.   After the war, its high levels of vitamin B made it a favourite with mums.   Today we consume almost 23 million jars of Vegemite a year and the dark spread is found in one out of every three sandwiches eaten.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/jar_1980.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Seamonkey on February 20, 2007, 06:39:11 AM
Good Morning Tibrogargan, though I am sure it is your evening lol.

 We have crayfish too, I think it depends in what part of the country you are in that they are also called crawdads. I wonder if what we call crayfish and crawdads are the same thing within our own country. Mini lobsters, and very yummy but a lot of work for so little meat lol. But still not as bad as all the work to get out of a crab. I got rather lazy with my hardshell fish being on the Maine coast most my life I like the almost no work compaired to get the meat from lobsters. lol.

 InRe: Sculpted tshirt lobster. They are tshirts I sculpt to look like lobsters, I then airbrush them, add eyes, then antennae. I call them Louies and B-Louies (blue ones). They were rather popular in the gift shops and tourist spots here until I had to stop making them from a lack of space in our new home, but I am hoping to convert part of our barn into a "louie making studio" lol. When these tshirts are opened, which I don't like to think about, they look like a tie dyed shirt. I had a patent pending on them.
 We have a festival here called the Lobster Festival, people from all over the world come to it, in a 4 day period 100's of thousands of people pass through those gates, my dream is to one day have my louies and b-louies in it. But I will need to make at the very LEAST 500 of them to sell.
 I will try to post a piccy of them..I never posted a picture within my post so i have no idea if it will work.
 (http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e3/Whimsies/louietrap2x.jpg)

 Ohhh I think it worked!!! I am so use to html and have no idea how this code works. I guess the same way only with boxed ends. lol

 Anyways, where was I?.. Those are the louies and b-louies. Not a fantastic picture but it gives you an idea what they look like.

 That is VERY interesting about the vegemite history. I read somewheres that the reason us "yanks" are so cranky is because we do not eat vegemite lol I guess that is because it is so rich in Vitamin B ( the make you happy vitamin) that we do not get it lol.  And the USA banning it I think was a hoax after I dug around a bit about it.
 I also love the song they have to go with the vegemite lol I am beginning to sound vegemite obsessed. ;)

 Yes, and perhaps a thread on USA would be good too, because obviously within our own country there are many differing cultures that would be nice to learn from.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Sleuth on February 21, 2007, 02:46:42 AM
Quote from: "Seamonkey"
 
 I do have a question though in regards to vegemite (which I love). I was told there was an old fable the parents would tell thier children to get them to eat thier vegemite, if I remember correctly it had something to do with an animal..a bear?? it had a name. I do not remember it well at all but do remember how cool of a fable. Do you recall it to share with us ?
 


 :lol:

Dispelling the Urban Legend that surrounds the Australian Dropbear
Dropbears
Copyright 2002 Ashley Gittins

It is a disturbing trend, but many people seem to take great pleasure in spreading fear and mis-information. Sadly, the Australian Dropbear is another victim of this type of treatment. For many years, visitors to Australia have been warned of this almost mythical sounding creature which stalks the forest canopy, waiting for a meal to pass by below. Whilst wide-eyed newcomers are listening intently to this new information, the informant-turned-storytellermay stoop to embelishment. This is unacceptable, as the threat posed tohumans by the Dropbear is very real, and should be treated with the utmost seriousness.

I think it's safe to say that most people understand that Aussie's love a good yarn. Indeed, competitions for the telling of tall stories are held at many folk and music festivals around the country. While I think that these in themselves are a great thing, perhaps we should be wary of how we allow our storytelling to alter what in effect should be public service announcements. Some of the un-truths I have heard about the Australian Dropbear include:

The Wrestler
This embellishment claims that the Dropbear resulted from a chance mating between a native Koala and a Pro Wrestler in the mid to late 1970's. Please! This type of rubbish only serves to dilute the credibility of the Dropbear threat. Goodness knows we have enough trouble with the Government in ourCountry doing everything they can to conceal the Dropbear's very existence without resorting to blatant jests (look how well they did at hiding the fact that Tasmania has Tigers roaming freely about). It is well understood that the dropbear has evolved over thousands of years. It's diminutive cousin the Koala was more often found in dryer areas of Australia where it's herbivorous lifestyle was a natural adaptation to scarce food supplies. Conversely, Dropbear prides were more common in sub-tropical forests, where larger mammals (a primary food source) were more prevelant. The population density along coastal areas accounts for the less than comfortable relationship shared over the years by humans and Dropbears. Due to habitat destruction, many Dropbear prides have divided over the years, some of which head further inland in search of more plentiful food sources, and safer environments in which to raise cubs. This in turn has displaced some koala populations. This in fact serves to provide the Australian government with a convenient cover story. They (and others) claim that coastal Koala habitats are being destroyed, thereby lowering the count of koala's typically seen around urban Australia. This is a fallacy, as koala's never inhabited coastal areas in any great numbers due to the Dropbear not being particularly concerned with matters of ettiquette regarding feeding on relatives. However, since many tourists tend to be dissapointed that they do not see a koala in every eucalytpus tree, the government perpetuates this story of an endagered species in a shrinking habitat. As horrible as it is, it sounds a lot better than saying "Oh, those cuddly things? Yeah, the dropbears ate them all".

Vegemite
I have heard it claimed that Vegemite (a black foodstuff, high in vitamin B, manufactured as a joke to play on tourists) is a good Dropbear repellent when applied to the face and neck. I find this very difficult to believe, but cannot in truth disprove it. The fact is that the only true Dropbear repellent is Aeroguard. It is 100% effective, and not a single confirmed dropbear killing has been recorded against a person protected with Aeroguard (not to mention the fact that smearing Vegemite over your body is far less pleasant than a few sprays of Aeroguard). Due to political pressure Aeroguard is marketed as an insect repellent (a task it also performs rather well).

We all have our strange marketing laws, and just as in the USA it is illegal to advertise the health benefits of a non-drug product, in Oz it is illegal to market protection products against "Creatures of plausible deniability". Go figure.

More at:  http://www.purple.dropbear.id.au/curios/dropbear.html


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Sleuth on February 21, 2007, 02:46:58 AM
Quote from: "Seamonkey"
 
 I do have a question though in regards to vegemite (which I love). I was told there was an old fable the parents would tell thier children to get them to eat thier vegemite, if I remember correctly it had something to do with an animal..a bear?? it had a name. I do not remember it well at all but do remember how cool of a fable. Do you recall it to share with us ?
 


 :lol:

Dispelling the Urban Legend that surrounds the Australian Dropbear
Dropbears
Copyright 2002 Ashley Gittins

It is a disturbing trend, but many people seem to take great pleasure in spreading fear and mis-information. Sadly, the Australian Dropbear is another victim of this type of treatment. For many years, visitors to Australia have been warned of this almost mythical sounding creature which stalks the forest canopy, waiting for a meal to pass by below. Whilst wide-eyed newcomers are listening intently to this new information, the informant-turned-storytellermay stoop to embelishment. This is unacceptable, as the threat posed tohumans by the Dropbear is very real, and should be treated with the utmost seriousness.

I think it's safe to say that most people understand that Aussie's love a good yarn. Indeed, competitions for the telling of tall stories are held at many folk and music festivals around the country. While I think that these in themselves are a great thing, perhaps we should be wary of how we allow our storytelling to alter what in effect should be public service announcements. Some of the un-truths I have heard about the Australian Dropbear include:

The Wrestler
This embellishment claims that the Dropbear resulted from a chance mating between a native Koala and a Pro Wrestler in the mid to late 1970's. Please! This type of rubbish only serves to dilute the credibility of the Dropbear threat. Goodness knows we have enough trouble with the Government in ourCountry doing everything they can to conceal the Dropbear's very existence without resorting to blatant jests (look how well they did at hiding the fact that Tasmania has Tigers roaming freely about). It is well understood that the dropbear has evolved over thousands of years. It's diminutive cousin the Koala was more often found in dryer areas of Australia where it's herbivorous lifestyle was a natural adaptation to scarce food supplies. Conversely, Dropbear prides were more common in sub-tropical forests, where larger mammals (a primary food source) were more prevelant. The population density along coastal areas accounts for the less than comfortable relationship shared over the years by humans and Dropbears. Due to habitat destruction, many Dropbear prides have divided over the years, some of which head further inland in search of more plentiful food sources, and safer environments in which to raise cubs. This in turn has displaced some koala populations. This in fact serves to provide the Australian government with a convenient cover story. They (and others) claim that coastal Koala habitats are being destroyed, thereby lowering the count of koala's typically seen around urban Australia. This is a fallacy, as koala's never inhabited coastal areas in any great numbers due to the Dropbear not being particularly concerned with matters of ettiquette regarding feeding on relatives. However, since many tourists tend to be dissapointed that they do not see a koala in every eucalytpus tree, the government perpetuates this story of an endagered species in a shrinking habitat. As horrible as it is, it sounds a lot better than saying "Oh, those cuddly things? Yeah, the dropbears ate them all".

Vegemite
I have heard it claimed that Vegemite (a black foodstuff, high in vitamin B, manufactured as a joke to play on tourists) is a good Dropbear repellent when applied to the face and neck. I find this very difficult to believe, but cannot in truth disprove it. The fact is that the only true Dropbear repellent is Aeroguard. It is 100% effective, and not a single confirmed dropbear killing has been recorded against a person protected with Aeroguard (not to mention the fact that smearing Vegemite over your body is far less pleasant than a few sprays of Aeroguard). Due to political pressure Aeroguard is marketed as an insect repellent (a task it also performs rather well).

We all have our strange marketing laws, and just as in the USA it is illegal to advertise the health benefits of a non-drug product, in Oz it is illegal to market protection products against "Creatures of plausible deniability". Go figure.

More at:  http://www.purple.dropbear.id.au/curios/dropbear.html


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Sleuth on February 21, 2007, 02:51:54 AM
Sorry about the double post.   The good news it is worth a second read   :wink:


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 21, 2007, 02:53:11 AM
Hi Seamonkey I love the Louie Lobsters!  I have never seen anything like that here, even in the fishing/tourist villages.  I hope you are able to make the 500 to have them at the Festival.  They would be a big hit.  
We have a wide variety of fish, all called different names depending on where you are, and shellfish.  I prefer the fish to eat but will eat shellfish at times.  DH loves shellfish. We also have yabbies which live in freshwater and it is a great sport for kids catching them.  They live in earth dams as well but because they dig burrows to hide in during the dryer times they undermine the dam walls.  We have several types of prawns (shrimp) moreton bay bugs, also called balmain bugs in Sydney, as well as sand crabs and mud crabs, oysters and of course the crays and lobsters.  I realised after I wrote the last post that here in Tas we call the saltwater ones crays and on the mainland they call them lobsters.  Exactly the opposite.  Our largest freshwater fish is the Murray Cod which can grow to enormous sizes.  There are a lot of reef or coral fish which are yummy, and our cold water fish are great too : Trevally, Orange Roughy and Blue Grenadier are my favourites.  Don't go much on the baby octopus but like the calamari.  
We will hear Cat over here purring before too long!
I wonder how many other Monkeys would like to contribute to an American  thread as we talked about earlier?


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Sleuth on February 21, 2007, 02:57:08 AM
YUM, YUM - both moreton bay bugs and balmain bugs are delicious.   Cat, you can have my leftovers.....


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Sleuth on February 21, 2007, 03:00:03 AM
Yes, Tib, the shamrocks provide a good substitute to my normal eucalyptus diet....   :wink:

We are not sure of our exact plans, but definitely will be coming as far south as Melbourne.  Either Tas or New Zealand...


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 21, 2007, 03:01:36 AM
G'day Sleuth They must keep that story for the overseas tourists as I have not heard it before!  I suppose most of my touring has been with locals when I have been interstate and have not been let loose among the tour guides, which seems like it was a good move judging by this story.  I certainly enjoyed reading it.
By the way they still have not proven that Tasmanian Tigers are extinct.  There are still some sightings by very reputable people.  The southwest where they could be living is very dense forest and you could lose a tribe of aboriginals in there without knowing they exist.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 21, 2007, 03:04:54 AM
Quote from: "Sleuth"
Yes, Tib, the shamrocks provide a good substitute to my normal eucalyptus diet....   :wink:

We are not sure of our exact plans, but definitely will be coming as far south as Melbourne.  Either Tas or New Zealand...


Both Tas and NZ are very nice to visit.  Get my email from Klaas if you need any other info at all.  Happy to help my monkey friends. :wink:  :wink:


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 21, 2007, 03:29:42 AM
Dainty Swallow Tail Butterfly:

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/P1030206MyDainty.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 21, 2007, 03:30:56 AM
King Parrot male and baby:

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/P1030604babykingparrot.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 21, 2007, 07:11:41 AM
THE TALE OF THE TASMANIAN TIGER
   
More than 60 years ago, in a chain-link cage at the Hobart Zoo, in Australia, a creature with a five foot long, low dog-like body died. Its death marked the extinction of the Tasmanian Tiger.
Maybe.............
Ever since that specimen died in captivity, there have been sporadic but unconfirmed reports of tigers being sighted in the wilds near their old habitats. In 1995, a park ranger spotted what looked like a Tasmanian Tiger in the Pyengana region of Tasmania. Two years later, villagers in two remote mountain towns on the island of Irian Jaya, Indonesia, reported a pack of six or seven of the creatures were attacking the villager's chickens and pigs. A hundred years ago the tigers (which are not cats at all, but marsupial wolves) were common on the Island of Tasmania. In the distant past they also populated the continent of Australia, and perhaps many of the surrounding islands, but became extinct about 2000 years ago as they were pushed out by competing animals. They carried their young in pouches as do other marsupials like the kangaroo and the koala. They also sported a long, heavy, kangaroo-like tail. The name "tiger" comes from dark strips that ran across the flanks of the creature's yellow-brown fur. The animals were also referred to as Tasmanian Wolves, or thylacines (their scientific name is Thylacinus cynocephalus). The tigers' primary food source were small mammals like wallabies, kangaroos and rats. The tiger's feet left a five toed print which is similar, but easily distinguished from a dog's. Dogs have only four toes. While the creatures looked fierce because of their large heads and wide jaws (opening larger than that of any other mammal), they were actually shy and retiring. The largest of them grew six feet long, including the tail, and they stood two feet high at the shoulder. At the end of the 19th century as humans moved into the tiger's territories, conflicts arose. Farmers blamed the tigers for livestock losses. Development of cultivated land also interfered with the animal's habitat. A bounty was placed on the creatures and thousands of them were killed. By the time the Australian government moved to protect the tigers, it was too late. Most of the recent reports of Tasmanian Tigers come from the Island of Tasmania, a state of Australia, which lies just south of the eastern portion of the continent. Tasmania covers 26,383 square miles and about a half-million people live there. There are still wild sections where the creature could be hiding. In 1995 the government launched an investigation to try and find the tiger. Also, many amateur cryptozoologists have searched for the animals. So far, if the tigers are still alive, they have evaded science's eyes.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 21, 2007, 07:18:22 AM
EARLY PHOTOGRAPH OF TASMANIA TIGERS IN CAPTIVITY :

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/wildlife_tiger3.jpg)

PAINTING OF TASMANIAN TIGERS :

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/image06.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Seamonkey on February 21, 2007, 07:36:30 AM
Sleuth -- That's the one!! The dropbear. Now I remember it. Oh thank you so much, it has been nagging at me to remember, ya know? like a song you keep humming but can't remember the name to? I love all the stories you shared. Yes, it was worth a second read. :) Thank you again.

Tibrogargan -- Thank you, I never had seen a louie either. I had a chat friend about 5 years ago, he was talking about his trip to the Maine coast, he lived in New Jersey, he mentioned picking up quite unique art piece that looked like a lobster. I was joking and said " a Louie?" he said "yeah and a B-louie, how do you know" ..being on chat he never knew my real name and all he knew about me was I basically would sculpt with anything i could get my hands on back then lol. I then recited exactly what was on his label that came with the Louie. Over the last 10 years I have met others who have also gotten a louie just by being a tourist lol Makes me very proud and happy to know what was just once a thought and a doodle is appreciated by so many.

 Your animals are so interesting. I love all you are sharing with us :)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 21, 2007, 05:02:31 PM
Good morning Seamonkey Guess you are asleep now  :lol:
I am glad Sleuth answered your question about the dropbears.  After reading Sleuth's posting (twice)  :wink:  I googled "Dropbears" and came up with the most outlandish collection of tales I think I have ever read!  No wonder tourists come here and think we are all slightly mad.  With dropbears and all the other "leg pulling" antics the average Aussie tries out on the unsuspecting tourist it is a wonder we have any visitors.  You certainly need a sense of humour here, especially if you are talking to some of the oldtimers around the backblocks.  Hee hee  Maybe I should print an Aussie slang dictionary?


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Seamonkey on February 21, 2007, 07:26:01 PM
Hello Tibrogargan, Ummm would it be good arvo (afternoon) to you? Or doesn't all of australia say that?
 It's the "leg-pulling" that is half the reason I am so fascinated by Australia. I love folklores and legends. And as far as being outlandish..hehehe I am irish, need I say more? lol. But we call it "spinning a yarn" or making things a bit more "illistrative". :)

 Yes, you should do an aussie slang dictionary ! My favorite would be "sticky beak" lol.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 22, 2007, 04:44:28 AM
OPAL MINING

Opal is one of the world's most rare and valuable gemstones, and it comes in every colour of the spectrum. Opal is made of tiny, microscopic spheres of silica. It is these tiny spheres that give opal its amazing colours, by breaking white light up into rays of different colours. When white light enters a precious opal, it hits the spheres of silica. The spheres split light into rays of different wavelengths, which we see as different colours. The colours and patterns in an opal are determined primarily by the size and arrangement of the silica spheres it contains.

Opal forms within spaces in rock. It is found within sedimentary rocks, such as sandstone; and in volcanic rocks that have hardened from molten lava with air bubbles trapped inside.
The basic ingredients for opal are water and silica - but the exact conditions required for opal formation are still not fully understood. On the extremely rare occasion that conditions are just right, silica collects in spaces within the rock and gradually hardens to form opal. The opal takes the shape of the space it is filling. Where the rock cavities once contained plant or animal remains, opalised fossils are formed.
More than 95 per cent of the world's opal is found in Australia. Most of this opal is found in the Australian outback, around the margins of an ancient inland sea that once covered almost one third of Australia - around 110 million years ago, during the Cretaceous period. The opal is found in small pockets between layers of sandstone in clay beds that once formed the floor of this great lost sea.
Some scientists think this Australian opal took thousands of years to form, at high temperatures and under great pressure; others think the opal formed relatively quickly, at about 20 degrees celcius. It seems that at least some opal formed when bacteria took silica from the surrounding clay or stone, then deposited it in spaces in the rock, where the silica became opal.

Opal mining is just about the only mining enterprise still run by individual operators or small partnerships, rather than by large companies. This is mainly because opal is so rare, and occurs so unpredictably. Despite its rarity (indeed - because of it!), opal is extremely valuable, and is an important export product for Australia. It is also this chance of 'striking it rich' that inspires opal miners to stick to their tough and risky occupation.
The equipment used for opal mining depends on whether the opal is mined underground or by the open cut method; and also on the miner's budget. Equipment ranges from hand picks through jackhammers to small machines called diggers and boggers; right up to large earth moving equipment. Most miners start out with the basics, then upgrade when they strike opal.
Most opal is mined from underground, where it formed. In Australia, opal is found down to around 25 metres below ground level. Occasionally opal is found on the surface after it has been brought there by years of weathering and erosion.
In some areas of Australia opal is mined by the open cut method, whereby all of the ground above the opal is removed to expose the 'opal level ' - the layer of rock in which opal may be found. Material from this layer is known as opal dirt.
Where opal is deep underground or is found in only small, elusive patches, the open cut method is uneconomical. Moving such large amounts of earth is too expensive unless there is a good chance of finding a relatively large amount of opal.
In these cases, underground mining methods are used. A narrow vertical shaft is dug or drilled down to the opal level, then horizontal tunnels called 'drives' are dug out in the search for opal. Miners climb up and down their shafts on ladders; opal dirt is usually taken out of the mine using an automatic hoist or a blower, which uses suction to transport opal dirt out of the mine and into a truck waiting above. Most opal mining at Lightning Ridge is done this way.
At Lightning Ridge, miners tumble or wash their opal dirt to remove bulky clay or sandstone from the opal. This washing process is done in a large agitator - usually a modified cement mixer. The products of the washing process are called tailings, and these are carefully sorted for any trace of the elusive, precious opal.

UNDERGROUND OPAL MINER :
(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/mining_drilling.jpg)

OLD TIME MINERS COTTAGE :

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/minerscottage.jpg)

OUTBACK OPAL MINE BUILDINGS :

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/outback_east_turleys_c.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 22, 2007, 04:48:17 AM
ROUGH OPALS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/roughopals.jpg)

FREE FORM OPAL

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/freeform.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 22, 2007, 04:50:53 AM
ELECTRIC CRYSTAL OPAL :

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/CrystalOpal.jpg)

LUMINOUS GREEN BOULDER OPAL :

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/GreenOpal.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 22, 2007, 04:59:54 AM
UNDERGROUND BUILDINGS AT OPAL MINING TOWN OF COOBER PEDY :

CATHOLIC CHURCH

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/catholic1.jpg)

SERBIAN CHURCH

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/serbian1.jpg)

Buildings used to have to be dug out of the sandstone by hand with picks and shovels but are now done by machinery which gives a smoother finish.  A whole new meaning to adding a room or renovating a house, as most of the population live underground.  Shops, bars and resort motels can also be found underground to escape the intense heat.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 22, 2007, 05:13:49 AM
Quote from: "Seamonkey"
Hello Tibrogargan, Ummm would it be good arvo (afternoon) to you? Or doesn't all of australia say that?
 It's the "leg-pulling" that is half the reason I am so fascinated by Australia. I love folklores and legends. And as far as being outlandish..hehehe I am irish, need I say more? lol. But we call it "spinning a yarn" or making things a bit more "illistrative". :)

 Yes, you should do an aussie slang dictionary ! My favorite would be "sticky beak" lol.


Yes most of Australia say "arvo".  Most of our early settlers came from England and Ireland so I guess that is where the humour came from.  Australians have always had a reputation for being larrikins and not very class conscious!  "Jack is as good as his Master" was often quoted.  We also have some rhyming slang which would have come from the Cockney English.

Larrikin : harmless prankster

Sticky Beak or Treacle Beak : An inquisitive person.

Having a sticky beak : Looking for something

Yarning or Having a Yarn : Talking to someone


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 23, 2007, 06:02:11 AM
SHIP HITS HOBART BRIDGE  

Lake Illawarra was a steel motor vessel, bulk carrier, 7274/4343 tons. Captain B. J. Pelc. Undoubtedly Tasmania's most sensational shipping disaster which sank after running into and demolishing part of the Tasman Bridge crossing the Derwent River at Hobart, 5 January 1975.  Seven of her crew and five people in cars that went over the bridge lost their lives. Sailed from Port Pirie, South Australia, with a cargo of zinc concentrate for the Electrolytic Zinc Company's Risdon works. Approaching the bridge she was surging forward at eight knots, apparently under the influence of a strong flood tide, and the master dropped speed to approach the bridge at a 'safe' speed. As the vessel came closer it was seen she was out of line for the central navigation span of the bridge, and despite several changes of course the ship proved quite unmanageable, apparently due to insufficient speed relative to the current to maintain steerage way. In desperation the master finally called out full speed astern, at which point all control was lost and the vessel drifted bodily towards the bridge about midway between the navigation span and the eastern shore, crashing first into the pile capping of pier 18 and then pier 19, bringing the three unsupported spans crashing onto the vessel's hull. The ship listed to starboard and sank within minutes in deep water a short distance to the south, where most of it remains to this day in 110 feet of water.  The master had his certificate suspended for six months after it was found that had not handled the Lake Illawarra in a proper and seamanlike manner. The ship herself could not be moved without high risk of further damaging the bridge, and after all oil was recovered from the wreck to reduce the likelihood of pollution, she was left where she lay. The damage to the eleven year-old bridge wrought havoc on the city of Hobart, the residents of the heavily populated residential eastern shore being forced to drive a considerable distance to Bridgewater in order to cross the Derwent River and then drive the same distance along the river’s western shore to Hobart city area where most were employed. The disruption to the livelihood of the eastern shore residents resulted in large shopping centres and business branches being established there as well as all other essential services. A temporary Bailey Bridge was erected by the Army further up  river but the amount of traffic using this was restricted.  The Tasman bridge was repaired and reopened for traffic on 8 October 1977.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 23, 2007, 06:35:06 AM
Photograph showing cars suspended on edge of bridge.
One of the drivers had only one arm and was fortunate to be able to exit his vehicle.  Some lucky motorists who managed to stop in time tried to flag down others who were speeding across the bridge in the sudden darkness but were ignored.  I used to work with one young woman who, with her husband and unborn baby,  perished in the tragedy as they were driving home across the bridge at the wrong time.  All lighting, electricity and telephones to the eastern shore were cut as the bridge carried the cables for these services.  It was total chaos for many days.  Owners of small boats helped the only ferry service operating to carry people across the river for many weeks.  Several more ferries were purchased or borrowed from interstate and these did a roaring trade in the three years it took to restore the bridge.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/tasbridge1.jpg)

Side view of bridge showing the extent of the damage :

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/tasbridge3.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 23, 2007, 06:48:03 AM
PRESENT DAY PHOTO OF TASMAN BRIDGE WITH LIGHTNING :

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/0539119400.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: pdh3 on February 23, 2007, 12:43:12 PM
Thanks for the bridge story. Very interesting, and very sad.

I think my favorite Aussie word is "tosser" ! I take it to mean someone who drinks a lot, or "tosses" back a few quite often. Is that right? We'd say someone is a drunk, and an Aussie would say someone is a tosser?


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 23, 2007, 06:22:34 PM
Hi pdh3
That was a well thought out meaning.  Tosser is a word we have borrowed (poached) from the English (poms) and actually means an idiot.
The word was given some publicity lately as the anti-litter council used it as a slogan "Don't be a tosser" which could mean both an idiot and/or someone who tosses (throws) rubbish away in public places.
Someone who drinks too much can be called a boozer, as well as other less polite terms.  Booze is slang for alcohol and the boozer also can mean a pub (hotel).
An idiot can also be described as a galah, a sandwich short of a picnic or a few kangaroos short in the top paddock.  No offence meant to galahs which are really quite clever birds but at certain times in the year they feed on wild nectars which have an effect on them and you can see flocks of them staggering around on the ground looking quite stupid.  Boozed you could say!
Hope that helps  :lol:  :lol:


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 23, 2007, 07:08:29 PM
GALAH

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/20060406084521_galah.jpg)

PAIR OF GALAHS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/20060423152412_galah2.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 23, 2007, 07:13:49 PM
LYREBIRD

A very shy and wary, drab coloured bird about the size of a chicken.  So called because of shape of male bird's tail when displayed is like the musical instrument.  They hide in heavily wooded areas and are great mimickers of other bird's calls.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/lyrebird1.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 23, 2007, 07:15:35 PM
SCARLET ROBIN

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/20060419222400_scarletrobin.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 23, 2007, 07:16:50 PM
CLOSE-UP OF CRIMSON ROSELLA

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/RosellaFace.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 23, 2007, 07:17:45 PM
RAINBOW LORIKEETS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Rainbow_Lorikeet_Heidelberg030425.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: pdh3 on February 23, 2007, 07:20:46 PM
Thanks for the clarification! I had seen the use of tosser on another forum where Aussies post, and the discussion was about people in rehab, so I was interpreting it in that context. One Aussie called the person in rehab a tosser! :lol:
So the next time I want to call someone an idiot, I'll just use tosser instead. :wink:

Another thought.....this is why culture plays such an important role in interpreting language. It's so easy to get it wrong.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 23, 2007, 07:29:51 PM
BAY OF FIRES, EAST COAST OF TASMANIA

The unusual name for this area was given by Capt. Tobias Furneaux as he sailed along the Tasmanian coast in 1773 because of numerous fires burning which led him to believe the country was densely populated.  Abundant evidence of this occupation by Aboriginals can be seen today by their middens (shell and bone deposits) in the sand dunes.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/fire_bay.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 23, 2007, 08:20:48 PM
We have a very well respected Maritime College here in Tasmania, where students study Fisheries, Marine Resources and Aquaculture and also an Antarctic Research Station which is the home port for Antarctic expedition icebreaker ships going to our Southernmost bases.

One marine biologist was telling his friend about some of the most recent research findings into the whale songs.  "Some whales can communicate at a distance of 300 miles" he said.
"What the hell would one whale say to another whale 300 miles away?" the friend asked sarcastically.
The biologist replied : "Well, I am not absolutely sure, but it sounds something like : Can you hear me now?"

Humpback Whales in Antartica :

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/adb.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 24, 2007, 11:46:34 PM
A GOOD NEWS STORY ABOUT CROSS COUNTRY CHILD ABDUCTION

Finally back together: Malaysian prince meets long-lost Australian mother
Published: August 25, 2006

A MOTHER, son and daughter separated by one of Australia’s most notorious custody battles embraced in a Melbourne garden today - all together for the first time in 14 years.

Jacqueline Pascarl was rejoicing at the surprise arrival in Australia of her 23-year-old son, Iddin. He was following in the footsteps of his sister Shahirah, 21, who was reunited with her mother in April and now lives permanently with her in Melbourne.  Iddin, then nine, and Shahirah, seven, were snatched from their mother in 1992 during an access visit to Australia by their father, Malaysian prince Raja Bahrin.  Then known as Jacqueline Gillespie, Ms Pascarl fought a protracted and unsuccessful battle with her former husband for her children’s return. She secretly rekindled her relationship with them through emails and phone calls and finally, in April, Shahirah travelled from Malaysia to be with her mother.

Today, Iddin also held his mother and told reporters:”I’ve got two homes now.” Asked why he had returned to Melbourne, he said: “Because I want to see my mum. I miss her a lot. I love her a lot.” Iddin indicated he would stay in Melbourne “a really, really long time” but did not say if he intended to stay permanently.  “Well, he’s had 14 years to think about this,” Ms Pascarl smiled. “Australia is his home, too.”

Ms Pascarl, who has two other children from a later marriage, said Shahirah and Iddin had surprised her with Iddin’s arrival in Melbourne.“It’s absolutely blissful and wonderful,” Ms Pascarl said as the three stood arm in arm outside her home in suburban Hawthorn today. “I have four beautiful, unique and amazingly individual children and a wonderful husband and we are overjoyed to be together as a family for the first time in 14 years,” Ms Pascarl said.

“We need to get to know each other and they (Iddin and Shahirah) need to get to know me, and they need to get to know themselves, which is really important. “I’m just so overjoyed that my children are at home together and they’re here with me, and we are happy. We want to thank everyone for your support and the generous good wishes all through the years, and the people who have just sort of stuck in there with us.”

Ms Pascarl married Raja Bahrin in 1980 and Iddin and Shahirah were born in Malaysia.  She returned to Australia with the children after the prince took a second wife under Islamic law. He abducted Iddin and Shahirah in 1992, driving them to Queensland, where they were smuggled by boat to Indonesia and then Malaysia.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 25, 2007, 12:04:14 AM
Shahirah and her mother reunited :

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/sinceiwas.jpg)

Iddin, their mother and Shahirah reunited :

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/iddinREUNIONtheage24thaug06.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 25, 2007, 05:21:41 AM
SUNSET OVER DERWENT RIVER SHOWING TASMAN BRIDGE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/06_19_0008.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 25, 2007, 05:45:47 AM
IRWIN ZOO TO EXPAND FOR SAFARI EXPERIENCE

(The Examiner Newspaper 24 Feb 2007)

The zoo made famous by crocodile hunter Steve Irwin is to be enlarged and developed as a world-class tourist destination after a land deal with the Queensland Government.
The Government has agreed to hand over a parcel of state land so Australia Zoo can set up an open-range experience, incorporating wildlife from Africa, South-East Asia and North America.
In return for the land, the zoo will give the Government a larger piece of land near the Peachester State Forest, to be used for forestry. The zoo also will pay the state the difference in land value for the swap.
Queensland Environment Minister Lindy Nelson-Carr said the move would bring to fruition Steve and Terri Irwin's dream of a stand-alone world-class tourist destination.
The zoo's new piece of land will be excised from the Beerwah State Forest, to the south-east of the attraction's existing facilities.  A spokeswoman for the zoo said the deal was welcome.  "There are a number of processes which Australia Zoo must implement to realise its dream, but the agreement on forestry land which it has reached with the Government brings expansion one step closer" she said.
Irwin, 44, died last September when a stingray barb pierced his chest as he filmed a documentary on the Great Barrier Reef.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 25, 2007, 06:01:07 AM
Missed by The Examiner, but included by other newspapers, with the above  article :

Steve's legacy conservation fund, Wildlife Warriors, has attracted millions of dollars in donations since his death, with some of the money to go towards building a new animal hospital at the zoo.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 25, 2007, 06:54:26 PM
GORDON RIVER - WEST COAST OF TASMANIA

Two wild rivers hurtle through mountainous rainforest wilderness and merge as the Gordon River, which flows into the vast Macquarie Harbour on the west coast. The scene is the Franklin-Gordon Wild Rivers National Park, in the Wilderness World Heritage Area of the south-west. The rivers were the centre of a controversy in the 1980s, when they were to have been dammed for hydro-electricity, but the scheme was quashed by an environmental campaign.

Part of Gordon River showing wilderness :

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Gordonriver.jpg)

Cape Sorell at mouth of Gordon River :

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/CapeSorell.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 25, 2007, 06:56:26 PM
ROCKY CAPE - FAR NORTH WEST COAST OF TASMANIA
:

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/RockyCape.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 25, 2007, 11:23:58 PM
I will present this story without comment ......

The Examiner Newspaper 12 Feb 2007.

We don't want to stop at 10 : Mum[/b

A Brisbane couple who made world-wide headlines for having two sets of quads through fertility treatment are expecting baby number 10.
Life in the household of Dale and Darren Chalk, of Strathpine in Brisbane's north, is about to become even more hectic with the couple revealing they are pregnant again.
And despite being plagued with morning sickness, Mrs Chalk,28, said they couldn't wait to have more babies.  "It's not morning sickness, it's all day sickness, but hopefully it will soon pass," she said.  "We adore children, so there are no plans to stop at 10."  They have been assured this is a single pregnancy.
Mrs Chalk and her husband, a taxi driver, became parents to quads in August 2004 using an anonymous sperm donor through the Queensland Fertility Group.  Emma, Ellie, Samuel and Joseph were born 13 weeks premature.
The Chalks made international news when they gave birth to another set of quads born in October the next year - Sarah, Alice, Matthew and Milly.  However, Milly was stillborn.
The Chalks have another daughter, Shelby, 4.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 25, 2007, 11:25:49 PM
Awwww - I can't help myself.

Who needs immigration?

Can you imagine the anonymous donor's face if they all turned up one day on his doorstep  "Daddy......."


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Elaine on February 25, 2007, 11:35:23 PM
Quote from: "Tibrogargan"
Awwww - I can't help myself.

Who needs immigration?

Can you imagine the anonymous donor's face if they all turned up one day on his doorstep  "Daddy......."
LOL! Tibro, I really have enjoyed reading your thread here, keep up the great work!


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 27, 2007, 04:28:28 PM
PIE FLOATER

Unique to the state of South Australia the pie floater is a minced meat pie floating is a sea of thick split pea soup and topped liberally with tomato sauce, which is more savoury that American ketchup. Typically, they are only available extremely late at night from caravans (pie carts?) parked around inner Adelaide.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/pie.gif)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on February 27, 2007, 04:29:40 PM
VIEW OF HOBART WITH MOUNT WELLINGTON

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/MtWellington.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Seamonkey on February 28, 2007, 07:37:07 AM
OMG! all those babies at only 28...eeek! Takes a special person to do that, that's for sure.

Your pictures you are sharing are very breath takingly beautiful. I like to pop in here with my morning coffee, it is relaxing to read the posts and pictures you post.
 thank you for adding to my peaceful mornings :)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Leslie on February 28, 2007, 12:30:40 PM
I like this land down under - beautiful scenary, amazing wildlife, friendly people and a relaxed attitude; but there must be other culinary dishes native to Oz other than the pie floater.  That picture is truly disturbing.  I have never seen pea soup that green.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 01, 2007, 05:04:02 AM
Thank you monkeys for your kind comments.
Leslie, I agree that the pea soup is a strange colour - hopefully it is the lighting or the photography.  :lol:
We do have a very varied cuisine especially the past few years with all the influences from many other cultures.
Years ago the main foods were good solid British cooking : roasts and puddings etc, but over the years there has been a few dishes that are considered exclusive to us.
Pictures (and I will post any recipes if any monkeys would like them)

Roast Leg of Lamb, served with baked veges and green peas.  Topped with mint sauce and gravy.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/BBQLegLamb.jpg)

Famous meat pie.  Meat can be minced or diced and cooks in its own gravy.  Flaky puff pastry.  Family size can be served with mashed potatoes and veges.  Must have the tomato sauce.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/MeatPie.jpg)

Damper is large scone loaf.  Was originally made by travelling stockmen while on their long cattle drives and baked over open fire.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Damper.jpg)

Outdoor meals are popular with family and friends gathering for a barbeque.  Usually meats cooked are sausages, chops and steaks. Served with salad and icy cold beer or wine.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/BBQchopsSnags.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 01, 2007, 05:12:54 AM
More Aussie Food :

Vanilla Slices (or custard squares).  The slices shown have passionfruit icing on top.  Also on plate are chocolate eclairs for BTgirl :wink:

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/VanillaSlice.jpg)

Anzac Biscuits. A firm chewy cookie which keep very well and were so named because they were baked and sent to our troops in the first world war.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/300px-Single_ANZAC_biscuit.jpg)

Pumpkin Scones

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/scones.jpg)

Lamingtons which are made from squares of day old cake covered in melted chocolate or chocolate icing and rolled in coconut.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/lamingtons.gif)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 01, 2007, 05:14:58 AM
This is as Australian as you can get  :lol:  :lol:

Vegemite on toast

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/250px-Vegemiteontoast_large.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 01, 2007, 05:22:28 AM
For all the seafood lovers : A Seafood Platter.  Would contain hot and cold seafood - lobster, moreton bay bugs, prawns, oysters, crabs, calamari, scallops, fish fillets with salads and tropical fruits.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/seafood-platter.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 01, 2007, 05:24:39 AM
And if you have any room left there is a pavlova topped with whipped cream and fresh seasonal fruits :

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/350px-Pavlova.png)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 01, 2007, 05:28:04 AM
And for when all the monkeys drop in for an Aussie barbeque I have invited our Robots to do the cooking for us :

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/BBQRobots.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 01, 2007, 06:36:59 AM
LAVENDER FARM

The lavender-rowed hills of Nabowla in North-East Tasmania might seem an unlikely place to produce a world leader in essential oils industry.  Volatile oils are extracted from a wide variety of plant materials including sandalwood, eucalyptus, mint, anise and neroli, and used for flavourings, perfumes and medicines.

Bridestowe Estate at Nabowla is the largest single producer of lavender oil in the world, producing 3.5 per cent of total world output.  The essential oils industry is now huge worldwide.  But it could have stayed a cottage industry without the brilliance and ingenuity of industry pioneer, Tim Denny.  
 
It was Mr Denny’s ground breaking research at Bridestowe that revolutionized the steam distillation extraction process around the world.  For years he had been convinced that the orthodox theory of steam distillation, set out in 1910, was wrong because it defied the second law of thermo-dynamics.  “This law states that heat cannot be transferred from cooler to hotter bodies by any continuous self-sustaining process’” he said.  “Here at Bridestowe we worked out the right way that steam did in fact extract the oil”

The new distillery equipment he installed increased the oil yield by 20 per cent and also reduced the time required to extract the oil from the loads of flowers.  It also improved the quality of the oil to a point where it could hardly be matched anywhere in the world.

Mr Denny’s father established the estate in 1921 with seed from camphor-free French lavender.  The climate and the fact that there are no native lavenders to cross pollinate with the pure lavender was what brought him to Tasmania.

The 120 acres of rolling fields of lavender are a spectacular sight when the lavender blooms in December and January and then there is a 5 week long harvest.
The café on the property also serves lavender flavoured ice-cream.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 01, 2007, 06:38:54 AM
LAVENDER ESTATE :

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/lav_2.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 01, 2007, 06:40:30 AM
VIEWS OF THE LAVENDER FIELDS :

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/lavfields.jpg)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/M563P38225_thumbnail.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Seamonkey on March 01, 2007, 06:56:44 AM
WOW!!! those fields are absolutely GORGEOUS!!
 and Yummmyyyyyy all that food. And vegemite *drool*


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 01, 2007, 04:39:07 PM
BRISBANE RIVER

Tales of a river - by Phil Hammond

March 01, 2007 11:00pm Article from: The Courier-Mail

WE GRAVITATE to water. To enjoy a cooling breeze from the front of a speeding CityCat, or a picnic beneath a shade tree on the shore at New Farm Park, is to appreciate the moody and mysterious grandeur that is the Brisbane River.  If you have plenty of cash, you can buy a home with riverviews.

The german shepherd, with a koala riding its back, was once the welcome to Lone Pine Sanctuary for visitors who took the river route. And even though the pleasure boats have been ousted from their old North Bank moorings below the Treasury Casino, the MV Mirimar still gives new generations pleasure with its daily Lone Pine trips.

The wool stores these days are up-market blocks of units, but the big water dragons still sun themselves on the rocks up Indooroopilly way. Where once there was industry, children now play in riverside parks such as the Octopus Garden at Colmslie, or the showpiece Rocks Riverside Park near the river's Seventeen Mile Rocks. The youths who used the coal barges sliding past Toowong for target practice with .22 rifles are grown up. Dredging is a memory, and since it stopped the waters have cleaned up. Not quite as clean yet as when colonial soldiers could paddle knee deep near Tank St, ease their hands in, and flick sizeable fish ashore. Dozens of community groups plant trees, remove rubbish and repair the river's tributaries, but familiar still in the creeks are tennis balls in the tide, flushed in stormwater from distant streets, along with choking growths of introduced plants.

On September 25, 1824, when John Oxley was exploring the reaches upstream of the Bremer junction, he noted metre-long sharks. Today, the bull sharks, in packs of up to 70 according to marine research, maraud far up towards Mt Crosby.

Water destined for Brisbane's consumption flows steadily from the wall of Wivenhoe Dam to the Mt Crosby treatment works. For most of the 56km, as far as Kholo, it is a worthwhile canoe adventure, with fast flowing races around tight bends and calm stretches bordered by cow paddocks. From the days when forests of hoop pine and river gum grew right down to the shoreline camps of local Aborigines, to the city Riverwalk – a 15-year project to create 34km of continuous riverside walkways and boardwalks – the river has been a fascinating story.

Far up near Esk, you can enjoy SEQWater's Lake Somerset Holiday Park, launch a tinnie, and with a $7 fishing permit, try for everything from red claw crayfish to Mary River cod and saratoga.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/BrisbaneRiver.jpg)

View of Brisbane River showing part of River Walk.  Story Bridge in far right of photo


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 01, 2007, 06:20:52 PM
MORE VIEWS OF BRISBANE RIVER :

Ferry passing close to the CBD

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/bris.jpg)

Night view of city skyline and river

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/cityatnight.jpg)

Moon over Brisbane CBD

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/brisbanearea.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 01, 2007, 06:33:54 PM
SOUTH BANK IN BRISBANE

For the World Expo in 1988 they landscaped a large area close to the CBD and built an artificial beach by transporting sand from coastal areas.  The area was so popular during the Expo that it was left for future public use and is very popular.  

South Bank Lagoon

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/southbank.jpg)

Bougainvillea Arbor on one of the walkways

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/southbank_gall.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Leslie on March 01, 2007, 11:17:49 PM
Tasmania looks like a paradise.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 02, 2007, 01:07:32 AM
MAP OF AUSTRALIA


(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/ausmap.gif)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 02, 2007, 01:14:26 AM
"RIVERFIRE" - A QUEENSLAND SPECTACULAR

A very popular event held annually in September as part of the Brisbane River Festival.

In a spectacular display of choreographed colour and music the bridges, rooftops and skies above Brisbane City will light up the river for Brisbane's most popular annual celebration.

The gravity defying Roulettes* will begin the festivities with an awesome display of aerodynamic precision.

Then at 7pm sharp electric skies erupt with a massive fireworks display set to the exclusive Riverfire soundtrack live on Triple M 104.5FM.

As Brisbanites unite on the banks of the river and in Brisbane backyards, Channel Nine hosts Bruce Paige and Heather Foord will cover the action in a special live broadcast commencing at 6:30pm and simulcast live with Triple M from 7pm.

And for the Riverfire finale, an RAAF F-111* strike jet will sweep low over the city, reaching speeds of up to 800kph before performing the crowd favourite ‘dump and burn’ display.

Roulettes fly in formation over the city at dusk

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Roulettes.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 02, 2007, 01:17:02 AM
Vapour trails from Roulettes flying over fireworks and illuminated city

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/RF2006.jpg)

Fireworks on Story Bridge

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/RFStory.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 02, 2007, 01:18:24 AM
More Firework Displays at Riverfire

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/RFSBridge.jpg)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/RFFirewks.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 02, 2007, 01:20:31 AM
The Finale :

F-111 "Dump and Burn"

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/RFdump.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 02, 2007, 01:22:50 AM
Quote from: "Leslie"
Tasmania looks like a paradise.


Yes Leslie, it is a paradise and you can see why we returned to live here.  I have a very soft spot for Queensland also as you can see so I guess I have concentrated on these two states.  I promise to give the other states a fair go from now on  :lol:


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 04, 2007, 06:55:15 PM
IRWIN LEGACY TO SICK ANIMALS

By Lou Robson   March 03, 2007 11:00pm   Article from:  Sunday Mail

IN A small corner of the busy emergency room, Jon Hanger is preparing to operate. The 36-year-old scrubs up, dons a surgical mask and raises his hands. "This patient was hit by a car and has quite nasty injuries," Dr Hanger says. "Ada's got a bad jaw fracture, serious lip lacerations and is one sad koala."
Ada is among 5000 patients admitted to the Australian Wildlife Hospital at Australia Zoo at Beerwah, 20km inland of Caloundra on the Sunshine Coast. Opened in March 2004, the hospital is open 24 hours and treats all-comers. It was inspired by Lyn Irwin, the mother of the late Crocodile Hunter Steve Irwin.  Mrs Irwin, who died in a car crash in 2000, was a pioneer in wildlife care in Queensland and it was her dream to establish the hospital.
Tree frogs have received tiny leg splints, lizards had broken limbs cast and a 4g feathertail glider was treated for shock. Magpies, crows and emus are welcome. Possums, kangaroos, feral pigs and baby platypuses are admitted. Wild dogs, brown snakes, exotic parrots and blind koalas are also accepted.  "We don't send anything away," Dr Hanger said.  "We are here to relieve the suffering of animals and that means all of them, even feral animals such as pigeons, dingo-cross puppies and wild dogs. We don't look at a species and say, 'Oh it's common, we're not going to deal with it.' "
The small hospital is always busy. Last week, a green sea turtle was treated for shell lacerations, while a koala went under the knife. A 3m carpet snake received medication for a mouth infection while week-old wood ducklings waited for hourly feeds. An eclectus parrot with a nervous condition roosted outside while two baby platypus did laps of a kiddie pool.
Steve's widow, Terri Irwin, said the hospital, initially a koala care facility, had an "all creatures great and small" policy.  Terri, who recently returned to the Sunshine Coast after touring Canada with daughter Bindi, 8, and Robert, 3, to promote Australian tourism, said the facility catered to all animals.  "Steve always had this concept of treating animals the way you'd like to be treated," Terri, 42, said.  "Certainly if my leg was broken I'd hope that somebody wouldn't say, 'There's billions of humans, let's not worry about this one'."
At the hospital, crows are cared for as carefully as rare breeds, possums receive five-star treatment and goannas get top medical attention  "It's the idea of caring for the individual animal whether or not they're endangered and we do not put a dollar amount on that," Terri said. "We've spent thousands of dollars on individual koalas to get them back up and running again."
One injured animal became a family friend. Terri said an emu called Kristy, found while the Irwins were travelling, has befriended Robert.  "We have an emu that we personally brought back from out west a couple of years ago. We go check on Kristy regularly, and Kristy and Robert have a very special relationship," Terri said.  "Kristy stopped growing so they're about the same height and they have long conversations together at the hospital when we drop in, which is often."
The hospital, once an avocado packing shed, is to be expanded to treat up to 10,000 animals a year. It needs more room because some injured animals never leave. Blind 18-month-old koala Sammy, brought in as a baby, would die in the wild and now spends his days eating eucalyptus leaves outside the ER. Three-year-old koala Whistler, the victim of a dog attack, lives a life of leisure in an outdoor enclosure and often donates blood to injured koalas. Reno, the psychologically disturbed parrot, enjoys the calming company of sane birds in a sheltered courtyard. The animals, like the hospital's four vets, six full-time nurses and 70 volunteers, are fixtures.
Inside, it's organised chaos. Donated equipment, animals and staff vie for space. The reception area merges with the operating room. Incubators, gifts from hospital pediatric wards, line the walls along with anaesthetic equipment, tiny X-ray machines and oxygen tanks.  A koala X-ray, clipped to an illuminated white board, shows Dr Hanger's handiwork. There are metal pins, a section of steel plate hand-sculpted to fit the animal's jaw, and a series of staples.
"No one else does this kind of work," said vet nurse Pauline Brookman. "Dr Hanger is really good at what he does. He's one of Australia's best veterinary surgeons."
Since December 2003 he has worked on crocodiles, tigers, cheetahs, pelicans, camels and dingoes. He's wormed venomous snakes and performed check-ups on elephants and alligators.  "About 30 per cent of our work comes from Australia Zoo," Dr Hanger said.  "But the Wildlife Hospital caters for incoming animals, so we charge the zoo for the treatment we give."  
The hospital, built on land donated by Australia Zoo, is part of Wildlife Warriors Worldwide Ltd, a charity created by Steve and Terri in 2002. The charity operates independently with Terri as patron.  Wildlife Warriors Worldwide spokesman Steve Francia said it cost more than $1 million a year to run the hospital and more funds were needed to expand the facility. Donations and volunteers were always appreciated. • Anyone with an injured animal can contact the hospital's 24-hour hotline on 1300 369 652 . For more information, visit www.wildlifewarriors.org.au


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 04, 2007, 06:58:36 PM
(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/AustZooVet.jpg)

In good hands ... Veterinary nurse Pauline Brookman and top vet Jon Hanger take a close look at Ada the Koala.
Picture: Megan Slade


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 05, 2007, 04:18:15 AM
THE BILBY
 
Bilbies are marsupials and the largest of the bandicoot family. They are covered in silky, grey fur, have a long snout and a slender tongue. Their large, hairless ears assist them in keeping cool as well as hearing predators. Although they have poor vision, their sense of smell is very good which is important for finding food. The strong front limbs have three toes with claws and two without claws which bilbies use to burrow rapidly. The hind limbs are slender with a large middle toe like a kangaroo and are used for grooming. With such a delicate appearance one is led to wonder how such an animal could ever survive such harsh desert conditions.In recent times, Australians have begun a trend of using the bilby as the symbol of Easter replacing the rabbit which has caused so much damage to the Australian environment. The rabbit, with its incredible reproductive capability, symbolised the fertility that spring brings at this time of the year. Although the female bilby has eight teats in a backward-opening pouch, it usually has litters of no more than three young. The gestation period is around 21 days and the young will stay in the pouch and suckle milk for another 75 days. It is possible for young to be born throughout the year, but breeding may depend on rainfall and the amount of food available. Therefore, as a symbol of fertility, the bilby is not really an appropriate substitute. No one knows how long they live in the wild but captive bilbies can live for up to 5 years.At night bilbies emerge from the coolness of their burrows to forage for insects and their larvae or native fruit and seeds. As the seasons change, so do the food sources. In times of drought colonies of termites can provide bilbies with energy and moisture. Bilbies are mainly found in grasslands and acacia scrublands amongst spinifex and tussocks. Although most bandicoots do not make burrows, bilbies dig burrows that spiral downwards to a depth of about two metres. These burrows usually have a single opening which are hidden by a small bush, grass tussock or termite mound. Early this century, bilbies were hunted for their fur, killed by poison baits and caught in rabbit traps. Today they are preyed upon by foxes and feral cats. Most destructive has been the spread of rabbits and cattle who compete with bilbies for food and habitat.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 05, 2007, 04:20:02 AM
BILBY IN IT'S NATURAL HABITAT

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/bilby03.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 05, 2007, 04:20:59 AM
BILBY EMERGING FROM BURROW

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/tsd05greater-bilby.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 05, 2007, 04:25:55 AM
A LARGE CONFECTIONERY MANUFACTURER PRODUCES "EASTER BILBY" WHICH HAVE BECOME VERY POPULAR AND PART OF THE PROCEEDS GOES TO THE "SAVE THE BILBY FUND"

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Chocolate_bilby.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 05, 2007, 04:30:04 AM
FRILLED NECK LIZARD

Otherwise known as the ‘cloaked-lizard’, the Australian Frilled Lizard is truly a unique creature. Its spectacular frill is used for defence and communication. This distinctive reptile loves the sun and is a member of the dragon family, a sub-species of lizards. Like most lizards it is active during the day. The energy absorbed from the sun warms its body allowing it to feed and run quickly.
Adult Frilled Lizards vary in size and weight but are usually between 26-38 inches in length (from head to tail). Their long, strong tail can measure up to 25 inches alone. They can weigh up to1 lb. The diameter of the frill is 8-10 inches, about the size of a small dinner plate!
Frilled Lizards can be found throughout northern and north western Australia. They favour tropical to warm temperate dry forests, woodlands and savanna woodlands, usually with an open shrubby or tussock grass understorey. This reptile chooses to dwell in trees. Using its long, slim front limbs and its strong hind legs it is able to stretch and move easily between branches. Frilled Lizards mostly live a solitary life, defending their territory against rivals.
The Frilled Lizard hunts in the trees for spiders and insects like cicadas. It goes to the ground looking for ants, small mammals and small lizards.
The main predators of the Frilled Lizard are birds of prey like eagles and owls, larger lizards, snakes and some mammals like dingoes and quolls.
When it sees danger the Frilled Lizard slowly lowers itself onto the ground, relying on its natural body colours to act as camouflage. If the lizard feels threatened it will extend its legs, open its brightly coloured mouth and show its teeth. It erects the frill which looks like a scaly umbrella. This helps to make it look bigger. With a loud hissing sound, it will jump towards the threat. If the frill and hissing is not effective the Frilled Lizard will begin to thrash its tail repeatedly, whipping it against the ground. As a last resort, the lizard will make a sudden turn and run off on its hind legs to the nearest tree, climbing until finding safety. If it is forced to fight, the Frilled Lizard is able to deliver painful bites with its large canine teeth.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 05, 2007, 04:34:29 AM
FRILLED NECK LIZARD ON ALERT.

Colour of the Lizard varies according to it's surroundings and can range from grey to brick red.  (refer to pictures of Bilby to see red colour of the outback.)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/FrilledLizardDisplayChrisBanks.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 05, 2007, 04:40:26 AM
PERTH - WESTERN AUSTRALIA

Offset by the vast tranquil waters of the Swan River, the beautiful city of Perth is a tourist's delight. Modern and vibrant, it contrasts with its historic counterpart - the port city of Fremantle accessible within 20 minutes by car from Perth.   The first recorded sighting by Europeans of Western Australia was in October 1616, when the Dutch navigator Dirk Hartog landed at Shark Bay, near Carnarvon. Von Edels discovered land a little further south in 1618, while, in 1619, Frederick Houtman sighted small rocky islands off the coast near Geraldton and named them Abrolhos, meaning 'lookout'. British authorities settled at the Swan River in 1828 and on May 2 1829, HMS Challenger commander Captain Charles Fremantle raised the British flag at the head of the Swan River and proudly took possession of the territory. Captain James Stirling arrived during the following month on his ship 'Parmelia' and with settlers in tow, founded Perth at a site near the present town hall on August 12, 1829. The Swan River colony experienced initial difficulties including a shortage of labour, financial problems and poor communication. To cope with such problems, the British Government sent convicts to Western Australia from 1850 to 1868 to assist with development. Tourists commonly refer to Perth as the ‘friendly city’ and famous notables have also renamed the city after their personal experiences. Astronaut John Glenn called Perth the ‘City of Lights’ after his historic fly-over in 1962 and victorious America’s Cup skipper Dennis Connor referred to it as the ‘most isolated city in the world’


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 05, 2007, 04:43:29 AM
PERTH SKYLINE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/skylinefromkp_med.jpg)

BLACK SWANS ON SWAN RIVER BANK

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/blackswans_med.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 05, 2007, 04:45:04 AM
TREE WALK NEAR PERTH

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/treewalkkeithhall_med.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 05, 2007, 04:47:21 AM
SWANS WITH CYGNETS PARADE THROUGH PERTH'S BURSWOOD PARK

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/burswoodpark_med.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 05, 2007, 04:49:50 AM
FREMANTLE - WESTERN AUSTRALIA

In a bygone era when passenger ships were the preferred mode of transport for world travellers, Fremantle was the western gateway to Australia. Millions of migrants arrived by ship and many made the area their home. Jet travel changed Fremantle’s prominence as a destination but the port city was rejuvenated when it became the centre of world attention during the Australian defence of the America's Cup in 1987.
Fremantle today retains much of its old charm: its situation at the mouth of the Swan River, its picturesque old buildings, its cultural diversity and what its long time residents still call the Fremantle feeling. This sets it apart from the capital, Perth. The feeling comes upon you when you cross the bridge over the Swan River from the northern suburbs, pass historic Cantonment Hill from the east or (ideally) drift down river from Perth in a pleasure boat.
Fremantle is a working port, host to a big fishing fleet as well as container ships and the occasional large cruise vessel. It maintains a vibrant commercial life and is a desirable tourist destination. It has, however, retained its cosmopolitan nature and preserved its identity, largely through the good sense and dedication of its modern-day civic managers.
A special feature of Fremantle is its maritime atmosphere and this can be best appreciated on a stroll around the Fishing Boat Harbour. This is a working harbour all year round and you may see fresh seafood being unloaded from the fishing boats ready for export or local despatch. There are many waterfront restaurants in Fishing Boat Harbour with spectacular views over the Indian Ocean out to Rottnest and beyond. The atmosphere is similar to San Francisco’s Fisherman’s Wharf, with cuisine catering for all tastes - Italian influences feature heavily, and, of course, the taste of freshly caught and cooked seafood should not be missed.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 05, 2007, 04:52:10 AM
MARITIME MUSEUM - FREMANTLE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/maritimemuseumFreo.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Seamonkey on March 05, 2007, 07:18:13 AM
Quote from: "Tibrogargan"
BILBY IN IT'S NATURAL HABITAT

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/bilby03.jpg)


Oh those are CUTE!!!
Now I know what my Chihuahua, Fernando,  REALLY looks like with his WAYYyyy to large of ears for his head and his little rat feet lol
 The Bilbys (Bilbies ?)  really are adorable animals. I might have to smuggle me one home someday so Fernando doesn't feel so freakish looking lol. :)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 06, 2007, 12:40:17 AM
DALAI LAMA TO PROMOTE KINDNESS AT IRWIN ZOO

By Christine Flatley

March 05, 2007 11:32am  The Courier Mail
Article from: AAP

CROCODILE Hunter Steve Irwin built his Queensland zoo show the world his love of animals - now the Dalai Lama will use it to promote kindness to all creatures.

Australia Zoo's 5000-seat Crocoseum will become the stage for the 14th Dalai Lama to launch the start of Kindness Week later this year, as part of his 2007 Australia Tour.

Kindness Week, which runs from June 13-19, is a major initiative by Karuna Hospice Services - Australia's only Buddhist hospice - which provides comfort and quality of life for people who are dying and their families.

It is designed to promote compassion for all living things.

Over the years, Australia Zoo - on Queensland's Sunshine Coast - has fostered a long-standing relationship with the Dalai Lama in Dharamsala, India, with both sharing a similar philosophy for wildlife and conservation.

During his visit to the zoo, the Dalai Lama will share this philosophy with visitors through a short talk on kindness and animal conservation.

The Dalai Lama's Australian tour takes the spiritual leader to a number of cities around the country, starting with a forum in Perth on June 6.

He also will visit Bendigo, Canberra, Brisbane and Sydney.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 06, 2007, 01:22:59 AM
SYDNEY - NEW SOUTH WALES

LIGHTNING OVER DARLING HARBOUR AND GLEBE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/DarlingHGlebe.jpg)

LIGHTNING OVER CBD SKYSCRAPERS AND TOWER

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/KentSt.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 06, 2007, 01:27:46 AM
THE LITTLE PENGUIN
 
The Little Penguin, also known as the Fairy Penguin or Blue Penguin, is the smallest of the 18 penguin species and the only penguin to breed in Australia.  Despite being only 13 inches tall, the Little Penguin is adventurous and a young bird can travel distances of over 600 miles in the first year of its life.The Little Penguin cannot fly in the air but has been said to ‘fly’ through the water. It uses its small wings or flippers to glide through the water at speeds of up to 4 miles per hour.The Little Penguin is covered in short stiff feathers, almost like scales, which are a blue-grey colour on their back and white on its belly. This type of colouring is called ‘countershading’ and camouflages the penguin while in the water - from above it blends with the surface colour of the water, while from below it blends with the light entering from above. A layer of down feathers insulate the Little Penguin from the cold. It secretes an oily liquid from the base of it’s tail which is rubbed over the feathers to help keep them waterproof. Its small legs are low on the body so they can be used as a rudder in the water or to walk upright on land where it waddles awkwardly. The Little Penguin has webbed feet and long toenails. It communicates with high pitched yapping ‘barks’ and becomes quite noisy when it leaves the water to roost or during fishing.The Little Penguin has a life expectancy of around 6½ years, but some survive for over 20 years. Every year the Little Penguin fattens up and then retreats to its burrow to moult. It takes about two weeks to moult its old feathers and grow new ones. It cannot feed in the sea during this moulting phase.The Little Penguin lives along the coast of southern Australia, including Tasmania and New Zealand. Major colonies occur on islands, sometimes with 40 000 Little Penguins on one island. Although needing the shore to roost each evening, the Little Penguin may travel 12 miles off shore to feed. It is the only penguin to wait until after dark to come ashore and form groups before waddling across the sand dunes to roost in rock crevices or burrows lined with plant matter.The Little Penguin eats mainly fish and squid, sometimes diving deeper than 100 feet to catch its food.  Ashore, the Little Penguin is vulnerable to attack by foxes, dogs and cats, whereas in the water it is on the menu for sharks, fur seals and sea lions. By keeping in groups the Little Penguin lessens the threat from predators.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 06, 2007, 01:30:38 AM
LITTLE PENGUIN

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/LittlePenguinrd.jpg)

PENGUIN SWIMMING

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/PenguinswimmingRD.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Seamonkey on March 06, 2007, 07:43:15 AM
Hmmmm note to self...also smuggle out a fairy penguin. SOoo cute.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: BTgirl on March 06, 2007, 07:47:30 AM
Quote from: "Tibrogargan"
DALAI LAMA TO PROMOTE KINDNESS AT IRWIN ZOO


I LOVE the Dalai Lama! I wish I could be there!!!!!


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 07, 2007, 04:59:20 AM
Hey Seamonkey you are going to have to build an ark to carry all these animals you plan to take home to America with you. :lol:  :lol:

BT it would be a very inspiring talk.  He is such a compassionate and peaceful person.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Seamonkey on March 07, 2007, 07:27:33 AM
*building an ark* hehehe :)
Beautiful Lightening Photos !!


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Lala'sMom on March 07, 2007, 11:00:50 PM
I think I could spend hours in this thread just dreaming of visiting all these places.  It's almost as good as being there.  You have no idea how much I have enjoyed this, I just come here and read and look at the pictures over and over.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Seamonkey on March 08, 2007, 06:24:30 AM
LaLa's Mom - isn't it so peaceful and enchanting? This is where I have my morning coffee. It is so generous of Tibrogargan to do this..THANK YOU Tibrogargan :)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Seamonkey on March 08, 2007, 06:29:47 AM
Oh BTW I wanted to tell ya I couldn't get fairy Penguins out of my head all yesterday so ...since I make fantasy art dolls, I was drawing out plans for a fairy penguin lol. See how easily influenced I am? lol

Then I sculpted a caricature of my chihuahua and it came out looking somewhat like that bilby, then again, Fernando really does look like one , except he is white with sable spots, lol I need to get his picture on here to show you the resemblance.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 08, 2007, 03:30:48 PM
Lala'sMom I am glad you get so much pleasure from these pages.  You cannot imagine how much enjoyment and fun I get from presenting them.  Makes me feel more a part of SM and also that I can contribute something for the Monkeys who are working so hard for Natalee and her family.

Seamonkey Looking forward to photos of Fernando, and also the Penguin dolls when you make them.  They would be cute.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 08, 2007, 03:40:01 PM
Something different for St Patrick's Day :

Photos taken at last year's parade in Sydney.  Looks like a great time was had by all.  Oh, and do does America have a Bachelor quest on your St Patrick's day celebrations?  Sounds like a good idea.
 :lol:  :lol:

ST PATRICKS DAY 2007

This is the fourth year that the Sydney St Patrick’s Day Parade Org Inc has held the St Patrick’s Day Bachelor of the Year but it is fast becoming a not to be missed event in the lead up to St Patrick’s Day.
The Organising committee has been busy scouring the suburbs of Sydney in search of 12 fine lads of Irish heritage. On the night, the lads will perform their special cabaret talent not only for the judges but also in front of a live audience of 300 people.
As well as the adulation of Sydney’s Irish community, 2007’s Bachelor will win a travel voucher to the value of $1,500.

Pipe Band leading the march

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/PipeBand.jpg)

Irish Wolfhounds enjoying the march

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/IrishWolfhounds.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 08, 2007, 03:42:22 PM
One of the Floats

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Float2.jpg)

Old time travel

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/JauntingCar.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 08, 2007, 03:46:33 PM
Our American friends join in the fun also

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Boston.jpg)

At the end of the march, they all join in a dance and party in one of the large parks in the city

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Dancers.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 08, 2007, 05:03:04 PM
Lady Monkeys, here is something that will go well with your morning coffee:

St Patrick's Day Irish Bachelor of the Year 2007 entrants:
(Individual details are available on website - just ask me) :lol:  :lol:

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/bach07_group2.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 11, 2007, 06:23:44 AM
AUSTRALIA'S OWN CAR

First produced in 1948 and adapted from an American design the Holden Model 48-215 was built almost entirely in Australia.

A photo  of a nicely restored vehicle in original ivory colour :

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/dennis.gif)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 11, 2007, 06:31:01 AM
ULURU IN THE NORTHERN TERRITORY

Once called Ayers Rock, Uluru rises from seemingly nowhere in the deep centre of Australia, and is one of the world's great natural wonders.
Most visitors would have seen photographs, or advertisements featuring Uluru, but nothing prepares you for the physical impact of this vast monolith. Its sheer immensity dwarfs everything around it. Uluru has acquired its reputation not just because it is such a unique landform, but also because of the effect the sun has on its colours and appearance. Sunrises and Sunsets cause changes to its colour from browns though oranges, reds to finally grey.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Uluru.jpg)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/rainbowUluru.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 11, 2007, 06:35:45 AM
Welcome to Aboriginal land,
welcome to our home.

Pukul ngalya yanama, Ananguku Ngurakutu
welcome greeting in Yankunytjatjara

Pukulpa Pitjama, Ananguku Ngurakutu
welcome greeting in Pitjantjatjara

We, the traditional land owners of Uluru - Kata Tjuta National Park, are direct descendants of the beings who created our lands during the Tjukurpa (Creation Time). We have always been here. It is our duty to look after the land, which includes passing on its history to our children and grandchildren. We call ourselves Anangu, and would like you to use that term for us.
Some of us speak Yankunytjatjara and others speak Pitjantjatjara as first languages. We teach our language to our children.
"This is Aboriginal land and you are welcome. Look around and learn, in order to understand Aboriginal people and also understand that Aboriginal culture is strong and alive."
Nellie Patterson, traditional owner.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/SpiritUluru.jpg)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/sunsetUluru.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 11, 2007, 06:39:41 AM
Our land is a unique and beautiful place. This is recognised by its listing as a World Heritage Area for both its cultural and natural values. We would like all people with an interest in this place to learn about the land from those who have its knowledge. Please respect this knowledge and open your minds and hearts to our enduring culture.
You are welcome to visit Uluru to be inspired by the natural beauty, to enjoy it. We are greatly concerned about your safety while on our land, because we want you to return to your families to share the knowledge about our culture that you have gained.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/UluruDesert2.jpg)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/ulurustorm.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 11, 2007, 06:44:59 AM
Please Don't Climb Uluru

Nganana Tatintja Wiya - 'We Never Climb'

The Uluru climb is the traditional route taken by ancestral Mala men upon their arrival to Uluru. Anangu do not climb Uluru because of its great spiritual significance.
Anangu have not closed the climb. They prefer that you - out of education and understanding - choose to respect their law and culture by not climbing. Remember that you are a guest on Anangu land.
Also, Anangu traditionally have a duty to safeguard visitors to their land. They feel great sadness when a person dies or is hurt.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/UluruFlight.jpg)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/UluruCamel2.jpg)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/luruHarleyride.jpg)

Some of the many other ways to enjoy Uluru besides the coach and 4WD tours.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 11, 2007, 06:50:23 AM
Mala return to Uluru

Anangu and Parks Australia have completed the construction of a 170 hectare feral proof enclosure, which is the new home for 25 Mala, reared in Watarrka National Park in the Northern Territory. It is hoped that the Mala will adapt to their new home, breed and eventually be released into the wild and contribute to the long-term survival of the species.
The Mala, or rufous hare-wallaby, once inhabited spinifex country throughout Central Australia. Today the Mala is extinct in the wild, wiped out by European settlement, changing fire regimes and feral predators such as cats and foxes. There have been no Mala in Uluru – Kata Tjuta National Park since the mid 1900s. But for Uluru’s traditional owners, Anangu, the Mala or 'hare wallaby people' are important ancestral beings. For tens of thousands of years, the Mala have watched over them from rocks and caves and walls, guiding them on their relationships with people, plants and animals, rules for living and caring for country. Mala Tjukurpa, the Mala Law, is central to their living culture and celebrated in story, song, dance and ceremony.

The Mala story

In the beginning, Mala men women and children travel a long way to reach Uluru. When these hare wallaby people arrive, they camp at sites separate from one another: young men in one place, old men in another, senior single and married women elsewhere, all surrounding the other women and children in the middle.
Senior Mala men come from the north-west, bearing a ceremonial pole which they plant at a high point on Uluru. Now the Inma or ceremony can begin. Everything is done in a proper way, even everyday jobs like hunting, gathering and preparing food, collecting water, talking to people, or just waiting. This has been Tjukurpa, the Law, for men, women and children ever since.
Luunpa, the kingfisher bird, cries out a warning “Purkara, purkara!”: an evil dog –like creature called Kurpany has been created by people in the west to destroy the Mala ceremony. The warning is ignored and Kurpany kills two Mala men, and everyone, men, women and children run away.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/mala.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 12, 2007, 04:32:46 AM
MONKEY MIA - WESTERN AUSTRALIA

Located at Dolphin Beach, famous for its kilometres of secluded crystal blue waters and pristine white-shell beaches, Monkey Mia has attracted schools of dolphins to its tranquil shores daily for more than forty years.

Wonderful things started happening in the early 1960s, when a pod of bottlenosed dolphins began what has become a ritual. Every day a number of dolphins swim into the clear shallows of the bay to interact with humans, delighting visitors with their intelligence and grace. As the dolphins are wild, numbers and the exact time of their visit varies, however they usually visit the shore several times a day and more frequently in the mornings

This dolphin interaction is known to be one of the most reliable meeting places for dolphins in the world.  Dolphins have visited everyday in the last five years excluding only four times.  It is the only place in Australia where dolphins visit daily, not seasonally, and researchers from across the world come to Monkey Mia to study the dolphins.
Monkey Mia dolphins are the only dolphins in the world known to use ‘tools.’ For example some use sea-sponges to protect their snouts when they hunt!
The brain of a bottlenose dolphin is bigger than that of a human!
‘Wedges,’ one of the local dolphins, enjoys catching Golden Trevally (a large Australian fish). He was once seen hunting a particular Trevally for over an hour!
Many dolphins of the region often herd fish onto the beach and then search in waters just several centimetres deep to catch them!
Adult dolphins hang out in groups of two or more called ‘alliances.’ These alliances cruise together in search of a female and just like a group of boys they’ll compete to win her heart! They may spend up to a month pursuing a particularly attractive female.
Dolphin youngsters have a close bond with their mother who teaches them hunting, survival and social skills.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/MonkeyMia3.jpg)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/PelicanMM.jpg)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/MMBeach.jpg)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/MMWatching.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 12, 2007, 05:38:21 PM
STEVE IRWIN DOLLS GO NATIONAL

March 11, 2007 11:00pm     The Courier Mail
Article from: AAP

STEVE Irwin dolls are to be dispatched from their Australia Zoo home in a crusade to raise money to save endangered species.
And they soon may be joined by Bindi The Jungle Girl, with plans under way for a doll of the late Crocodile Hunter's daughter Bindi.

Australia Zoo's Brian Dore today said a new line of animal toys and Steve Irwin dolls currently only sold at Australia Zoo would be sold at stores across Australia by the end of the month.  The new toys were launched in the US last month at the 2007 International Toy Fair.

Mr Dore said it was hoped the range would "excite and engage children, igniting their passion for wildlife and the environment".

All royalties received would go directly to the zoo's endangered species program, which supports conservation around the world, he said.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: hummingbird7525 on March 12, 2007, 08:52:15 PM
Tibro,
Oh, I'm so glad you posted about the Dolphins at Monkey Mia.  I saw something about this on Discovery channel.  I just love Dolphins, (don't tell anyone but I love them more than Hummingbirds) I swam with two of them in California 3 years ago.  It was the most magical day of my life.  I was in the pool with 5 other people.  I was positioned on the wrong side of the trainer when he had the dolphin do a jump, and the dolphin sorta hit the side of my left arm. Oh man, they are so powerful, anyway after the dolphin did that, she came over to me real close and looked into my eyes as if to say "I'm so sorry I hit you".  It brought tears to my eyes, I felt so special because  of what that dolphin did.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 13, 2007, 02:25:37 AM
hummingbird that is just such a special experience.  They are so intelligent and I am sure they wish to communicate with us.  We are just too dumb!
I had a similar moment with a Dolphin at Sea World on our Gold Coast.  We were among the crowd watching them swim around in a smaller pool where they come to be fed by some of the visitors.  People are not allowed to swim in the pool with them, which I think is because of chance of illness as they do not swim freely out in the ocean.  They have a very large fenced off ocean area to keep the sharks away where they can swim away from the people.
Anyway one dolphin swam a little away from the others and as I was on the edge of the crowd I concentrated on this dolphin and was thinking what a beautiful creature it was when it swam right over in front of me and nodded its head up and down.  It stayed there for a couple of minutes looking at me while I spoke to it and then it glided off.  It was a very warm and fuzzy moment.
I will find some more pictures to post that you would like.  Thank you for your interest in this thread.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 13, 2007, 02:43:23 AM
MONKEY MIA  
Monkey Mia (pronounced My-Ah) was named after a pearling boat called Monkey that anchored there in the late 19th century when there was a large pearling industry in the region.
It is totally up to the dolphins to come to swim with people and the feeding is strictly controlled to ensure the very smart dolphins do not pick up a "free feeding pattern" so they do not become dependent on humans for their food.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/MMCrowd.jpg)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/MMTwins.jpg)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/MMKids.jpg)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/MMHello.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 14, 2007, 06:16:04 AM
KURANDA - FAR NORTH QUEENSLAND

Kuranda is a romantic village, shrouded by pristine rainforest and nestled alongside the mighty Barron River and the big boisterous Barron Falls. First settled by Europeans in 1885 and then connected to Cairns by rail in 1891, Kuranda quickly earned a well-deserved reputation as a premium visitor destination, a cool mountain retreat removed from the sweltering heat and humidity of the tropical coast. Today Kuranda is known as the "village in the rainforest" an exciting vibrant community on Cairns' doorstep. Kuranda is a pulsating township that exudes a bohemian character. Kuranda' s natural beauty, prolific wild life and embracing year round climate has mesmerised people of all ages, creeds & cultures. An atmosphere of kinship surfaces then radiates from the picturesque village, a community united in its love of Kuranda and her tranquillity. Kuranda sees a diverse multi-cultural population come together as a bonded community; today, exhibited by all to few other places in the world. Kuranda citizenry's passion for home and habitat dominos into a generous community spirit, where neighbours sincerely care for each other in a measure from a bygone era; a return to an age of grace. Kuranda is a Mecca for artists of every genre painters; sculptors, visual artists, musicians, and thespians. Kuranda enjoys a burgeoning cottage industry community, people inspired by its majesty and drawn by its charm. Gifted artisans and crafts people market their hand made wares from quaint shops, studios and bazaars where the artist, artisan, miner or crafts person by being on-hand, provides the visitor with the opportunity to buy, first hand. Do something daring buy original and be different. Every lady still drawing breath will fall in love with Kuranda's shopping; language is no barrier as most staff are multilingual. She will discover unique jewellers who create from rare diamonds coloured with hues of rose & champagne. Look on as the jeweller turns and polishes opal then facets gem stones. Tour Kuranda and unearth aromatic leatherwear of distinction, alluring pelts taken from the kangaroo, crocodile, barramundi, emu and flamboyant sea snakes. Artwork may be found everywhere on canvas, ceramics, glass, metals, textiles, earthenware, stoneware, terracotta and clay pots. Hideaway antiques stores and photo galleries must be prospected for that special little, "stumble upon". Rainforest timbers with richly coloured grains are shaped and sculptured as you watch on. Stylish boutiques and market stalls offer garments reflecting the colours, culture and lifestyle of Kuranda. Souvenir an inexpensive t-shirt or treat yourself to a one-off, hand sewn creation by a local couturier. Kuranda Heritage Markets and The Original Kuranda Markets provide a timeless wander through a beautiful rainforest setting where you may also observe artists at work and sample the local produce, picked at sunrise by the same farmer standing before you, ready to serve. The rainforest setting has been and continues to be an inspiration for artists. Kuranda over the years has attracted some of the world's best artists to reside in or near the village.

KURANDA STREET

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/kuranda_streets3.jpg)

KURANDA SCENIC RAILWAY STATION

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/kuranda_rail_stat.jpg)

KURANDA RAIL PASSING BARRON FALLS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/KRBarronFalls.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 14, 2007, 06:20:27 AM
SKYRAIL RAINFOREST CABLEWAY

Stretching for 7.5 kilometres (4.7 miles), Skyrail is the world's longest gondola cableway. There are 32 towers along the way, with the tallest being 40.5 meters above the rainforest floor. Skyrail is indisputably the most admired and most popular tourist attraction in North Queensland, you will see why the moment you step aboard your gondola. The cableway voyage grants amazing panoramic views of Cairns City and environs, the Coral Sea, coastal tropical islands and the Great Barrier Reef, enchanting visitors with a literal birds eye perception of the beauty of Tropical North Queensland. As the gondolas soar over the mountaintops towards Kuranda village, the scenery transforms into dense rainforest, one moment you are gliding along with the rainforest canopy only meters below your feet, then across wild impenetrable, ravines, gorges and thunderous waterfalls.

VIEW OVER CAIRNS FROM CABLE CAR

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Skyrail.jpg)

RAINFOREST TRIP IN CABLE CAR

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/SRTrip.jpg)

CABLE CAR TRAVELS OVER RIVER

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/SRRiver-7.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 14, 2007, 06:25:58 AM
CASSOWARY

The Southern Cassowary (Casuarius casuarius), the most famous bird in the Wet Tropics has become a rare sight since it was listed as endangered Federally in April 1999. It is the largest and most spectacular flightless bird in the Australian rainforest, which flourished in Gondwanaland around 100 million years ago. Cassowaries are amongst the most ancient birds on earth. They belong to the Ratite Family like the Emu, Ostrich, Rhea and Kiwi. They are fruit-eating (frugivore) animals that disperse over a hundred species of rainforest trees and vines. Therefore, this "Rainforest gardener" plays an important role in rainforest regeneration and diversity.
There are three cassowary species in the world: the Southern Cassowary in Australia, New Guinea and Ceram; the Single Wattled Cassowary (Cassowary unappendiculatus) in Northern New Guinea; and the Dwarf Cassowary (Casuarius bennetti) in Montane New Guinea. The name cassowary is of Papuan origin. It comes from 'kasu' meaning horned and 'weri' meaning head, in reference to the casqued or helmeted head.
These birds can be dangerous and inflict serious wounds if threatened or cornered.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Fatherside.gif)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Cassowary.jpg)

WALKWAY OVER MOSSMAN GORGE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/MossmanGorge.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 15, 2007, 06:06:25 PM
MOUTH-TO-MUZZLE SAVES DOG

By Glenis Green
March 15, 2007 11:00pm   Article from:  The Courier Mail

 IT was lucky for Beethoven that Kingaroy ambulance officer Travis Comello didn't mind dog's breath. If he had, the lively little collie would not be here today.
Mr Comello, a patient transport officer, went above and beyond the call of duty to give the kiss of life to Beethoven recently when the dog choked while playing with a ball.
A reluctant hero, Mr Comello said yesterday he did not even know if administering mouth-to-mouth resuscitation on the apparently lifeless dog would even work "but it just happened".
He said the drama began just after he had arrived back from work at his home in Harris Rd, Kingaroy, when he heard his neighbour, Rosalie Rudd, yelling for help.
When he saw Beethoven lying on the ground, Mr Comello thought at first the animal had been hit by a car but was told he had choked on a ball.
Putting his fingers down the dog's throat to extract the ball, Mr Comello said Beethoven was still not breathing but he was able to detect a very faint heartbeat.
Cupping his hand into a fist, he put it against Beethoven's muzzle and blew in a few puffs of air and then pushed firmly on the dog's ribs.
"To be honest, I didn't think it would work but she (Mrs Rudd) was so upset that I thought I'm going to at least try," he said.
Mr Comello said Beethoven had been "completely out of it . . . not moving at all" but after he administered mouth-to-mouth the dog had gasped several times and regained consciousness.
"He was sitting up in five minutes," he said.
"He was a bit away with the fairies for a while – a bit dopey and disoriented – but in about 10 minutes he was fine. I was amazed."
Mr Comello, who has been with the ambulance service for nine years, admitted it was the first time he had saved a dog's life and only thought of trying the kiss of life "because I'd seen something like that on telly".
Mrs Rudd said Beethoven would probably have died if not for Mr Comello's quick actions.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 15, 2007, 06:13:48 PM
That was a good news story to start our day.  Kingaroy is an outback town in Queensland and is noted for peanut growing (ground nuts)

Here is a picture of Beethoven :

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Beethoven.jpg)

Beethoven with his rescuer and his owner :

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Rescuer.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Sam on March 15, 2007, 06:54:44 PM
I love good news stories, Tibro.
Thanks


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 16, 2007, 04:51:34 PM
Yes, Sam they do not print or report enough of the good things people do for each other.  There are some very kind and compassionate people in the world but they get swept aside by all the negative ones and their wrong doings, and the media's preoccupation with all the grubby details.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 16, 2007, 04:59:32 PM
KINGAROY - Australia's Peanut Capital

Kingaroy is a rather pleasant, middle-sized town which proudly boasts that it is both the 'Peanut Capital of Australia' and the 'Baked Bean Capital of Australia'. For a time it was one of Australia's best known country towns. The reason: It is the home of Sir Johannes Bjelke-Petersen, long time Premier of Queensland, would-be aspirant Prime Minister in the 'Joh for PM' campaign, and one of the most controversial, frustrating and entertaining politicians of recent times. Love him or hate him the political scene changed when he departed. It is not surprising that his name appears everywhere. There's the Johannes Bjelke-Petersen Airport (which is conveniently located next to the property of the former premier) and the Bjelke-Petersen Research Station. And, if you want a memento of your brief visit to Bjelke-Petersen country, you can buy tea towels which combine a picture of Lady Flo with the recipe for her famous pumpkin scones.
Located 431 m above sea level and 225 km northwest of Brisbane on the D'Aguilar Highway, Kingaroy was probably named after the Aboriginal word 'kinjerroy' which was a term used to describe a particular type of red ant. However, there is a school of thought that says the town was named after an early settler named King but there is little evidence to support this claim.
Like so much of the land north of Moreton Bay, Kingaroy was opened up in the 1840s when Henry Stuart Russell and the Haly brothers moved into the area. Taabinga Station homestead (now listed on the National Estate) was built in 1846.
The old homestead is described as follows: 'A slab building erected in 1846 by the Haly brothers. The west elevation is sandstone blocks, 60 centimetres thick, quarried on the site. The shingled roof is now covered with corrugated iron and the wide verandahs with trellises and weatherboards. Stables and yards are in excellent condition. This is a fine example of the early homesteads of the Kingaroy district.' It is located 5 km south of Kingaroy and is closed to the public.
Areas of the vast Taabinga Station were set aside for a town as early as the 1880s but it wasn't until 1902 that any serious development of the town centre began. In the next five years the town grew rapidly. In 1904 the railway arrived (thus ensuring the town's continuing existence), the Post Office and Police Station were built, and the first hotel was constructed. Three years later Taabinga Station was opened up for closer settlement and a butter factory was built.
The next major stage in the town's development occurred in the 1920s when the first significant crops of peanuts was harvested and the first peanut silo was built (1928). Today the town seems to be run by peanuts. There are big peanut signs in the street, peanut selling points known as 'The Peanut Van' are located at either end of the town, the peanut silos dominate the town, and even the Visitors Centre gets in on the act by ensuring it has peanuts for sale.
The town is now one of Australia's major peanut producers with part of the crop being exported to New Zealand, Britain and Japan. The huge peanut silos are 29 m high and capable of holding 12 000 tonnes.

View of Kingaroy coutryside

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/KingaroyCountry.jpg)

Peanut Silos and Sheepdog Trials

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/sheepdogs1.jpg)

Peanut Fields

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Field2a.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 16, 2007, 05:03:53 PM
BUNYA MOUNTAINS NATIONAL PARK

One of the true natural highlights of the area is the Bunya Mountains National Park which is about 60 km from Kingaroy.
This pleasant and isolated area of the Great Dividing Range has bushwalks, camping facilities and excellent picnic sites. With an average elevation of 975 m and a diversity of flora including rainforests, woodlands and grasslands it is an area rich in history and typical of the development of much of the region.
The Queensland National Parks and Wildlife Service, who administer the area, record the park's interesting history in numerous brochures and leaflets.
'Every three years in February and March, the bunya pine produces a heavy crop of cones. Aboriginal tribes came from as far as the Maranoa, the Clarence and Maryborough area for six weeks of tribal ceremonies, hunting, feasting, mock fighting and corroborees. Most evidence of this important gathering of tribes is gone.
'European settlers moved into the region in the early 1840s; however, the Bunya Mountains were not opened for selection until 1878. In the late 1860s, sawmillers arrived to log red cedar; initially, the bunya pine was not cut because of its significance to Aboriginals. The last great bunya feast took place in 1875 and remnants of the tribes continued to assemble until 1883 when the Great Bunya Sawmill opened and commenced cutting bunya pine. The last sawmill on the mountain closed in 1945.
'In 1908, 9303 hectares were gazetted as the Bunya Mountains National Park - the second national park in Queensland. The park now covers 11 700 hectares.

Bunya pines in National Park

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/bunya_mtns.jpg)

Bunya Pine Cones

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/bunyas4.jpg)

Hiking country in Bunya National Park

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/BunyaHike2.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 16, 2007, 05:06:09 PM
Sunset over Kingaroy Fields

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/KingaroySunset.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 17, 2007, 01:58:18 AM
BASS STRAIT SHIPPING

     During the 1830s and early 1840s, the days of early European settlement in Victoria, most regular traders were sloops and schooners of around 12 to 25 metres, carrying everything from sheep, cattle, timber and general cargo; and in the early days, all the passengers and mail.

Passenger, mail and important cargo services, were gradually taken over by steamers, and the sailing craft continued carrying timber and lower-value goods across Bass Strait, and also between Tasmanian ports and Bass Strait Islands, until after World War II. Typical of the later, was the 143 gross ton, 33-metre brigantine Woolamai, built in 1876 which carried timber around the southern Australian coastline until being wrecked at Apollo Bay, Victoria on 4 June 1923, fortunately without loss of life.

In 1842 regular steam services between Launceston, Melbourne and Sydney commenced first with Benjamin Boyd's wooden paddle steamer Seahorse, replaced in 1843 by the Hunter River Steam Navigation Company's iron paddle steamer Shamrock. Although under 50 metres in length, these vessels provided reliable transport and soon carried most of the passengers and mail between the colonies. In 1851 the first full-time Bass Strait steam ferry service commenced with the wooden screw steamer City of Melbourne. With the onset of the Gold Rush later in the year, large numbers of steamers arrived from the U.K., many taking up running across Bass Strait.

By the 1950s an increasing number of tourists were travelling to Tasmania, and many wanted to drive their own cars. The Taroona could only carry a small number, laboriously loaded on board by crane. However, in Europe the ferry business was being revolutionised by the introduction of Roll-on/Roll-off ships, into which cars could be driven directly on and off. The Federal Government agreed to built a number of such vessels to service Tasmania, to be operated by their Australian National Line.
After several roll-on roll-off type ferries over the years the current ones are named Spirit of Tasmania, I and II.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/sot-pm.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 17, 2007, 02:01:41 AM
PORT PHILLIP HEADS, THE 'RIP' AND PORT PHILLIP BAY - VICTORIA

The entrance to Port Phillip Bay from Bass Strait is recognized as being capable of becoming one of the most dangerous sections of water in the world. The water depth, changes dramatically between the Port Phillip Bay and Bass Strait, and fast flowing tides over the uneven seabed between the deep and shallower water, combined with bad weather can create very dangerous conditions. There is a long list of shipwrecks which have occurred there. Most have come to grief on Corsair Rock, a rock named after the pilot vessel which discovered it about 1853 after a search owing to several large vessels having been damaged or lost. The rock, lies beneath the surface about a kilometre west of Point Nepean, and has less than four meters of water over it at low tide. There has been established, a system of lights at Queenscliff within the bay. Ships coming into the bay keep two lights in at this location in line in order to to keep to the middle of the channel. Tidal flow in and out of Port Phillip Bay is very strong at its peak, between 6 and 9 knots, and combined with gale force winds which occur, particularly on the darkest of nights, this stretch of water is easily turned into a navigational nightmare for those unfamiliar. Ships sailing in or out of the Bay with the tide in their favour, can appear as if to moving really swiftly, while some sailing in or out against the tide can sometimes appear to be not moving. A pilot vessel is based at nearby Queenscliff and transfers pilots to incoming ships and picks them up from outgoing ships. Transfers are made a few miles or so out into Bass Strait. In the second picture, a hill called Arthurs Seat a little over 1,000 feet high, can be seen in the distance in the left. The deeper shipping channel which most ships navigate, heads towards this, and then a sharp turn to port is made (about 90 degrees) before heading for Port Melbourne. (From the Heads to the top of the bay is some 42 nautical miles).   Due to the narrow entrance to Port Phillip Bay, and the huge volume of water it holds, together with the inadequate time the water has to flow in and out to equalise the depths, the bay never achieves the high and low tide variation of Bass Strait. The tide consequently stops flowing, and then changes direction at the heads, when the tide level in Bass Strait is at around half as this is when the water levels in the Bay and Bass Strait are about the same.

Spirit of Tasmania passing through Port Phillip Bay on a calm day :

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/SoTPortPhillip.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 18, 2007, 01:47:50 AM
SYDNEY HARBOUR BRIDGE CELEBRATES 75th ANNIVERSARY

 Mar 18, 2007

Thousands of people wearing celebratory hats and waving Australian flags walked across Sydney Harbour Bridge on Sunday to celebrate the "Coathanger's" 75th birthday.
The last time the bridge closed for a public walk in 2000, about a quarter of a million people crossed in support of aboriginal reconciliation.
The aboriginal community again played a leading role on Sunday when a didgeridoo player in traditional dress mounted the bridge's northern gantry to herald the start of the day's diamond jubilee celebrations.
Among the first wave of the good-natured crowd to cross the Coathanger, as locals fondly call the bridge, were De Hampel and Sue Griffiths, two friends from Shellharbour, about 100 kilometres south of Sydney, whose parents were children when the bridge opened.
"It's the biggest party I've ever been to and I'm not one to miss many," said De Hampel, 61, sporting a silver sash proclaiming "Happy Birthday" and a tiara with 75 written on it.
"The bridge is part of our life, it's Sydney. I can't imagine the city without it."
Another walker was Bruce Boddington from Bathurst, about 200 kilometres west of Sydney, who, as a four-year-old, was the youngest person to walk across the bridge at the 1932 opening.
"It's wonderful, seeing the crowd," grinned Boddington, now 79, as he prepared to cross. "They've all got happy looks on their faces."
Organisers were expecting 200,000 walkers, many of them sporting bright green commemorative baseball caps, to cross the bridge's 500-metre-span during the day, serenaded by loudspeakers playing archive recordings of events that have impacted Australia throughout the bridge's history, from World War II to the Bali bombings of 2002.
Waltzing Matilda
There were more light-hearted memories too, including a recording of the 1948 international retirement of Australian cricket legend Donald Bradman, while a medley of songs from Waltzing Matilda to modern Australian pop kept the Sunday strollers' feet moving.
Beneath them, Sydney Harbour filled with a flotilla of boats, including Berrima, a 1940s workboat, two tugs from the 1960s, and rowing boats used by Sydney's lifesavers on the city's beaches.
Formal ceremonies passed with little mishap unlike on March 19, 1932, when a maverick former cavalry officer named Francis de Groot pushed in front of the official opening party to cut the ribbon with his sword.
The ribbon was swiftly retied, de Groot temporarily detained, and around a million people lined Sydney's harbour to enjoy the opening celebrations.
During the preceding 8 years, about 1,500 workers had worked on the bridge's construction, between them hauling more than 50,000 tonnes of steel into place, all held together by six million hand-driven rivets imported from northern England.
Australian engineer John Bradfield oversaw the project, but tension has simmered for three-quarters of a century over whether he was responsible for the detailed design or Ralph Freeman, a consulting engineer retained by Dorman Long, the British engineering firm that built the bridge.
The debate over who really designed the bridge continues between Australia and Britain. The official opening plaque mentions both men.
Living bridge
Although the bridge is firmly fixed in the world's eye for hosting Sydney's annual New Year's Eve celebrations or the dazzling fireworks display that closed the 2000 Olympics, it is an integral part of the city's day-to-day life.
Around 200,000 cars cross in 8 lines of traffic every day and two busy train lines carry office workers into the city from Sydney's northern suburbs, flanked on either side by a foot and and cycle path.
This heavy usage, as well as Australia's fierce sun, means maintenance is a big job, including regular repainting of about 485,000 square metres (5.221 million sq ft) of steelwork - the equivalent in area to 60 football fields.
Among the workers who have given the bridge a lick of paint over the years is Crocodile Dundee Paul Hogan, who worked on the bridge before hitting fame as a TV comic in the 1970s.

SOME OF THE CROWD WALKING ACROSS THE BRIDGE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/SHB75Walk.jpg)

CLASSIC PICTURE OF THE BRIDGE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/sydney_harbour_bridge_waterview1_bi.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Seamonkey on March 18, 2007, 05:14:47 AM
That harbor is so pretty :) As are all the images you are sharing. Such a beautiful place.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 19, 2007, 05:45:31 AM
Seamonkey - Sydney Harbour is magnificent.  I have some more great photos to post at a later date but will post a couple more tonight from the celebrations of the 75th Anniversary of the Bridge.  I have seen reports of from 200,000 to 500,000 people having crossed the bridge - maybe they counted them going and returning to get the higher figure?  However the night scenes are very pretty with the walkers carrying lights and instead of fireworks, which would have been dangerous for all the crowd, they floodlit the bridge by coloured lights.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/SHBPeople.jpg)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/SHBNight.jpg)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/SHBLights.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Seamonkey on March 19, 2007, 05:54:06 AM
WOW!! beautiful !! Hmm you think that viking ship will fit under it?? lol


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 21, 2007, 04:32:57 AM
KATOOMBA AND THE BLUE MOUNTAINS, N.S.W

 The Blue Mountains are part of the Great Dividing Range, which stretches from Gippsland region of Victoria in the south to the tropical rainforests of north Queensland.
The range rivals the Rockies in length, but nowhere near in height. Australia's highest mountain is Mount Kosciusko about 500 kilometres south of Sydney. At 2229 metres it is a mere baby by North American and European standards.
Yet the Blue Mountains, peaking at about 1000 metres, proved a heartbreaking challenge until they were conquered by a trio of explorers - Gregory Blaxland, William Lawson and Charles Wentworth in 1813. They and four men hacked through dense bush for 18 days to find a route. Sections of the Great Western Highway from Sydney still follow parts of their trail.
The 'mountains', as they are commonly called, stood between the still fledgling settlement at Sydney and the agricultural and grazing country to the west. The conquest of the Blue Mountains opened up the vast grain growing and sheep grazing areas of New South Wales. East of the range the climate was too wet for wheat and sheep, which developed 'footrot', which literally caused their hooves to rot.
The settlement of the western slopes and plains established Australia's fine wool and wheat industries, which created great wealth and are still very important export industries. Australia led the world in the development of the Merino sheep, imported from South Africa. It is still the finest sheep wool in the world, gracing the backs of fashionable men and women from Rome to New York.
The Blue Mountains are so named because, from Sydney, they look blue. They are clad in vast forests of eucalypts (commonly called gum trees), which in the hot sun discharge a fine mist of eucalyptus oil from their leaves. The mist refracts light, which makes the haze look blue at a distance. That same oil makes the Australian bush as volatile as a pine forest in a bush (forest) fire. The vapour explodes, causing the fire to race through the canopy.
The first road was cut into the Blue Mountains by William Cox using a team of 30 convicts and eight guards. Starting at Emu Plains at the foothills in July 1814, they cut an incredible 47 miles to Mount York (past the highest point of the mountains at Mount Victoria - 1064 metres) in just four months. At the end of six months they completed 101 miles of road to Bathurst, which was founded as the major centre for agriculture on the western slopes.
The road was too steep for horse-drawn carriages until another branch was built from Mount Victoria to the historic township of Hartley in 1832. That could be considered the start of tourism to the area.
The first railway into the mountains, from Emu Plains to Wentworth Falls, opened in July 1867. Trains now run to Katoomba and beyond. The first motor car did not cross the Blue Mountains until 1904, and then it had to be hitched to a horse to make the steep incline up Mount Victoria. The advent of the motor coach opened the area to 'mass' tourism in the 1920s.
For most people Katoomba is the true heart of the Blue Mountains. When they think of the Blue Mountains they think of the spectacular views over the Megalong and Jamieson Valleys, the Three Sisters, the Skyway and the Scenic Railway  The area became hugely popular with the establishment of a railway station in 1876. It was first called 'Crushers' but was changed to Katoomba a year later.
It is known that when Blaxland, Lawson and Wentworth crossed the mountains they came close to the present town site as one of the members of the expedition clearly marked a tree. The evidence suggests that they camped near the modern-day town site on 25 May 1813. The town's name reputedly comes from a local aboriginal word 'godoomba' meaning 'water tumbling over a hill'.
As early as 1841 George Clarke had discovered coal in the area (the whole Sydney basin has an underlay of coal which rises at Newcastle in the north, around Wollongong in the south and is present at the bottom of the cliffs in the Blue Mountains) and by 1870 kerosene shale had been discovered in Kanimbla Valley. A coal mine opened at Katoomba in 1879 and kerosene shale was being mined by 1885.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 21, 2007, 04:37:18 AM
KATOOMBA TOWNSHIP

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Katoomba.jpg)

KATOOMBA SCENIC RAILWAY

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/KatRailway.jpg)

KATOOMA SKYWAY

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/BlueMtns-1.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 21, 2007, 04:40:47 AM
BLUE MOUNTAINS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/region_blue_mountains1.jpg)

THE THREE SISTERS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/ThreeSisters.jpg)

KATOOMBA FALLS TAKEN FROM UNUSUAL ANGLE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/KatoombaFalls.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 21, 2007, 04:42:38 AM
MORNING MIST IN THE BLUE MOUNTAINS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/BlueMtnsMist.jpg)

AND AS THE SUN SINKS SLOWLY IN THE WEST ....

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/BlueMtnsSunset.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 21, 2007, 04:44:55 AM
(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/BruceCat.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 21, 2007, 04:50:22 AM
The Boss of the RSPCA

(Pictured above)

Brian Williams

March 20, 2007 11:00pm
Article from: The Courier-Mail

RSPCA staff have a rather interesting case on their paws - they are trying to find the owner of a lost and cranky American.

A fine-looking stray cat was caught by a resident in a trap at Carindale on the city's eastside on March 13 and handed in to the Fairfield shelter.  Fairfield is a suburb of Brisbane, Qld.

As usual, staff passed an electronic wand over the cat to see if it had been micro-chipped. It had . . . but the chip was from the US.

Staff named the Bengal cat Bruce – aka singer Bruce Springsteen who had the smash hit Born in the USA.

For the past week, veterinary nurse Shannon Whiting and veterinarian Vickie Lomax have been trying to track down chip details to see if they can locate the owner. Dr Lomax said she had spoken to two chip manufacturers who said the chip would have been issued in either Florida, Maryland or South Carolina.

Ms Whiting and Dr Lomax have since contacted numerous vet surgeries but none have records of a green-eyed cat, such as Bruce, aged about seven.

"It's a bit of a mystery unless he was chipped when he was a kitten and the details were not registered," Dr Lomax said.

"He's such a beautiful-looking animal. I don't think he's been on the streets too long."


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Seamonkey on March 21, 2007, 05:56:20 AM
WOW! if ever I have to leave the United States and live somewhere else I am going to Katoomba ! That place looks wonderful !! It is so beautiful !


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 21, 2007, 05:36:52 PM
Maleny in the hinterland of Queensland's Sunshine Coast would be my choice of somewhere else to live. Will look for some info on that area for next time.

For browsng through Aussie products available in the US here is a good website.  It was like a trip through our local supermarket for me.  Plenty of Vegemite (5 lb pails to take on Cat's journey) but out of stock of most of the Tim Tams.  BTW Buderim products are tops.  I have never heard of any of the wine labels though.

www.simplyoz.com


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 22, 2007, 03:23:55 AM
Now to my favourite area in Queensland :

MALENY AND THE BLACKALL RANGE

The unique rural community of Maleny is perched high above the Sunshine Coast beaches on the Blackall Range between Brisbane and Noosa and also overlooks South-East Queensland's amazing Glasshouse Mountains, so named by Captain Cook who was reminded, by the sun reflecting off the rockfaces, of the glasshouses back in his beloved Yorkshire.
It is an area of spectacular views and stands of lush rain forest. Maleny was initially a timber region with virtually all of the Cedar, Beech & Hoop Pine being felled to provide furniture and construction timber for SE Queensland and the UK. Once clearing had been achieved it quickly became a dairy farming area and supported the surrounding areas for many years with all their milk-based products.
Maleny is now better known for its tourist activities and its diverse population. The area is a craft paradise and is home to many nationally recognised artists and art galleries. It is also an area of extreme interest to the eco-tourist.
Other towns on this strip of range are Montville, Mapleton and Flaxton all of which are tourist attractions in their own right, and the scenic drive along the top of the Range is considered one of the best in Queensland.

Maleny is pronounced Ma-lay-nee.

MALENY TOWNSHIP

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Maleny.jpg)

MALENY MAIN STREET

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/views02-x.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 22, 2007, 03:31:35 AM
VIEW OF GLASSHOUSE MOUNTAINS FROM MALENY

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/GHMtnMist.jpg)

ANOTHER VIEW OF GLASSHOUSE MOUNTAINS FROM THE RANGE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/mistyglasshousemts.jpg)

MALENY COUNTRYSIDE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/malenymistam.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 22, 2007, 03:34:32 AM
BLACKALL RANGES

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/aerial.jpg)

ROAD ALONG BLACKALL RIDGE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Mapleton.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 22, 2007, 03:36:33 AM
BUDERIM FALLS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/buderim-falls-buderim-fores.jpg)

A COOL OASIS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/tw_buderim_falls.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 22, 2007, 03:40:06 AM
TWO OF THE MANY TOURIST ATTRACTIONS IN THE AREA :

THE BIG PINEAPPLE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/1999072006-w.jpg)

TRAIN TAKES TOURISTS THROUGH THE PINEAPPLE FIELDS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/BPTrain.jpg)

GINGER FACTORY TOURIST TRAIN

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/GingerFactory.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 22, 2007, 03:45:16 AM
KENILWORTH  ON THE EDGE OF THE RAINFOREST

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Kenilworth.jpg)

RAINBOW LORIKEETS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/a-lorrikete-web.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Seamonkey on March 23, 2007, 07:36:03 AM
OH stunning!! I can see why that is your favorite area!

 I also had fun going through that Aussie site of goodies. YUmmm.
I also know where I can replace my Ughs if they ever wear out lol They are over 12 yrs old and still look new. The boots there look like the same type. Most comfy boots I ever wore and warm too, which in Maine I NEED.

 I am gonna put in a few orders probably this month, yummm I can smell the vegemite now lol


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 23, 2007, 07:49:31 PM
Glad you enjoyed that site, Seamonkey.  I see they now have new stocks of Tim Tams, a favourite of my DH.  My favourites are the chocky Teddy Bears!
Also worth trying is the Buderim Champagne Sensation, particularly if you prefer a less sweet jam.  It has a nice tang to it.
The prices of the foodstuffs look very reasonable.  I think it is AU$1 = US80c at present and the prices they quote are close to our supermarket prices.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Seamonkey on March 23, 2007, 08:11:20 PM
I found the prices very reasonable.
 I want to try those tim tams, those look sooo yummmy! And I may follow your advice and try the Buderim Champagne Sensation, I do like my jellys and stuff on the less sweeter side.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 24, 2007, 05:09:39 AM
An explanation of the saying "doing a Harold"

Prime Ministers of Australia ....Harold Holt ....1966-67

Harold Holt had plenty of time to find out what being Prime Minister would be like - he served for ten years as Deputy Leader of the Liberal Party under Menzies. He took over as Prime Minister when Menzies retired in 1966 and later that year won a sweeping victory at the polls on the issue of support for the Australian and United States involvement in the Vietnam War. Late in 1967 he disappeared while swimming in the ocean, making him the third Australian Prime Minister to have died while still in office.Rt Hon. Harold Edward Holt was Prime Minister from 26 January 1966 to 19 December 1967. Born: 5 August 1908 at Sydney, New South Wales. Presumed dead: 19 December 1967 (Melbourne) Harold Edward Holt was born in Sydney on 5 August 1908, and disappeared, presumed drowned, on 17 December 1967.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/MenziesHolt.jpg)

Robert Menzies (left) with Harold Holt.

When R.G. Menzies retired as Prime Minister, Holt took over the leadership of the Liberal Party, having been deputy leader since 1956. As the war in Vietnam grew more intense, Holt visited the USA in June 1966 to discuss the situation with US President L.B. Johnson. Holt confirmed his government's full support for USA's Vietnam policy, and adopted the slogan 'All the way with LBJ'. On the 14 February 1966, Holt introduced decimal currency - dollars and cents.
The war in Vietnam was growing bigger. 4,500 soldiers were sent in 1966, including the first conscripts (non-volunteers). By the end of the year the number had risen to 6000. The first major battle in which Australians were involved, Long Tan, was fought in June 1967, leaving 18 Australian soldiers dead.
As more and more people in Australia began to protest against sending Australian troops to Vietnam, Holt campaigned for a general election on 26 November 1966 with Australian involvement in the war as a major issue. It seemed that, for the most part, the people of Australia agreed with his war policy, as his government was returned with an impressive ten seat gain. On the 14 February 1966, Holt introduced decimal currency - dollars and cents. More and more people became opposed to sending our troops to Vietnam. Holt's government was also under attack over various other issues, including its handling of the Voyager disaster, VIP aircraft flights, and a proposal to break the nexus between the two federal houses of parliament.
When US President L.B. Johnson visited Australia in October 1966, demonstrators protested fiercely in the streets of Sydney and Melbourne.In August 1966 the Aboriginal stockworkers of the Gurindji tribe living on Wave Hill station in the Northern Territory went on strike and walked off the property in protest over low wages and living conditions. In March 1967 they occupied part of the station in an attempt to force the government to return their tribal land, an action which was later seen as being the beginning of the Aboriginal land rights movement.
On the 27 May 1967 Australians voted 'Yes' in a Referendum to change the Commonwealth constitution. 'Full-blood' Aborigines could now be counted in the national census, which meant that the federal government was now just as responsible as the states for Aboriginal affairs.
Harold Holt disappeared while swimming in heavy surf near Portsea, Victoria, on 17 December 1967. Despite a major search his body was never found. His memorial service in St Paul's Cathedral, Melbourne, on 22 December was attended by US President L.B. Johnson, the Prince of Wales, UK Prime Minister Harold Wilson and other heads of state and government.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/HoltLBJ.jpg)

Lyndon B & "Ladybird" Johnson with Harold Holt


An article by Ross Coulthard of Nine Network Australia outlining some of the speculation that followed the disappearance of Harold Holt :

Sink or Swim? Spy or Suicide?

On a beautiful sultry Summer's day, just before the Christmas of 1967, Australia's then Prime Minister Harold Holt - a keen and highly competent skindiver - went out for a snorkel at Cheviot Beach, just near his Portsea beach house. Holt was cast as a '007' wetsuit-clad James Bond character by the popular press because of his enthusiasm for watersports. But after he entered the water at about noon on December 17, he was never seen again. Thirty years on, conspiracy theories still rage about what happened to Australia's then 59-year-old Prime Minister. A colleague tells me of how he recently heard a classic Holt conspiracy yarn: While travelling in far North Australia he bumped into a man who claimed to be a former spook for the Australian Government who had helped Holt return to Australia several times since his death. Holt travelled incognito from a home in France. It appears the PM had swum around to the next bay, hopped in a car driven by a lover, and slipped out of the country. The spook claimed Holt had later died of a heart attack on the French South Coast sometime during the 1980s. The conspiracy theory has it that many people know about this, including one very senior Liberal Party figure. Just when we were trying to laugh away this theory, one former very senior Labor Minister told us he had "the astounding truth" about Holt buried in his confidential files -- only to be released in the event of his and his informant's death. Some of the wilder theories had it that Holt was assassinated by the CIA because he wanted to get Australia out of Vietnam. The best one of all came in 1983 when British author Anthony Grey published a book claiming that Holt was a Chinese spy and fled Australia via a Chinese submarine parked off his beach. A Victorian State Court officially declared the Prime Minister dead, presumed drowned. Nothing, not even a piece of clothing, was ever found of the PM's body. There were always rumours of an official cover-up because the public had been falsely led to believe that only one person had been with Holt - a Mr Alan Stewart, who was chief of the local quarantine station. But, in fact, the PM had been on the beach with an alleged lover, Ms Marjorie Gillespie, and other young women. There were also rumours that the PM might have suicided because of the recent death of his brother and threats to his leadership. His then press secretary, Tony Eggleton, pooh-poohed such claims at the time, saying his boss was quite happy. The cop in charge of the investigation, then Inspector Lawrence Newell, told the Melbourne Age in 1992 that he thinks Holt fell for his own publicity about his swimming prowess, and in fact the PM, "believed he couldn't drown. Remember, he wasn't a young man anymore. When you are 59 years old you don't have the reserves to draw on that you used to have. And he had a bad shoulder. He got into trouble and couldn't get himself out." And so, that's the end of the matter...or is it? We discount the wilder claims surrounding this mystery, but that still leaves many questions unanswered.          
Ross Coulthart, Reporter


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 25, 2007, 06:48:49 AM
After a very busy and tiring day catching up with relatives I am going to cheat a little tonight and just post some of the photos I have already stored in my Photobucket of Sydney Harbour and two of the many beautiful beaches near there.  Enjoy :

SYDNEY COVE AND OPERA HOUSE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/SydneyCove.jpg)

SYDNEY HARBOUR BRIDGE SHADOWS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/SydneyWest.jpg)

NORTH SYDNEY

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/NthSydneyAerial.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 25, 2007, 06:50:58 AM
THE ROCKS AREA

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/TheRocks.jpg)

MANLY FERRY

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/ManlyFerry.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 25, 2007, 06:53:35 AM
MANLY BEACH

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/ManlyBeach.jpg)

BONDI BEACH

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/BondiBeach.jpg)

GROUND LEVEL VIEW OF BRIDGE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Sydney-1.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Mere on March 25, 2007, 08:42:35 AM
Tibro.....Hi...I woke up early this morning and started on page 18...reading back to where I left off last time...vegemite...!
This thread could be a travel brochure...thank you for the articles
and the pictures....your country is gorgeous.... :D   Mere


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 26, 2007, 03:47:56 AM
MeMere I am so glad you are enjoying this thread.  Please let me know if there is anything you would like to know more about or any place or subject I have not yet covered.  Thank you for your appreciation.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 26, 2007, 04:08:11 AM
Now something for the dog loving monkeys.  I will feature the four dog breeds that have evolved here in Australia, apart from the Dingo.  I will not include the Australian Shepherd as that breed did not originate here and has only been recognised in local Show breed standards recently.

THE AUSTRALIAN TERRIER

As his name implies, the 'Aussie' is essentially Australian. The only true terrier to be evolved outside the British Isles, he must never be confused with the Australian Silky, which is a Toy breed.  Early free settlers in Australia needed a small, hardy, alert dog, keen enough to hunt and kill its own food, for killing vermin, such as snakes, rats and rabbits, and to act as a guard dog.  Several terrier breeds were combined over a number of years to produce the hard bitten Aussie. Those used are believed to include the old Scotch (not to be confused with today's Scottish Terrier), Dandie Dinmont, Black and Tan and Yorkshire Terriers. By the late 1800s a definite new breed type had emerged and a standard was set in 1896.

The Australian Terrier is a lowset, sturdy, rough coated dog. His double coat is extremely well adapted for Australia's changing climates and provides protection when hunting.  He is an even tempered dog, very agile in movement, good company for young and old and delights in human companionship. Small and tough, he is equally at home on a farm or in a suburban backyard and makes a good house dog. The Aussie normally barks only when there is something amiss.

A GOOD EXAMPLE OF THE AUST TERRIER

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/austterr.jpg)

PUPPY

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/ATBaby.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 26, 2007, 04:14:22 AM
AUSTRALIAN CATTLE DOG

Bred as a knock-about farm dog. the Australian Cattle Dog has become one of Australia's national symbols. Nicknamed the 'blue heeler', this dog is renowned for its outstanding loyalty and physical endurance.  In search of a good cattle dog - a silent biter that could be easily trained - squatter Thomas Hall mated his two blue merle, smooth-coated Collies to a Dingo in 1840. The progeny, Hall's Heelers, were mated to Timmon's Biters (a Dingo-Smithfield Collie cross made 10 years earlier). Its breeding was continually refined - adding Dalmatian blood improved its loyalty and rapport with horses, Kelpie crosses gave intelligence and Bull Terriers were used for toughness. All this stopped in 1893 and since then the breed has remained pure. It has a hard, flat coat that is either blue or red speckle.
Loyalty and protective instincts are the hallmarks of this breed. It has been said the Cattle Dog "will eat anything that doesn't eat him first" but the breed is not naturally aggressive. Although naturally suspicious of strangers, a dog that trusts his owner will not react with fear or aggression towards others. Cattle Dogs have great intelligence, a strong will and endless energy. Their alertness and vigilance make them wonderful guard dogs while their protective instincts extend to the family's children. As it was bred for the outback, the Australian Cattle Dog likes the wide open spaces and while suitable for the backyard, it still requires plenty of exercise.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/austcatt.jpg)

AT WORK GUARDING THE HERD

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/aworkingdog.jpg)

TWO RED HEADS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/cobberdigger.jpg)

PUPPY HEELER

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/bundi2.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 27, 2007, 01:07:11 AM
LATEST NEWS :

CORBY STRIPPED OF PROFITS
Leanne Edmiston and Amanda Watt
March 27, 2007 02:21pm  Article from: The Courier-Mail

SCHAPELLE Corby has been stripped of any proceeds from her tell-all book about her conviction and jailing for smuggling marijuana into Bali.

In a unanimous judgment this afternoon,  the Queensland Court of Appeal has ordered that the money not be spent until the courts have decided whether the Commonwealth has any legal claim to it. The three-judge panel also moved to stop Schapelle's sister Mercedes from spending the $15,000 paid to her for an exclusive interview with New Idea magazine. However, the judges said the move was only an interim measure and the family had the right to appeal the ruling.

The Commonwealth Director of Public Prosections brought the matter before the Queensland Court of Appeal after an application under the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002 to the Brisbane District Court was refused on February 15. Both hearings were held in secret and without the knowledge of the Corby family, lest the money be spent before the court could intervene. "The application is brought ex parte . . . because the moneys (sic) in question might be easily disposed of before any order could be made if notice of the application were to be given to the respondent," the judgment stated.

It does not detail how much money Schapelle received from the book, but indicated publishers Pan McMillan Australia wired funds to her Indonesian-based brother-in-law. It was suspected by federal agents, in affidavits submitted to the court, that the money was held on her behalf. It reported that it was not known whether the $15,000 payment intended for Mercedes Corby – for an exclusive interview, photographs and excerpts from Schapelle's diary – had been paid; and if so, to whom. Mercedes lives in Bali, where Schapelle is serving 20 years for trying to smuggle 4.1kg of cannabis into Indonesia in a surfing bodyboard bag in October 2004.

Tom Gilliat of Pan MacMillan, which published My Story, by Schapelle Corby with Kathryn Bonella, has previously stated that Schapelle wanted to use the money from her best-selling book to fund her ongoing legal battle. The book, published last November, has been constantly on the best-seller list.

Justices Pat Keane, Glenn Williams and John Helman ordered that any further legal action arising from their order be brought before the Brisbane Supreme Court.The order was made on March 2, 2007, and the Corby family has since been notified of the action. The judgment could not be made public until certain terms of the order were met.  The judgment did not indicate whether dates had been set for further hearings of related matters, including final determination of the distribution of the funds.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 27, 2007, 02:23:42 AM
AUSTRALIAN SILKY TERRIER

The Australian Silky Terrier is an alert, friendly companion dog. He was originally developed to hunt domestic rodents and pursues this today when opportunities arise. Because the Silky is single coated he does not shed coat and makes a great little household pet for asthmatics and allergy prone people.  The development of the Silky began in the 1800s when it is said that the Skye, Dandie Dinmont, Clydesdale, Scotch, Waterside and Paisley Terriers were all interbred. There were many theories as to the Silky's origin after this, however, the most common theory in Australia is that the Australian and Yorkshire Terriers were crossed to develop better colour. From this cross breeding litters were sorted into three types - the Australian, Yorkshire and Silky. In 1932 the Kennel Control Council prohibited cross breeding between the three types so as to protect each breed identity, as small Silkys were becoming increasingly difficult to separate from large Yorkshire Terriers.

The Australian Silky Terrier is a toy breed with terrier characteristics. When groomed properly, his blue coat lies flat against his body and has a glossy silk like appearance that feels like satin. Puppies are born black and tan and it takes up to 18 months for the mature colour to develop. The Silky may be small in stature but his brave, outgoing terrier-type temperament leads one to think he believes he is much larger than he is. An intelligent breed, the Silky is loyal to his family, easy to train and an excellent watchdog.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/silkyterrierstand.jpg)

SILKY PUPPY

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/SilkyPup.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 27, 2007, 02:31:46 AM
KELPIES

Drovers say a good Australian Kelpie is worth two men on horseback. It is the workaholic of the canine family and an estimated 80,000 are employed on farms in Australia. In the 1800s thousands of immigrants and their working dogs travelled to Australia from Europe to take part in the wool boom. It was survival of the fittest and the Kelpie was one of those few survivors. In the 1870s a NSW grazier imported two 'Rutherford fox collies' and a Victorian shipped over two Collies (collie was the Scottish term for sheepdog), and through selective breeding farmers produced an ideal working dog, many claiming "a dash of Dingo" was best for the breed.
Kelpies are intelligent, good natured and alert. Their energy is inexhaustible and they have a natural aptitude for herding sheep.

A one man dog, the Kelpie shows marked loyalty and will work for his master under any circumstances.  A courageous breed, they are equally as willing to take on a one tonne bull as they are a sheep flock. Despite its loyalty, the Kelpie is an independent thinker and graziers claim their dogs know what has to be done to the flock just as much as they do. Kelpies are easy to care for, with a water-proof coat and great heat tolerance. They do not suit indoor living and even with a backyard need plenty of exercise each day.

KELPIE RUNNING ON SHEEP'S BACKS, A TYPICAL WAY TO AVOID BEING TRAMPLED BY THE FLOCK

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/oscarjumpsheep.jpg)

TWO KELPIE PUPS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/spin_and_skip.jpg)

KELPIE "WORKING" HEWY, DEWY AND LOUIE AT A FUN DAY

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/PARADE_DUCKS_HR.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Seamonkey on March 27, 2007, 05:58:28 AM
Beautiful dogs. I love to read about the backgrounds of the breeds.
 Those kelpies are very handsome dogs, they also look like they are full of character.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 28, 2007, 04:21:55 AM
FLYNN OF THE INLAND

The Very Reverend John Flynn, O.B.E., D.D., 'Flynn of the Inland', was born at Moliagul, Victoria, 45 kilometres west of Bendigo, on the 25th of November, 1880. He was the third child, and second son of Thomas and Rosetta and his mother died in childbirth, causing him to be raised in Sydney, until he was five, by his mother's 18 year old sister. Flynn was around 16 when he decided to join the ministry and studied theology at Ormond College, at the University of Melbourne. He was ordained into the Presbyterian Church on 24th of January, 1911, and arrived at Beltana, in northern South Australia, to take up missionary work in early February.

An energetic worker, Flynn already had some training in missionary work in Victoria and was a keen writer and photographer. In 1910 he had published a book of hints for outback people on the proceeds of lectures he had given using his collection of lantern slides, and at Beltana he began publishing a quarterly newsletter,'The Outback Battler', in addition to his missionary work. In 1912 he was asked by the Church Home Mission Directors to prepare a report on religious conditions in the Northern Territory. After conferences in Melbourne and Sydney, he travelled by ship to Darwin where he visited Katherine, Bathurst Island and Adelaide River researching his paper. His report prompted the committee to authorise the implementation of his proposals for Inland Missions, and later that year the name Australian Inland Missions (A.I.M.) was adopted for the scheme. He was appointed Superintendent of the new body, a position he held all his life.

During the formative years of the AIM, Flynn became interested in the possibility of establishing an aerial medical service in outback areas. Several articles appeared in newspapers and magazines around the country recommending such a service, and Flynn pushed the idea through his own magazine,' The Inlander', which he began in 1913. He worked tirelessly at organising people and resources until in 1928, the first medical flight of what was to become the Royal Flying Doctor Service, was made from Cloncurry in Queensland. Radio was still more of a novelty than a fact in Australia at this time, but Flynn saw the potential of using it for outback communications. ( The A.B.C. in Australia had only begun broadcasting 5 years earlier.) In 1929 Alfred Traeger, who worked with Flynn as his radio expert. launched a pedal radio set at a cost of only $65, and another of Flynn's visions became reality. Flynn had been made a member of the Wireless Institute of Australia in 1925. In 1931, aged 51, Flynn married Jean Baird, a secretary with the AIM, and in 1933 he was admitted to the Order of the British Empire. By November 1939, all states had their own Aerial Medical Service, and the Australian Inland Mission operated hospital-hostels in remote areas over most of the country. At this time there were 200 outpost radios and six aircraft with pilots and doctors attached to the Aerial Medical Service.

Flynn was appointed Moderator-General of the Prebyterian Church in Australia in 1939, a position he held until 1942. In May 1950, Flynn attended what was to be his last Flying Doctor Council meeting, he died of cancer in Sydney on May 25th, 1951. His body was cremated and the ashes rest under the Flynn Memorial just west of Alice Springs in the shadow of Mt. Gillen. In 1976, the ashes of his wife, Jean, were also placed there. The burial service for Flynn on the 23rd, May, 1951 was linked up to the Flying Doctor network and was heard at remote stations and settlements all over the outback.

Flynn's work is perpetuated throughout the outback in many ways. The Royal Flying Doctor Service and the Australian Inland Mission are working testimonials to his drive and vision. In 1956 the Flynn Memorial Church was dedicated in Alice Springs; at Threeways, north of Tennant Creek a massive monument marks the junction of the Barkly Highway from Queensland and the Stuart Highway to Darwin, it is called the Flynn Memorial. Flynn once said. ' If you start something worthwhile - nothing can stop it.' A former Governor General of Australia, Sir William Slim once said of Flynn.' His hands are stretched out like a benediction over the Inland.' The outback owes much to 'Flynn of the Inland', and he will long be remembered by the hundreds of thousands of people who have benefited by his work.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/RevJohnFlynn.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 28, 2007, 04:29:05 AM
FLYNN'S GRAVE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/flynngrave.jpg)


The Rev John Flynn died on 5 May 1951 and his ashes together with those of his wife Jean are buried at this site in Alice Springs. In 1952 a large eight ton boulder, from the Devils Marbles area, was put on a low loader and driven 480 kilometres south to Alice Springs by George Nicholls and placed here as a marker for his grave.

Unfortunately the stone had been taken from the highly sacred women's site of Karlu Karlu at the Devils Marbles. It has taken more than 45 years of negotiations between the Arrernte Aborigines and the White custodians before the original stone was returned to its sacred site and replaced by the present one on 4 September 1999.

 While the new grave stone was dedicated and blessed with a Christian service at Alice Springs, the Warumungu and Kaytej women celebrated the return of their granite boulder at Karlu Karlu.

PART OF THE DEVIL'S MARBLES

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/devilsmables.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: nonesuche on March 28, 2007, 08:29:53 AM
Tib I love all you have shared with us here, my brother had a roommate from Australia whose family is in cattle ranching, he returned post college to take over the ranch from his grandfather. Thank you for sharing so much of your life and country with us.

Our dog is an adoptee from the pound but resembles a dingo in part? The photos of the red's you posted resemble him greatly? He's the sweetest dog we've ever had, but we were told he was an assimilation of carolina walking dog with even some pitbull but seeing that photo I do think he has some of the red lineage in him? I'll post a good photo later to see what you think?


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 29, 2007, 08:21:14 AM
Hi None - glad you are enjoying this thread.  I have fun putting it together and like to hear my monkey friends are learning something about my wonderful country.  It must be very similar to America and your lifestyle.
The two reds are taken from a Heeler Fan Club site.  The one on the left has a more correct broad head for show qualities and the one on the right looks a little fine in the head.  Maybe a female but they still are supposed to have the broad head.  They are very solidly built dogs and tremendously strong for their size.  I would love to see the photo of your dog.  They say that there is some dingo in the best of the Heelers and Kelpies.  Frowned on now of course by the ANKC for show registration but who knows what happens on the outback stations?   A Dingo head for comparison :

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/dingohead_s.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 29, 2007, 08:34:42 AM
RED PANDAMONIUM AT TARONGA ZOO, SYDNEY, N.S.W.

Taronga Zoo is seeing red after twin Red Panda cubs have started to emerge from of their warm nestbox to explore their outdoor exhibit with their mum.  The two male cubs, named ‘Jishnu' (meaning bright or triumphant) and ‘Tenzin' (after the famous Nepalese Mountain climber Tenzin Norgay) were born on 8 January this year. Their mum ‘Wanmei' (meaning beautiful) and called “Winnie”, came to Taronga from Erie Zoo in America last year to breed with the Zoo's male Joshi, called “Mayhem” and to establish an important new bloodline in the Australasian breeding program.  

The Red Pandas at Taronga Zoo are part of the international breeding program for this endangered species and including the two new arrivals, 43 cubs have been born at Taronga since the program commenced in 1977. Red Pandas are also known as Chitwas or Wahs in their native Nepal. The size of a small dog, they move like a bear and act like a cat. Discovered 48 years before their Giant Panda relatives, Red Pandas also love bamboo, eating up to 200,000 leaves in one day.

Senior Carnivore Keeper Louise Ginman said: "It is always a time of great celebration when an endangered species is born at Taronga Zoo, especially when they are as charismatic as Red Panda cubs. ‘Wanmei' is a very experienced mother and she is doing a fantastic job rearing her cubs.  
"The cubs are now 12 weeks old and on their last weigh-in they weighed 1.04kg and 871 grams. Red Pandas are excellent climbers and even though their coat is rusty red in colour, they camouflage extremely well high up in the branches and canopy of the trees. Visitors will need to look carefully to try and spot them", said Louise.

‘Jishnu' and ‘Tenzin' will start eating a huge variety of fresh fruit and vegetables soon including apple, pear, melon, kiwi and sweet potato. Fresh browse and leaves such as bamboo will also take up a large part of their diet.  Taronga's veterinarians have also given the cubs a clean-bill of health after they quickly checked the cubs in their nestbox at eight weeks. The cubs received a general examination which included a vaccination, weigh-in and the insertion of a small micro chip.

Taronga Zoo's Red Panda breeding program is supported by a regional education program in Nepal to teach locals about the devastating effect of harvesting forests for firewood. This reduces the amount of forest available to the Red Pandas for food and refuge.  

Red Pandas, which range across the Himalayan mountains and foothills of northern India, China, Nepal and Bhutan are listed as endangered. It is uncertain how many Red Pandas remain in the wild today, but estimates suggest numbers may be as low as 2500 individuals. They are threatened by illegal hunting and deforestation of their wild habitat.  Remaining populations are fast becoming fragmented and isolated from each other.

TENZIN AND JISHNU :

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/twins-redpanda-200703.jpg)

CLOSE-UP OF TENZIN :

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/tenzin-redpanda-200703.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Seamonkey on March 29, 2007, 08:39:13 AM
OMG!!!! Those are adorable!!!! So precious. Ok, I need to add Red panda to my list too. I have never seen anything so cute!!!
I really enjoy these posts , Thank you so much for sharing them :)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 29, 2007, 08:49:08 AM
Hi Seamonkey.  You are an early bird.  I am just about to go to bed!  It is nearly 11pm here.  Those Red Panda cubs are cute and I love that bushy tail.
I think you had better check with Cat how big his viking boat is going to be before you load too many animals on it.  
 :lol:  :lol: :lol:  :lol:


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Seamonkey on March 29, 2007, 08:55:14 AM
Early?? I get up at 4am lol It is almost a noon to me ( 9am). I am on a break :)

 Oh yes, that tail is wonderful !!

 As far as cat goes, I will just load another barrel on board, he will be so busy playing the piano and singing he won't notice. You know how cats can be lol.

 Sleep well Tibro and dream sweet :)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: nonesuche on March 29, 2007, 09:28:30 AM
Quote from: "Tibrogargan"
Hi None - glad you are enjoying this thread.  I have fun putting it together and like to hear my monkey friends are learning something about my wonderful country.  It must be very similar to America and your lifestyle.
The two reds are taken from a Heeler Fan Club site.  The one on the left has a more correct broad head for show qualities and the one on the right looks a little fine in the head.  Maybe a female but they still are supposed to have the broad head.  They are very solidly built dogs and tremendously strong for their size.  I would love to see the photo of your dog.  They say that there is some dingo in the best of the Heelers and Kelpies.  Frowned on now of course by the ANKC for show registration but who knows what happens on the outback stations?   A Dingo head for comparison :



oh Tib those red pandas are precious, I suspect once Anna sees those she will want to visit you ! Honestly when you posted the photos of the reds it's the first time I've seen another dog that I really felt resembled our Red? I can't find a photo of him in repose with his mouth shut  :lol: but he's just the happiest most loving fella. He looks more like the female on the right in your picture when his mouth is shut  :lol: He's such a part of our family, even loves our cats and they him, plus he loves fondant icing  :lol:

(http://i86.photobucket.com/albums/k101/daisysistah/family/DSC02409.jpg)

he thinks he's a human too  :lol: he loves to sit in my late hubby's chair surveying his backyard kingdom. he does 'eliminate' moles and field mice too pretty effectively even though daughter/mommy to him is horrified when he does. He also likes to dig into the earth and sniff, like he gets a high from sniffing in and smelling dirt ??? Go figure  :lol:

(http://i86.photobucket.com/albums/k101/daisysistah/family/DSC02411.jpg)

I really do just love your thread here and all  you are sharing, you are so knowledgeable and Australia such a beautiful and strong country !


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: nonesuche on March 29, 2007, 02:41:49 PM
Tib,

of course my daughter saw the photos I posted and as a typical mom I did it ALL wrong  :lol: she's so excited and is on the web researching heelers now after my showing her your thread. Anyway she wanted <rather demanded lol> I post this photo for you

(http://i86.photobucket.com/albums/k101/daisysistah/family/e7cad2af.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 29, 2007, 04:49:26 PM
None, what a handsome dog!  He looks so regal and happy.  Easy to see he is loved.  I have to agree there must be some heeler or dingo in him, or at least the same breeds they used to make up the heeler over time.
Thank you for sharing those photos and I can see why your family is so proud of him.  There would be Heeler breeders in the US.

I don't know about being too knowledgeable but when I went to school all those years ago we had to learn a lot about our country (and England) and I fear it is not so these days.  I have always has an inquiring mind and love to learn about other countries and how their people live. Also I have a good Google search engine which allows me to confine searches to Australian sites.  Thank goodness for the internet otherwise I would be camped at the library most of my days  :lol:  :lol:


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 29, 2007, 04:56:39 PM
BINDI'S US TV DEBUT

Peta Hellard in Los Angeles
March 29, 2007 12:00am Article from: The Courier-Mail

BINDI Irwin will make her US television debut in June - hosting a kids nature series and a one-hour special about her late father Steve.
The bubbly eight-year-old's series Bindi: The Jungle Girl, which she began filming with her father in early 2006, will premiere on June 9 on Discovery Kids Channel.

Discovery Channel spokesman David Schaefer yesterday (Thursday Aust time) said the 26 episodes showed Bindi interacting with a variety of animals, including koalas, elephants and snakes, while explaining how all animals needed to be respected and protected.

Mr Schaefer said Irwin, who died died in September after a stingray's poisonous barb pierced his chest during shooting for the series, would appear in the series in scenes shot before his death and in other archival footage.

He said Bindi and Irwin's widow Terri had decided to continue on with filming the weekly series, which is designed to help get more children interested in wildlife conservation, after his death. Production on the series, which was originally set to debut in January, was delayed for several months after Irwin's tragic death.

Bindi will also host My Daddy the Croc Hunter, a one-hour special that will air June 8 on the Animal Planet. The special includes clips from Bindi's early childhood.  It is not clear when the series and special will air in Australia.

Bindi visited the US in January as a Tourism Australia ambassador for the annual G'day USA week, where she performed in sold-out concerts in Los Angeles and New York with her back-up dancers The Croc Men.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Seamonkey on March 29, 2007, 05:54:28 PM
Quote from: "Tibrogargan"
BILBY IN IT'S NATURAL HABITAT

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/bilby03.jpg)


Ok I finally got piccys of Fernando actually sitting still to show you the resemblance, of course, it is NOT in the poses I had hoped to show his little RAT Bilby-like feet too lol. But you can see what I mean by the Bilby nose and ears.

(http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e3/Whimsies/fern32907cx.jpg)

(http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e3/Whimsies/fern32907ax.jpg)

 I tried to take pictures of my sculpture of the characture, but I seem to be out of practice for taking images of things so small..VERY out of focus. I still haven't done the fairy penguin, all I got done so far is the drawings lol. But now I am adding Red Panda to the list of possibilities for art dolls.

 Thank you again for providing such inspirational posts.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 29, 2007, 06:18:23 PM
Those ears!  They are enormous for such a small dog.  But he would not think he is small of course.  I bet he does not miss much either.
What a dear little dog.  He does look like he has some Bilby in him - you can use him as a live model for the Bilby dolls :lol:  :lol:
Just as well you had not seen the pictures before you got him otherwise you would have named him "Bilby"  :lol:  :lol:

Thank you for the compliments.  I will see what other soft and furry creatures I can find.  Cannot have you with nothing to do, can we?  :wink:  :wink:


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Seamonkey on March 29, 2007, 06:58:25 PM
Quote from: "Tibrogargan"
Those ears!  They are enormous for such a small dog.  But he would not think he is small of course.  I bet he does not miss much either.
What a dear little dog.  He does look like he has some Bilby in him - you can use him as a live model for the Bilby dolls :lol:  :lol:
Just as well you had not seen the pictures before you got him otherwise you would have named him "Bilby"  :lol:  :lol:

Thank you for the compliments.  I will see what other soft and furry creatures I can find.  Cannot have you with nothing to do, can we?  :wink:  :wink:


LOl, no, he does not think he is small. That's half his problem..BIG dog in LITTLE dog body . :) But very much a sweetheart to those he trusts.

  He is extremely alert. Then again, how can help not to even pick up space transmissions with those ears lol. That would have been a great idea to have named him Bilby. The pictures still didn't do justice to the actual size.

 Ohhh no, couldn't have me just sit around doing nothing, I may melt lol.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: nonesuche on March 29, 2007, 08:26:44 PM
Tib-

I appreciate your information, I was hoping your photo and information might head off the expenditure of $100 my daughter was going to pay to have Red's DNA tested  :lol: and I'm not kidding for she's that curious and attached to him !

Seamonkey, what a precious pup, and he's the BIG little dog? Even cuter !


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Seamonkey on March 29, 2007, 08:38:54 PM
Quote from: "nonesuche"
Tib-

I appreciate your information, I was hoping your photo and information might head off the expenditure of $100 my daughter was going to pay to have Red's DNA tested  :lol: and I'm not kidding for she's that curious and attached to him !

Seamonkey, what a precious pup, and he's the BIG little dog? Even cuter !


Hello None, I think that is cool your daughter wants to do a dna test on her dog. BTW, he is a very nice looking dog, rather regal looking. That is one dna test that won't be splashed across the media I hope, unless it turns out that HKS is the dogs father lol. Sorry, bad joke.

 Yes, BIG little dog, all 3 pounds of him lol.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 30, 2007, 02:56:18 AM
BOULIA AND THE MIN MIN LIGHT

On the edge of the Simpson Desert in Queensland's Outback lies a tiny town with a ghostly reputation.  If you are driving through the bush at night around Boulia, 300km south of Mount Isa, and you see a strange light with no apparent source dancing in the gidgee scrub or floating near an isolated highway - you're not the first.

This is the Min Min light - a bizarre, ghostly light that can appear, hover, disappear and reappear with an eerie will of its own. The light has been reported around Boulia, population 300, for more than 70 years.  And no-one has any decent explanation as to what it actually is.

Locals have their own theories as to its origin. Old timers believe the light was first seen in the vicinity of the old Min Min Hotel - about 70km from Boulia on the road to Winton. One story has the light rising from behind a grave at the back of the hotel.

Theories abound on what causes the Min Min light - some ideas are that the light is caused by a will-o'-the wisp which is a phosphorescent light often seen over marshy ground, firefly insects, a bird or even an unidentified flying object.  Others say the Min Min could be a kind of mirage - caused by a distant light refracting off a temperature inversion. Whatever the cause and despite the lack of explanation - or maybe because of it - the Min Min light is a source of fascination for visitors to Boulia.

Boulia local Robert "Bruiser" Cooms has lived in the area all his life and sighted the Min Min at least half a dozen times while driving at night.  "It's an orange glow that hovers around you," Bruiser said. "It doesn't throw a beam. It's just a big lump of ball. It hovers and bobs around. It puts the hairs up on the back of your neck."

Let's face it, if you go to Boulia and talk to the locals, you'll find someone who's seen the light or knows someone who has. Boulia visitors can explore this phenomenon more fully at the $1.8 million Min Min Encounter in the heart of town. The centre houses a fascinating sound and light display, interactive features and the history of the Min Min light. The best part is that it combines the Outback's dry irony with some spooky special effects.

Boulia itself is an amazing little town, not much more than a village, flanked on one side by a vast plain and on the other by the Burke River. The vistas are superb in this area: low plains spreading to the horizon, crumbling mesas and bizarre, jumbled rock formations. Boulia is also focal point for the annual Desert Sands Camel Races on the third weekend of each July. These races are Australia's largest professional camel racing event and attract thousands of visitors. Boulia lies 300km south of Mount Isa or 350km west of Winton on the sealed Min Min byway.

BOULIA SIGN

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/BouliaSign.jpg)

BOULIA TOWNSHIP

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/BouliaTown.jpg)

BURKE RIVER

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Boulia.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 30, 2007, 02:59:25 AM
FEATURES OF THE BOULIA DISTRICT

CAMEL RACES

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/CamelRace.jpg)

QUARTERHORSE EVENT AT RODEO

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Rodeo.jpg)

DUST STORM APPROACHING

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/BouliaDust.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 30, 2007, 08:12:07 PM
An amusing story about a serious subject.

HOUNDED ABOUT HEALTH

Janelle Miles  March 31, 2007 12:00am Article from :  The Courier Mail

ALISON Brennan's dog Adonis senses when she's about to have an epileptic fit and lets her know – 15 minutes before it happens. Until she got her golden labrador four years ago, she was afraid to be in the house alone, worried she may have a seizure in the shower or if she left the oven on, that the house may burn down. These days, her pooch paws at her legs to warn her of a pending attack, giving her time to lie down and avoid injuring herself in a fall.

And on at least one occasion when her husband Keith was serving with the Australian Defence Forces in Iraq, Alison Brennan says Adonis probably saved her life. She was on her way to do some shopping when he tried to take her house keys off her and then blocked her path so she couldn't leave. He didn't let up even when she went to lie down, continuously pawing at her.

"I thought it must be going to be a bad one so I called an ambulance," recalls the 28-year-old who runs a Townsville secondhand bookshop. "By the time the ambulance got there I was already unconscious. Nobody would have known I was unconscious and I probably would have died." That night Brennan, who was diagnosed with epilepsy when she was 15, was operated on for a blood clot on the brain. When she awoke from surgery, she was told how organised Adonis had been, giving the ambulance officers a set of house keys to lock up and a backpack they assumed was an emergency overnight bag for his owner. But when hospital staff unpacked it, instead of a nightie and toothbrush, they found it was full of Adonis's toys and dog treats.

"When I woke up from the operation, they were all still laughing about my dog bringing his own backpack into hospital," Brennan said. She said having Adonis had taken some of the anxiety out of living with epilepsy. "I have fewer seizures. I think it's because you're not as stressed out thinking: 'When's the next one going to happen?'," she said. "Once you have a dog telling you every time you're going to have a seizure, that stress isn't there any more."

Faye Downie, of the Association for Australian Assistance Dogs, said not all dogs were able to alert their owners to impending epileptic seizures. She said it was a mystery why some dogs could sense an owner's attack ahead of time. Some believe that dogs, which have a sense of smell much more acute than humans, can sniff out subtle changes in body odour before their owner has an epileptic fit. Others suspect the dogs can detect extremely subtle changes in their owner's behaviour. Downie said puppies could not be trained to be seizure-alert dogs – they either had the ability or not.

Although some within the medical fraternity remain sceptical of a pet being able to foresee a health emergency, neurologist Terence O'Brien, of the University of Melbourne, said he believed in the benefits of seizure-alert dogs like Adonis. "There's quite a lot of good anecdotal evidence that these dogs do somehow sense a change in their owners before a seizure," Associate Professor O'Brien said. "We know that there can be complicated changes in brain-wave activity . . . 10 or 20 minutes before a seizure. Things do happen before a seizure and these dogs do seem to be able to sense it."

(snipped)

ALISON AND ADONIS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Adonis.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: hummingbird7525 on March 30, 2007, 11:05:15 PM
Thanks Tibro for posting this great story.  Alison is so lucky to have found such a wonderful friend and protector.  
I love all your posts about your homeland.  It is like going on vacation every time I read here.   Thanks so much, I know you put a lot of work into it.   :D


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 31, 2007, 02:24:43 AM
Hi hummingbird.  These medical alert dogs do a wonderful job.  They use them for diabetics also as they can sense the variations in blood sugar levels.
I particularly liked the part where Adonis made sure they took his toys and treats with them.  :lol:  :lol:
It is not hard work as I enjoy it so much and I like to think I am entertaining the monkeys who do such hard work for Natalee's family.  It is difficult to do anything useful from over here so I feel I am doing my bit in this way.  Thank you for your kind words.  It is my pleasure.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 31, 2007, 02:30:13 AM
JELLYFISH THAT ATE HOLLYWOOD

March 30, 2007 12:00am  Article from:  The Courier Mail

DEADLY jellyfish interrupted filming in Queensland of a new movie by Hollywood stars Kate Hudson and Matthew McConaughey.

A new location will now be found when the two actors return from the US to complete filming of the final scenes of Fool's Gold in coming weeks.  The stars have been filming in Queensland since last year and were due to act out their final scene in the waters of Hervey Bay for the Warner Brothers feature until a marine expert sighted potentially fatal irukandji jellyfish. James Cook University's Dr Jamie Seymour had been hired to ensure the safety of the film's stars while in the water and it was money well spent after he spotted the thimble-sized creatures in the nick of time.

The irukandji jellyfish, which has a translucent body and 30 centimetre stingers, is regarded by many scientists as one of the deadliest creatures in the animal world. An antidote is yet to be discovered for its venom, which can inflict pain, paralysis and increase blood pressure to dangerous and sometimes fatal levels. "We were aware it was jellyfish season, we just weren't aware it would be such a problem," the film's publicist Fiona Searson said.

Two tourists died from so-called "irukandji syndrome" in Queensland in 2002 which led scientists to ramp up research into treatment for the jellyfish's sting. While the irukandji usually inhabits warm tropical waters off far north Queensland, global warming has been linked to its migration south.

The final scenes of Fool's Gold, in which a married couple played by Hudson and McConaughey rekindle their romance when they discover a clue to finding a lost treasure, will be picked up in the next month at a location yet to be decided. "There's only a little bit of filming still to do, so we'll have to complete that in another location," Ms Searson said.
Ms Searson confirmed most of the US cast and crew, including Hudson and McConaughey, have returned home until the final scenes can be scheduled, which should happen in the next week. "They're all gone, everybody's left for the time being, all the Americans anyway," she said. The film's scheduled release in early 2008 will not been affected by the delay, Ms Searson said.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on March 31, 2007, 02:35:16 AM
(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/irukandjijellyfish.jpg)

The Irukandji (Carukua barnesi) inhabits Northern Australian waters. This is a deadly jellyfish, which is only 2.5 centimetres (1 inch) in diameter, which makes it very hard to spot in the water, but can cause death to humans within days.  It is related to another deadly marine creature, the box jellyfish.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/boxjellyfish.jpg)

The Box Jellyfish (also known as a Sea Wasp) is a very dangerous creature to inhabit Australian waters. The Jellyfish has extreme toxins present on its tentacles, which when in contact with a human, can stop cardio-respiratory functions in as little as three minutes.
This jellyfish is responsible for more deaths in Australian than Snakes, Sharks and Salt Water Crocodiles.
The creature has a square body and inhabits the north east areas of Australia. The tentacles may reach up to 80 cms (30 inches) in length. It is found along the coast of the Great Barrier Reef.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 01, 2007, 03:24:13 AM
GUM TREES OR EUCALYPTS

In California the eucalypt is so common that many people believe that it is a Californian native. With the exception of E.globulus, which is listed among the exotic pest plants of greatest concern by the California Exotic Pest Plant Council, eucalypts seem to have been generally accepted in California for their intrinsic qualities but there are understandable concerns about the widespread use of what is, after all, an alien species. An excellent account of the history, uses and environmental issues of Californian eucalypts can be found in The Eucalyptus of California: Seeds of Good or Seeds of Evil?


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 01, 2007, 03:28:55 AM
GUM TREES OR EUCALYPTS (continued)

Gum trees (eucalypts) are the essence of the Australian flora. Their range extends from sub-alpine areas to wet coastal forests, temperate woodlands and the arid inland. In fact, the only major environment where eucalypts are absent is probably rainforest. There are about 12 species which occur naturally outside of Australia but around 700 are Australian endemics. Only 2 species are not found in Australia. One of these, Eucalyptus deglupta, is the only eucalypt to be found growing naturally in the northern hemisphere, occurring in the southern Phillipines (as well as in New Guinea and parts of Indonesia).
Even Australians who wouldn't know a Banksia from a Begonia know what a gum tree looks like and smells like. Soldiers returning by ship from the first and second world wars are rumoured to have been able to smell the aroma of the eucalypt before land was visible on the horizon. Most Australians may not be able to identify a particular species (there are hundreds of them, after all!) but they will know "that's a eucalypt".
The term "gum tree" is derived from the habit of some eucalypt species to exude a sticky, gum-like substance from the trunk. This is by no means a general characteristic but "gum tree" has become a common generic term for most eucalypts. A number of other common names have been applied to certain groups of eucalypts based on features such as bark type, timber characteristics or growth habit. Some names in common usage are:
·   Apple - A name used by early European settlers due to a similarity in appearance of some plants to apple trees (eg. Angophora bakeri, "Narrow-leaved apple")
·   Ash - Timber is similar to the European ash trees (eg. Eucalyptus regnans, "Mountain ash")
·   Blackbutt - The lower part of the trunk has persistent bark which is usually black due to past fires (eg. Eucalyptus pilularis, "Blackbutt")
·   Bloodwood - Timber often has pockets of a dark red gum known as kino (eg. Corymbia eximia, "Yellow bloodwood")
·   Box - Bark is retained on the tree and is short fibred; plates of bark may shear off with age (eg. Eucalyptus melliodora ("Yellow box")
·   Ironbark - Bark is retained on the tree and is hard and deeply furrowed (eg. Eucalyptus crebra, "Narrow-leaved ironbark")
·   Mallee - Multi-stemmed trees, usually fairly small in height (eg. Eucalyptus albida, "White-leaved mallee")
·   Peppermint - The oil in the leaves has a peppermint-like aroma (eg. Eucalyptus dives, "Broad-leaved peppermint")
·   Ribbon Gum - Bark is deciduous and is shed in long strips which often hang from the branches (eg. Eucalyptus viminalis, "Ribbon gum")
·   Scribbly Gum - Bark is deciduous and the smooth trunk is marked with "scribbles" caused by an insect larva (eg. Eucalyptus sclerophylla, "Scribbly gum")
·   Stringybark - Bark is retained in long fibres which can be pulled off in "strings" (eg. Eucalyptus eugenioides, "Thin-leaved stringybark")
The most important commercial use of eucalypts is in forestry and this is an area where there has been considerable conflict between conservation and timber interests in the last 20 years or so, particularly as resistance to woodchipping and the move to preserve old growth forests have gained momentum.
Timber production from eucalypts is carried out in Australia and overseas. Many different species are used both from natural forests and from plantations. Eucalypt plantations can be found in more than 90 countries with the largest overseas plantations being in Brazil which has over 1 million hectares. Some of the uses for eucalypts are:
·   Building (for termite resistance);
·   Furniture;
·   Woodchips;
·   Paper;
·   Fuel;
·   Another commercially important feature of eucalypts is the extraction of the oils contained in the foliage. Eucalypt oil has been used in medicine, industry and for perfumes.
The flowers of all eucalypts contain nectar and many species are important in the beekeeping industry. Honey is often marketed under the name of the main species involved in its production (eg. Yellow box, Red ironbark

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/eucbark.jpg)

Eucalypt bark types - clockwise from left top: Angophora bakeri, "Narrow-leaved apple"; Corymbia maculata, "Spotted gum"; Eucalyptus saligna, "Sydney blue gum"; Eucalyptus eugenioides, "Thin-leaved stringybark"


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 01, 2007, 03:46:39 AM
SOME VARIEITIES OF EUCALYPTS

SPOTTED GUM

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/SpottedGum.jpg)

RED RIVER GUM

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/RedRiverGum.jpg)

NORTHERN SALMON GUM

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/NthnSalmon.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 02, 2007, 02:58:32 AM
MORE EUCALYPT VARIETIES

APPLE GUM

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Apple.jpg)

CAZNEAUX

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/cazs.jpg)

MOUNTAIN ASH

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/MtnAsh.jpg)

MACROCARPA FLOWER

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Macrocarpa.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 02, 2007, 03:03:54 AM
STILL MORE EUCALYPTS

MOUNTAIN ASH

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/MtnAsh.jpg)

RED IRONBARK FLOWERS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Rediron.jpg)

WESTERN COOLIBAH

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/e-victs.jpg)

ILLYARRIE FLOWERS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/e-erythrs.jpg)

SHOWING EUCALYT REGENERATION AFTER BUSHFIRE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/AfterFire.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Seamonkey on April 02, 2007, 09:06:17 AM
Quote from: "Tibrogargan"
(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/irukandjijellyfish.jpg)

The Irukandji (Carukua barnesi) inhabits Northern Australian waters. This is a deadly jellyfish, which is only 2.5 centimetres (1 inch) in diameter, which makes it very hard to spot in the water, but can cause death to humans within days.  It is related to another deadly marine creature, the box jellyfish.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/boxjellyfish.jpg)

The Box Jellyfish (also known as a Sea Wasp) is a very dangerous creature to inhabit Australian waters. The Jellyfish has extreme toxins present on its tentacles, which when in contact with a human, can stop cardio-respiratory functions in as little as three minutes.
This jellyfish is responsible for more deaths in Australian than Snakes, Sharks and Salt Water Crocodiles.
The creature has a square body and inhabits the north east areas of Australia. The tentacles may reach up to 80 cms (30 inches) in length. It is found along the coast of the Great Barrier Reef.


Oh My!! Those are quite scarey looking!! I certainly won't be adding them to my booty of critters I plan to bring back to the states.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Seamonkey on April 02, 2007, 09:17:00 AM
Quote from: "Tibrogargan"
STILL MORE EUCALYPTS

MOUNTAIN ASH

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/MtnAsh.jpg)

RED IRONBARK FLOWERS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Rediron.jpg)

WESTERN COOLIBAH

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/e-victs.jpg)

ILLYARRIE FLOWERS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/e-erythrs.jpg)

SHOWING EUCALYT REGENERATION AFTER BUSHFIRE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/AfterFire.jpg)


I often thought Australia must be the most pleasant smelling place because of all the euclyptus trees, but I NEVER realized there was even more than ONE or two kinds lol.

I wonder what kind it is we find in our markets that I even have in my home. They have little round leaves , they come in browns and greens and reds ( loke a brick red). they are thick leaved like the MACROCARPA seems to be but with little and round leaves. We have some broad leafed ones too that I buy but those leaves are thinner.

 I also always assumed with all those lovely smelling trees around that Australians may run a lesser occurance of breathing problems. Is that true?


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 03, 2007, 07:57:55 AM
Yes, Seamonkey I was amazed that there were 700 varieties of eucalypts.  They are trying to split them into sub-groups as they are so varied.  Unfortunately the proliferation of the eucalypts does not help with our breathing problems.  A lot of them are unscented or have very little scent, and we have so much dust especially in times of drought as at present.  Also there is a lot of pollen and other irritants everywhere. And of course there is pollution in the cities and industrial areas so we have a lot of asthma and other breathing problems just like everywhere else.
From what little I know, the round leaves you describe could be from the Spinning Gum.  I found a good site which describes these particular gums as growing well around Seattle.  I would expect their weather to be similar to where you live?  The site is www.arthurleej.com and on right hand side about 6 titles down you will find "Articles."   Somewhere in 1990 you will find "Spinning Gum" and may find his description and pictures help you to identify the leaves.
I hope you enjoy the next article.  Still on Eucalypts but a bit different than what I normally post.  Trying to find articles to interest most people  :wink:


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 03, 2007, 08:03:15 AM
(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/may-gibbspic.jpg)

MAY GIBBS

Cecilia May Gibbs.....1877 - 1969

"I could almost draw before I could walk" May Gibbs recalled when her thoughts travelled back to her childhood.

There was much to remember. Her earliest recollections were of England, where she was born in Sydenham during the cold January of 1877. Then, when she was four, came the exciting voyage to join Papa who had gone ahead to South Australia. Her baby brother Ivan, forever to be called "The Wreck of the Hesperus" (the ship they sailed in from England), was born shortly before the storm-delayed ship reached Adelaide.

May had three brothers and when the family moved to The Harvey in Western Australia, the children enjoyed remarkably carefree growing years. After daily lessons with Mother came the joys of riding the pony, Brownie, swimming in waterholes, fishing and frog hunting, turning Kurrajong seeds into boats and, best of all, borrowing the big laundry tub to sail on the river. The children helped make the daily bread, sampled the preserves and eagerly listened to readings of Alice in Wonderland and other books. May drew and she painted, but she wanted to be an actress, not an artist. However, by her twelfth year one of her drawings was published in a Perth newspaper.

By then the family lived close to that city and the little girl with thick reddish-brown hair and bright brown eyes already had imaginatively observed the Western Australian bush. The Banksias on The Harvey district were destined to be immortalised by May. "I was out walking, over in Western Australia, with my cousins," she said. "We came to a grove of Banksia trees and sitting on almost every branch were these ugly little, wicked little men that I discovered and that's how the Banksia Men were thought of."

The creation of the gumnut babies was less defined for May. "It's hard to tell, hard to say, I don't know if the bush babies found me or I found the little creatures," she recalled. "Perhaps it was memories of West Australia's flowers and trips to Blackheath."

Whatever triggered their inspiration was probably after the seven years she spent studying formal art in London, just as her parents had done years before. Twice May made the long sea voyage to England and during her last stay she illustrated her first books - historical dramas. British publishers were not enthusiastic about the Australian environment of her own stories, so she wrote About Us, based on the imaginary chimney-pot people of London and this was later published in the UK and the USA, but not Australia.
It wasn't until 1913 when she returned to live in Neutral Bay, Sydney that the gumnut babies first appeared, unobtrusively peeping over the edge of a gumnut on the cover of Ethel Turner's book, The Missing Button.  Careless glances could easily overlook their debut.

During the years of World War I May received recognition for her indigenous, cheerful postcards and bookmarks, calendars, school magazine illustrations and her series of five booklets featuring gumnut babies and flower children. However, her mind searched for a story book. "I thought of the name Snugglepot for a book on bush babies," she remembered, ''but I could not get another name. I wanted two, and one night, lying in bed quietly, I thought Snugglepot. . .Cuddlepie!" The adventures of the two half-brothers were published during the Armistice celebrations of 1918. The book, which has remained in print, was dedicated to "The Two Dearest Children in the World, Lefty and Bill." Few people realised that they were May's beloved parents, Cecilia and Herbert.
Shortly afterwards May Gibbs married James Ossoli Kelly. Work continued, including weekly comic strips, Bib and Bub and Tiggy Touchwood. There were more books but she found time to learn to drive a car nicknamed Dodgem with Scottish terriers yapping on the back seat or riding in wicker baskets on the running board during camping trips. Eventually, in 1925, "Let's build her a house," said Bib to Bub. It was Nutcote with cheerful yellow walls and blue shuttered windows, and a cherished garden where generations of Scotties dug holes but inspired May, especially after the death of James in 1939.

May lived on, still working during her eighties. The nation honoured her with an MBE and a small literary pension. Best of all, generations of children have loved her books and immediately recognised "ugly little, wicked little men" lurking amongst the Banksia leaves.

Jean Chapman
All quotes are from a taped interview with May Gibbs produced by Hazel de Berg for the National Library of Australia, Canberra.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 03, 2007, 08:06:48 AM
SNUGGLEPOT AND CUDDLEPIE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/snugcud.gif)

GUMNUT BABIES

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/gumnuts.gif)

KOALA BOAT

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/boat.gif)

NUTCOTE AT NEUTRAL BAY, SYDNEY

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/nutcote.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 03, 2007, 08:10:26 AM
UNRIPE GUMNUTS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/unripenedgumnuts.jpg)

RIPE GUMNUTS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/ripegumnuts.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Seamonkey on April 03, 2007, 10:40:21 AM
Thank you Tibro.after going to the site you posted I found it is a spinning gum. Seattle is a lot like where I am as far as wetness,  but I think thier temps stay a bit higher than Maine for longer periods of time.

 I LOVED that story about May Gibbs. I also think I have seen her illistrations before. I never heard of those stories, but am very intrigued to look them up. I love her sense of whimsy and imagination which never seemed to ebb even late in life. I can admire that since I am also one of those " I never wanna grow up kinda kids " lol. I often feared if I grew up TOO much inside I ( my mind's eye) will no longer see the fairies or other characters I create.

 Thank you so much for sharing her story, I totally enjoyed it and learning of an author and artist I never heard of before. She is such an inspiration!!


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 04, 2007, 03:18:38 AM
I though you would enjoy that story about May Gibbs.  Most generations of Australians have grown up with Snugglepot and Cuddlepie and their friends.  I do hope it is not too unsophisticated for our current children.  Imagination and dreaming never hurt anyone.  The illustrations are magical.

Now for an unusual photo :

A MOB OF RED KANGAROOS DRINKING :

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Redkangaoos.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 04, 2007, 03:23:08 AM
ST ANDREWS CROSS SPIDER'S WEB

Orb-weaving spiders have puzzled, charmed and inspired people over the centuries. If you observe closely, you’ll notice that the web of each species is unique in its pattern. The St Andrews Cross spider usually spins one that is a complete and vertical orb, but this springtime juvenile only spun the bottom two thirds of his web. It’s fascinating to watch the spider build as it walks around each circle, using a leg to measure off the exact distance to lay down the next thread.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/StACrossWeb.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 05, 2007, 02:01:06 AM
PINT-SIZED WAVE KING

April 05, 2007 12:00am
Article from: The Courier Mail

HE might be just two years old, but Jaylan Amor is making giant waves in the world of surfing.
The toddler is believed to be the youngest boarder on the Gold Coast and is already winning sponsorship deals with surf businesses.
He first stepped on a board at Currumbin beach six months ago and now brings the beach to a standstill each time he catches a wave.

"No one here has ever seen anyone this young surf before – he's just incredible," dad Peter said.
Jaylan's surfing skill came as no surprise though, as his four-year-old sister Shayla learned to surf a year ago.
"They both took to swimming like ducks to water and love the beach. Their mum and I were keen surfers when we were younger, so I guess our kids have got it in their blood," Mr Amor said.

Jaylan sits on his board while his dad paddles out to the open water. The toddler then hops up and rides waves back to the beach, sometimes cruising along for more than 50m.
"When he falls in he just dog-paddles back to the board and waits for me to get him," Mr Amor said.

But Jaylan is under no pressure to become the next Kelly Slater.
"We'll just let nature take its course. He's a pretty good soccer player so he might become the next Harry Kewell instead," his father said.
"The most important thing is that he enjoys surfing. You only have to watch him smiling to see that he loves being on the water."

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/JaylanAmor.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 06, 2007, 02:16:43 AM
(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/BucklandWindow.jpg)

EASTER IN AUSTRALIA

Easter commemorates the resurrection (return to life) of Jesus Christ following his death by crucifixion. It is the most significant event of the Christian calendar. Easter, also known as Resurrection Day, is observed between late March and late April (early April to early May in Eastern Christianity). It celebrates the resurrection of Jesus, which his followers believe occurred on the third day after his death by crucifixion. In the Roman Catholic Church, Easter is actually an eight-day feast called the Octave of Easter.
The Christian churches began Easter celebrations about 300 years after the death of Jesus Christ, however pagan Spring equinox festivals associated with birth, the renewal of life, fertility and sunrise date back long before Christianity. Many of the present-day customs of Easter have their origins in these festivals. The date on which Easter falls varies from year to year.

RELIGIOUS OBSERVANCE

The Christian churches in Australia observe the Easter Christian Calendar which begins with Shrove Tuesday, some 40 days before Easter, and ends with Whitsun (or Pentecost) which is 50 days after Easter Sunday.
Good Friday, the Friday before Easter, commemorates the crucifixion of Jesus and is a day of mourning in church. During Good Friday services Christians meditate on Jesus's suffering and on his last words spoken from the cross: 'Father, forgive them; for they do not know what they are doing.' (New English Bible, Luke 22: 34)
Easter Sunday is the commemoration of the resurrection of Jesus Christ and is celebrated with great enjoyment by Christians. Churches are usually filled with flowers and the celebrations include the singing of special hymns.

EASTER TRADITIONS

Pancake Day

Pancakes became associated with Shrove Tuesday because they were a dish that could use up perishable foodstuffs such as eggs, fats and milk, with just the addition of flour, prior to the beginning of the 40 days of fasting during Lent.
Many Australian groups and communities make and share pancakes on Shrove Tuesday. Selling pancakes to raise money for charity is also a popular activity.

Hot Cross Buns

Hot cross buns are sweet, spiced buns made with dried fruit and leavened with yeast. A cross, the symbol of Christ, is placed on top of the buns, either with pastry or a simple mixture of flour and water. The buns are traditionally eaten on Good Friday, however in Australia they are available in bakeries and stores many weeks before Easter.
A recent variation on the traditional fruit bun has become popular in Australia. A chocolate version is made with the same spiced mixture, but cocoa is added to the dough and chocolate chips replace the dried fruit.

Easter Eggs

Eggs, symbolising new life, have long been associated with the Easter festival. Chocolate Easter eggs, along with other forms of confectionery specially manufactured for Easter, have become a favourite part of Easter in Australia.
In the lead up to Easter, many organisations take the opportunity to raise funds by selling tickets in raffles for baskets of Easter eggs. Community groups organise Easter egg hunts for children in parks and recreational areas.
Easter eggs are traditionally eaten on Easter Sunday, however stores start stocking Easter treats well before the Easter holiday period.

The Easter Bunny

Early on Easter Sunday morning, the Easter Bunny 'delivers' chocolate Easter eggs to children in Australia, as he does in many parts of the world.
The rabbit and the hare have long been associated with fertility, and have therefore been associated with spring and spring festivals. The rabbit as a symbol of Easter seems to have originated in Germany where it was first recorded in writings in the 16th century. The first edible Easter bunnies, made from sugared pastry, were made in Germany in the 19th century.

The Easter Bilby

Rabbits are an introduced species in Australia and are unpopular because of the damage they do to the land.
In 1991 a campaign was started by the Anti-Rabbit Research Foundation to replace the Easter Bunny with the Easter Bilby (an endangered species). Author Jenny Bright wrote a children's story called Burra Nimu the Easter Bilby to support the campaign.

Greek Orthodox Easter traditions

The celebrations for Greek Easter begin two months before Christian Easter celebrations with Mardi Gras. The Carnival or Apokria season starts on the Sunday of Teloni and Fariséou and ends on Shrovetide Sunday with the Burning of the Carnival King , which involves setting fire to an enormous papier-mâché effigy of Judas.
For Greeks, Clean Monday is one of the most festive holidays of the year. As Lent begins, children and their parents go into the hills of Athens and the Greek countryside to fly kites and feast at local tavernas or outdoor picnics.
On Holy Thursday the bright dyed red eggs that are symbolic of Easter in Greece are prepared. Tradition says that the Virgin Mother, Mary, dyed eggs this colour to celebrate the Resurrection of Christ and to celebrate life. On Good Friday or Great Friday, flags at homes and government buildings are set at half mast to mark the mournful day.
Celebrations continue with the cracking of eggs and The Resurrection Table. The dyed red Easter eggs that are found on the Resurrection Table become pieces of a traditional game. Each person takes an egg and challengers attempt to crack each others' eggs, which is meant to symbolise Christ breaking from the Tomb. The person whose egg lasts the longest is assured good luck for the rest of the year.

The Ulladulla Blessing of the Fleet Festival on the New South Wales south coast is an old tradition which originated in Sicily to ensure that the fishermen would return to port and have a bountiful catch.
In 1956, Italian fishermen and their families organised Ulladulla's first Blessing of the Fleet, with St. Peter being chosen as the patron Saint of Fishermen. Activities included the spaghetti-eating contest, climbing of the greasy pole, apple on a string, greasy pig and the naming of the Fishermen's Princess, traditions which still continue.
 
THE EASTER HOLIDAY IN AUSTRALIA

The four-day 'weekend'

In addition to its religious significance, Easter in Australia is enjoyed as a four-day holiday weekend starting on Good Friday and ending on Easter Monday.
This extra-long weekend is an opportunity for Australians to take a mini-holiday, or get together with family and friends. Easter often coincides with school holidays, so many people with school aged children incorporate Easter into a longer family holiday. Easter is the busiest time for domestic air travel in Australia, and a very popular time for gatherings such as weddings and christenings.

The Sydney Royal Easter Show

The Sydney Royal Easter Show is Australia's largest annual event and celebrates all everything from our bush heritage to the vitality of city life. It takes place annually at Sydney Olympic Park over a two-week period which includes the Easter long weekend.
The Show is part of the long tradition of agricultural shows that are held in towns and cities across Australia. At these shows, rural and farming communities showcase their livestock and produce, and exhibitors, organisations and companies provide people in urban areas with a glimpse of rural life.
Shows are also a time for competition, spectacle and entertainment. The Sydney Royal Easter Show includes the Sydney Royal Rodeo, and the visitors to the show can enjoy the latest on offer in the way of extreme rides and attractions.

Festivals

There are many festivals held over the Easter holiday in Australia. Performers and audiences travel long distances to attend music festivals as diverse as the National Folk Festival in Canberra, the East Coast International Blues & Roots Festival at Byron Bay in northern New South Wales, and the Australian Gospel Music Festival in Toowoomba in Queensland.
There are also festivals with a more local or regional nature such as the Bendigo Easter Festival, in Victoria.

Sport

The football season is well under way by Easter and all football codes schedule major league matches over the Easter holiday period which are well attended.
The Brisbane to Gladstone Yacht Race, a 308 nautical mile ocean race, is Queensland's premier blue water classic and one of Australia's major sporting events over the Easter weekend.
For horse racing fans there is a four-day Easter Racing Carnival at Randwick Racecourse in Sydney, Caufield Racecourse in Melbourne holds an Easter Saturday Meeting and an Easter Monday Meeting, and other cities and regional centres also schedule racing events at this time of year.
The Tasmania Three Peaks Race, a four-day, non-stop 335 nautical mile sailing and endurance running race around Tasmania's east coast every Easter attracts contestants from around the world. Teams of two runners leave their yachts at three points on the coast for 133 km of running. Each run involves scaling a rugged mountain peak.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 06, 2007, 02:25:58 AM
CHURCH OF ST JOHN THE BAPTIST, BUCKLAND, TASMANIA

The village of Buckland sits in a district known as Prosser Plains by the first European settlers. White settlement here began in the 1820s.  The name Buckland was bestowed upon the small hamlet by Governor Franklin in 1846, in honour of the Dean of Westminster (1845-56), William Buckland.

The year 1846 was also when the sandstone St John the Baptist Church was built in Buckland. Designed in the English-style by architect Crawford Cripps Wegman, the church features a stained glass east window, which has been authenticated as dating from the 14th century. The window depicts the life of John the Baptist and has been linked historically as being originally designed for England's Battle Abbey on the site of the Battle of Hastings. The means by which the window arrived in Buckland has been disputed but it is said that in the 1800s the Marquis of Salisbury gave the window to Buckland's first rector, the Reverend T.H. Fox. It was installed in the church in 1849.

ENGRAVING BELIEVED TO HAVE BEEN DONE AROUND 1848


(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Buckland.jpg)

The stained glass window referred to is pictured above.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 07, 2007, 05:46:03 AM
SOME AUSTRALIAN EASTER ACTIVITIES

THREE PEAKS RACE :

One of the many international events conducted each year in Tasmania is the Three Peaks Race.
It starts near AMC's campus at Beauty Point each year on Good Friday, and comprises:
·   A sail leg of 90 nautical miles to Flinders Island from Beauty Point on the Tamar River
·   A 65 kilometre run to Mt. Strezlecki on Flinders Island
·   A sail leg of 145 nautical miles from Flinders Island to Coles Bay on the East Coast
·   A 33 kilometre run across the "The Hazards"
·   A final sailing leg to Hobart of 100 nautical miles
·   A 35 kilometre run up Mt. Wellington and back down to finish at Constitution Dock.

The concept of a race combining sailing and climbing or running first arose in 1976 in a small seaside Welsh village of Barmouth, the home of the famous seaman and mountaineer, Major Harold William (Bill) Tilman.
From the start, the race flourished. The unique combination of the two disciplines giving a much wider appeal than a simple yacht race. The competitiveness on land by dedicated runners was augmented by boats of increased performance and so, fast multihull vessels started to come to the fore. Being so fast and spectacular, the multihulls also attracted the sponsors and so the race as a whole benefited even further from the increased publicity.

In 1987 Martin Pryor led the first Australian team to compete in the British event in a chartered formula 40 catamaran. Although very fast and leading at the time, the team was forced to retire due to damaged rudders.
During the planning of that campaign, Pryor came up with the idea of a sister event in Australia. It was obvious that the only place to satisfactorily replicate the British event was Tasmania. The uncanny similarity of the Tasmanian course, in terms of terrain, distances and waters to be sailed made course selection relatively easy. In addition, the event could encompass the two largest cities in the State, Launceston and the capital, Hobart.

On returning to Australia, planning began in earnest, culminating in the highly successful inaugural race over Easter 1989, followed by exciting events being held at Easter each year since.

The Australian Three Peaks Race is a non-stop event, commencing at Beauty Point just north of Launceston on the Tamar River and finishing in Hobart on the Derwent River. En-route, teams have to scale Mt Strzelecki, Mt Freycinet and Mt Wellington.

The east-coast course around Tasmania affords the best combinations of suitable mountains, coastal centres, accessibility for followers, press crews and the public. It brings publicity and exposure to two of the more beautiful but remote areas of the State, Flinders Island and the Freycinet Peninsula, and takes competitors, supporting groups and the media the length of the beautiful east coast.

For competitors it offers an interesting alternative for the yachting fraternity and a challenging new activity for runners, climbers and bushwalkers. It is this unique combination of the two disparate disciplines which provides for such a challenging event.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 07, 2007, 05:48:49 AM
THE SYDNEY ROYAL EASTER SHOW

The Sydney Royal Easter Show is the largest annual event staged in Australia, attracting on average around one million Showgoers each year.  Sydney Showground, Sydney Olympic Park is transformed to play host to a festival that is unique to Australia and its diverse cultural and rural heritage.  

The Show runs for 14 days over the Easter period and is a pinnacle event enjoyed by Australians of all ages.  Each year, the Sydney Royal Easter Show aims to highlight Australian agricultural excellence through competitions and education and to promote national and international awareness of the country’s proud rural heritage.  

Approximately 15,000 competitors submit some 35,000 entries for judging in over 50 unique and diverse Sydney Royal competitions including livestock, domestic animals, District Exhibits, apiculture, poultry, arts, woodchopping and horticulture to name but a few. The Sydney Royal Easter Show is a festival of diversity, culture and lifestyle, a celebration of the legacy that is Australian agriculture.  

The Sydney Showground literally overflows with entertainment, excitement and educational opportunities. Whether it’s a culinary feast you desire or a day of adrenaline pumping action, fireworks and fashion, rides and races, the Sydney Royal Easter Show is your ticket to the real Australia.

On Easter Sunday 8 April, the The RAS and the Salvation Army will host an Easter service in the Amphitheatre.  The service welcomes all denominations and is a great opportunity for all the entire Show family to come together on site to commemorate Easter at the Show.   The service will take place from 8.30-9.30am.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 07, 2007, 05:52:29 AM
SOME PHOTOS FROM THIS YEAR'S SHOW (2007)

SECTION OF THE CROWD

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Crowd.jpg)

ANIMAL NURSERY

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Nursery.jpg)

YARD DOGS DEMONSTRATION

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/YardDog1.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 07, 2007, 05:55:39 AM
A WINNING EXHIBIT TITLED "BUTTERFLY ENCOUNTERS"

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/ButterflyEncounters.jpg)

PART OF THE GRAND PARADE OF LIVESTOCK

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/GrandParade1.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 08, 2007, 09:46:07 PM
Happy Easter Monkeys.

I have had internet problems but looks like it is all sorted out now.

Here is a nice Easter Bilby story for you and the children.  Enjoy :

www.easterbilby.info/default.html


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 10, 2007, 05:07:52 AM
STEVE IRWIN’S VISION LIVES ON

Melissa Maugeri
April 07, 2007 12:00am  Article from: The Courier Mail

AUSTRALIA Zoo will launch whale watching tours from the Sunshine Coast as part of its expansion plans.
Zoo director Wes Mannion told guests at a VIP breakfast that a 130-seat catamaran had been bought and named Steve's Whale One.
"Steve knew whales were so much more important to the world alive, living in our oceans than on some fancy dinner plate," Mr Mannion said.
The tour, which will operate out of Mooloolaba's Spit with bookings taken from May 1, will be the only whale watching tour based on the Sunshine Coast.
Australia Zoo is also continuing with plans for an open-range safari and had part of the land through a state government-approved land swap.
It comes as animal attraction is proving a big winner in the tourism stakes across the board – with smaller parks starting to ride on the popularity of their bigger brothers.
While new animal attractions feature at Dreamworld, SeaWorld and Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary, smaller operations such as Alma Park Zoo are also planning improvements.
There have also been big changes in the way wildlife parks are presented, with the highlight of visits to modern attractions being interaction and education.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 10, 2007, 05:09:28 AM
REEF “COULD DIE IN 20 YEARS”

Rosemary Desmond
April 06, 2007 12:00am  Article from: AAP

THE Great Barrier Reef could be dead in 20 years unless there is a drastic reduction in greenhouse gas emissions, a marine biology expert said today.
Rising sea temperatures were bleaching the coral and causing it to die, said Professor Ove Hoegh-Guldberg of the Australian Research Council Centre for Excellence for Coral Reef Studies.
At the same time, increasing levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere were turning the world's oceans more acidic and preventing corals from forming their limestone skeletons, he said.
Prof Hoegh-Guldberg and Professor Terry Hughes provided expert advice to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) which released its latest report in Brussels today.
The combination of rising temperatures and increasing acid levels could be deadly for the reef, Prof Hoegh-Guldberg said.
"I'd say with 20 to 50 years under the current unrestricted emissions of CO2 into the atmosphere it is highly likely that it will be significantly changed to the point where we no longer have live corals," he said.
"They could be replaced by things like seaweed.
"It (the reef) certainly won't be the place it is now, which is a place of incredible biodiversity."
The warning signs had been around since 1998 when a major bleaching event caused the death of 16 per cent of the world's coral.
Prof Hoegh-Guldberg said the reefs were like a "canary in a coal mine" for other vulnerable areas of the environment, such as glaciers and rainforests, which were also retreating due to global warming.
Around 60 per cent of Australia's bird species were in the wet tropics area of north Queensland.
"The predictions are that if we have a very sharp increase in temperature that is predicted, we will lose at least 50 per cent of that by the middle of the century."
Also of concern was the dramatic increases in the rate of coral diseases, some of which have increased five fold in the past decade.
But action was needed now on climate change.
"If we don't cut back on emissions very dramatically, we are going to look at loss of things like the Great Barrier Reef and other coral ecosystems," Prof Hoegh-Guldberg said.
"If we take it seriously and reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 80 per cent in the next 30 years, we have chance of saving these ecosystems but this is the last time we have the option to choose."


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 11, 2007, 03:13:06 AM
THE SNOWY MOUNTAINS SCHEME

The Snowy Mountains Hydro-Electric Scheme is by far the largest engineering project ever undertaken in Australia. It is also one of the largest and most complex hydro-electric schemes in the world.
The system's construction is seen by many as a defining point in Australia's history, and an important symbol of Australia's identity as an independent, multicultural and resourceful country.

The Snowy Scheme is also considered economically important for Australia. It supplies vital water to the farming industries of inland New South Wales and Victoria. The system's power stations also produce up to ten per cent of all electricity needs for New South Wales.

The Snowy Mountains Scheme consists of:
·   sixteen major dams
·   seven power stations
·   a pumping station
·   225 kilometres of tunnels, pipelines and aqueducts.

This makes it one of the most complex hydro-electric schemes in the world. Only two per cent of the entire construction is visible above the ground.  The entire scheme covers a mountainous area of approximately 5,124 square kilometres in southern New South Wales.

The purpose of the scheme is to collect water from melting snow and rain in the Snowy Mountains. Where once most of this water used to flow into the Snowy River, it is now diverted through tunnels in the mountains and stored in dams. The water is then used by the power stations to create electricity. The water then flows mainly into the Murray and Murrumbidgee Rivers. These rivers are important for irrigation of farms and for household water for communities in New South Wales, Victoria and South Australia. A small proportion of the water flows into the Snowy River.

JOUNAMA DAM

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/JounamaDam.jpg)

TUMUT 3 POWER STATION

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Tumut3PowerStation.jpg)[/quote]


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 11, 2007, 03:18:58 AM
SNOWY MOUNTAINS SCHEME (continued)

Because the project was so much bigger and more complex than anything that had been done before, the engineers needed to develop methods that were new to Australia and the world. Safer and cheaper construction techniques were created and the project set some new standards in occupational health and safety for the time. The power stations adopted higher outputs of electricity transmission than ever before.

The project used Australia's first transistorised computer, which was also one of the first in the world. Called 'Snowcom', the computer was used from 1960 to 1967, contributing greatly to the efficient and successful completion of the project.

More than 100,000 people from over thirty countries came to the mountains to work on the project. Up to 7,300 workers would provide their labour at any one time.  Seventy per cent of all the workers were migrants. They came to Australia to work on the project, attracted by the relatively high wages. At that time, soon after the Second World War, work was hard to come by in Europe.
At first, most of the workers were men who had left their families at home in Europe. Their plan was to work hard, save money and bring their families out when they could afford to.  The work was hard and the conditions were tough. Because ninety-eight per cent of the project was underground, there was a lot of tunnelling, often through solid granite rock. Work in the tunnels was dirty, wet, noisy, smelly and sometimes dangerous. More than 120 workers died in the project's twenty-five year period.

Living conditions were also hard in the camps and towns built in the mountains to house the workers and their families. Often these dwellings were not suited to the freezing conditions. They were cold and the water would freeze in the pipes. When the workers' wives came to join them in the townships, these women had to work hard to overcome the hardships and establish communities in the strange, new, wilderness environment. When work in one area was completed, the dwellings were dismantled and moved to another area, so very little remains of these towns today.
The majority of the workers stayed on to live in Australia after the project was completed, making a valuable contribution to Australia's modern multicultural society.

SNOWY MOUNTAINS DAM

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/SnowyHydro_Ph_50.jpg)

MAIN RANGE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/MainRange.jpg)

EIGHT MILE CREEK

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/8MileCreek.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 11, 2007, 03:26:16 AM
SNOWY MOUNTAINS SCHEME (continued)

Work on the system started in 1949 and was finished in 1974, taking twenty-five years to complete. The entire project was completed on time and to budget, costing approximately A$820 million.  At the launch of the project, the then Prime Minister Ben Chifley presented it as a national milestone - important for the drought relief it would bring to inland Australia, the power it would supply and for the ambitious size of the project.
 
The Snowy Mountains scheme is situated in the Kosciuszko National Park. The balance between the scheme's operations and the surrounding environment is closely monitored. Efforts are also made to prevent soil erosion and to monitor the impact on plants and animals. Hydro-electricity is a fairly clean and efficient source of renewable energy. However, the scheme has had some direct impacts on the environment. When dams were built, some eco-systems that were habitats for plants and animals were flooded.

Diverting and storing water for the scheme has changed the nature of the Snowy River and other rivers in the region. In some places, the Snowy River carries only one per cent of the water that it used to before the scheme was built.

In 1998, the New South Wales and Victorian governments set up The Snowy Water Inquiry to find a solution that balanced environmental, economic and social factors. The governments have agreed to restore twenty-one per cent of the original flow to the Snowy River by the year 2010. Eventually, the river flows will be restored to twenty-eight per cent, which is the minimum amount that scientists say the river needs to return it to good health. The governments will also invest in water saving projects to ensure that the farmers who currently rely on water from the scheme do not suffer from water shortages.

LAKE EUCUMBENE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/LakeEucumbene.jpg)

SNOW BRANCHES

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/snowbranches.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 12, 2007, 05:27:16 AM
FIRST LITTER OF SUMATRAN TIGER CUBS BORN AT DREAMWORLD!

Dreamworld’s first litter of Sumatran tiger cubs were born at Tiger Island on Saturday, March 31, 2007.

The first cub, a baby girl arrived at 7.45am weighing in at 1.19kg. Just under an hour later, a second female cub arrived weighing 1.18kg. Both cubs measure approximately 30cm in length (head to tail).

The little sisters are bonding well with their mother and spend the day suckling and sleeping. Soraya, the first-time mum, has become the model parent.

The cubs and their mother will remain in a quarantine environment for the next couple of weeks to allow the cub’s immune system’s to strengthen.
 
Dreamworld guests can view the cubs through closed circuit television monitors positioned at Tiger Island. In the next 2-3 weeks the cubs will be moved to their purpose built nursery. At 6 weeks they will be walking around the park.

“The birth of the cubs is a hallmark event for Dreamworld, as this is the very first littler of Sumatran tiger cubs born at Tiger Island. In 1998, we welcomed our Bengal tiger cubs, including the birth of the first white tiger in Australia,” Dreamworld Chief Executive Officer, Stephen Gregg said.

Now the primary focus is the health and well-being of Soraya and her cubs, and presently they are all doing well.

The cubs are under the watchful eyes of Dreamworld’s on-site vet and the Tiger Island team.

The cubs are born to Soraya (meaning Princess), 4yrs of age, and father, Raja (meaning King/Ruler), 3yrs of age). Both Sumatran tigers arrived to Tiger Island from German Zoos as the part of the an international breeding program to save the species.

Having limited human contant prior to their arrival to Tiger Island, Raja and Soraya live in their purpose built, off-exhibit tiger facility at Tiger Island.

With less than 400 left in the wild, Sumatran tigers are listed as one of the world’s most critically endangered species, that's why the cubs are a great step to help save the species from extinction. They will be raised at Tiger Island until they are required by other zoos for breeding.

Dreamworld’s Tiger Island is part of the theme park situated on Queensland's Gold Coast and is also home to seven Bengal tigers (larger than Sumatran species) and two cougars.

In addition to supporting the breeding and conservation programs, Dreamworld makes a significant contribution through the park’s Tiger Fund. To date, over $650,000 was donated to world-wide organisations saving tigers in the wild.

PROUD MOTHER SORAYA

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Soraya.jpg)

CUBS AT TWO DAYS OLD

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/tigercubs_2day_01.jpg)

WEIGH-IN

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Weighin.jpg)

IT IS HARD WORK BEING TWO DAYS OLD

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/HardDay.jpg)

Photographs taken from the Dreamworld website.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Angiex911dsptchr on April 12, 2007, 04:10:25 PM
Tibro,
 What beautiful photos of the animals and trees.  I cant get over the 2 year old on a surfboard  LOL  and I loved the pic of the red kangaroos drinking together!!!


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 13, 2007, 06:29:58 AM
Hi Angie - glad you enjoy this thread.  I liked the picture of the kangaroos too.  I bet if you tried to get them to line up like that they would not do it for you!  You have to be very patient to catch animals at their best like trying to photograph children and get it to look natural.   :wink:


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 13, 2007, 06:38:18 AM
SCIENTISTS WORK ON MAP OF SINKING COMMUNITIES

By Belinda Tasker April 10, 2007 06:35pm  Article from: AAP

A HUGE digital map of Australia's coastline is being created by scientists to help pinpoint coastal communities that face being washed away by rising sea levels.

The Federal Government's Australian Greenhouse Office is coordinating dozens of scientists to take part in the project amid fears about the dramatic rises in sea levels that climate change could trigger.
The map will identify coastal roads, homes, businesses, transport and port facilities in danger of going under water if sea levels continue rising.

One scientist taking part in the mapping exercise, the Australian National University's (ANU) Professor Will Steffen, said the seas surrounding Australia were predicted to rise by between 8 inches and 5 foot.

“We want to have a very fine resolution map right around Australia's coastal zone because sea levels have risen about 8 inches in the last century or so and are predicted to increase much more,” Prof Steffen said. “So when you combine that with storm surges and then the waves associated with cyclones it gives you a much better handle on which parts of our infrastructure could be quite vulnerable. In order for people to adapt to that we need a very good data base.”

Prof Steffen, who heads ANU's Fenner School for Environment, said the map would be able to help local council planners, developers and engineers work out how to respond to the possibility of some coastal communities being submerged by higher sea waters. “I think what we will have to do is some serious assessment of the most vulnerable regions and we need to engage with communities,” he said.

GeoSciences Australia will also play a role in developing the digital coastal map.

Dozens of scientists have already held initial meetings about how to best develop the map, but no deadline for its completion has yet been set.
A United Nations climate change report focusing on Australia and New Zealand released today predicted rising sea levels would threaten built-up areas of south-east Queensland.

The Northern Territory's famous Kakadu nature park is also feared to be at risk of saltwater intrusion from rising sea levels.


HERE ARE SOME VERY EXPENSIVE REAL ESTATE AREAS THAT WILL LOSE VALUE VERY QUICKLY WITH ANY SEA LEVEL RISE :

GOLD COAST HIGH RISES ON BEACHFRONT

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/ironmanphoto.jpg)

MANSIONS ON THE CANALS AT NOOSA

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Noosa.jpg)

MORE GOLD COAST BEACHFRONT DEVELOPMENT

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/GCBeach.jpg)

PROPOSED ARTIFICIAL ISLAND DEVELOPMENT

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/GCIsland.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 14, 2007, 02:26:38 AM
ROSE BREEDING

The rose is among the most popular flowers in the world and that means rose breeding is big business. But it's not a job for the faint hearted. One of Australia's best known rose breeders is George Thomson from Willunga, 44 kilometres south of Adelaide. He painstakingly plants more than 350,000 rose seeds a year, with the aim of breeding roses ideally suited to Australian conditions.

George says that rose breeding is really a lottery. “It's the old numbers racket. The more seeds you put in, the better chance you've got. After planting 320,000 seeds, you might end up with two good roses if you're lucky.”

George completed an apprenticeship at Kew Gardens in London and then worked with renowned rose hybridiser, Alex Cocker in Scotland, before immigrating to Australia in 1958. It wasn't long before he started breeding roses in Australia.

He says the first step in rose breeding is the selection of parents. It's very important to get that right. Each flower has male and female parts. The male part, or stamens, is on the outside and the female part is in the middle.

“To breed roses take the stamens out of the rose. It takes 24 hours for them to drop their pollen. Then prepare the seed parent or mother by removing all petals and stamens.

“Then leave it for about 24 hours and come back with the pollen and a little dish. Take the pollen on a finger and put two little dabs onto the seed plant. And do the same again in 24 hours. Do this in early spring until late autumn.

“When the rose sets seeds inside the hips simply take the hips off and split them open with a knife. Then plant the seeds in a box.

“The seeds are put in the fridge. Roses are a cold country plant and the seeds need to be chilled for anything up to two or three months in the fridge to make them come through at the same time.

“Then we take a handful of seeds and scatter them on about 2 inches or 5cm of potting mix. Level it off, water and put it outside. In about three weeks, rose seedlings start to pop through.”

Just four months after the seeds are sown, the seedlings flower, so that the breeder can tell whether the flower is single or double and most importantly its colour.

George says it's always a fantastic feeling to see the first flower because you never really know what colour you're going to get.

“The roses are then planted into our trial gardens and gardens around Australia. Trialling is very important because we've got a vast country with different climatic conditions.

“Roses must be disease resistant, have a nice flower, perfume, and the public have then got to like them- that’s the final test.

“If we think we have a winner, it is then budded onto root stock in the fields. On average it's about seven years from the day that you plant the seed, to the day that the public can buy it.

“I love the challenge. It's 40 per cent know how, 60 per cent luck…. and at the end of the day you really do need Lady Luck on your side,” George says.



(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/GeorgeThomson.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 14, 2007, 02:55:00 AM
2005 NATIONAL ROSE TRIAL GARDEN WINNERS

BEST AUSTRALIAN ROSE - BURGUNDY ICEBERG

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/BurgundyIcebarg.jpg)

BEST AUST BRED ROSE - CHINA SUNRISE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/ChinaSunrise.jpg)

OTHER GOLD MEDAL WINNERS :

RANCH

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/RANCH.jpg)

KNOCKOUT

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/KNOCKOUT.jpg)

SUNDANCE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/SUNDANCE.jpg)

.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tylergal on April 14, 2007, 12:08:20 PM
Tibro, thank you for posting these pictures of your lovely country.  I wanted to tell you that I have met a rosebreeder from Australia who studied at Kew, who later went to China to work and design gardens there.  He was such an inspiration for me via e-mail and on a visit to the south, I actually had occasion to meet him in Birmingham at the Botanical Gardens there.  Birmingham has some of the finest rose gardens in the south.  In fact, I think they are my favorites.  He also was my inspiration for the rose Renae, which he did not breed, but was a big advocate of.  The rose is one of Ralph Moore's and he was at that time on his way to meet with Mr. Moore.  For non-rose-growers, Ralph Moore celebrated his 100th birthday this year and is still breeding roses.  Our California friends probably know of his celebrity.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tiger on April 14, 2007, 09:17:54 PM
Beautiful.My cousins and the Tiger cubs,and the Roses


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 14, 2007, 10:27:13 PM
Thank you Tylergal and Tiger.  I will post a few more rose photos.  They are prize winners at a Rose Show on the Gold Coast which is a sub-tropical area but they are unnamed which is a pity.  They grew here in Aust so I will claim them as Aussies anyway  :wink:  
Rose breeders seem to live long lives.  Must be the patience and serenity that comes from working with these perfect flowers.  Close to God and Nature.

I will keep a watch on the tiger cub site and post any more photos as they grow.  It does not take long for them to grow up.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 14, 2007, 10:33:05 PM
NO WONDER THIS BLOOM WON FIRST PRIZE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/rshow_12.jpg)

A VARIETY OF COLOURS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/oct5.jpg)

MY FAVOURITE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/aug6.jpg)

PUZZLE - SPOT THE INTRUDER

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/sept1.jpg)

.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 15, 2007, 03:23:02 AM
THE AUSTRALIAN STOCK HORSE

This, possibly the world's most versatile horse, is often referred to as 'The breed for every need'. The Australian Stock Horse is a fine working and performance animal, renowned for its toughness, endurance, resilience and strength. It also has cat-like speed and agility, giving the horse a cosmopolitan blend of attributes which have produced the world's best at work and play.  The basic prerequisites of high performance sporting horses are a quiet temperament, intelligence and an athletic ability. The Australian Stock Horse has all of these qualities, and is now regarded as the benchmark for equestrian breeding excellence.  

The ancestors of the Australian Stock Horse arrived in Australia on the First Fleet in January 1788. The end of the 18th century saw horses imported into Botany Bay in small numbers, believed to be of Arabian and Barb blood. The Barb, developed on the Barbary Coast of North Africa, was a desert horse with great hardiness and stamina. Eventually more horses where imported, these were of English Thoroughbred and Spanish stock. Later importations included more Thoroughbreds, Arabs, Timor and Welsh Mountain Ponies. All horses sent to the Colony needed strength and stamina - not only to survive the long sea journey, but also to work in the foreign, untamed environment that had become their home.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Breed-Ancestry_1.jpg)

In the 1830s, knowledgeable horse breeders imported a steady stream of Thoroughbreds to improve the local horse strains. The settlers had a keen interest in horse racing, so Thoroughbreds became very popular at the beginning of the 19th century. The use of Thoroughbred stallions over the condition-hardened local mares produced the beautiful strain of tough but stylish animal exemplified by today's Australian Stock Horse.

Australian horses had been selectively bred for strength and stamina, reliability and versatility. The strongest were retained for breeding and despite their mixed origins they developed into a strong and handsome type. The horses that developed had a good temperament, were tough and reliable, able to work under saddle and in harness. They were used to clear timber, plough the land and herd sheep and cattle. From this base the breed was refined and developed, using the outstanding sires of the day. Thoroughbreds had a considerable influence, even though the breed carried bloodlines from other breeds.

Explorers, stockmen, settlers, bushrangers and troopers all relied on horses that could travel long distances, day after day. Weak horses were culled; the stronger types were used to breed sturdy saddle horses that were essential for the Colony's settlement. Exploits of the explorers and stockmen and their reliable horses in the Australian bush became Australian folklore, and stories such as The Man from Snowy River and Clancy of the Overflow depict the character of these pioneers and their horses.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Breed-Evolved_2.jpg)

Many Australians refer to their horses as stock horses or station horses. When purchased by a cavalry exporter, the horse became known as a remount horse. Originally all Australian horses came from New South Wales (thus the name Waler), but as the settlers spread throughout the continent, they took their horses with them. It was in 1846 that the term Waler was coined by the British. The hardiness of the Waler made him a natural mount for the cavalry. The Australian Army used the Waler in the First World War.

The origins of the Waler date back to 1840 and during the Boer War and World War I the Australian Horse received worldwide recognition through the success of the Australian Light Horse regiments, a quite significant achievement for horses in Australia's history. The Waler was considered to be the finest cavalry horse in the world, winning International acclaim for its endurance, reliability and hardiness during the Indian Mutiny, the Boer War and the First World War. In the Boer War, the Waler served in such regiments as the Lancers, Commonwealth Horse, Mounted Rifles and Bushmen's Troop.

Around 160,000 Australian horses served in World War I and their performance was best summed up by the English cavalryman, Lt Col RMP Preston DSO, in his book, The Desert Mounted Corps. He described the stamina and spirit of the Australian Light Horse, "… Cavalry Division had covered nearly 170 miles…and their horses had been watered on an average of once in every 36 hours…. The heat, too, had been intense and the short rations, 9½ lb of grain per day without bulk food, had weakened them considerably. Indeed, the hardship endured by some horses was almost incredible. One of the batteries of the Australian Mounted Division had only been able to water its horses three times in the last nine days - the actual intervals being 68, 72 and 76 hours respectively, yet this battery on its arrival had lost only eight horses from exhaustion…. The majority of horses in the Corps were Walers and there is no doubt that these hardy Australian horses make the finest cavalry mounts in the world…."

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Horses-at-war.jpg)

After the First World War, despite the recognition Australian Horses had won and although the Waler was known as a distinctive type, there was no Stud Book or Registry. Mechanisation of primary industries reduced the need for working horses and it was not until the 1960s that an interest in horses was revived due to the increasing leisure time available to society.
In June 1971, the Australian Horse was given the recognition and formal organisation it deserved with The Australian Stock Horse Society being established.  The object of The Australian Stock Horse Society Limited was to preserve the identity and breeding records of the Stock Horse through registration and to promote their attributes through exhibitions and performance.

Australian Stock Horses are used for general riding and stock work on rural properties, as well as equestrian competitions. With its versatility, the Australian Stock Horse has achieved outstanding success in a wide variety of sports including: campdrafting, showjumping, dressage, eventing, pony club events, harness, polo and polocrosse.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Versatility.jpg)

The Australian Stock Horse is intelligent, with courage, toughness and stamina, and has a good temperament. The Australian Stock Horse is considered possibly the world's most versatile horse, the horse evolved through selective breeding in response to the demands of the environment.  The basic pre-requisites of a high performance horse are a quiet temperament, intelligence and athletic ability. These qualities are essential for a brilliant performance whatever the event.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Breed-today1.jpg)

CAMPDRAFTING

A truly Australian sport, requires agility, intelligence and strength of both horse and rider. The horse must also have speed and 'cattle sense' which is required when the competitor selects a beast from the 'camp' or yard and separates it from the remaining cattle. After 'cutting-out' the beast, the rider has to work it with his horse around an outside course.

DRESSAGE

This is the most elegant of equine sports. A dressage horse must have intelligence, suppleness, obedience and smoothness of movement to produce a flowing and disciplined performance.

POLO and POLOCROSSE

These sports require fast, strong horses with stamina and a 'love of the game.' Called ponies in both games, these horses must demonstrate intelligence, agility and control at speed.

SHOWJUMPING and EVENTING

These horses are indeed athletes and need to be obedient, intelligent and bold with obvious strength and soundness.

PONY CLUB

These horses need a quiet temperament, and the ability to perform capably in a variety of events. They need intelligence, athletic ability and the ability to adapt to their rider's standard of horsemanship.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 15, 2007, 03:25:04 AM
A FINE EXAMPLE OF DRESSAGE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/89255.jpg)

THE NEXT GENERATION

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/ash3b.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 15, 2007, 03:34:29 AM
To my monkeys friends who read here regularly :
I will be unable to post for a few days.
If there is anything in particular you would like me to post or if there is any more details on anything you would like to know, please post your request and I will follow up later in the week for you.
The items I have posted so far show how different but also how alike our countries are and I hope it helps to cement the friendship between our two
free nations.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 18, 2007, 10:27:11 PM
UPDATE ON TIGER CUBS

Two beautiful, healthy female babies and eight nervous fathers celebrated today (17/4) as Dreamworld’s two week old Sumatran tiger cubs took their very first look at the outside world.

Thrilled onlookers watched the cubs graduate to their purpose built, glass fronted nursery at Tiger Island to begin the hand rearing process essential to establishing the strong bond between handler and tiger.

This bond will enable the cubs to interact as fully grown tigers without the confines of cages and will ensure they have a rich, fulfilling and stimulating life at Tiger Island.

Guests can now come face to face with the adorable cubs, the result of an international breeding program to save one of the most critically endangered species on Earth.

Dreamworld’s number one dad, Tiger Island Manager Patrick Martin-Vegue said people have a very rare opportunity to see the babies grow right before their eyes as the cubs receive their daily weigh-ins and get down to what cubs do best.

“At this early stage, eating and sleeping are the most important parts of their day. They’ll also play and wrestle and start to develop their own personalities in the coming weeks,” Mr Martin- Vegue said.

Both weighing in at around 2.5kg, the cubs have both doubled in size, each drinking more than 250mls of special milk formula each day.

The cubs will remain in this quarantine environment for the next three to four weeks to minimise the risk of infection and allow their immune systems to strengthen.

They will then begin to take brief walks through the park and interact with guests at exclusive “Cub Experiences” starting mid May before mixing and mingling with Dreamworld’s big cats on Tiger Island from about 2 months of age.

Dreamworld Chief Executive Officer, Stephen Gregg said the best way to send a message about the importance of conservation of rare and endangered species is giving people real world experiences that they can personally relate to.

“Tiger Island’s charter of ‘conservation through education’ fulfills a very important role in this work. It is an enriching opportunity for guests to gain a first hand understanding of the grim future faced by tigers in the wild,” Mr Gregg said.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 18, 2007, 10:36:42 PM
LATEST CUB PHOTOS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/tigercubs_2week_framed.jpg)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/tigercubs_2week_02.jpg)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/tigercubs_3week_03.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 19, 2007, 06:12:07 AM
McLEOD'S DAUGHTERS

WHERE IT ALL BEGAN......

McLeod's Daughters was launched on the Nine Network in August 2001 and was the third most watched Australian TV drama series in 2002.

Series one of McLeod's Daughters was sold to the giant American cable network Hallmark, who successfully debuted it in the UK in October 2001, and throughout Asia in March 2002.

The series was also been picked up by TVNZ in New Zealand, where it became an instant hit with viewers.

Creator Posie Graeme-Evans developed the original concept for McLeod's Daughters for a successful and high-rating 1996 Nine Network telemovie, and it has been in development since as a series.

Posie says a photograph depicting "blue skies and quintessentially Aussie girls' faces with big wide grins under the broad brim of a classic RM Williams hat" inspired her.

Anecdotes by country friends and Posie's love of South Australian landscapes, as depicted in Sir Hans Heysen paintings, also contributed to the McLeod's Daughters concept.

While the series was being developed, Kingsford, the property featured in the original telemovie, was put on the market. The Nine Network seized the opportunity to purchase the property in 1999, knowing that being able to film on a working farm would be fundamental to the success of the series.

Although the location remains the same as the telemovie, the characters in the series of McLeod's Daughters have been developed considerably and are played by a different cast.

Ex-cast member Bridie Carter, who played Tess Silverman McLeod, was a newcomer at the beginning of the series but became a household name along with fellow cast newcomer Rachael Carpani and ex-cast member Myles Pollard. Simmone Jade Mackinnon, who joined the cast at the end of 2003, has fast becoming a recognised name. The highly talented Michala Banas joined the core cast in 2004.

Sonia Todd and Aaron Jeffery complete the core cast and bring diverse experience in both television and features films — contributing immeasurably to what Posie refers to as "a well-balance cast". They are supported by experienced actors Marshall Napier and John Jarratt who play regular guest cast roles.

The four female leads carry the heart of each story throughout the series, which Posie believes reflects much of the truth of what's happening in Australia.

"The timing was right for this type of show - a rural-based series which showcases a predominately female cast and tells stories that reflect the lives and desires of contemporary Australian women," said Posie.

McLeod's Daughters is the first prime-time drama series to be filmed entirely in South Australia. The series, which is currently in its seventh series, is a co-production between Millennium Television and Nine Films and Television, produced with the assistance of the South Australian Film Corporation.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/mcleods_daughters_posters.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 20, 2007, 01:41:37 AM
McLEOD'S DAUGHTERS

ABOUT THE LOCATION AND PRODUCTION :

McLeod's Daughters is filmed on a working property located in the Light Regional District, between the townships of Gawler and Freeling, one hour north of Adelaide.

The property, Kingsford, is surrounded by 135 acres (55ha) of farming land, which Posie Graeme-Evans refers to as "our very own backlot".
Although originally part of a 30,000-acre (12,245ha) property, Kingsford has been used in recent years by the South Australian Government as a wheat research station. The Nine Network purchased the property in 1999.

The historical house was built from Edinburgh sandstone, transported to Australia as ship ballast. It took over 30 years to build and was finished in 1856.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/wilgul-1.jpg)

Production Designer Tony Cronin (Shine, Innocence) says the position of the property is perfect for filming. "It is isolated among the hills and gives a clear 360 degree view."

Although Kingsford was a grand property in its day, it is now quite run down - a look that was important for the production design of the series, as the McLeod family has no money for maintenance.

"The character is something you would spend a million dollars trying to re-create. The old buildings have warm orange colours in the stone from years of dust and red dirt," Cronin said.

The interior scenes set at Drovers Run are all filmed inside the house. Not only does this add to the authenticity of the production, it is also convenient, as the large rooms and high ceilings are ideal for filming.

Additional buildings on the property are used for Meg's cottage and Becky's quarters. The property also includes a machinery shed, shearing shed and stockyards.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Willgul-2.jpg)

Kingsford was a working farm in its day. "Everything on the site was purpose-built for farming and adds an authenticity which would be hard to emulate on a set," said Cronin.

The yards and paddocks at Kingsford house the stock needed to create McLeod's Daughters. The property currently has 150 sheep, 100 cattle, 15 horses, working dogs and a team of stockmen headed by master animal wrangler Bill Willoughby.

Bill is resident at Kingsford with brother Jim and two other stockmen. The wranglers maintain the stock, double for stunts and teach the actors farming skills including riding, shearing, drenching and mustering.

"We know every aspect of station life," said Willoughby, who has worked in films for over 20 years. He worked on the telemovie of McLeod's Daughters in 1996 and plays an important role in authenticating the animal sequences in the series.

He says that keeping the stock on the property at Kingsford works well and helps the horses "to look like farm horses."

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/shearing_shed.jpg)


Although the actors had little riding experience before the series began, Bill is happy with their progress, noting that Lisa Chappell and Bridie Carter are doing particularly well with their riding skills and other farming abilities.

The cinematography for McLeod's Daughters is vast and the composition is beautiful. Director of Photography, Roger Dowling has masterfully created the illusion that the series is shot on a 20,000 acre property in the Australian bush, instead of on a heritage estate, the size of a hobby farm, just one hour north of Adelaide.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/coach_departing.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 20, 2007, 01:44:24 AM
McLEOD'S DAUGHTERS

FANS OF THE SHOW WILL BE FAMILIAR WITH THESE SCENES :

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/front-shot.jpg)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Road.jpg)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/waterhole.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 20, 2007, 02:00:46 AM
McLEOD'S DAUGHTERS

MORE FAMILIAR SCENES :

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/tour_2.jpg)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/ruins.jpg)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/tour_1.jpg)

.
My Note :

All photographs I have posted for these articles on McLeod's Daughters have been taken from the website of www.mcleodscountry.com.au and used with their kind permission.  Please visit their website for more photographs of their tours and tourists.

They organise custom designed tours where you can find out more about where many of the scenes are filmed for the television series McLeod's Daughters. You can also hear from those whose properties are used and also from those who have worked behind the scenes.
See the beautiful countryside and enjoy a country morning tea. You will be captivated by the history of the Light Region of South Australia.
You are sure to make some new Aussie friends and have plenty of time to chat about those memorable moments in the series.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Anna on April 21, 2007, 01:42:57 AM
Thanks for posting all this info for us Tibro.  Tyler is right, maybe some of us are thinking of moving, lol!  

Of course I liked the dog breeds of Australia best and those breeds are just so popular in this country, too.  The Australian shepherd is very popular here as a working dog, sort of.  Lots of guys seem to prefer that breed because they will mind so well.  I have seen several "guarding" trucks and they seem to belong to men.

Silky Terriers are just like great big Yorkies!  Love em and also the Australian Terrier which is sort of like Yorkie Carin?

Most of all I like all the photos you post.   I like to look at them when I am too tired to think late at night they are soothing.  Fun to imagine a place so far away and what it would be like to live there.  A young country full of adventure.

.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 21, 2007, 02:27:51 AM
Hi Anna.  If you are thinking of moving - the bamboo grows well here too  :lol:  :lol:

Silky Terriers are supposed to be up to 10 inches at withers according to their standard.  The Aussie Terrier is about an inch shorter than the Scotties, Westies and Cairns.  Much wirier coat and a solid, no nonsense and tough little dog.

I left out the Aust Shepherd as they were not developed here but for the readers who are wondering what we are talking about here is their history. They are a recognised breed here now and can be shown.  Also I must find out more about those Basque Sheepherders.

SHORT HISTORICAL SURVEY - While there are many theories as to the origin of the Australian Shepherd, the breed as we know it today, developed exclusively in the United States.   The Australian Shepherd was given its name because of the association with Basque Sheepherders who came to the United States from Australia in the 1800's.

The Australian Shepherd's popularity rose steadily with the boom of western horseback riding after World War II which became known to the general public via rodeos, horse shows, movies and television shows.   Their inherent versatile and trainable personality made them assets to American farms and ranches.   The American stockman continued the development of the breed, maintaining its versatility, keen intelligence, strong herding instincts and eye-catching appearance that originally won their admiration.

Although each individual is unique in colour and markings, all Australian Shepherds show an unsurpassed devotion to their families.   Their many attributes have guaranteed the Australian Shepherd's continued popularity.

SHAME THEY DOCK THE TAILS :

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/gracie.jpg)

HERE IS A NICE MATCHING QUARTET

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/4blk.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tylergal on April 21, 2007, 02:40:34 AM
I just wanted to tell you how much I have enjoyed your postings, not only here but throughout.

I found this neat story, and enjoyed it.  Interesting, very interesting.

Fri Apr 20, 10:46 AM ET

SYDNEY (Reuters) - Australian rescuers were on Friday trying to solve the "Mary Celeste" style mystery of a yacht found floating off the coast with its engine running, food on its table ready to eat, but no crew.

 
The 12-meter (36 feet) catamaran was found 80 nautical miles off Townsville on the northeast coast, but there was no sign of the three crewmen who had set sail from Queensland state bound for Australia's west coast on Sunday.
"What they found was a bit strange in that everything was normal, there was just no sign of the crew," Jon Hall from emergency management in Queensland told local radio on Friday.

Hall said the yacht's sails were up but one was badly shredded. He said the engine was running, there was food on the table, a laptop was turned on, and the radio and global positioning satellite (GPS) were working.

Three life jackets and survival equipment, including an emergency beacon, were found on board, but no life rafts.

The Mary Celeste was an abandoned "ghost ship" found off the coast of Portugal in 1872. None of the Mary Celeste's crew or passengers were ever found.

The KAZ 11 was spotted adrift on the outer Great Barrier Reef on Wednesday. Rescue crews boarded the vessel on Friday but there was no sign of the three crew men, aged 56, 63 and 69.

Police said weather conditions at sea on Sunday and Monday were rough. "There was a fair sort of a wind out there but it's improved since then, so who knows what could've happened," said Police Chief Superintendent Roy Wall,.

Rescuers have retrieved the boat's GPS system to analyze data for clues to the mysterious disappearance of the crew.

"That will now enable us to track backwards where this yacht has actually been in the last few days, and we're hoping that can pinpoint the search area for the missing crew," said Hall


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 21, 2007, 02:41:18 AM
KILKIVAN GREAT HORSE RIDE

Annually on a Saturday in April close to Easter up to 1100 horses, riders and horse-drawn vehicles start from five points around Kilkivan Shire, travel 20 - 30kms through some of the most picturesque country in South-East Queensland, then meet up for the grand parade through Kilkivan township at 4.00 pm.

KILKIVAN is one of the few towns actually situated on the Bi-Centennial National Trail, which runs from Cooktown to Victoria, and this was the inspiration for establishing the annual Kilkivan Great Horse Ride in 1986.
The Kilkivan Great Horse Ride was first suggested by Widgee grazier and former Kilkivan Shire councillor Fabian Webb, who wanted people of all ages and riding ability, from all walks of life, to get involved with a recreational ride through the scenic country which makes up Kilkivan Shire. In 1988 the Queensland opening of the National Trail was incorporated into the ride and legendary late R M Williams was among the riders who followed the trail.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/KGHR_Sign5_285.jpg)

Markets and street activities provide fun and entertainment in Kilkivan while spectators await the arrival of the horses. Following the parade, riders relax at the Tom Grady Campfire Concert at the Kilkivan showgrounds, with a fully licensed bar and catering by local community groups. The evening concert features the finals of the Toyota Kilkivan Country Talent Search sponsored by Toyota and Ken Mills Toyota. 2007 is the second year of this competition catering for up and coming country artists.

"Sunday is Funday" with  a wide range of horse-sports, a Team Penning Competition as well as Pony Club events for all ages and abilities, including Senior and Junior novelty events.

WAITING TO START ONE SECTION

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/banner_2000.jpg)

ALONG THE HANGING ROCK TRAIL

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/hanging_rock_trail_2000_small1.jpg)

THE GRAND PARADE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/grand_parade_2000_small1.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 21, 2007, 02:49:44 AM
Thanks for your interest Tyler.  I enjoy finding articles and hunting for suitable pictures.  I try to keep them varied and not just what I am most interested in.........
That is a mystery about the missing men on that boat.  Will try to see if there is any more up to date news in the morning.  Spooky.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 21, 2007, 05:57:33 PM
(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/0545531400.jpg)

UPDATE FROM THE SUNDAY MAIL NEWSPAPER

WITHOUT A TRACE

Sonia Campbell, David Murray and Kay Dibben
April 22, 2007 12:00am

THE mystery deepened yesterday into the fate of the crew of a north Queensland ghost yacht with boating experts questioning whether they were victims of their own inexperience, piracy, a fatal swim or freak squall.

The chilling disappearance of skipper Des Batten, 56, Peter Tunstead, 69, and his brother James, 63 – all from Western Australia – has baffled emergency services and the yachting community. Their 9.8m catamaran, Kaz II, was found unmanned and adrift on Wednesday about 160km off Townsville, where it was towed for testing by police forensic officers. Helicopters and two boats joined a scaled-down search for the trio yesterday along the coastline between Airlie Beach, from where they set sail on their ill-fated voyage last Sunday morning, and north of Bowen, as hopes of finding the trio alive began to fade.

While police said the crew of Kaz II most likely had been washed overboard after hitting rough seas and strong winds last Sunday, rescuers reported finding the men's clothing in neat piles on the boat's rear deck – as if they had gone swimming.

As families of the victims arrived in Townsville yesterday searching for answers, police admitted they were baffled by the mystery of what happened.  "There is very little hope that they would have survived at this stage if they were still in the water, so we're concentrating on the coastline just in case they made it to shore," Chief Supt Roy Wall said.
Data collected from GPS systems on board the vessel indicated the yacht was on course last Sunday morning after departing Shute Harbour at Airlie Beach, but had struck trouble that afternoon.
"The vessel in the early part of Sunday was on course, but later on during the day it appears that it's just been tracking in a slightly different direction," Chief Supt Wall said.

When the yacht was boarded, its engine was running, a laptop computer sat switched on inside, navigational equipment and plotting gear were laid out and all safety gear was on board. Police denied previous reports that food was on a dining table ready to eat. Chief Supt Wall said the men could have been swept overboard in rough conditions. "We really don't know for sure and it's probably dangerous to speculate but obviously they've become separated from their vessel, it's as simple as that," he said.

"There's no indication whatsoever of anything untoward, no sign of a struggle or a fight. There doesn't appear to be any blood or anything like that. Everything seems to be quite intact.  We may never ever know exactly how it all unfolded. There are a number of scenarios. One of them could have been fishing and may have fallen in and the others might have tried to rescue him. Who knows? They were obviously long-term friends. It would be obvious that they would help each other if they were in strife."

But Emergency Management Queensland helicopter rescue crewman Phil Livingstone told The Sunday Mail clothes had been found neatly placed on the rear deck, suggesting the men may have gone for a swim. "There were neatly placed shorts, sunglasses, cap, sitting on the back deck, unruffled like they'd just gone for a swim," Mr Livingstone said. "Alongside the clothing was a fishing rod with its line in the water."

The only thing out of place aboard the catamaran was its badly ripped sail.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Anna on April 21, 2007, 06:40:48 PM
The Travel Channel is featuring Australia this evening.

Should be interesting.

.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 21, 2007, 07:38:54 PM
Good viewing, Anna.
You can watch for familiar places or note any you need more info on for this thread  :wink:  :wink:


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 22, 2007, 02:57:59 AM
TARGA TASMANIA

SOMETHING FOR THE MOTOR SPORT FANS
17 - 22 April 2007

In 2007 Targa Tasmania celebrates its 16th anniversary, hallmarking the historic staging of what has become one of the ‘must do’ tarmac rallies on the world’s motorsport calendar.

Targa Tasmania is an exciting International Classic. It is a tarmac rally with competitive stages on closed roads for the best touring, sports and GT cars in the world. Its inaugural year was in April 1992 when Tasmania hosted this distinguished International motoring classic.

The competition concept is drawn directly from the best features of the Mille Miglia, the Coupe des Alpes and the Tour de Corse. However, Targa Tasmania is not a slow-motion re-run. It is a genuine "red-blooded" motor sport competition. It is also a unique annual opportunity for the owners of sports cars and GTs to drive them the way they were designed to be driven, on some of the most exciting and challenging tarmac roads in the world.

Targa Tasmania caters for up to 300 select cars including many overseas competitors. Entries are selected from Applications to Compete, by a Vehicle Selection Committee. Invitations to Compete in each year's Event are announced on a progressive basis from August through to March (close of applications).  Targa Tasmania has quickly established itself as an annual event, conducted in April each year. The present format is to conduct the event over five days plus a Prologue on some 2,000 kilometers of tarmac roads.

Targa Tasmania entrants comprise a wide range of media-attracting personalities including former World Champions and other well-known motor sport competitors from both Australia and overseas, as well as national and international celebrities. In short, this is not only a competitive motor sport event. It is a unique commercial and tourist attraction capturing the imagination of the Australian public as well as the national and international motor sport fraternity.

Tourism Tasmania has announced that more than 200,000 people per annum watch Targa Tasmania each year over the five days, while an international viewing audience of over 480 millions has been estimated for each event.

Targa Tasmania has the support and backing of the Confederation of Australian Motor Sport (CAMS) as well as the Federation International de l' Automobile (FIA). The Tasmanian Government rates this special event as having a substantial commercial contribution as well and being a major tourist attraction to the State, and active support is provided by the Department of State Development. Thus, Targa Tasmania is another example of the successful partnership between Government and Motor Sport, attracting between $5 and $10 million new tourist dollars to Tasmania each year.

The goal of organisers, Octagon, and the Tasmanian Government has been achieved - to see Targa Tasmania develop into the premier motor sport event of its type in Australia, ranking alongside the Australian Grand Prix in Melbourne and Rally Australia in Perth.


QUADRIPLEGICS SET TO RACE IN TARGA TASMANIA

Contributor: AQA Victoria.Source: AQA Victoria.Posted: 11-04-2007
Targa Tasmania is an exciting international classic car race / rally drive held annually in Tasmania. The event in 2007 commences on Tuesday 17 April and includes the best sports and GT cars in the world.This year, the six day event will again see the entry of two drivers who have a spinal cord injury – SCI Team Targa Tasmania. In 2006, the team successfully overcame all odds to complete the Targa and become the first ever 'disabled entry' to achieve such a goal.Alan Stevenson, a quadriplegic since 2001 after an accident, had a vision for some time to participate in Targa Tasmania. With his motor racing skills, determination, ingenuity and knowledge of spinal cord injury, it all came to fruition.He is being joined by Nazim Erdem, also a quadriplegic caused by a diving accident. Nazim is a two time Paralympian in Wheelchair Rugby who works at AQA Victoria (a support organisation for people with spinal cord injury) has enlisted support from AQA to assist Alan fulfill this challenge.They both aim to show others, including the general public and others with disability, that 'life with a disability isn’t a dead end'. Hopefully by creating awareness they will be able to get their message across.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 22, 2007, 03:46:06 AM
TARGA TASMANIA

SOME OF THE 2007 COMPETITORS

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(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/7TT6121T.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 24, 2007, 09:10:35 PM
ANZAC DAY

Australian war historian C.E.W. Bean attributes the acronym ANZAC to a Lieutenant A.T. White, one of General Birdwood’s ‘English clerks’. The first official sanction for its use was at Birdwood’s request to denote where the Corps had established a bridgehead on the Gallipoli Peninsula. However, there is little argument that ANZAC was first used as a simple code in Egypt. A later historical work, Gallipoli, by the English historian Robert Rhodes James states:
Two Australian Sergeants, Little and Millington had cut a rubber stamp with the initials ‘A & NZAC’ for the purpose of registering papers at the Corps headquarters, situated in Shepheard’s Hotel, Cairo. When a code name was requested for the Corps, a British officer, a Lt. White, suggested ANZAC. Little later claimed that he made the original suggestion to White. It was in general use by January 1915.

Whatever its origin, the acronym ANZAC became famous with the landing of the Corps on the Gallipoli Peninsula at the Dardanelles, on 25 April 1915. It has since become synonymous with the determination and spirit of our armed forces. The significance of the day, and the acronym, in Australia’s heritage is probably best stated by Dr. Bean in the following excerpt from his official war history:
It was not merely that 7600 Australians and nearly 2500 New Zealanders had been killed or mortally wounded there, and 24,000 more (19,000 Australians and 5,000 New Zealanders) had been wounded, while fewer than 100 were prisoners. But the standards set by the first companies at the first call - by the stretcher-bearers, the medical officers, the staff, the company leaders, the privates, the defaulters on the water barges, the Light Horse at The Nek - this was already part of the tradition not only of ANZAC but of the Australian and New Zealand peoples. By dawn on 20 December, ANZAC had faded into a dim blue line lost amid other hills on the horizon as the ships took their human freight to Imbros, Lemnos and Egypt. But ANZAC stood, and still stands, for reckless valour in a good cause, for enterprise, resourcefulness, fidelity, comradeship and endurance that will never own defeat.

The acronym survived Gallipoli. I and II ANZAC Corps fought in France and the ANZAC Mounted Division fought in Palestine. The decision to separate the Australian and New Zealand components of the ANZAC Corps was taken on 14 November 1917 when it was announced that the Corps would cease to exist from January 1918. An Australian Corps was then created to absorb the Australian divisions.
There was a brief period during World War 2 when ANZAC was resurrected. On 12 April 1941 in Greece, General Blamey declared I Australian Corps to be the ANZAC Corps, much to the delight of its Australian and New Zealand formations.

ANZAC was again a reality during the Vietnam conflict where, in the late 1960s and early 1970s, an ANZAC battalion served in Phuoc Tuy Province. These battalions were created by absorbing two companies and supporting elements from The Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment into a battalion of the Royal Australian Regiment (RAR). Our 2nd, 4th and 6th Battalions held the distinction of being titled, for example, 2RAR/NZ (ANZAC) Battalion

The ANZAC Day Dawn Service has become an integral part of commemorations on 25 April. However, credit for its origin is divided between the Reverend Arthur Ernest White of Albany, WA and Captain George Harrington of Toowoomba, Queensland.
Reverend White was a padre of the earliest ANZACs to leave Australia with the First AIF in November 1914. The convoy assembled at Albany’s King George Sound in WA and at 4 am on the morning of their departure, he conducted a service for all men. After the war, White gathered some 20 men at dawn on 25 April 1923 on Mt Clarence overlooking King George Sound and silently watched a wreath floating out to sea. He then quietly recited the words ‘As the sun rises and goeth down we will remember them’. All were deeply moved and the news of the ceremony soon spread. White is quoted as saying that ‘Albany was the last sight of land these ANZAC troops saw after leaving Australian shores and some of them never returned. We should hold a service (here) at the first light of dawn each ANZAC Day to commemorate them.’
At 4 am on ANZAC morning 1919 in Toowoomba, Captain Harrington and a group of friends visited all known graves and memorials of men killed in action in World War 1 and placed flowers (not poppies) on the headstones. Afterwards they toasted their mates with a rum. In 1920 and 1921 these men followed a similar pattern but adjourned to Picnic Point at the top of the range and toasted their mates until the first rays of dawn appeared. A bugler sounded the ‘Last Post’ and ‘Reveille’

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(Above) One of the few photos taken during the landing at ANZAC Cove, Gallipoli. (AWM J3022)  By kind permission of the Australian War Memorial, Canberra


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 24, 2007, 09:13:59 PM
SIMPSON AND HIS DONKEY

Twenty-two years old, English-born and a trade union activist, John Simpson Kirkpatrick was an unlikely figure to become a national hero. Having deserted from the merchant navy in 1910, he tramped around Australia and worked in a variety of jobs. He enlisted in the AIF, expecting this would give him the chance to get back to England; instead, Private Simpson found himself at ANZAC Cove on 25 April 1915, and was killed less than four weeks later.

Simpson would not have made a good peacetime soldier, and he was recklessly independent in war. Instructed to recover and help the wounded he undertook this work enthusiastically. Famously, he used a small donkey called Duffy to carry men down from the front line, often exposing himself to fire. Simpson and his donkey became famous among the Australian soldiers at Gallipoli because of their bravery. Day after day Simpson and his donkey would wind their way through the hills and valleys looking for wounded soldiers. Even though it was very dangerous, Simpson would crawl on his belly and drag soldiers back to safety. He would then put the injured soldier on the donkey’s back and lead him down to the beach. One day Duffy came down to the beach with a soldier on his back, but without Simpson. Simpson had been killed trying to save another soldier. The donkey somehow knew that even though his friend was dead, Simpson would have wanted him to take the injured man to safety.

The bravery of this "man with the donkey" soon became the most prominent symbol of Australian courage and tenacity on Gallipoli. Although Simpson carried no arms and remains an enigmatic figure, the nature of his sacrifice made a vital contribution to the story of ANZAC. Simpson’s actions are regarded as the highest expression of mateship, and he remains one of Australia’s best known historical figures.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/AWMA03114.jpg)

(Above) This photograph is the only authentic one of Simpson and Duffy in action in Shrapnel Gully, Gallipoli. (AWM A03114) By kind permission of the Australian War Memorial, Canberra


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 24, 2007, 09:17:52 PM
ANZAC BISCUITS

1 Cup Flour
155 gms Butter
1 Cup Rolled Oats
1 Level Teaspoon Bicarb Soda
1 Cup Coconut
1 Tablespoon Golden Syrup
1 Cup Sugar
2 Tablespoons Water

Combine flour, oats, coconut and sugar. Add melted butter. Mix syrup, bicarb soda and hot water and add to other ingredients. Mix well. Drop in small pieces on greased tray. Bake in slow to moderate oven 10 - 20 minutes. Allow to cool slightly on tray before removing.

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During World War 1, the wives, mothers and girlfriends of the Australian soldiers were concerned for the nutritional value of the food being supplied to their men. Here was a problem. Any food they sent to the fighting men had to be carried in the ships of the Merchant Navy. Most of these were lucky to maintain a speed of ten knots. Most had no refrigerated facilities, so any food sent had to be able to remain edible after periods in excess of two months. A body of women came up with the answer - a biscuit with all the nutritional value possible. The basis was a Scottish recipe using rolled oats. These oats were used extensively in Scotland, especially for a heavy porridge that helped counteract the extremely cold climate.
The ingredients they used were: rolled oats, sugar, plain flour, coconut, butter, golden syrup or treacle, bi-carbonate of soda and boiling water. All these items did not readily spoil. At first the biscuits were called Soldiers’ Biscuits, but after the landing on Gallipoli, they were renamed ANZAC Biscuits.
A point of interest is the lack of eggs to bind the ANZAC biscuit mixture together. Because of the war, many of the poultry farmers had joined the services, thus, eggs were scarce. The binding agent for the biscuits was golden syrup or treacle. Eggs that were sent long distances were coated with a product called ke peg (like Vaseline) then packed in air tight containers filled with sand to cushion the eggs and keep out the air.
As the war drew on, many groups like the CWA (Country Women’s Association), church groups, schools and other women’s organisations devoted a great deal of time to the making of ANZAC biscuits. To ensure that the biscuits remained crisp, they were packed in used tins, such as Billy Tea tins.
ANZAC biscuits are still made today. They can also be purchased from supermarkets and specialty biscuit shops. Around ANZAC Day, these biscuits are also often used by veterans’ organisations to raise funds for the care and welfare of aged war veterans.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 25, 2007, 02:28:47 AM
YACHT THREE "KIDNAPPED"

Christine Flatley ..April 25, 2007 12:00am .. Article from: The Courier-Mail

RELATIVES of the skipper of a mystery yacht found off the coast of north Queensland believe the three missing crew members may have been kidnapped.

Hope Himing, niece of Derek Batten, 56, said yesterday there were many unusual circumstances that suggested foul play in regard to the yacht, which was found adrift off the coast of Townsville last Wednesday.

Emergency service crews found the engine running, computers turned on and the GPS system operating but no sign of the boat's crew.

"It just doesn't all add up," Ms Himing said her family dismissed police suggestions that her uncle, known to the family as "Des", and his crew members – brothers Peter and James Tunstead, aged 69 and 63, all from Perth – were washed overboard in bad weather.

She said she strongly believed that the 9.8m catamaran Kaz II was boarded, and the trio may have been kidnapped.

"It looks like they've been boarded," she said.

Ms Himing said she held grave fears for the trio's safety, but believed they were still alive. She said the families would continue to search Airlie Beach and the surrounding islands until they had closure.

"My mum and I are both spiritualists. My mum's had a really strong feeling from Des that he's somewhere dark and he can't see and I don't feel that he's dead either," she said.

Ms Himing said the families of all three crew members felt that authorities had called off the search too quickly.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 25, 2007, 02:35:38 AM
LOGIES TO HONOUR IRWIN

April 25, 2007 02:00am...Article from: The Courier-Mail

CROCODILE Hunter Steve Irwin is to be posthumously honoured for revolutionising the wildlife documentary industry with induction into Australian TV's Hall of Fame at next month's Logie Awards.
The TV presenter built a loyal worldwide following as he shared his passion for wildlife conservation in his TV series and a feature film.

His widow Terri will accept the award while daughter Bindi, whose own wildlife series begins airing in the US in June, will present the award for most outstanding children's program.

The awards will be held in Melbourne on May 6.

"Our documentaries started airing in Australia, and we were only ever going to do one episode about crocodiles and, in a very short period of time, we'd done 10 episodes to tremendous ratings," Terri Irwin told TV Week.

She said people had become detached from wildlife in recent history and it was a "point of pride" for Steve that he was considered a pioneer of his genre.

"Changing the face of television and bringing wildlife back into people's living rooms in a hands-on way was so important to him," she said.

The Hall of Fame award goes to a nationally known individual or program for "an outstanding and sustained contribution to Australian television".

Terri and Bindi Irwin appear today on the cover of The Australian Women's Weekly wearing elegant gowns, and tell the magazine that fond memories of Steve were helping them overcome the grief of losing him.

"My grief comes easily, but I keep putting one foot in front of the other as there are so many things I want to accomplish," Terri tells the magazine.

She says Bindi and her brother Bob need her more than ever since their father's passing.

"I need to be there for them, and they need me to be there, too," she says.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 26, 2007, 03:16:44 AM
Here you go, Mishy.  This will explain "hooning"   :lol:  :lol:

CAMERAS TARGET HOONS

By Chris Griffith...April 25, 2007 12:00am...Article from: The Courier-Mail

A QUEENSLAND road safety group is offering "hoon removal kits" to help frustrated households rid their neighborhood of reckless drivers.
For $150-$200, residents upset by the antics of hoons will be able to hire a ‘’consultant’’ to film them with specially made cameras.

The cameras take 10 still photos per second, can snap number plates clearly even where cars travel at high speeds,and offer evidence that can be tendered in court, says the organisation.

Roadside Watch founder Loraine McElligott said the group was interviewing former Queensland Police Officers and private investigators who would provide the ‘’hoon removal’’ consultancy service and operate the cameras.

The controversial service will see roadside video surveillance not just a police activity but also in the hands of private citizens.

In a double whammy to dangerous drivers, parents concerned about their teenage children’s driving habits will be able to mount the same high speed cameras in their cars as monitoring devices.

She said that in the United States, parents had mounted cameras in cars in states where breaches of law could lead to a parental car being confiscated

"The parents know what is going on in the car before the police arrive on the doorstep.’’

She said the two special cameras would be trialled this weekend.

"We’re going to do a test run this weekend. We’ve just imported two cameras from the States,’’ Ms McElligott said.

She said Roadside Watch had written to police ministers around the country who had been supportive of the group’s aims while not necessarily endorsing its tactics.

"We got these cameras from OBS (on Board Security) in the States and they offer evidence that’s usable in court,’’ Ms McElligott said.

She said evidence of driving offences, and dangerous spins and wheelies would be available to police.

“We’ve also had a good response from police at the local level and higher level.’’

She said the group had established a blog for hoons to hear their side of the story.

"I don’t have a problem with them chatting on our site. It opens up the project. They say they have a right to let off steam on the road.’’

Ms McElligott said frustrated residents knew exactly where and when hoons would be operating, and therefore getting them on camera was likely to be relatively straight forward, whatever the time of day or night.

She said Roadside Watch planned to make its business national and offer consultants with their cameras in each state.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 27, 2007, 02:05:47 AM
MAGPIES

The piping shrike is also known as the white-backed magpie. Magpies can roughly be divided into white-backed and black-backed. The white-backed magpie is largely confined to western and southern Australia. (Kaplan, 2004).

There are at least four different subspecies of Australian magpie:
·...The Black-backed Magpie found in Queensland and New South Wales, right across the Top End and most of arid Western Australia. In the future the black-backed race may be further split into four separate races, as there are regional differences between them.
·...The White-backed Magpie  found in Victoria, South Australia, and outback NSW.
·...The Tasmanian Magpie.
·...The Western Magpie  in the fertile south-west corner of Western Australia.

At least two of the races were originally classified as separate species, but they are cross-fertile and hybridise readily. Where their territories cross, hybrid grey or striped-backed magpies are quite common. Magpies mate across the year, but generally in winter. Nesting takes place in winter and spring is the season when the babies are looked after. By late summer the babies either make their own clan or separate from their parents whilst staying in the same clan.

Magpies are known to "dive-bomb" people or animals who venture too close to their nesting sites.  They can inflict nasty wounds and protective headgear is necessary if walking or cycling through their territory.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/magpie_in_tree.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 27, 2007, 02:08:14 AM
NUMBAT

Numbats (also known as Walpurti) are small marsupials, which feed almost solely on termites. Because of this, they are also known as the Banded Anteater. When fully grown, they reach about 40 cms from nose to tail.

They inhabit woodlands in Western Australia, this is the only state in which they are found in the wild. To improve numbat numbers, they are also bred in captivity at the Perth Zoo. However, a new colony has now been established in South Australia. The area in which they live have a high termite population, and each numbat can consume up to 20,000 per day! Numbats have a long snout, and this helps them to find termites in soil. They also have a long tongue which aids when feeding on termites.

Numbats are one of the few marsupials who are active during the day.
Numbats were critically endangered a few years ago, but populations have now increased. With their unique look, it makes them a very popular animal. Their body is covered in reddish-brown fur, and has white bands running across. They have long bushy tails, about the length of their body

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/numbat.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 27, 2007, 02:11:19 AM
WEDGE-TAIL EAGLE

Wedge-tail eagles are among the world's largest eagles with a wingspan of up to 2.5 metres. They are relatively common all over the Australian mainland, in Tasmania and southern New Guinea, except in densely populated areas. To get off the ground they use an active flapping flight, but once airborne these eagles use thermal updrafts to carry them effortlessly aloft and gracefully spiral upwards to great heights.

Australia has three species of eagle, the Little Eagle (Hieraetus morphnoides), the White-bellied Sea Eagle (Haliaeetus leucogaster) and the largest, the Wedge-tailed Eagle (Aquila audax - literally 'bold eagle'). Wedge-tails prefer open woodland, but are found exploiting a range of habitats from arid desert to grasslands, mountainous areas, and even rainforest.

Easily identified by their size (up to 3.2 kg for males and 4.2kg for females), Wedge-tails are known as booted or trousered eagles thanks to the heavy feather 'trousers' covering their legs. They are also characterised by finger-like wing feathers and, of course, a long wedge-shaped tail. Young birds can be distinguished by their light brown plumage and golden highlights; the plumage of older birds tends to darken to near black at sexual maturity between five and seven years.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/f_g.jpg)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/f_d.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 28, 2007, 02:34:41 AM
BORONIA

The large family of plants which includes the genus Boronia is distributed over many parts of the world. Botanically the family is known as the Rutaceae and it includes a number of commercially important plants such as the citrus group of fruit trees (oranges, lemons, lime, etc) and popular ornamental plants such as Diosma which is native to South Africa. Within Australia there are about 40 genera, many of which are cultivated. The most widely cultivated of these are the genera in the "Boronia group".
Generally the Boronia group comprises plants of open forests and woodlands. They only rarely are to be found in rainforests or in arid areas. Overall the group is distributed throughout Australia but certain genera within the group may be restricted in their distribution (eg Correa is not found in Western Australia).

The flowers are bisexual and usually have four or five petals but it is not unusual for some of the flowers on a particular plant to have an abnormal number of petals. In some cases the petals are fused into a bell-like tube while in others the petals are small and the stamens are the conspicuous parts of the flowers, similar to the flowers of the well known but unrelated genera Callistemon and Melaleuca. The number of stamens either equals the number of petals or is twice the number of petals. The fruits contain hard, waxy seeds which are expelled over a wide area when ripe.

The Boronia group of plants are usually small to medium sized shrubs; none would reach even small tree proportions. A feature of most of the group is the presence of aromatic oils in the foliage and, in some cases, the flowers. When crushed or brushed against, the foliage gives off quite a strong aroma. In most cases this is an attractive feature but a few people find the very strong aroma of some species to be unpleasant. A number of the boronias have a very attractive perfume with the "Brown Boronia", being the most famous.

LEDUM BORONIA

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/LedumBoronia.jpg)

BROWN BORONIA

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/BrownBoronia.jpg)

BORONIA MICROPHYLLA

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/BoroniaMicrophylla.jpg)

HARLEQUIN BORONIA

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/HarlequinBoronia.jpg)

SOFT BORONIA

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/SoftBoroniajpg.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 29, 2007, 02:49:48 AM
"ODDBALL" IDEA PROTECTS ISLAND PENGUIN POPULATION

Story by Lorna Edwards

A South-West Victorian chicken farmer known as Swampy and his dog Oddball may have found a way to save some of Australia's endangered wildlife from predators.

After Warrnambool's once-flourishing penguin population was decimated by foxes and dogs until only 27 remained, Allan "Swampy" Marsh hatched a radical plan to save the birds. His four maremma sheepdogs had been protecting his chickens against predators for a decade. He figured they could do the same for the penguins.
"The difficulty was trying to convince all the wildlife wallies to think outside the square," Mr Marsh said. "It's not an altruistic view of penguins or chooks but an ingrained sense of territory that makes maremma dogs work, and it is far stronger in these dogs than any other domesticated breed."

Oddball's stint as guardian of Middle Island's colony last month was a success. At the end of the month, 70 pairs of happy feet were counted returning to the island. About 2000 penguins inhabited the island in the 1990s.

"The poor little buggers have copped such a hiding," Mr Marsh said. "Oddy is really protective of the chooks, so to her the penguins were only chooks in dinner suits."

Highly territorial dogs, maremmas have been bred in Italy to guard livestock for 2000 years. They instinctively ward off intruders such as foxes and dogs.

The trial's success has generated interest from overseas. The use of guard animals such as maremmas — and even alpacas, which also deter foxes — is now being considered to save other endangered species such as the eastern barred bandicoot.

Oddball's first encounter with a penguin resulted in a peck on the nose.
But they soon learnt to live in harmony, with Oddball sleeping metres from the penguins' burrows. "They pretty quickly got used to the fact there was a new smell on the island," said Mr Marsh, who also camped on the island.
Warrnambool City Council environment officer Ian Fitzgibbon said the community was excited by the trial's success and its implications for wildlife.

"The penguins are part of the Warrnambool community and everyone feels pretty strongly about them," he said. "People see maremmas as a conservation technique that could be used with other animals suffering from predation."

The council closed Middle Island to the public during the trial amid concerns that the dog might attack people. Department of Sustainability and Environment regional biodiversity manager Craig Whiteford said the concept could be adapted to protect shearwater, gannet and other penguin colonies along the coast, as well as the eastern barred bandicoot in the Hamilton area. "We've adapted a normal agricultural process into conservation of an animal and we don't know that that has happened before with native species," he said. "There is global interest in this little trial."

The council and DSE are now considering a year-long trial at Middle Island, using two maremma puppies recently acquired by Mr Marsh.
With Oddball back guarding her chooks and interview requests trickling in from overseas, Mr Marsh said he was chuffed she had become the "Paris Hilton" of the animal world. "From the point of view of having introduced a new idea to the conservation community and opened a lot of closed minds, I feel really proud," he said.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/ODDBALL.jpg)

Oddball the maremma and Allan "Swampy" Marsh at Middle Island in Warrnambool. The chicken-loving dog spent last month guarding the island's penguin colony, with great success. Photo: Robin Sharrock


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Elaine on April 29, 2007, 08:06:11 PM
Quote from: "Tibrogargan"
LATEST CUB PHOTOS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/tigercubs_2week_framed.jpg)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/tigercubs_2week_02.jpg)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/tigercubs_3week_03.jpg)
Awwww, they are so pretty, such nice coloring and all!


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 30, 2007, 06:19:44 AM
Beautiful markings too, Elaine.  You can see the differences in the black lines on the individuals cubs faces.  I have been checking the website but no new photos yet.  Hope they print some soon otherwise the cubs will have grown quite big.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on April 30, 2007, 06:26:42 AM
THE AUSTRALIAN WINE INDUSTRY

Australian wine has won an international reputation for quality and value. Australian wines have taken key international awards, competing favourably against longer-established national wine industries. Innovative Australian winemakers are sought internationally for their expertise.
Australia produces a full range of favoured wine styles from full-bodied reds and deep fruity whites through to sparkling, dessert and fortified styles. Prized Australian bottlings grace the menus of many of the world's leading restaurants, while popular varietal and blended wines compete on the shelves of wine shops and supermarkets in some 80 countries around the world.

Wine-grape growing and winemaking are carried out in each of the six States and two mainland Territories of Australia. The principal production areas are located in the south-east quarter of the Australian continent, in the states of South Australia, New South Wales and Victoria.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/ta.jpg)

The older-established concentrations of productive wineries in South Australia's Barossa Valley, in the Hunter River region north of Sydney in New South Wales and in Victoria played a major role in the development of the industry and continue to be important sources of fine wines. However, wine is produced in over 60 regions, reflecting the wide range of climates and soil types available in the continent. These include areas such as Mudgee, the Murrumbidgee and Murray River valleys (New South Wales); the Southern Vales, Clare Valley and Riverland (South Australia); and Rutherglen and Yarra Valleys (Victoria). The States of Western Australia, Tasmania and Queensland have smaller wine industries, which have grown rapidly in volume, quality and reputation. The Canberra region, near Australia's national capital, has a recognised cool-climate wine industry.

A generous range of grape varieties goes into the making of Australian wine. In 2003-04 Shiraz was the most-produced variety, followed by Chardonnay and Cabernet Sauvignon. Premium white varieties other than Chardonnay include Semillon, Riesling and Colombard. Main red wine varieties other than Shiraz and Cabernet Sauvignon include Merlot, Grenache and Pinot Noir.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/VicVineyard.jpg)

Wine is very much a part of Australian life, closely associated with both business and leisure. Wine consumption is often linked to the country's outdoor-oriented lifestyle as well as to the cosmopolitan urban way of life of the bulk of the Australian population.
Wine festivals are a feature of cultural life in the major wine producing regions of Australia and draw many Australian holidaymakers and international visitors each year.

The first vines arrived with the first European settlers to Australia in 1788. Initially wines were produced in the coastal region around the fledgling city of Sydney. John Macarthur established the earliest commercial vineyard.
In 1822 Gregory Blaxland shipped 136 litres of wine to London, where it was awarded the silver medal by the forerunner of the Royal Society of Arts. Five years later a larger shipment of Blaxland's wine won the gold Ceres medal.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/tasmania1.jpg)

Planting of vines accompanied the spread of European settlement across the Australian continent, and by the beginning of the 20th century Australia was exporting some 4.5 million litres of mainly full-bodied dry red wines to the United Kingdom.

The end of the Second World War saw a rapid influx of migrants from Europe who brought with them a strong culture related to wine. This provided an important impetus to the Australian wine industry.
However it is the period 1996 to 2004 that has seen spectacular growth in exports following rapidly increasing appreciation of Australian wines overseas. Major wine producers from abroad have invested in Australian wineries and Australian companies have taken controlling interests in wineries in countries such as France and Chile.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 01, 2007, 06:00:16 AM
AIN’T NOTHIN’ BUT A HANGDOG

Martin Philip..May 01, 2007 12:00am..Article from: The Courier Mail

EIGHT-year-old blue heeler Patch is one old dog that can be taught new tricks. Perched high on a hang-glider above Rex Lookout near Cairns in Norther Queensland,  the versatile cattle dog looks every bit the seasoned pro he is But Patch isn't just a hang-gliding hound. The 12-flight veteran is also an accomplished motorcyclist and surfer, not to mention an old hand at the job he was bred for – rounding up cattle.

Professional hang-gliding instructor Greg Newnham has owned Patch since he was five weeks old, but waited until he turned two before taking him on his maiden voyage. It's not where a dog should be, I think they're happier on the ground, but to come up with me and see what I do, I think that puts the whole world in a different perspective for him," Mr Newnham said.

After Patch passed his first aerial test with flying colours, Cairns-based Mr Newnham set about equipping him with a set of skills usually reserved for Hollywood stuntmen. "I taught him to ride a surfboard, he rides on the front and on the back of motorbikes and he's good on cattle as well – he's a jack-of-all-trades," he said.

Patch is strapped into a training harness before taking to the skies. The unflappable bluey is a better learner than a lot of his hang-gliding students, according to Mr Newnham – a hang-gliding veteran of 23 years. "He's easier to handle, there's less weight to carry and he doesn't talk as much," he said.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/PatchHangGlider.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 02, 2007, 02:50:44 AM
IRWIN TEAM TO CATCH LA ALLIGATOR

Peter Mitchell…May 02, 2007 12:00am…Article from: AAP

STEVE Irwin's expert crew of Australian crocodile wranglers are set to fly to Los Angeles to catch one of the city's most elusive rogues - Reggie the alligator.
LA residents were stunned yesterday when news broke that Reggie, a 2m long alligator, was spotted swimming in Lake Machado, a popular inner-city lake.
Reggie was last seen in the lake 18 months ago and Irwin, who was visiting LA at the time, vowed to catch the reptile before it attacked a jogger or picnicker.
LA City Council contacted the late Crocodile Hunter's manager, John Stainton, in Australia yesterday to ask if Irwin's crack crew of wranglers at Queensland's Australia Zoo could trap Reggie.
"They have shown initial excitement about this," LA councilwoman Janice Hahn told AAP today.
"They felt like it would be a great way to honour Steve's memory and fulfill his promise.
"We're in discussions right now and they're going to call us back when they have a sense of when they could come over."
In LA, a city filled with celebrities, Reggie has created his own cult status.
Hundreds of locals lined the lake today with binoculars, hoping to spot the elusive reptile, while local TV stations led their news bulletins with the Reggie sighting.
US authorities allege the alligator was owned by a former LA policeman, Todd Natow, who kept it as a backyard pet, but when Reggie grew too big Natow dumped it in the 16-hectare Lake Machado.
Natow has pleaded not guilty to misdemeanour charges tied to Reggie's possession and lake release.
If Reggie is captured he will likely be housed at LA Zoo.
Reggie shocked locals when he was first spotted swimming in the lake in August 2005, but two months later he disappeared until yesterday's sighting.
Hahn and LA city officials and residents are dumbfounded about where Reggie may have been hiding.
"I want to talk to Steve's crocodile guys to give me a sense where Reggie has been all this time," Hahn said.
Irwin, who was killed by a stingray on Queensland's Great Barrier Reef last September, toured Lake Machado in a small boat with Hahn in early 2006 searching for Reggie.
"Steve knew we were in quite a predicament since we were very unfamiliar with alligators," Hahn said.
"Steve was such a gentleman and so gracious.
"I loved my hour with him.
"Steve said 'I want to help Los Angeles'.
"All of LA felt connected with him and when he passed away the city was devastated."
Hahn said she did not know if Steve's wife, Terri, and budding TV star daughter, Bindi, would join the Reggie expedition.
"That would be so sweet if they could come over," Hahn said.
Details of who would pay for Irwin's crew to fly to LA were still to be finalised.
"We'll work all that stuff out," Hahn said.
"If they can come, we'll try to figure it out."
Adding to the folklore of Reggie, LA Council had enlisted a motley crew of American crocodile trappers to catch Reggie, but all failed.
"We've had our share of 'gator wranglers," Hahn laughed.
"One of them had escaped from jail."


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 02, 2007, 02:52:05 AM
OBESITY PILL DEVELOPED FOR DOGS

May 02, 2007 01:31pm…Article from: AAP

OVERWEIGHT dogs may soon get a scientific leg-up to help shed unwanted puppy fat after an Australian company's animal weight-loss drug passed initial tests.
Perth-based Stirling Products Ltd's R-salbutamol drug was trialled on 15 beagles in the US, each losing 3 per cent weight loss a week, the company said.
Stirling chief executive and managing director Calvin London said it was early days in the drug's development.
"Phase one established an initial dose range that was considered safe to administer to dogs without any clinical side-effects and the second phase tested both high and low dose options in reducing the weight of overweight dogs," said Dr London.
"While it is early days, these results are extremely encouraging and we know we can enhance the effectiveness of R-salbutamol even further with revised formulations in studies."
The company will now tweak the formulation before more extensive trials.
If the second phase of testing is successful, the company will seek approval from the US Food and Drug Administration - a stage Dr London hoped to reach in about two years.
Should R-salbutamol make it to the supermarket shelves, the spoils won't be small (dog) biscuits.
About 35 per cent of US dogs and cats are considered to be overweight or obese, a statistic mirrored in Australia and Europe, Stirling said.
The market for anti-obesity drugs for pets is estimated to be worth more than $US200 million ($242.17 million) in the US alone.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 03, 2007, 01:44:23 AM
CRADLE MOUNTAIN

Cradle Mountain is the central feature of the Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park, part of Tasmania's World Heritage area. The park covers an area of 124 942 ha which is characterised by a rugged, glaciated landscape with over 25 major peaks and a wide range of glacial formations - tarns, glacial lakes, moraine deposits, U-shaped valleys and waterfalls.  The area was glaciated during the last ice age (about 10 000 years ago) when a huge 6 km ice cap formed and glaciers flowed from its edges carving the landscape into dramatic shapes with their inexorable erosive powers.

The mountain is one of the favourite features in the park and is surrounded by stands of native deciduous beech (wonderfully colourful in autumn), rainforest, alpine heathlands and buttongrass. Icy streams cascade down the mountainsides, and ancient pines are reflected in the still glacial lakes.  Here you see the face of creation all around you in the mirror lakes and rugged mountain peaks. And you don't need to be an environmentalist to feel humble in the towering presence of a King Billy Pine - over 1,000 years old yet still a relative newcomer to these ancient forests At night time the nocturnal animals which inhabit the park - the Tasmanian devil and possums can be seen.  There are also pademelons and Bennet's wallabies in the area.

The first human settlement of the region occurred when the local Aborigines moved into the highlands as the glaciers began retreating. The extensive button grass plains are a legacy of their extensive use of fire to clear pathways through the rugged terrain and to aid hunting by attracting animals to the tender shoots of the new vegetation.  Early reports of the Aborigines in the area tell of recently burnt vegetation and well constructed huts of bark some of which were still standing 25 years after the last of the people had been removed.  Archaeological research in the Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park has revealed many Aboriginal sites consisting of stone tools and quarries which suggests that people moved mainly through the valleys with occasional visits to higher areas.

Cradle Mountain was named in 1827 by the explorer Joseph Fossey who decided it bore a remarkable similarity to a cradle. It was first climbed by a European in 1831 when the explorer Henry Hellyer successfully reached the summit. Surveyor General George Franklin passed through the area in 1835 and he was duly followed by prospectors, trappers and settlers. As early as the 1890s there was some tourism in the area. Governor Hamilton had a house and boat shed built for visitors on Lake St Clair.

The man remembered as the founding father of tourism in the area was the Austrian born naturalist Gustaf Weindorfer who, in 1911, bought land in Cradle Valley where he built 'Waldheim' which he opened to guests who wanted to explore the region. When his wife died Weindorfer moved to Cradle Valley permanently. He died in 1932 and is buried near 'Waldheim'. Weindorfer is credited with naming  Dove Lake, Crater Lake and Hansons Lake. He named Mount Kate after his wife.

Reservation of land began in 1922 when an area from Cradle Mountain to Lake St Clair was set aside as a 'scenic reserve and wildlife sanctuary'. It became a National Park in 1971.  In 1978 the National Parks and Wildlife Service built a replica of 'Waldheim' and this, combined with the Cradle Mountain Lodge and the excellent new NPWS Information building, have made Cradle Mountain one of the most accessible and interesting attractions in Tasmania.  In 1982 Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park along and the Franklin-Lower Gordon Wild Rivers National Park were placed on the prestigious world heritage list in recognition of their outstanding natural, cultural and wilderness qualities.  Today the area is a model of an accessible wilderness region. There are numerous walking huts, a wide range of walks through the mountains, a road to the edges of Lake Dove which lies in the shadow of Cradle Mountain, and plenty of excellent accommodation.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 03, 2007, 01:47:38 AM
CRADLE MOUNTAIN

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/tasmania-tourism.jpg)

DOVE LAKE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/cam_dove_feat1.jpg)

LAKE ST CLAIR

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/a1a196.jpg)

CRADLE MOUNTAIN SNOW

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/cradleMtnSnow.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 04, 2007, 02:21:43 AM
SOMETHING FOR THE CHOCOHOLICS :

CHOCOLATE TO HELP ARMY SOLDIER ON

Glenn Cordingley…..May 04, 2007 12:47pm….Article from: AAP

VITAMIN-packed dark chocolate that won't melt in the heat of battle - but will melt in your mouth and also last for years - is being developed for Australian soldiers.
Scientists from the Defence Science and Technology Organisation (DSTO) at Scottsdale in Tasmania are working on a new super chocolate for army ration packs.
"From a nutritionist's point of view we would love to give the soldiers a fresh meal every day," DSTO spokeswoman Helen Ward said.
"But logistics don't always allow that and we don't want our soldiers to die of malnutrition when they are in a foxhole feeling hungry."
Ms Ward said the idea of supplying troops with chocolate had psychological and physiological advantages.
"We could just give them a pill containing the same vitamins, but it would be nothing like giving them real food.
"Chocolate has long been regarded as a treat, something to look forward to, and something that would provide a mental and physical boost.
"That's why this is being developed to withstand the elements."
DSTO food technologist Dr Lan Bui, who is based at Scottsdale, said the new product is more granular and firmer but the flavour is still appealing.
"DSTO is looking at product reformulation, including new fat compounds, to improve texture and flavour, without affecting the melting point," Dr Bui said.
Normal chocolate melts at about 25-30 degrees celsius, but she said the new version will be expected to maintain its uniformity for extended periods at over 49 degrees celsius.
Scientists are working with food experts on coating vitamins to keep out humidity, moisture and oxygen, while allowing them to be slowly released into the body.
The team also is working on a milk chocolate variety and developing less permeable packaging to extend shelf life.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 04, 2007, 02:24:43 AM
AND FOR THE NEMO FANS :

NEMO REALLY CAN FIND WAY HOME

May 04, 2007 12:00am….Article from: AAP

THE cute clownfish made famous by the hit movie Finding Nemo really can find his way home after spending months at sea, researchers have found.
An Australian-led team of coral reef scientists has discovered that 60 per cent of clownfish complete the journey back to their reef of origin after being swept into the open ocean as babies.
The team of Australian, American and French scientists say they have achieved a world breakthrough that could revolutionise the sustainable management of coral reefs and help restore threatened fisheries.
The team, led by Dr Geoff Jones and Dr Glenn Almany of the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at Queensland's James Cook University, pioneered a new way to study fish populations by "tagging" adult fish with a minute trace of a harmless isotope which they pass on to their offspring.
The findings were published today in the international journal Science.
Working on coral reefs in a protected marine area in Papua New Guinea, the researchers tagged more than 300 female clownfish and vagabond butterflyfish with a barium isotope.
The researchers found that 60 per cent of their offspring returned to the tiny home reef - only 300 metres across - after being carried out to the sea as babies.
"Just as importantly, 40 per cent of the juveniles came from other reefs that are at least 10 kilometres away, which indicates significant exchange between populations separated by open sea," Dr Almany said.
"This shows how marine protected areas can contribute to maintaining fish populations outside no-fishing zones.
"...If we can understand how fish larvae disperse, it will enable better design of marine protected areas and this will help in the rebuilding of threatened fish populations."
The team is conducting further research at an aquaculture facility in Bali, looking at the possibility of applying the tag to coral trout.
They hope to conduct trials on coral trout off Great Keppel Island on the Great Barrier Reef and in PNG, as well as work with a threatened species, the Nassau groper, in the Caribbean.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 04, 2007, 03:16:19 AM
SOME COLOURFUL INHABITANTS OF THE REEF

MOORISH IDOLS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/MoorishIdols.png)

CLOWN TRIGGER

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/ClownTrigger.jpg)

SEND IN THE CLOWNS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/CLOWNS.jpg)

WHITE HUMPBACK

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/WhiteHumpback.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 04, 2007, 03:20:56 AM
PTEROIS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/pterois.jpg)

ANEMONE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Amemone.jpg)

CUTTLE FISH

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/CuttleFish.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 05, 2007, 03:26:49 AM
SURREAL DAYS IN BOWEN

May 05, 2007 12:00am….Article from The Courier Mail

BOWEN is living a strange double life. The north Queensland town is simultaneously a vast film set, preparing to work around the clock to helP create Baz Luhrmann's new epic film, Australia.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/BowenWelcome.jpg)

But the town is also pretending to be a 1940s Northern Territory town and wartime Darwin. As the first of the cast and crew moved in this week locals adapted – one local cafe started selling "hunky" meat pies in honour of one of the stars, Hugh Jackman.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/BowenPub.jpg)

And a woman who looked uncannily like Nicole Kidman drove a herd of cattle through the streets. It wasn't Kidman – it may have been her stand-in – but the cattle drive gave residents a taste of what was to come.
Hundreds of extras will be used in the film. Most will be drawn from Bowen and surrounding towns.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/BowenFilm.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 05, 2007, 03:33:29 AM
KIDMAN IN NEW BAZ FLICK

Brett McKeehan….May 02, 2007 08:50pm….Article from: The Courier Mail

THIS is the first picture of Nicole Kidman looking grand as cattle queen Lady Sarah Ashley in Baz Luhrmann's sweeping new $120 million epic Australia. The Oscar-winning beauty, 39, plays an upper-crust English aristocrat who heads Down Under just before World War II to confront her skirt-chasing husband - only to find him dead. This leaves her in control of a massive Northern Territory cattle station the size of Belgium.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/LadySarahAshley.jpg)

Kidman joins a massive cast of top Aussie talent with Hugh Jackman, David Wenham, Bryan Brown, Jack Thompson, John Jarratt, David Gulpilil and Bill Hunter all hand-picked by Luhrmann. Filming began in Sydney this week at the 150-year-old Strickland House in Vaucluse, which is doubling as Darwin's Government House.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/StricklandHouse.jpg)

Kidman and a bearded Jackman were earlier spotted brushing up on their riding skills in Centenntial Park. Riding is an essential part of the film - the pair fall in love as Jackman, playing a rough stockman, helps her drive 1500 cattle across the property. Shooting takes place over five months with the production moving to the tiny North Queensland mango growing town of Bowen later this month.
The coastal community is now bustling with construction workers as more than eight town blocks are taken back in time. Stockyards, shacks, old-fashioned cottages, shops and even a hotel have been erected at the oceanfront site.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/HughJackman.jpg)

A 93-year-old sugar cane locomotive called Homebush has even been enlisted to play a significant role in the flick. The loco started chugging around near Mackay in 1915 and was kept in mint condition by sugar company CSR. Homebush will stay in Bowen until the end of next month - CSR even had to arrange for train tracks to be laid in the town's main street to complete the illusion.
But getting Bowen ready hasn't been all smooth sailing. New Idea magazine made a classic blunder when it ran a photo purportedly of Bowen's main street with inset snaps of Kidman and Jackman.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/RomaHotel.jpg)

Unfortunately the picture is of the main street of Roma - an inland Queensland town at least 1000km to the southwest. It also features a series of distinctive bottle trees, which can't even be found in Bowen.
Bowen Shire Mayor Mike Brunker was not amused. "Of all the beautiful photos of Bowen they had to go and use one of Roma,'' he stormed. "(The photo) has even got bottle trees in it."


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 06, 2007, 04:34:02 AM
BOWEN

AN ARTICLE ON BOWEN WHEN THE MOVIE CREW ARE NOT IN TOWN!

Bowen is an unusual and attractive tropical town characterised by a lazy and easy charm. There is a sense in which IT is an absolutely classic north Central Queensland town. The wide streets, the easiness of the lifestyle, the simple unpretentiousness which makes no concessions to development or visitors from the south, the languidness of a city slowly melting under a hot tropical sun. There is something which makes the visitor think of the 1940s and 1950s. This is a charming old-style town in an area where the rest of the world has moved on.

Once occupied by the Girudala people, the first European to set eyes upon the present site of Bowen was Captain James Cook who named Cape Gloucester after William Henry, the Duke of Gloucester. Cook passed within 9 km of the coast and was certainly close enough to observe that 'on the west side of Cape Gloucester the land trends away S.W. and S.S.W. and forms a deep bay, the land in the bottom of this bay we could just see from the mast head. It is very low and is a continuation of the same low land as it is at the bottom of Repulse Bay.' Further up the coast Cook named Edgecumbe Bay.

The town of Bowen really dates back to 1859 when Captain Henry Daniel Sinclair sailed from Rockhampton in the 9-ton ketch Santa Barbara in search of a suitable port north of Rockhampton. He found a good harbour which he named Port Denison (after the Governor of New South Wales) and returned south to claim a reward only to find that Queensland was about to become a separate colony and neither the old colony nor the new one was prepared to reward his discovery.

At the same time the explorer George Elphinstone Dalrymple had left Rockhampton looking for suitable grazing land to the north. He recognised the potential of the area but failed to find a suitable port. Hoping that the mouth of the Burdekin River would prove a suitable harbour he persuaded the new Queensland government to send a party to investigate. They found that the mouth of the Burdekin was useless but, in the process, confirmed the accuracy of Sinclair's initial analysis of Port Denison.
In March 1861 the Queensland government declared Port Denison an official port of entry, allowing for the future development of the region. It was decided to establish a town on the shores of the port. Sinclair, who had been working in Sydney, was recalled and appointed harbour master and chief constable of the new township. Dalrymple was made commissioner of crown lands and magistrate. Sinclair set off by sea and Dalrymple travelled overland with supplies including 140 horses and 120 cattle.

Dalrymple arrived on 11 April 1861 and with due ceremony and lots of cheering from the 111 people who had made the journey by sea and land, he raised the Union Jack and declared Bowen (named after the first Governor of Queensland) the northernmost town in Queensland. It was a remarkable formal beginning to the town. Within a year there were 20 cattle stations in the area, and hotels, stores and public instrumentalities had been established in the infant settlement.

Perhaps the most interesting moment in the early history of Bowen occurred in 1863 when James Morrill appeared out of the bush and announced 'Don't shoot mates, I'm a British object'. He had been shipwrecked seventeen years earlier and had spent the intervening time living with the local Aborigines. He went to Brisbane where he became something of a celebrity but eventually returned to Bowen and worked in the customs house. He died in Bowen in 1865 and is buried in the local cemetery. A large and distinctive obelisk marks the site.

In 1863 Bowen became a municipality. It was during this year that the town's first building, the gaol, was burned down. For a while prisoners were chained to logs or fence posts. There is a delightful story from this time of one prisoner carrying his log to one of the local pubs, fronting up at the bar, and ordering a drink.

Bowen's industries include beef cattle, vegetable and fruit growing (including mangoes) a salt works, coke production, a tomato-processing plant and fish.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 06, 2007, 04:38:41 AM
BOWEN BEACH

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/BowenBeach.jpg)

BOWEN MARINA

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/MARINA_sml.jpg)

PACIFIC OCEAN VIEWS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Rose_Bay_Resort_04.jpg)

TYPICAL SUNSET

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/BowenSunset.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 07, 2007, 03:44:10 AM
DARWIN

Darwin is the tropical capital city of Australia's Northern Territory.
It has a relaxed outdoor lifestyle and enjoys warm weather all year round. Perched on a peninsula with sea on three sides, Darwin is an excellent base to explore the natural attractions of World Heritage listed Kakadu National Park, Litchfield and Nitmiluk National Parks, the Tiwi Islands and Arnhem Land.

KAKADU

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/kakadu-majuk-2495L.jpg)


The city was founded as Australia's most northerly harbour port in 1869, and its population rapidly expanded after the discovery of gold at nearby Pine Creek in 1871. World War II put the city on the map as a major allied military base for troops fighting the Japanese in the Pacific.  The city of Darwin was badly damaged during WWII when it endured 64 Japanese air raid attacks, the most prolonged attack in Australia. Much of the town's military history can be explored by visiting various WWII sites that are scattered across town, including ammunition bunkers in Charles Darwin National Park and a variety of old airstrips in and around town.

WAR CEMETERY

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/adelaide-cemetary-nocode.jpg)


The city was again devastated, then rebuilt in 1975 after Cyclone Tracy hit Darwin on Christmas Eve in 1974. Despite its ordeal, Darwin regrouped, rebuilt and now stands stronger than ever - literally - as modern building regulations ensure a similar force could not wreak such damage again. The Museum and Art Gallery has a very realistic Cyclone Tracy display that recreates the atmosphere of that fateful Christmas Eve.

DARWIN HARBOUR

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Darwinharbour.jpg)

Its colourful history has contributed to the Darwin's cultural diversity - more than 50 nationalities make up its 100,000 population, including the area's traditional landowners, the Larrakia Aboriginal people. The cultural and culinary benefits of such a melting pot are best experienced at its weekly markets, variety of restaurants and through its annual calendar of festivals and events.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 07, 2007, 03:51:58 AM
DARWIN HIGHLIGHTS

TROPICAL SUMMER

Our tropical summer (October to March) is considered by many to be the region's most beautiful time of year. A predictable daily ritual of sunshine and afternoon showers refreshes the landscape and coaxes nature back to life on a grand scale. The sights, sounds and smells associated with this season make summer a truly sensory experience.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/darwin-storm.jpg)

HISTORICAL BURNETT HOUSE

Every Sunday from 3.30pm to 6pm the National Trust host a High Tea in the verdant tropical gardens of Burnett House in the Myilly Point Heritage Precinct. Burnett House is a rare example of Darwin's early tropical architecture, having survived both the Japanese bombings in 1942 and Cyclone Tracy in 1974.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/tea-burnett-house-1982.jpg)

DARWIN BEER CAN REGATTA

Get a taste of Australian humour at its quirkiest at the annual Darwin Beer Can Regatta held in July. Participants compete by building boats out of beer or soft drink cans. The event is held at Darwin's Mindil Beach, only five minutes from the city and home of the Sunset Markets.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/beer-regatta-7127.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 07, 2007, 03:56:33 AM
DARWIN FROM THE AIR

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/46150-darwinair.jpg)

HARBOUR CRUISE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/harbour-cruises-2149.jpg)

SWIMMING COMPANION

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/crocodiles-6114.jpg)

KATHERINE GORGE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/katherine-5003L.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 08, 2007, 02:35:20 AM
MYTHIC CAT OR JUST A CAT?

Melbourne Zoo's public relations chief yesterday declared the silly season open as senior animal keepers were called in to analyse images of yet another mystery cat seen near the Grampians.

Zoo staff take every sighting of unusual creatures seriously, just in case the fabled American puma or the Tasmanian tiger are discovered in Victoria. Legend has it that decades ago an American circus, or American airmen stationed in the bush who supposedly kept big cats as mascots, released the creatures into the wild, and that their numbers have since multiplied.

This year, 38 sightings of suspected big cats have been recorded by the 50-member Australian Rare Fauna Research Association. If the rare animals did exist, the zoo keepers would like to know, said Judith Henke, the Melbourne Zoo's communications manager.

Senior keeper Noel Harcourt and the keeper in charge of carnivores, Richard Roswell, examined the shaky video recording of the latest sighting taken by campers at Dunkeld - and sold to Channel Seven for an undisclosed sum.

The video shows a large black cat running through open pasture and encountering a kangaroo. But it was too small, ran too fast and looked too much like a regular cat to be anything more exotic, the keepers said.

And that's if you ignore the fact that the kangaroo finally appeared to hop after the cat, suggesting a degree of familiarity.

"There are so many people who keep releasing cats, it's a huge problem for wildlife," Mr Roswell said.

Ms Henke said such sightings were examined about three times a year by keepers. "They're patient souls," she said.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/08CAT.jpg)

Experts Bernie Mace, John Turner, Gordon Williams and zoo keepers Noel Harcourt and Richard Roswell assess the image of what was claimed to be a wild puma.
Photo: Paul Harris


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 09, 2007, 06:00:03 AM
MACQUARIE ISLAND

Lying roughly midway between Tasmania and Antarctica, Macquarie Island is a long, narrow, steep-sided plateau only 34 kilometres long and 5.5 kilometres wide at its broadest point. It is cold and windy, with frequent low cloud and strong westerly winds. Its nickname of 'The Sponge' is well earned: it experiences over 300 rainy days a year.A rare uplifted portion of the sea bed at the edge of two tectonic plates of the earth's crust, the island was declared a World Heritage property in 1997 for its geological qualities. The island lies beside the southern extension of the great Alpine Fault of New Zealand and experiences frequent earth tremors. But it is also home to vast quantities of Southern Ocean birds and mammals, a factor that made it a prime target of commercial interests in the 19th and early 20th century.
Not everyone has been impressed by their first view of Macquarie Island. In 1822 Captain Douglass, of the ship Mariner called it "the most wretched place of involuntary and slavish exilium that can possibly be conceived; nothing could warrant any civilised creature living on such a spot".Despite the harsh treatment meted out to convicts during Australia's colonial era, administrators baulked at sending them to Macquarie Island. In 1826 the Hobart Town Gazette contained the quote: "the remote and stormy region in which Macquarie Island is placed is a strong reason against the adoption of that place as a penal settlement".Discovery of the island is attributed to Captain Frederick Hasselborough of the brig Perseverance who sighted it on 11 July 1810 during a sealing voyage out of Sydney. He may have been preceded by Polynesians or other earlier visitors - he recorded seeing a wreck "of ancient design" on the island. Hasselborough named the place after the then Governor of New South Wales, Lachlan Macquarie.

Hasselborough's main interest was in the enormous numbers of seals on the island - especially fur seals, estimated at the time to number between 200,000 and 400,000. The commercial reaction to his discovery was immediate: during the first 18 months of commercial operations at least 120,000 fur seals were killed for their skins and ten years later the population was almost wiped out.With the fur seal population unable to support the skin industry, the focus of commercial activity turned to the elephant seals whose blubber contained oil that then had widespread commercial use. By the mid-1840s numbers of elephant seals had been reduced by 70 percent.Commercial exploitation then turned to the island's prolific penguin population. Whilst not as valuable as seal oil, penguin oil at least had the advantage of being relatively easy to obtain. After the king penguin colony at Lusitania Bay was devastated by this activity, attention turned to the royal penguins at The Nuggets. At the peak of the industry in 1905, the plant established here could process 2,000 penguins at one time with each penguin producing about half a litre of oil.

During this period a dispute between the colonies of Tasmania and New Zealand about sovereignty over the island was resolved in Tasmania's favour. Macquarie Island is now part of Tasmania's Huon Municipality.From when it was first discovered, Macquarie Island was also of interest to scientists. The Russian expedition led by Thaddeus von Bellinghausen collected flora and fauna on the island in 1820. Charles Wilkes's US Exploring Expedition and two New Zealand scientists, JH Scott and A. Hamilton, followed. Joseph Burton spent three and a half years from 1896 collecting specimens while working with oiling parties on the island. Scientists with Captain Robert Scott in 1901 and Sir Ernest Shackleton in 1909 also collected specimens on the island.

In 1911, Australia's Sir Douglas Mawson established the island's first scientific station. In addition to conducting geomagnetic observations and mapping the island, studies were made of the island's botany, zoology, meteorology and geology. The Macquarie Island expedition also established the first radio link between Australia and Antarctica by setting up a radio relay station on Wireless Hill that could communicate with both Mawson's main expedition group at Commonwealth Bay, and Australia.From 1913 to 1915 the meteorological observations begun by Mawson's group were continued by the Commonwealth Meteorological Service but discontinued after the loss of the relief ship Endeavour with all crew and passengers in 1914. The Ross Sea party of Shackleton's Trans-Antarctic Expedition on Aurora visited the island in 1915, and Mawson returned aboard Discovery in 1930 with the British, Australian and New Zealand Research Expedition.

The island was declared a wildlife sanctuary in 1933 and, with the establishment of the Tasmanian National Parks and Wildlife Service in 1971, Macquarie Island became a conservation area. It was upgraded to a state reserve in 1972 and in 1978 was renamed the Macquarie Island Nature Reserve. In 1998 Macquarie Island was granted World Heritage status.Macquarie Island ANARE station was established on 25 March 1948 and has been operating continuously ever since.

MACQUARIE ISLAND

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/macquarie_island.jpg)

SUB ANTARCTIC SEALS

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ON THE ROCKS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/jd_sent.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 09, 2007, 06:04:36 AM
KING PENGUINS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/KingPenguins.jpg)

MAWSON ICE EDGE

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ROYAL PENGUINS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/RoyalPenguin.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 09, 2007, 06:08:36 AM
CRECHE OF EMPEROR PENGUIN CHICKS

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HEARD ISLAND

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/heard_island_peak.jpg)

HUDDLE OF EMPEROR PENGUINS

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All photographs courtesy of the Australian Antarctic Division website.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 10, 2007, 03:56:20 AM
ANTRACTICA

Antarctica is the coldest, windiest, driest and highest continent in the world. It is also the most isolated. This southernmost land of ice and snow, where for part of the year the sun doesn't rise and for another part, never sets, sits alone more than 2500 kilometres south of Hobart. Only one native warm-blooded animal remains on the Antarctic continent during the freezing winter--the emperor penguin. No human has ever made a permanent home in Antarctica. But people do visit--mostly scientists, support personnel, and tourists. To some it becomes a way of life and they may go back south many times over the years.

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Australia claims as territory nearly six million of Antarctica's 13.5 million square kilometres, a patch roughly the size of Australia without Queensland, and the largest Antarctic claim of any nation. The Antarctic Treaty, which Australia signed in 1959, neither supports not denies claims of sovereignty. Only four other nations--France, New Zealand, Norway and Britain, which each also claim part of Antarctica--have formally recognised Australia's claim. But geography reveals the true connection.

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 Australia and Antarctica, the only continents entirely within the southern hemisphere, were physically connected in the Gondwana super continent, and in human terms have been linked since explorers searched first for the mythical Great South Land, Terra Australis.Australia, through the Antarctic Division of the Department of the Environment and Heritage, sends scientists and the people who support them to Antarctica under the umbrella of the Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions (ANARE). Researchers from government organisations, including the Antarctic Division itself, the Bureau of Meteorology, the Australian Geoscience Australia and CSIRO, and from Australian and foreign research bodies, conduct and support the scientific work of ANARE.The Australian Antarctic Division maintains three permanent year-round stations and several temporary (summer only) bases on the Antarctic continent, as well as a permanent station on subantarctic Macquarie Island. Australian expeditioners stay in Antarctica for as long as a year and a half, or for as short as several weeks over the brief summer.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/MtErebus.jpg)

Mount Erebus is the world's southernmost historically active volcano.
The volcano is located on the western half of Ross Island.
Erebus is noted for its long active lava lake.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 10, 2007, 04:06:18 AM
ANTARCTIC FLIGHTS

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Twice yearly scenic flights are arranged to the coastline of Antarctica where expert Antarctic expeditioners including scientists, glaciologists, explorers, adverturers and mountaineers are onboard to talk on the polar environment and history, video screenings depict life on the ground, and a camera on the flight deck gives you a pilot’s eye view of magnificent plateaux, vast mountain ranges and expanses of permanent ice.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/AntFlight.jpg)

On New Year’s Eve Midnight Sun Party Flights the passengers would be the first to see the sun in the New Year – it is daylight at 12.01am as they sing ‘Auld Lang Syne’ over the ice and dance in the aisles to a live jazz band

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/AntBand.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: klaasend on May 11, 2007, 01:11:51 AM
Great photos Tibro - thanks so much for posting them.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 11, 2007, 03:39:42 AM
My pleasure, Klaas.  

The photographs from Antarctica are particularly stunning.  Government photographers and the best of equipment I would think.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 11, 2007, 03:45:26 AM
COCOS (KEELING) ISLANDS

The Cocos (Keeling) Islands are an Australian territory situated in the Indian Ocean 2768 km north-west of Perth, and only 400 km south of Indonesia. West Island, or Pulo Panjang, is the main island of twenty-seven small coral islands, with a total area of only fourteen square kilometres. Only two islands in the group are inhabited, with a total population of eight hundred. The islands are the quintessential tropical paradise, with palm fringed beaches and uninhabited cays. The islands were discovered in 1609 by Captain William Keeling of the East India Company, but they remained uninhabited until John Clunies Ross took his family there in 1827. The islands remained under the rule of the Clunies-Ross family until 1975 when the Australian Government "reclaimed" them and appointed a new administrator.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/CocosIsMap.gif)

The islands played an important role in the capture of the famous German cruiser Emden in 1914, during World War 1. A landing party from the Emden attempted to destroy the wireless station on Direction Island; the Australian cruiser HMAS Sydney heard a message of distress from the island, sped to the scene, and attacked the German raider.

HMAS SYDNEY

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/hmassydney1b.jpg)

The first two salvos were damaging hits on the Sydney, however she quickly found her range and pounded the Emden, putting her on a reef, blazing and helpless; the torrid gun battle put the German cruiser aground on North Keeling. In the engagement, the Emden lost eight officers and 126 men, whilst the Sydney lost four. Her loss  put quite a damper on German intentions in the Indian and Pacific Oceans.  The Emden had been the scourge of the Indian Ocean during World War 1, sinking many thousands of tons of allied shipping. Her sinking was a significant victory for Australia and the allies. Over the past few years there have been expeditions to visit the Emden site.

THE EMDEN AGROUND AFTER THE ATTACK

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/emden-aground.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 12, 2007, 02:36:49 AM
COCOS (KEELING) ISLANDS

Almost all isolated oceanic islands sit atop the remains of ancient volcanoes. The Cocos (Keeling) Islands are two coral atolls which have developed on top of old volcanic seamounts, rising from the depth of 5000 metres in the north east Indian Ocean.The islands' foundations are two of a series of undersea features known as the Vening Meinisz Seamounts. This undersea range of mountains also includes Christmas Island and extends in a north north-easterly direction from a prominent Indian Ocean sea floor feature known as the Ninetyeast Ridge. The Cocos atolls are two peaks in a section of the range known as the Cocos Rise and are connected by a narrow underwater bank at a depth of 700-800 metres.Atolls are more or less circular coral reefs enclosing a lagoon, but without any land inside. On large atolls, parts of the reef have been built up by wave action and wind to form low island chains connected by the reef. The environmental aspects of atoll islands are unique in some respects. For example there is no rock other than coral limestone composed of calcium carbonate. This means that plants requiring other minerals such as silica, can not be cultivated without the aid of fertilisers or some outside source of rock from a larger island composed of volcanic or other igneous rock. The palm tree is native to atoll islands because it thrives on brackish water and the seed, or nut, is distributed widely by floating from one island to another.

COCOS ISLAND

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/CocosIsland.jpg)

Charles Darwin visited the Cocos (Keeling) Islands in 1836 aboard the HMS Beagle and it was during this visit that he developed his theory of atoll formation. He spent some time exploring the southern atoll and also visited North Keeling. In his publication on coral reefs in 1842, he was the first to propose the theory of reef formation and evolution, building on his discovery of coralline fossils in inland areas and in mountains earlier in the journey and his visit to the islands. That theory, which is still held as valid, explains the dynamics of the three principal categories of coral formation.

Amazing though it is, even tiny, remote islands support plants and animals. Continental islands have a head start in this regard since some of their species may have been stranded when the island formed and have simply persisted there ever since. For oceanic islands and atolls, the situation is quite different. When atolls emerge from the sea, they contain no terrestrial life: all their plants and animals must reach them across a seawater barrier.

WEST ISLAND

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/WestIsland.jpg)

As atolls grow large enough to retain fresh water and the interiors are further removed from the effects of salt spray, conditions become more benign and more immigrant species become established. Plants help both stabilise and enrich the soil with organic matter as they die and decay. These improved conditions allow additional species of plants to colonise.
Sixty one plant species have been recorded on the Cocos (Keeling) Islands with only one endemic sub-species; Pandanus tectorius cocosensis. Stands of these pandanus can be found on Home Island and the southern end of West Island. Some plant species are more abundant on North Keeling island than on the islands of the southern atoll, either because of greater areas of suitable habitat or due to clearing over the last 160 years to make way for the coconut plantations.

OCTOPUS BUSH

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/OctopusBush.jpg)

Seabirds are usually the first animals to colonise an island formed by an oceanic volcano. Young seabirds tend to return to breed in the place they were raised, so new breeding colonies begin slowly. Once a new colony is established it will grow. The size of seabird populations is often regulated by competition for food within easy foraging range of the breeding site. North Keeling Island is the only seabird breeding area within a radius of 900km - it is therefore of unique importance to the ocean's seabird biota. The only endemic bird to the Cocos (Keeling) Islands which can only be found on North Keeling Island is the Cocos Buff-banded rail (Gallirllus phillppensis andrewsi).

COMMON NODDY

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/CommonNoddy.jpg)

On the southern atoll you are more likely to see birds in flight rather than nesting. Most common are the Red-footed booby birds, common noddies, white terns, frigate birds, Rufus Night Heron, White-faced Heron and several types of wading birds. Many of the birds seen are vagrant species, travelling to and from their homes even as far away as China! Approximately 60 species of birds have been recorded on the two atolls.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 12, 2007, 02:40:54 AM
THE COCOS MALAY PEOPLE

The first group of settlers brought to the islands by Alexander Hare were predominately Malay with a number of people of Chinese, Papuan and Indian descent. It is believed the party also comprised a few African individuals. The people came from such places as Bali, Bima, Celebes, Madura, Sumbawa, Timor, Sumatra, Pasir-Kutai, Malacca, Penang, Batavia and Cerebon. They were described by subsequent visitors to the islands as being nominally Muslim and speaking Malay - the trading lingua franca of the then East Indies. Today the Malay dialect spoken by the Cocos Malay people is an unsophisticated oral language. It contains words that reflect the diverse origins of these people and their history of sporadic contacts with outsiders. Of necessity, modern interpretation is given in Bahasa Indonesia/Malay with some adaptation to local usage.

MALAY BOATS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/malaybot_1.jpg)

The society that exists today has been held together for eight generations by its very isolation, shared economic endeavour, strong family loyalty, a deepening commitment to Islam and their unique version of the old Malay language of the East Indies. Theirs has been a world sealed off from the outside by geography, politics and language. Few outsiders have lived among them and very little has been recorded of their cultural practices and traditions.Despite their disparate origins, the Cocos Malay people achieved an identity of their own within one generation of settlement. The "Cocos-born", as they were officially referred to, lived separately from both the Javanese contract labourers and the European owner-settlers. They had their own mosques, their own leaders and their own ceremonies.Today the cornerstone of the Cocos Malay society and the focus of each individual's life is the Islamic religion. Few depart from its teachings and observances. Elements of the English-Scottish traditions of the early overseeing families have been absorbed into Cocos Malay cultural practices. Certain foods, dances and musical influences have a western flavour.

MALAY VERSION OF A SCOTTISH REEL

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/malay_3.jpg)

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Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 13, 2007, 02:52:53 AM
THE MOTHERS DAY CLASSIC

The MDC is the biggest community fundraising event for breast cancer in Australia. It involves thousands of women, men, girls and boys of all ages and takes place each year in capital cities and regional areas around the country on Mothers Day.  Participants run, jog or walk the designated course of around 8 kilometres and can be sponsored.

2007 marks the 10th anniversary of the Mothers Day Classic! The event will be bigger and better then ever and we encourage anyone who has attended over the years, to come back and enjoy the celebrations.

The events are organised and presented by Women in Super - a national network of women working in the superannuation industry. The vast majority of the people who help to put together the Mothers Day Classic are volunteers. They give their time each year as a way of actively contributing to the fight against breast cancer.

This initiative was inspired by the knowledge that research is gradually improving the survival rate of the one in 8 women who will be diagnosed with breast cancer during their life. Improving the quality of life of those with breast cancer is a valuable and rewarding investment into our community.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/fim_thumb.jpg)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/march.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 13, 2007, 03:00:43 AM
AUSTRALIA A GREAT PLACE TO BE A MUM

By staff writers...May 09, 2007 04:45pm...Article from:  news.com.au
 
AUSTRALIA is the fifth best place in the world to be a mum, according to an annual index by child rights organisation Save the Children.

Australia was up two places from last year on the eighth annual Mothers Index, which ranks the best and worst places to be a mother and a child and compares the well-being of mothers and children in 140 countries.
Sweden, Iceland and Norway topped the rankings this year while Niger ranked last among the 140 countries surveyed.

The top 10 countries generally attained very high scores for mothers and childrens health, educational and economic status, Save the Children said today. Rounding out the top ten were New Zealand in fourth place, Denmark in sixth, Finland seventh, Belgium eighth, Spain ninth and Germany in 10th place.

The 10 bottom-ranked countries, nine from sub-Saharan Africa, performed poorly on all indicators.  Conditions for mothers and their children in countries at the bottom of the index were grim, Save the Children said.
On average, one in 13 mothers would die from pregnancy-related causes. Nearly one in five children did not reach their fifth birthday, and more than one in three children suffered from malnutrition.  The bottom 10 countries were Djibouti, Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Angola, Guinea-Bissau, Chad, Yemen, Sierra Leone and Niger.

"If 75 years of field experience has taught us anything, it is that the quality of children's lives depends on the health, security and well-being of their mothers, said Save the Children Australia chief executive Margaret Douglas. "By providing mothers access to education, economic opportunities, and maternal and child health care, we ensure that mothers and their children will have the best chance to survive and thrive," she said.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 13, 2007, 03:09:02 AM
THE HISTORY OF MOTHERS DAY

AN INTERESTING EXCERPT FROM AN ONLINE SERMON.

Mothers' Day does not appear in the official calendar of the Church. It is a modern American innovation, now publicised largely for commercial purposes. For some centuries, there was an earlier tradition in some parts of England where the Fourth Sunday in Lent was called "Mothering Sunday". That day, which would have come a month or so before the date of the American observance in May, is still observed to some extent in Anglican Churches. It was a time when people in some areas visited their mothers and when there was a practice of visiting the cathedral or mother church on that day.

The practice which has now come to dominate in the general community began during the American Civil War when Mrs Anna Reeves Jarvis was organising a special day for mothers who had sons fighting on both the opposing sides. Later Julia Ward Howe, who wrote the rousing hymn Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord, organised a Mothers' Day meeting in her home town of Boston. By 1907 the idea was so popular that Anna Jarvis, the daughter of the Civil War campaigner, began a movement to make it an American national event and in 1915 President Woodrow Wilson proclaimed the second Sunday in May as Mothers' Day.

In Australia, Mothers' Day was first celebrated in 1920 at the Presbyterian Church, Burwood, NSW. The Youth Leader John Stewart wrote to Anna Jarvis to get details of the American observance, and the youth group handed out white flowers to all mothers at the morning service. The wearing of white flowers seems to have taken on generally in a few years, but that was about all there was to it. Later, children came to be encouraged to do helpful things for their mothers on that day. It has been massively promoted in recent years by commercial interests as another occasion for buying and giving gifts although that had no part in the original observance. Fathers' Day was invented and placed at a different time of the year entirely for that commercial reason.

Should the church go along with this kind of community practice? The commercial exploitation of Mothers' Day can be rejected as yet another example of otherwise harmless sentiments being manipulated for money making purposes. The values of the market place tend to debase ordinary human values all too easily, especially when new needs and expectations are created by marketing techniques which have the capacity to create demand where none existed previously. But there could still be value in a community observance even if it is distorted by base motives. If people want to give presents, I suppose there is no great harm in that, provided it is kept in perspective and does not become a burden.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 13, 2007, 03:12:44 AM
(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/mothers-day-boy_001_260w.jpg)


HAPPY  MOTHERS  DAY




.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 14, 2007, 02:15:52 AM
KIDMAN STARTS FILMING

By Peter Michael ….May 14, 2007 12:00am….Article from: The Courier Mail

NICOLE Kidman began work on the Baz Luhrmann-directed Australia today after jetting into Bowen yesterday. Kidman dressed in period costume for her first scenes in the $100 million-dollar blockbuster.  Yesterday, Kidman flew into the north Queensdland town and was whisked off by a security team in a scene fitting of an action-packed Hollywood blockbuster.

Burly security guards bustled the movie mega-star and her husband Keith Urban into four-wheel drives with blacked out windows to avoid a small welcome party waiting at the airstrip of the north Queensland town after her jet touched down about 3.30pm.

The couple arrived in the town for the start of filming today of the Baz Luhrmann outback epic, Australia, after spending the night in Brisbane where the Caboolture-raised country music singer Urban played his first home concert in two years.

They were driven directly to a stately Queenslander on the outskirts of Bowen which will become home over the next few months of filming.
Nearly 100 volunteers have been recruited from the ranks of star-struck locals to help co-ordinate the flood of sightseers flocking to the new film set.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 14, 2007, 02:18:04 AM
CHINA DELIGHT AT KOALA TWINS

By Greg Stolz ….May 14, 2007 12:00am….Article from: The Courier Mail

THE irony is as delicious as the gum leaves are to them. Twin koalas – as rare as the proverbial hen's teeth – born not in Queensland, but in China.

The furry sibling sisters, dubbed Little Michelle and Little Amanda after their Australian keepers, were officially unveiled yesterday at the Xiangjiang Safari Park in Guangzhou, southern China.

A sea of enthralled Chinese faces pressed against the glass in the park's $1.6 million koala enclosure as the twins finally emerged from their mother Murrumbidgee's pouch after a day-long wait.

Born seven months ago, they are the offspring of Murrumbidgee and her mate, Murray – two of six koalas sent to China last year by the Gold Coast's Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/TwinKoalas.jpg)

BEARING up . . . Little Michelle and Little Amanda with mum, Murrumbidgee. Picture: Adam Head


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 15, 2007, 04:15:21 AM
AUSTRALIAN DOMESTIC ARCHITECTURE

Early Australian domestic architecture was a response to the Australian landscape and the climate with its unique flora and fauna, intense sunlight and dappled shadows. Early buildings needed to respond to these discrete climatic elements.

EARLY QUEENSLAND FARM HOUSE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/qlander_small.jpg)

The early houses of Queensland were characterised by broad verandas shaded by gracefully curved expanses of corrugated roofing iron, tall stumps, lattice, and roof ventilators. These qualities had the effect of cooling the house, allowing for breezeways, and allowed for the run off of tropical down pours. Shutters were also effective against the rages of cyclones. Constructions which had fully opening walls were often essential for cooling down the buildings. This was developed in early beach houses. Similarly the pitch of a roof varies according to the latitude and climate of the region. Overlapping layers of roofs are used so that air can move between the layers.

RESTORED QUEENSLANDER

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/GraciousQldr.jpg)

Like lattice-work verandahs on' the Queenslanders', slats can be found in many 'wool sheds' or 'shearing sheds' to prevent the sun heating up the building. In modern day constructions, slats are set at particular angles as screens for sun control allowing for entry of light in winter or cool seasons and excluding it in the heat of summer. Slatted floors used in wool sheds were also used as verandahs in tropical areas to encourage air flow.

FEDERATION STYLE HOUSES

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/FedHse.jpg)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/FednHse.jpg)
 
The ornate Federation house, built mainly between 1900 and 1914, was a sign of prosperity - an Australian version of the English Edwardian house but, detached with gardens, and with Australian motifs and a roof of terracotta tiles with detailed fretwork in the roof gables and windows. Many houses had a sunrise motif in the front gable as a sign of the dawning of a new century. Add-ons and renovations with heritage restraints were a constant experience of living in a federation house.
By World War I (1914-1918), there was a shortage of tradesmen and materials. The cost of houses had to be reduced, so the ceilings were lowered to create 'bungalows', houses which were built between 1915 and 1940. Gone was most of the detail, and a plainer style lead lighting was put into the front windows.

1930 STYLE BUNGALOW

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/1930Bung.jpg)

Post-war housing (1950s and 1960s) could be made from anything, varying from either weatherboard, asbestos cement or brick veneer. Redevelopments were anything from three storey walk up flats to town houses, villas and dual occupancies. It was this development which the Australian architect and critic, Robin Boyd referred when he described the Australian suburbs as 'the ugliness of bad conscious design'.

RESTORED AND MODERNISED QUEENSLANDER

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/LeuraSt.jpg)

MODERN DAY VERSION OF A QUEENSLANDER

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/ModernQldr.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 16, 2007, 02:58:21 AM
AUSTRALIAN ARCHITECTURE

Architects in Australia have created some of the most unusual and outstanding buildings in the world. Internationally recognised Australian icons include buildings like the Sydney Opera House (architect Jørn Utzon) and the new Parliament House in Canberra (architect Romaldo Giurgola).
Distinctive Australian architecture is also recognisable in the rural icons of 'the Queenslander', the 'wool shed' and the 'beach house' which have developed in response to climate, history, place and identity. Characteristically, these designs used local materials as well as corrugated iron and emphasised space and light as well as a connection to the landscape.

These classic qualities were often sacrificed in the development of the Australian suburbs where 85 per cent of Australians have lived since 1900. Australian architect and critic Robin Boyd once described the Australian suburbs as Australia's worst failing. Australian architects like Boyd and Roy Grounds have argued for the importance of modern Australian architecture as an expression of a local identity which balanced the ideals of art and architecture against local climate and social realities.

Many of the first buildings in Australia were constructions associated with the immediate needs of the colonies. Port Arthur settlement and Point Puer (juvenile prison) were designed by the convict architect Henry Laing. The Round House in Fremantle, built in 1831 as a gaol, was the first permanent building in the colony of Western Australia.

In Sydney, one of the first permanent buildings was Fort Phillip, built by Governor Phillip in 1804. Both a military hospital (1815) [later Fort Street School (1850 - 1974)] and also the Sydney Observatory (1858) were later built on this site.

Early public buildings were constructed around the importance of influencing community and civic identity. There was a sentimental attachment to the idea of public space with a city square ringed by great civic buildings 'to the glory of god and humanity'. In the founding of the first buildings in Australia, a duality of approaches existed: those which dominated the landscape and those designed to blend in. In 1789 Governor Arthur Phillip placed himself firmly in the first group when he wrote: ... there can be few things more pleasing than the contemplation of order and useful management arising gradually out of tumult and confusion ... by degrees, large spaces are opened, lands formed, lines marked, and a prospect at least of future regularity is clearly discerned.

Convict architect Francis Greenway, from the second group, was responsible for the Macquarie Lighthouse on South Head, the forts at Dawes Point (blended into the folds of the landscape) and Bennelong Point (raised on platforms of local sandstone) as well as the large female factory at Parramatta, Hyde Park barracks, the District Courts and St Matthew's church, Windsor.

The Royal Exhibition Building was constructed in 1880 to house Australia's first international exhibition of cultural, technological, and industrial achievements. The design reflected Melbourne's position as a prosperous city basking in the wealth from the richest gold rush in the world. On 1 July 2004 it became the first building in Australia to achieve World Heritage listing.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 16, 2007, 03:02:50 AM
EXAMPLES OF AUSTRALIAN ARCHITECTURE

DERELICT WOOLSHED

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/DecrepitWoolshed.jpg)

BEACHSIDE WEEKEND SHACKS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/shack2.jpg)

BEACH HOUSE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/beach1jpg.jpg)

MODERN BEACHSIDE DEVELOPMENTS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/beach4.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 16, 2007, 03:09:50 AM
NEW FEDERAL PARLIAMENT HOUSE, CANBERRA

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/ParlHse.jpg)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/ParlHseAir.jpg)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/APHNight.jpg)

ROYAL EXHIBITION BUILDING, MELBOURNE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/RoyalExBld.jpg)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/RoyalExBldInt.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 17, 2007, 02:17:39 AM
EARLY AUSTRALIAN PAINTERS

When the first artists arrived in colonial Australia from Europe in the late 18th century, they were confronted by images and scenery the likes of which they had never seen:
...the whole appearance of nature must be striking in the extreme to the adventurer, and at first this will seem to him to be a country of enchantments.
Thomas Watling, Letters From An Exile in Botany Bay, To His Aunt in Dumfries, 1794

The traditions of European art and painting did not fit comfortably with this strange and bewildering new landscape. Early artists tended to paint what they saw and the better the representation; the better the work was regarded.

The new landscape

Artists like the convict John Eyre, who produced paintings and engravings in the first decade of the nineteenth century, and the landscape painter Conrad Martens - a close friend of Charles Darwin - produced important works during these early years of settlement.

CONRAD MARTENS :  BRISBANE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/martens_bris_33b-FS.jpg)

John Glover

Glover was one of the precursors of an Australian style of painting. He arrived in Tasmania from England in 1831. A talented landscape painter with a strong reputation in England (and France), Glover was never seen as an artist who 'pushed the boundaries'.
While he was initially criticised for not paying close enough attention to the 'local characteristics', he did find an individuality in his work through the new landscapes and atmosphere of Tasmania. His depiction of the Tasmanian light as bright and clear, was a departure from his European paintings and gave his paintings a true Australian quality.
His body of work made him a pioneer of landscape painting in Australia.

JOHN GLOVER : ABORIGINES DANCING AT BRIGHTON

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/GloverAbosDanceBrightont.jpg)

The Heidelberg School

The Heidelberg School was the first significant art movement in Australia. An evolving nationalism had led painters like Tom Roberts, Fredrick McCubbin and Arthur Streeton to unashamedly paint the Australian landscape in an effort to capture something of the essence of their land:
...the Australian Artist can best fulfil his highest destiny by remaining in his own country and studying that which lies about him...
Frederick McCubbin, c1915

ARTHUR STREETON : PURPLE NOON'S TRANSPARENT MIGHT

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/StreetonPurpleNoon.jpg)

Tom Roberts

Roberts was the first major painter to be selected to study at London's Royal Academy of Arts in 1881. He studied impressionism in Europe and returned to Australia in 1885 and, together with McCubbin, Streeton and Condor (the Heidelberg School), dedicated himself to painting the bush.
The outback was the stuff of his paintings - Shearing the Rams and A Break Away being amongst his most famous.

TOM ROBERTS : SHEARING THE RAMS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Roberts_shearingrams.jpg)

Fredrick McCubbin

McCubbin became the first Australian-born white artist of significance and was probably the most impressionistic of the nationalistic group of painters. His long association with Roberts had a significant impact on his painting and he was one of the Heidelberg School's leading lights.
McCubbin's most famous work - Lost - was inspired by twelve year old Clara Crosbie who was found alive after three weeks lost in the bush near Lilydale.

FREDERICK McCUBBIN : LOST

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/McCubbin_lost.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 18, 2007, 01:52:31 AM
OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/OldPHse.jpg)

Old Parliament House opened in 1927 and served as the home of Federal Parliament until 1988. In Canberra’s early years the House was the social, geographic and political heart of the new Australian capital. Over time, this impressive building became synonymous with some of the country’s most important moments including Australia’s declaration of war against Japan in 1941 and the dismissal of Gough Whitlam’s Labor Government in 1975.
The sixty years during which Old Parliament House served as a working parliament were a time of enormous change for Australia. The country grew from an Imperial Dominion to a nation in its own right. Over that time, Old Parliament House was the theatre in which the politics of the day were played out and momentous decisions made.

The significance of Old Parliament House today lies in its historical and social value to the Australian people. The House is a nationally significant ‘museum of itself’ and of Australia’s political heritage—so, as well as being a popular tourist destination, it is also a precious place which needs conservation.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/OPHBack.jpg)

Above: The rear of Old Parliament House at night. Photographer – Steve Keough. Old Parliament House collection.
 
In 1972, following twenty-three years of Liberal-Country Party Government, Australians decided ‘it’s time’ for change. The Labor Party was swept into Government on a wave of popular support. Three years later, Labor’s period of Government was abruptly terminated amidst a storm of controversy. It was three years marked by rapid change in Australian politics dominated by larger-than-life personalities and the political circumstances of the time.

The drama of the events leading up to the dismissal of the Labor Government in 1975 and the subsequent landslide victory of the Liberal-Country Party in the election of December 13 of that year were played out in the corridors, offices and chambers of this building. In many people's recollections, the events of 1975 are linked inextricably with the building itself.

Leading up to the dismissal were a series of events from as early as March 1974 until September 1975 that served as a prologue to the high drama of 11 November 1975. These events included the ‘Loans Affair’, ministerial sackings and resignations, the rise of a new Opposition Leader, Malcolm Fraser, and the appointment of a new Governor-General, Sir John Kerr.

The first act in the drama saw the Senate, controlled by the Opposition, block Supply of the Government’s budget bills. This was done in an effort to force Prime Minister Gough Whitlam to call an election. When Whitlam refused, a deadlock ensued.

In the second Act the Governor-General, Sir John Kerr, entered the drama as he considers his role in breaking the deadlock.

Act three, November 11, 1975, saw the Governor-General take action and dismiss Whitlam and his government. For many Australians the day of the dismissal is remembered as a moment of unique drama in their lives. To them, it shaped their political attitudes and changed their understanding of how the political system works in Australia. For politicians on both sides, it was to be a watershed in their political fortunes.

This action by the Governor-General was the penultimate climax to the drama, but the crisis was not resolved until the end of Act four—the federal election of December 13, 1975. This saw the complete rout of the federal Labor government in what Malcolm Fraser called “the biggest shift in public opinion in Australia’s history”.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/GoughWhitlam.jpg)

Gough Whitlam delivered one the most famous lines uttered by an Australian politician: “Well may we say ‘God Save the Queen’, because nothing will save the Governor-General.”


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 19, 2007, 05:27:56 AM
CRUISING WAVE OF SUCCESS

Phil Bartsch….May 19, 2007 12:00am…..Article from: The Courier Mail

THAT endless wave of success just seems to keep rolling on and on for The Wiggles. But for Jeff Fatt – the Purple Wiggle – when he's not busy falling asleep on stage and travelling the world with his skivvied bandmates, he enjoys riding some real waves.

On the eve of jetting off to the US, Fatt and the other members of the children's supergroup rolled up their trousers yesterday to officially open Wiggle Bay at Dreamworld's Whitewater World. A sea of young fans and their parents were there to greet their idols.

After the formalities Fatt revealed he was the only "surfing Wiggle" and was eager to tame the nearby wave pool. "I usually surf at Manly in New South Wales where I live. When I'm home I surf at least once a week. Even if there's no surf it's just great being out there in the water," he said.
Fatt said he had started riding a mini-mal in the past year after surfing kneeboards most of his life. But even when he's catching a few waves he can't escape his Wiggles fame. "Sometimes there are guys out there with their kids and I get the occasional 'Wake up, Jeff'," he said. His session in Whitewater World's wave pool was the first time he had surfed a manmade swell. "It's brilliant. It's better than a flat day in the surf and perfect for learning," Fatt said.

This week the park became the first in the southern hemisphere to offer surfing lessons in its wave pool. Yesterday the Wiggles were also introduced to the park's Sumatran tiger cubs Rahni and Indah and performed for some of their pint-sized fans.

Next week, they travel to the US to open three new Wiggles Worlds – the first of 15 to be built there over the next five years at Six Flags theme parks.

Fatt said the Wiggles had been undergoing a "rebirth" since being joined by new member Sam Moran after original Yellow Wiggle Greg Page hung up his skivvy due to illness last year. "Sam's been really well received. It's fantastic," Fatt said.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Wiggles.jpg)

SPLISH splash . . . the Wiggles and Captain Feathersword getting their toes wet at Whitewater World. Picture: Paul Riley


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 19, 2007, 05:32:42 AM
‘PANDA’MONIUM

By Greg Stolz ….May 19, 2007 12:00am…..Article from: The Courier Mail

A BILLIONAIRE Chinese zoo owner wants to send giant pandas to the Gold Coast in exchange for koalas, kangaroos and wombats. It would be the first time pandas, among the world's most endangered animals, have been shown in Australia since the 1988 Bicentennial.

The pandas would be housed in a planned Chinese exhibit at Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary, which last year sent six koalas to Xiangjiang Safari Park in Guangzhou, southern China. All six mated to produce joeys, including a rare set of twins which have created a wave of excitement in China since their birth in October.

The giant Xiangjiang Safari Park is owned by one of China's richest businessmen, tourism tycoon and politician Su Xhigang.

Delighted at the enormous publicity the koala twins have generated for his park, Mr Su wants to return the favour by sending two pandas to Australia. In Guangzhou yesterday, Mr Su's Chime-Long Group and Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary announced plans to establish a koala-panda research and conservation partnership.

As part of the pact, Xiangjiang hopes to swap pandas and other Chinese animals for more koalas, kangaroos, wombats and other Australian species. A Chinese showcase featuring gardens, animal displays and a restaurant would be built at Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary, while the Australian exhibit at Xiangjiang would be expanded.

Sanctuary chief executive Michelle Monsour said pandas and koalas were iconic species and the proposed exchange would promote conservation, education and tourism in China and Australia. But she said it would not be easy to get approval from the Chinese and Australian governments.
Revered by the Chinese as a national treasure, captive pandas are rarely sent overseas.

Mr Su said he hoped to meet Prime Minister John Howard to discuss the proposal. China is Australia's fastest-growing tourism market, with more than 330,000 Chinese visiting in the year to March.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/0549027500.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: nonesuche on May 19, 2007, 07:39:15 AM
Tib, I rarely post in your thread but please know I typically enjoy your entries with my morning coffee  :D thank you for sharing so much with us of your homeland, I love it !

We should nominate Anna as ambassadoress of the pandas too  :lol: that would be the perfect role for her.

I have fallen in love with Robert Gordon's ceramics, I can't find a US outlet for them beyond eBay and have even written to his operation in Australia to inquire if they do ship to the US, no reply yet  :?


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 20, 2007, 07:07:10 AM
N.R.M.A. CAREFLIGHT SERVICE

Twenty years ago a group of doctors had a shared vision: to create a better medical retrieval service in New South Wales. They believed that very sick patients who need to be moved between hospitals, and severely injured patients who need to be treated at the accident scene, should be attended by critical care specialists who can perform 'physician only' procedures. From this vision, CareFlight was born.

The visionaries established a base in the grounds of Westmead Hospital and commissioned their first helicopter. Initially, with only one doctor on duty each day, CareFlight flew to some four patients each month. Now, operating out of Westmead in Sydney and Orange in the Central West, we have three helicopters on standby and five medical teams on rostered duty every day of the year. Our role has expanded to providing critical care retrieval by road ambulance and fixed wing air ambulance. Last year we cared for and/or transported over 1,200 patients.

Over the years, our purpose and philosophy have remained constant: to be a world class rapid response emergency medical retrieval service, accessible to all members of the community. As a charity, our ability to serve the community without cost to the patient depends on the support of our donors and sponsors. CareFlight retrieves critically ill and injured patients from all around the world. We bring a hospital standard of care to the patient, because time really can mean the difference between life and death.

We employ physicians and senior registrars who are specialists in anaesthesia, emergency medicine and intensive care. Accredited with the critical care medical colleges, we train experienced doctors to care for patients in the pre-hospital and transport environment.
Our medical teams respond by helicopter, road ambulance or fixed wing air ambulance, depending on the nature of the mission.

After serving the people of New South Wales for 20 years, NRMA CareFlight is now evolving into a vital new service with an even greater medical focus.  Historically, CareFlight has offered an integrated aero-medical retrieval service to the people of NSW. Over the past two decades more than 15,000 critically ill and injured patients have been treated and/or transported by CareFlight doctors, utilising our own dedicated helicopters as well as road ambulances, fixed wing air ambulances and medi-jet

FIXED WING AMBULANCE SERVICES

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/fixed_wing_air_ambulance.jpg)

ROAD AND HELICOPTER AMBULANCE TRANSPORT

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/road_ambulance.jpg)

FUND RAISING BEARS

The original CareFlight Bear has been very popular and the range has now been expanded to 15 bears in various official uniforms.

PILOT BEAR

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/pilot_t.jpg)

For more information on this service and to see the full range of Bears :

http://careflight.org/


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 20, 2007, 07:15:44 AM
None thank you for your kind words.  I am glad you are enjoying my efforts to present some features of my beautiful country to my monkey friends.  Our two countries are very similar as are our people and I hope this helps us to understand each other better.

I agree Anna could well become an Panda Ambassadoress and she may even earn a trip to Australia to help settle our new Pandas into their adopted country!

I checked out the Robert Gordon Website and they say they can export to anywhere in the world within four weeks.  They also have agencies in several unusual countries, but none in the USA.  I may write to them to see if I can do an article on their history and range as I am sure other monkeys would be interested also.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: BTgirl on May 20, 2007, 08:23:43 AM
Tibro,

Just like None, I enjoy your Australian thread immensely. I know you must put a lot of effort into finding such interesting and beautiful things to post in the thread.

I have to tell you that I have a bear that looks exactly like the original pilot bear sitting in my spare bedroom upstairs. It came to us in a shipment of items that MIL sent when she sold her house. I'm wondering if it was purchased when hubby's family visited Australia many, many years ago. Wouldn't it be cool if it was!


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: nonesuche on May 20, 2007, 11:24:40 AM
oh BT I hope you can research that bear ! Cool indeed !

Tib, thank you. I still haven't heard back from Gordon's operation but I'd likely be happy to offer to open a storefront for their wares in the US?  :D Can you put in a good word for me?  :lol:

Daughter and I were discussing last night that maybe moving to Australia might be a cool thing one day for us? We can dream I guess.......maybe a vacation there soon?


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 20, 2007, 08:33:51 PM
BT The Careflight Bears have been around for about ten years.  It would be even more interesting if your bear was one of the English bears and depending on how old it is and the makers name it could be quite rare.

None get my email address off Klaas or Mishy and we can both contact these Robert Gordon family.  Might make more of an impression if they get contacted from two different directions.

That would be cool if you moved to Australia - then I could purchase your cookies!!!!  A vacation first would be the ideal way to go as it is a vast country with lots of possibilities - but do not try to smuggle any cookies in.  Food and plants are a big no-no, and Customs and Quarantine are deadly.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 21, 2007, 04:33:19 AM
MACQUARIE LIGHTHOUSE

A flagstaff was erected on this site at South Head in Sydney, in 1791, within one year of the First Fleet arriving to settle New South Wales.
A wood and coal fired beacon, a basket on a tripod, was established in 1793 and was the only guiding light for the next 25 years.

THE 1818 LIGHTHOUSE:

The first lighthouse structure in Australia it was started in 1816 and completed in 1818 at the command of Governor Macquarie.
The work was undertaken by Francis Greenway, the famous convict Architect, responsible for many significant and beautiful buildings in early Sydney.
Governor Macquarie was so pleased with the quality of the work the Greenway was producing that he granted him emancipation for his efforts.
However, Greenway had warned that the poor quality of the sandstone being used would result in the rapid deterioration of the new tower.
The new light was a revolving apparatus, powered by a clockwork mechanism, and consisting of a number of oil burning lamps set in parabolic reflectors. It flashed once every minute and was visible for 22 miles.
As Greenway had predicted the tower soon began to deteriorate. Several large stones fell away as early as 1823.  Large iron bands were placed around the tower to prevent further movement. The state of the tower was so parlous by 1878 that the New South Wales Government determined to build a new tower.

THE 1883 LIGHTHOUSE:

The construction of the current Macquarie Lighthouse was begun in 1881 and the light was first exhibited in 1883.  It was designed by James Barnet and is a replica of the original tower, but stronger in materials and design. Barnet's crown was larger to accommodate a large lantern room and the larger apparatus. There was also a gunmetal railing. This design was to become the trademark of many other lighthouses that Barnet designed.
The new light's giant lens was a first order sixteen sided dioptric holophotal revolving white light based on the Fresnel system, about two metres in diameter showing an eight second flash every minute, and with a range of 25 nautical miles.

The lighting apparatus at the time was described by the builder, Chance Brothers, of Birmingham as the most efficient in the world. It was electric in operation, with the power being produced by two De Meritens magnetos weighing two and a half tons. These were driven by an eight-horse power "Crossley - otto cycle" silent horizontal coal gas engine at 830 rpm. Only one of the de Meritens generators is still in existence: it is owned by the Powerhouse Museum and on display at the Lighthouse. Likewise the original switchboard is owned by the museum but installed the Lighthouse. The Museum have one of the arc lamps, but it is not on display at either venue.

The electric apparatus was only used in bad weather. When the weather got really bad the second magneto was brought into operation producing a light of 6,000,000 candelas, the most powerful in the world at the time. In clear weather the illuminate was provided by a gas burner. With the commencement of the new light, the lantern was removed from the old tower but the structure itself was not demolished for several years. The power generators for the new light proved too expensive to run and in 1912 the apparatus was was converted to a vaporised kerosene incandescent mantle system.

With the connection of the city power supply in 1933 the light was converted back to electricity. At the time a smaller lens was installed and this is basically the mode of operation we see today. The lighthouse was fully automated in 1976.The keepers were eventually withdrawn in 1989.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Macquariewb1.jpg)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/MacquarieLhseLit.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 22, 2007, 07:18:57 AM
JAPANESE GARDENS - COWRA, NSW.

Cowra’s relationship with the Japanese started with the siting of a P.O.W camp during WWII.  In the early hours of August 5, 1944 over 500 Japanese POW staged a mass suicidal break for freedom.  In the ensuing action 231 Japanese Prisoners of War and four Australian soldiers were killed.   Following the cessation of hostilities, members of the Cowra Sub-Branch of the Returned Servicemen’s League (R.S.L) visited the Australian War Cemetery at regular intervals to care for the graves of their comrades.  In 1948 they decided to forget the past and also assume the responsibility for the care and the maintenance of the Japanese section of the cemetery in conjunction with the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

In 1960 the Japanese Government were considering the repatriation of their war dead to Japan, however they were so impressed with the attitude of the R.S.L members that they decided to bring all their war dead from other parts of Australia to be re-buried at Cowra. The Cowra Tourist Development Corporation (Cowra Tourism Corporation, as it was then known) conceived the idea of further developing this unique friendship with Japan by the establishment of a Japanese Garden at Cowra.  The building of the Garden has come about as a direct extension of the cemetery.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/CowraJap1.jpg)

In 1971, Mr Ken Nakajima, world famous landscape gardener was appointed as designer of the Garden and is responsible for the final site choice.  In October 1979 the Garden became a fulltime tourist attraction, operating seven days a week (excluding Christmas Day).  In November 1986 stage two commenced completing the original plans of the Garden.
The Garden was made possible through donations received from both Australian and Japanese Governments and private entities.

A visit to Cowra just isn’t complete without a visit to our Japanese Garden and Cultural Centre.  Opened in 1979, this multi award winning Garden is a ‘must’ see at any time of the year, whether you are on your first visit to Cowra or your fiftieth. Ken Nakajima, created the Kaiyushiki (strolling) garden, which is designed to embody the entire landscape of Japan, where every bend takes the visitor on a voyage of discovery.  The striking hill representing Mt Fuji, manicured hedges cascading across the garden like rolling hills, streams flowing like rivers and ponds glistening like inland lakes and the sea - ponder a moment or feed the Koi.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/CowraJap4.jpg)

However, the Cowra Japanese Garden is unique in that it is more than just a ‘Garden,’ it is a powerful symbol of good will, it encourages reconciliation and peace. The Garden is designed in order to contribute to cultural exchange, international understanding and to show an appreciation of all existing nature Special features of the Garden include; Gift Shop, a three room Cultural Centre, Karesansui Garden, a traditional Tatami room, an authentic open air Tea House, Pottery House, Bonsai House, Audio Tour Guides, Plant Nursery and Restaurant.

Situated in the open courtyard of the Cultural Centre, the Stone or Karesansui Garden may be found. The Stone Garden is a popular Japanese style garden, often found surrounding teahouses in Japan.  The Garden is composed principally of large rocks surrounded by exquisitely raked dry sand.  Large stones are placed, as if islands within the sea, the white raked sand suggesting wave patterns that have been shaped by the land around which the water is moving.  

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/CowraJap3.jpg)

The Pottery House features characteristics of Japanese design and provides an ideal setting for potters to work at their craft.  The pottery is influenced by Japanese tradition, with the individual decorations on the pottery reflecting the mood of the Garden, as perceived by the potters, and includes designs brushed on with a traditional Japanese calligraphy brush.  Pottery is available for purchase.

The Bonsai House displays examples of bonsai, an ancient Japanese traditional art form.  Included in the collection are examples of styles such as informal upright, slanting, rock planting, cascade, semi-cascade, and the living landscape known as saikei.  

The Japanese structural open-air Tea House is a place where you can stop and observe the natural surroundings through the rectangular frames of the open windows.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/CowraJap2.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: nonesuche on May 22, 2007, 11:42:16 AM
oh Tib my mother would adore the japanese garden !!!!!!! I love the lighthouse as well, so much history in Australia worth learning about !

guess what? I made a new friend at Robert Gordon, they are willing to offer us wholesale cost for whatever we would like to order? YIPPEE !!!!!!!!!!

I wanted to hug them, last week was daughter's birthday and I didn't go overboard with gifts hoping I could get her a few of his pieces. Now the challenge will be not to go wild !!  :lol:


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: nonesuche on May 22, 2007, 11:51:34 AM
I had to post some of these for you Tib, now you can see why we're so nuts about it  :lol: It's our theme song  :lol:

(http://i86.photobucket.com/albums/k101/daisysistah/RGordon/a2c9f3e6.jpg)

daughter also absolutely loves this pattern for she's crazy about polka dots

(http://i86.photobucket.com/albums/k101/daisysistah/RGordon/ff0c6f72.jpg)

all can be seen at www.robertgordonaustralia.com  

 :D


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 23, 2007, 02:09:25 AM
None, I am so pleased you heard from the Robert Gordon family and that is a great deal they have given you.  You look like becoming their US outlet, which would be really really cool.

It would be difficult to choose favourites amongst their range.  You will have a hard time restraining yourself from ordering the whole lot!  The cup cakes are so dainty and colourful.  They would look lovely alongside your cookies.
I like the  Rooster ranges also - just something different and definitely colourful.  

I will post a little on their history in a few days as I think it is unusual these days to find a company still in the original family's hands where you can get personal attention.  I love the original pottery shed!  It would have looked great in my early Aust architecture article  :wink:

There are several Japanese Gardens in Australia and they are just so peaceful to walk through.  Even little children seem to hush and enjoy the atmosphere instead of just running around.  I have spent a lot of time in a particularly nice one in Toowoomba.  Will scout around for any photos I can locate.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 23, 2007, 02:31:57 AM
COWRA, N.S.W

A large country town famous as a POW camp during World War II
Cowra is a town of 9500 people situated on the Lachlan River, 310m above sea-level and 320 km west of Sydney at the junction of the Mid Western and Olympic Highways. It is the commercial and administrative centre of a shire in which the major industries are livestock, wool scouring, vegetable growing and processing, vineyards, furniture making and tourism.

CANOLA FIELDS NEAR COWRA

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/CowraCanola.jpg)

Cowra is noted for its historical and natural attractions, the magnificent Japanese Garden and Cultural Centre, quality restaurants, wineries, galleries, craft shops and horse riding. The public identity of the town has become bound up with the Cowra breakout of 1944 (in which Japanese prisoners of war attempted to escape from a local camp during World War II) and the subsequent association with Japan. This history has led the town to focus on and promote the values of pacifism and internationalism, which are at the centre of the annual Festival of Understanding.

COWRA POW CAMP AND THE COWRA BREAKOUT
 
A large army training camp was established just outside Cowra in 1940 which trained some 70 000 personnel throughout World War II. The following year, a prisoner-of-war (POW) camp was built at the north-eastern outskirts of town. On 5 August, 1944, this camp became the site of the largest mass POW escape in British military history. It was also the only such escape attempt to occur in Australia.  At that time the camp contained about 4000 prisoners who were held in four separate compounds of 17 acres each. A thoroughfare 700 metres long and 45 metres wide, known as Broadway, divided Camps B and C from Camps A and D. Adjacent Broadway was a 10-metre strip known as No Man's Land, on each side of which was barbed-wire security fencing. Camp B, hopelessly overcrowded, held 1104 Japanese POWs.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/AWM064347.jpg)

AWM 064347. A general view of the race between the four compounds of the Cowra prisoner of war camp. “B” and “C” compounds are on the left while “A” and “D” compounds are on the right.

On 3 June, 1944, a Korean prisoner reported a conversation in which he heard about a plan among the Japanese to attack the garrison, seize arms and ammunition and escape. As a result security was stepped up. Consequently, on 4 August, the leader of Camp B was handed a list of internees to be transferred to the POW camp at Hay on 7 August. At 1.30 a.m. of 5 August a bugle sounded and the prisoners of Camp B opened the hut doors. Screaming furiously, two groups - armed with knives, chisels, forks, saws, axe handles and baseball bats - rushed the wire separating them from Broadway while two other groups headed for the perimeter wire on the other side of the camp. They threw blankets over the barbed wire, or crawled under it, while others dressed in heavy clothing, threw themselves on the wire for others to climb over. 20 buildings were burned down due to prisoners overturning heating braziers. The Australian Recruit Training Centre, 3 km away, was alerted by telephone and flares. Two privates, who manned one of the Vickers machine gun trailers, were overrun and murdered, although Private Hardy managed to sabotage his gun before his death. Another private was stabbed to death in the fracas and a lieutenant was killed during the round-up the following morning. Another four Australian personnel were wounded and a civilian from Blayney died after a gun discharged in his vehicle during the round-up. 378 Japanese POWs escaped although the media were kept entirely in the dark about the event and local civilians were given partial and at times false information.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/AWM064284.jpg)

AWM 064284. Looking west showing compounds of the Cowra prisoner of war camp with the group headquarter buildings in the foreground.

Within nine days 334 escapees were recaptured by the authorities and by civilians. One POW reached Eugowra, 50 km away. Others had been killed and some committed suicide - two by laying their heads on railroad tracks. In all 231 Japanese died and 108 were wounded - three dying subsequently of their wounds. The organisers of the break-out had ordered that civilians were to remain unharmed and this proved to be the case.  One charming story entailed a Mrs Weir who refused to hand over two escapees until she had given the men tea and scones as they had not eaten for days. The men in question returned to the Weir farm in the 1980s to thank the family.


(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/cemetery_group.jpg)

Left, the Cowra War Cemetery and Right, the relic foundations of the POW camp. (Photographs courtesy Cowra Shire Council.)

Interestingly, the many Italian POWs were, for the most part, cheerful and cooperative and worked agreeably outside the camp while the Japanese POWs were surly, difficult and resentful. Attempts at employing them outside the camp had proved a failure due to their aggressive behaviour. Their lack of cooperation and the breakout itself arose from an overwhelming sense of shame engendered by a code of honour which viewed capture as a disgrace to themselves, their families and their country. Japanese soldiers were supposed to commit suicide rather than be humiliated by the subservience implicit in imprisonment. Indeed most of the prisoners were taken when they were too weak to offer resistance or they were merchant seamen scooped from the waters. They gave false names as they felt news of their capture would shame their families while the Japanese authorities reported all those missing in action as dead. When informed of the deaths during the breakout, the Japanese authorities asserted that those killed must have been Japanese civilians as, it contended, there was no such thing as a Japanese POW. When the internees returned many felt their 'shame' would render them unworthy of return to Japanese society (some expected to be executed) and half did not tell their families they had been POWs.  A Japanese war cemetery was established by agreement with the Japanese government in 1964. It now contains the remains of all Japanese POWs and civilian internees who died during their imprisonment in World War II.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/CowraJapWar.jpg)

A student exchange program was established in 1970 between Cowra High School and the Seikei High School in Kichijyouji in Tokyo. The Japanese Garden and Cultural Centre was set up with the aid of the Japanese government in 1978-79 to honour the dead on both sides.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 23, 2007, 02:36:49 AM
The Black and White photographs in the above article are from the Australian War Memorial collection, and reprinted with their kind permission.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: nonesuche on May 23, 2007, 07:08:13 AM
Quote from: "Tibrogargan"
None, I am so pleased you heard from the Robert Gordon family and that is a great deal they have given you.  You look like becoming their US outlet, which would be really really cool.

It would be difficult to choose favourites amongst their range.  You will have a hard time restraining yourself from ordering the whole lot!  The cup cakes are so dainty and colourful.  They would look lovely alongside your cookies.
I like the  Rooster ranges also - just something different and definitely colourful.  

I will post a little on their history in a few days as I think it is unusual these days to find a company still in the original family's hands where you can get personal attention.  I love the original pottery shed!  It would have looked great in my early Aust architecture article  :wink:

There are several Japanese Gardens in Australia and they are just so peaceful to walk through.  Even little children seem to hush and enjoy the atmosphere instead of just running around.  I have spent a lot of time in a particularly nice one in Toowoomba.  Will scout around for any photos I can locate.


Tib I don't know where to draw the line with their products, ALL are so appealing to me !! Did you know they have an outlet also? The address is on their website, we have an outlet for Vietri closeby which is an importer for italian ceramics. My mother used to carry that line and another US based one MacKenzie-Childs in her art gallery. Neither are as reasonably priced as Gordon's and like you, I like that his family continues to drive their operation.

We do cupcakes now, we're updating our site with some new photos but as you can see, their wee cake stands and whimsical toppers are a great fit with our products?

(http://i86.photobucket.com/albums/k101/daisysistah/8d4fb9d5.jpg)

(http://i86.photobucket.com/albums/k101/daisysistah/22992b22.jpg)

I will email Mishy to send you my email address and weblinks, I really do think the RG line is perfect for our catered events?  :wink:

My mother is a master gardener, she specializes in perennials and I was discussing with her last night perhaps she could join us in a trip down under. My brother also has a former roommate from AU who now runs his family's cattle operation, so perhaps we could also visit with Andrew.

AU really is an interesting place to live !


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Angiex911dsptchr on May 23, 2007, 11:45:48 PM
Tibro you have done an oustanding job with this thread!!   The photos are GORGEOUS!!!   Maybe I should move to Australia   :wink:


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 24, 2007, 03:09:48 AM
None - those RG ceramics are just made for your cookies and cup cakes.  They go together like a horse and carriage as in the words of that old song. Their factory outlet is about 35 miles from Melbourne CBD, as the crow flies.
I see they have agents in 5 other states (none in Tas   :( ) and NZ but I was intrigued by them having distributors in Dubai, Malaysia and Singapore and nothing in the UK or USA.  I am sure our local housewares specialist stores sell RG pottery and would be at a heavy mark-up too, I might add.

I am sure you would all find something of interest here for a visit.  There are some wonderful gardens and art galleries, and a visit to a cattle station would be quite an experience.  I can share more ideas with you through emails.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 24, 2007, 03:17:47 AM
Angie thank you for your appreciation.  It is a pleasure to present these items for my monkey friends to enjoy and learn about Australia.

The photos I find are very good - but there are a lot more out there that are copyrighted and it is a shame I cannot include those as well.  Maybe it will inspire some monkeys to search the internet for more information?  I have the benefit of an browser that allows me to restrict searches to Australian websites so that makes it easier for me.

Angie you would love it out here!


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 24, 2007, 03:26:17 AM
SYDNEY OBSERVATORY

Early in 1797, the first windmill in New South Wales was completed on what became known as Windmill Hill. It was used to grind grain into flour and was one of the colony's first steps towards self sufficiency. The mill tower was built of stone and the machinery and grindstone were imported from England. But they did not work for long. The canvas sails were stolen, the machinery was damaged in a storm, and by 1800 the foundations were giving way. Before it was ten years old, the mill was useless. This brief slice of history is still echoed in the name 'Millers Point', the harbour landing where grain was unloaded.

In 1803 Governor Hunter ordered a fort to be built on the site of Windmill Hill to defend the colony from rebellious convicts and possible French attack. The fort called Fort Phillip, was never fully completed and never fired a single shot in anger. In 1825 the eastern wall of the fort was converted to a signal station. From here flags sent messages to ships in the harbour and the signal station on the South Head of the harbour.
In 1840 the fort was partially demolished. A new signal station, designed by the colonial architect Mortimer Lewis, was built on the east wall in 1848. This is now the oldest building on the hill.

OBSERVATORY IN 1860

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/SydObs1860.jpg)

Plans for Sydney Observatory began as a simple time-ball tower, to be built near the signal station. Every day at exactly 1.00pm, the time ball on top of the tower would drop to signal the correct time to the city and harbour below. At the same time a cannon on Fort Denison was fired. It was soon agreed to expand the tower into a full observatory.  Designed by Alexander Dawson, the observatory consisted of a domed chamber to house the equatorial telescope, a room with long, narrow windows for the transit telescope, a computing room or office, and a residence for the astronomer. In 1877, a western wing was added to provide office and library space and a second domed chamber for telescopes.

Under Henry Chamberlain Russell, in the 1880s Sydney Observatory gained international recognition. Russell took some of the first astronomical photographs in the world, and involved Sydney in one of the greatest international astronomy projects ever undertaken, The astrographic catalogue. The catalogue was the first completed atlas of the sky. The Sydney section alone took 80 years and 53 volumes to complete.
After federation in 1901, meteorological observations became a Commonwealth government responsibility, but astronomy remained with the states.

OBSERVATORY TIME BALL

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/SydObsTimeBall.jpg)

Sydney Observatory continued working on The astrographic catalogue, keeping time, making observations and providing information to the public. Every day, for example, the Observatory supplied Sydney newspapers with the rising and setting times of the sun, moon and planets. By the mid 1970s the increasing problems of air pollution and city light made work at the Observatory more and more difficult. In 1982, the decision was made to convert Sydney Observatory into a museum of astronomy and related fields.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 25, 2007, 01:46:54 AM
INTRODUCING INDAH

One of Dreamworld’s gorgeous Sumatran tiger cubs received her name after a week long national naming competition on the Today Show.

Dreamworld received over 15, 000 entries and chose the name INDAH meaning beautiful or precious in Indonesian.

Indah

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Indah6week.jpg)

Nameless Cub

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/CubPeek6week.jpg)

Cubs at 6 weeks - "Walkies"

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/CubsWalk6week.jpg)

The 2nd cub's name will be announced on Friday 18th May when The Wiggles visit Dreamworld and will be spend some one on one time with Indah and her sister.

THE PARENTS :

Soraya - the mother

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/SorayaMum.jpg)

Handler Quote :“Soraya is an extremely inquisitive tiger with an easy-going nature."
Unlike Dreamworld’s other tigers, Soraya was not hand-raised so she does not appear on Tiger Island. She lives in her purpose built, off-exhibit tiger facility at Tiger Island.

Raja - the father

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/RajaDad.jpg)

Handler Quote: “Raja has had very limited human contact. He’s a little more temperamental and certainly likes to let us know who’s boss.”
Raja has not been hand-raised and can not be handled by Tiger Island staff. He lives in his purpose built, off-exhibit tiger facility at Tiger Island.

My note :  They are slow at updating their website as the second cub would be named by now.  Will post as soon as I see anything more.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 26, 2007, 04:05:21 AM
(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/AVATARS/8941-002-18-1072.gif)

IN MEMORY OF ALL THE BRAVE MEN AND WOMEN
WHO HAVE GIVEN THEIR LIVES TO KEEP US ALL SAFE AND FREE


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 26, 2007, 04:20:18 AM
TOOWOOMBA, QUEENSLAND

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/welcome.jpg)

Situated on the crest of the Great Dividing Range at some 700 metres above sea level, Toowoomba enjoys panoramic views, rich volcanic soil and four wonderfully distinct seasons. Citizens and visitors enjoy any number of over 150 public parks throughout Toowoomba. Many of these parklands are being cultured to represent a variety of international themes and one can already visit a well established Japanese Garden, New Zealand themed park and lake area, and a wetlands of the world area.

MAIN STREET

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Toowoomba5.jpg)

Toowoomba city has built a reputation over many years to become known as the Garden City of Queensland. With fresh mountain air and rich volcanic soils it has been an ideal location for the cultivation of some of the most magnificent park and garden settings in Australia.

TOOWOOMBA FROM LOOKOUT

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Toowoomba7.jpg)

All four seasons are experienced in Toowoomba. Winter brings the crisp mountain air and warm, earthy tonings. Spring is the most colourful and playful time of the year in Toowoomba.

The arrival of the Spring season is celebrated every year by the Carnival of Flowers. Visitors flock to the city from far and wide to tour the award winning private gardens and experience this week-long event of fun and festivities.

FLOATS FROM THE CARNIVAL

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/wb06float.jpg)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/wb06fifi.jpg)

From coffee shops to silver service restaurants, from international cuisine to hearty steakhouse menus, from a-la- carte to buffet as well as hotel meals and take-away outlets, Toowoomba offers all the dining choices one could ever desire. A selection of these restaurants operate from restored colonial homes, adding charm and atmosphere to any breakfast, lunch or evening meal.

GREAT DIVIDING RANGE HIGHWAY TOWARDS BRISBANE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Toowoomba10.jpg)

The city of Toowoomba has achieved recognition as a centre for academic excellence. A number of private primary and secondary schools and Christian Colleges service the educational needs of young people from all throughout Queensland. With well established reputations to uphold, these schools offer the ultimate in academic as well as sporting opportunities.
Further studies are offered by both the Technical And Further Education (TAFE) and the University of Southern Queensland. The University is modern and rapidly growing, with 13,000 students enrolled in an ever-expanding range of career-oriented courses. High quality and innovative teaching programmes have also earned the University of Southern Queensland a reputation as a leader in Distance Education.

WELL PRESERVED BUILDINGS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/4_i.jpg)

The Performing Airs Centre at the University regularly hosts a wide range of outstanding music, choral and drama performances, showcasing the talent of students, staff and visiting professionals.

GRASS TREES

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/grasstrees.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: BTgirl on May 26, 2007, 09:07:19 AM
Tibro

I love all the photos you post, but I especially love the Japanese garden ones. Since we have 13 acres of property, my dream has been to somehow have my own Japanese garden. The problem is, I don't think the raccoons and possums will accommodate my wishes.  :lol:


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 27, 2007, 04:11:28 AM
TOOWOOMBA - THE JAPANESE GARDEN : JU RAKU EN

(Ju-Longevity, Raku - to enjoy, En - a place for public recreation)

One of the most peaceful and beautiful parks in Toowoomba is the University's Japanese Garden which is the largest, most complex and traditionally designed Japanese Garden in Australia. It was named Ju Raku En by the designer - roughly translated it means long life and happiness in a public garden.

The Garden is a joint project of the University of Southern Queensland and the Toowoomba City Council and was opened in 1989. It was designed by Professor Kinsaku Nakane - renowned as the modern day master of Japanese garden design and famous for the restoration of many of Japan's old gardens and the design and construction of gardens in Japan and throughout the western world.

Its elements of mountain stream and waterfall, Dry Garden, central lake, Azalea Hill, 3 kilometers of paths, many species of Japanese and Australian native trees and plants, and lawns combine in a seamless and restful harmony.

Japanese gardens emphasise the use of rocks to create three dimensional pictures in stone. All the large rocks in Ju Raku En were accurately placed so as to appear naturally dispersed in a random way.

Ju Raku is more than just a group of rocks stitched together by water and artificially created hills and forests. It is actually a presentation of Buddhist paradise with the celestial sea lapping the rocky shores of the three islands where the immortals are said to dwell. The material world is the outer edge of the lake and a symbolic journal to paradise may be made by crossing one of the four bridges to the islands. The Central Lake represents the celestial sea from the Buddhist legend where believers dwelt in bliss amongst fragrant flowers, lotus blossoms and sounds of celestial music. The northern edge of the lake is lined by a large pebble beach to remind viewers of a seascape.

Other parts of the lake edge are rocky and jagged just like the sea coast of Japan. The skill of miniaturising real life features and reconstructing them in a garden is a highly sophisticated garden form unique to Japanese gardens. Approximately 2,500 full sun Azaleas are planted on the northern face of Azalea Hill as a representation of hillsides in Japan where Azaleas grow wild. The pruning of these shrubs will eventually provide a wave like massed green mat which will burst into vivid colour in Spring. When fully grown the hedge behind the Azaleas, in combination with the uneven and irregularly spaced stepping stones will not allow the visitor a view until they reach the summit where the total garden unfolds before them.

The Rock Island is the pivotal point of the garden representing the sacred Mt Sumeru which is the centre of the Buddhist universe around which all life rotates. The remaining two islands are where it is said that immortals dwell who possess an elixir capable of giving eternal life. It can be viewed that the outer edge of the lake is the material world where we all live and crossing over the bridges to the mystical islands is symbolic of a religious journey from one world to the next. Over 450 tonnes of rock were used to create the five metre high waterfall. Both the mountain stream and waterfall were made to recreate a natural environment or to imitate nature.

The dry or Contemplation garden is a very important element in a Japanese Garden. The design of the dry garden makes suggestions to the viewer rather than spelling out the obvious. The dry garden is an abstract design depicting a seascape although no water is present - raked gravel constantly changes shape from the moving shadows. To sit and view the dry garden for a period of time is a form of meditation and to a Buddhist this exercise can clear the mind of all preconceived worldly ideas to reach what is described as "pure thoughts" or "nothingness". Behind the dry garden, shrubs and trees are being planted to eventually form a thick forest area to give an illusion of great height copying the steep mountains of Japan.

The three kilometres of stroll paths meander around the garden and when all plantings are completed will constantly unfold new vistas and a gradually changing perspective of the garden. The path material is decomposed granite which when walked over produces a pleasant rhythmic sound allowing the visitor to feel part of the garden. The outer edge of the garden contains many quick growing trees, both Australian native and exotic species which were planted to form a buffer from the harsh winds of Toowoomba. These plantings will also aid in creating a microclimate within the garden - virtually its own ecosystem.

Toowoomba’s climate has sufficient distinctive seasons allowing an excellent range of Japanese plants to grow.  Eventually 230 species totaling over 20,000 individual plants will be planted.  Some of these include Cherry Trees, Japanese Maples, Azaleas, Camellias, Bamboo, Japanese Black Pine (the delicate pruning and pinching of candles of the Black Pines has already commenced), Iris, Lotus Lilies and Moss. Upon completion of the plantings the garden will contain the largest and most important collection of Japanese plants in Australia.

The master plan for Ju Raku En and the design for the community building and tea house were prepared in Japan after site analysis and intensive background studies by staff of the Nakane Garden Research. Construction commenced in 1983 after 3 years of planning.  Ju Raku En was opened on 21 April 1989 by Mr Yoshiharu Araki from the Brisbane Consul-General of Japan, but it is still a comparatively young garden and it will take many years for it to be considered complete.

It is estimated that over 50,000 per year visit the gardens. Most visitors stroll through the garden or relax on the seat near the Dry Garden; it is not uncommon to see an artist quietly painting a scene or children feeding bread to the fish or birds, which include swans, ducks, geese and smaller natives.  It is a popular venue for weddings: spring weddings are often held under the mass of lilac blossoms hanging from the Wisteria Pergola, while other couples choose to be married in front of the waterfall or under the Viewing Pavilion on one of the islands.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 27, 2007, 04:26:18 AM
PICTURES AROUND JU RAKU EN

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/TwmbaJapGarden1.jpg)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/TwmbaJapgar12.jpg)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/TwmbaJapgar10.jpg)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/TwmbaJapgar07.jpg)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/TwmbaJapgar03.jpg)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/TwmbaJapgar02.jpg)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/jpgarden7.jpg)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/jpgarden1.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: BTgirl on May 27, 2007, 04:52:31 PM
Tibro - thank you so much for the Japanese garden description and the beautiful photos. Unfortunately, I don't have any sort of naturally occurring pond on my property, but as I was reading the list of plants that were being used in the Japanese garden, I was interested to see that most of them are plants that people use frequently in my area - especially, irises, cherry trees, and Japanese maples. I think I can have a least a minature version of one of the gardens some day.  :D


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 27, 2007, 07:47:52 PM
BT - I thought you would like that article!  I do not know anything about Raccoons but I know our Possums are very partial to flowers and shrubs as well as tree blossoms, even if their natural diet is fruits and bark.

I think that not having a natural pond on your land would not be a problem - you could have a small goldfish pond (remembering you have to have a certain number of fish and one has to be black) or even go for the dry garden which is really a Zen garden.  They are made from granite gravel, raked into swirls to represent the sea and streams and with rocks or plants placed in patterns.  I have seen similar designs but the gravel has been replaced with grass or lawn.  It is very effective and of course very peaceful.  There are lots of ideas on the internet and pictures of some very minimalist Zen gardens in Japan.  They also design mini gardens for patios or courtyards so the possibilities are endless.  I love Bonsai also and have seen miniature gardens in a tray using Bonsai and small interesting rocks, so you do not have to wait on a landscaping marathon to have your Japanese garden.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 28, 2007, 02:43:59 AM
NIC RIDES TALL

Sonia Campbell….May 27, 2007 12:00am….Article from: The Sunday Mail

IN two short weeks Nicole Kidman has gone from an immaculately dressed English aristocrat to weathered cattle drover, in a role she is clearly relishing. As Lady Sarah in Baz Luhrmann's epic Australia – which is being filmed in Bowen in north Queensland – Kidman has impressed many with her skills as a horsewoman.  In one recent scene, she thundered on horseback down Bowen's main street ahead of a herd of 750 cattle, as whips cracked and dust flew in the air.

An on-set source told The Sunday Mail Kidman was "loving" getting into her outback role and shows no fear when herding cattle. Co-star Hugh Jackman is equally commanding as a rugged stockman and every bit the part with his dirt-covered face and sweat-stained clothes. The daily cattleyard scenes are a far cry from when an impeccably dressed Kidman, as Lady Sarah, arrived at the town's jetty – which had been transformed into 1930s Darwin – holding a parasol for the first day of filming.

The 500 cast and crew get a break from filming today, but they may well need it to recover from a "thank you" concert put on by Jackman and Kidman at the Grand View Hotel last night. "Nicole is having a ball at the moment and she loves filming in Australia. She and Hugh just wanted to say thank you to everyone involved in the film," a crew member said. "It's a chance to relax and let their hair down for the first time."

Crates of champagne were ordered in to toast the night, which was to culminate in Keith Urban taking to the stage. Among those partying were actors Bryan Brown, David Wenham and Ben Mendelsohn. Kidman has confided to the crew that she is enjoying the action scenes, and said it was a delight to have her husband and son, Connor, 12, on set as well.

As Bowen comes to terms with its newfound national fame, the town is awash with rumours that Kidman, her horseriding notwithstanding, may be pregnant. "Ludicrous, absolutely not true," said a close source.

One indisputable fact is that every motel, hostel and even caravan park in the area is booked out. Locals have started billeting visitors in their homes, the retirement village is offering beds and the CWA is also cashing in, renting out its hall.

While Kidman's personal bodyguard is always at close hand, the stars are trying to mingle with locals. Kidman popped into the pub on Wednesday night for the State of Origin Rugby League Football match between Queensland and New South Wales.  Jackman took his son for a swim at Horseshoe Bay and Wenham posed for photos at the supermarket.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/NicoleKIdman.jpg)

HEAD 'EM OUT: Nicole Kidman on horseback in Bowen for the making of Baz Luhrmann's new epic film, Australia. Picture: James Fisher.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 28, 2007, 02:51:00 AM
IRWIN LIVES ON IN BINDI'S TV SHOW

Neil Hickey….May 26, 2007 12:00am….Article from The Courier Mail

HUNDREDS of hours of never-before-seen footage of Steve Irwin will be the backbone of a new ABC series starring his daughter Bindi. Bindi: The Jungle Girl will premiere on the Discovery Channel in the United States on June 9 and will be syndicated worldwide before a global audience estimated to be as high as 300 million.

Irwin, who was killed filming a wildlife documentary in September last year, was filmed interacting with Bindi for the first seven episodes but his former manager John Stainton said yesterday there was enough material for the Crocodile Hunter to comprise "80 per cent" of the entire series.

The 26-episode series will debut on the ABC on July 18. The national broadcaster has only committed to the first series of the show. But at the official launch of the show at Australia Zoo on the Sunshine Coast yesterday, ABC managing director Mark Scott said he hoped the program would follow in the footsteps of other children's television icons. "We're absolutely thrilled that this family, loved and respected by all Australians, and the most famous eight-year-old in the country, will be able to join us on the ABC," he said.

"(The ABC has) a great family of famous Australian television icons, from Play School to the Bananas (In Pyjamas), to The Wiggles, and Bindi will be joining us as well." The program will be part of a boost in children's programming on the ABC. Mr Scott revealed plans for a third ABC channel dedicated exclusively to kids' shows.

Bindi: The Jungle Girl is based in Bindi's tree house but shot around the world, and will carry a strong environmental and wildlife message. Bindi said she wanted the show to teach children "that you should love animals, not fear them".

Her mother, Terri, said she was delighted that more Australian content would be on television. She said with Australian television increasingly showcasing American culture, it was important that phrases such as "crikey", "beauty, mate" and other "Australianisms" were on local screens.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/BindiElephants.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 29, 2007, 02:46:20 AM
THE TRAVELLING POST OFFICE   

A B (Banjo) Paterson ....(1864 - 1941)
First published in The Bulletin, 10 March 1894

The roving breezes come and go, the reed-beds sweep and sway,
The sleepy river murmurs low, and loiters on its way,
It is the land of lots o'time along the Castlereagh.

The old man's son had left the farm, he found it full and slow,
He drifted to the great North-west, where all the rovers go.
"He's gone so long," the old man said, "he's dropped right out of mind,
But if you'd write a line to him I'd take it very kind;
He's shearing here and fencing there, a kind of waif and stray--
He's droving now with Conroy's sheep along the Castlereagh.

"The sheep are travelling for the grass, and travelling very slow;
They may be at Mundooran now, or past the Overflow,
Or tramping down the black-soil flats across by Waddiwong;
But all those little country towns would send the letter wrong.
The mailman, if he's extra tired, would pass them in his sleep;
It's safest to address the note to 'Care of Conroy's sheep,'
For five and twenty thousand head can scarcely go astray,
You write to 'Care of Conroy's sheep along the Castlereagh.'

" By rock and ridge and riverside the western mail has gone
Across the great Blue Mountain Range to take the letter on.
A moment on the topmost grade, while open fire-doors glare,
She pauses like a living thing to breathe the mountain air,
Then launches down the other side across the plains away
To bear that note to "Conroy's sheep along the Castlereagh,"

And now by coach and mailman's bag it goes from town to town,
And Conroy's Gap and Conroy's Creek have marked it "Further down."
Beneath a sky of deepest blue, where never cloud abides,
A speck upon the waste of plain the lonely mail-man rides.
Where fierce hot winds have set the pine and myall boughs asweep
He hails the shearers passing by for news of Conroy's sheep.
By big lagoons where wildfowl play and crested pigeons flock,
By camp-fires where the drovers ride around their restless stock,
And pass the teamster toiling down to fetch the wool away
My letter chases Conroy's sheep along the Castlereagh.  

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Drovingsheep.jpg)

The Castlereagh (pronouned Castle - Ray) is one of the main rivers in NSW.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 29, 2007, 03:02:31 AM
'THE MAILMAN, IF HE'S EXTRA TIRED, WOULD PASS THEM IN HIS SLEEP'

Following on this advice, the outback dwellers fabricated mail boxes from whatever was available and being experts at making something from nothing,  some weird and wonderful designs are still to be found.

REFRIGERATOR

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Fridge320.jpg)

PIANO

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/piano.jpg)

TRIFFIDS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/TriffidMailBox320.jpg)

FLYING PIG

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/4424mailboxes-02.jpg)

PIRANHA

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Piranha320.jpg)

OUTBOARD MOTOR

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/outboardletterbox.jpg)

CASSOWARY

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/cassowary_letterbox.jpg)

FLAMINGO

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/dsc06577.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 30, 2007, 02:51:06 AM
SECOND CUB IS NAMED 'RAHNI'

It was a double celebration at the Tiger Island with The Wiggles visit and announcing the name for the second cub.

Rahni derived from the Sumatran word Berani meaning ‘brave’.

The winner of Dreamworld’s Name a Cub Competition, attracting over 45,000 entries from around Australia, was drawn randomly from all the entries suggesting the name "Rahni"

MAKING NEW FRIENDS IS JUST SO TIRING

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/tigercubs_6week_05.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 30, 2007, 02:56:25 AM
ALL ABOARD THE HUMPBACK EXPRESS

Michael Wray….May 30, 2007 12:00am….Article from: The Courier Mail

THE experienced whale-watching crew aboard 1300 Whales largely mistook the season's first humpback whale for a white boat yesterday. It was 9.42am when crew member Andrew "Gus" Currie pointed to a spot a few kilometres off the Surfers Paradise coast.  Fellow crew member Dion Carter announced: "An unconfirmed sighting of the first whale of the season dead ahead." Before adding: "No, no, it's a boat." Five minutes later, Currie again saw a telltale spout. "I think there's two of them, a mother and a calf," Carter confirmed after looking through binoculars.

The whales yesterday were at the head of up to 10,000 humpbacks migrating north along Australia's east coast in search of warm water and a safe place to give birth. Adding to the anticipation this year is the prospect of seeing an all-white calf, believed to be the offspring of the world's only known all-white humpback whale Migaloo.

Director of Southern Cross University's Whale Research Centre, Associate Professor Peter Harrison, confirmed that footage taken in August 2005 by Italian tourists at Cape Byron in northern NSW was "definitely an all-white calf". "It had that beautiful aqua blue glow under water that Migaloo does, so there's a possibility that we have another all-white humpback whale, which is very special," he said.

Dr Harrison said humpbacks had made an incredible comeback since extensive whaling nearly wiped them out last century. "The numbers were down to about 100 in the 1960s after commercial whaling had devastated the population," he said. "We're starting to see approximately 10 per cent growth in the population each year. That rate will slow down, but at the moment we're getting into the significant early stages of recovery."

However, as the expanding whale-watching industry delights in the growing whale numbers breaching, splashing and swimming along the coast, the threat of Japanese whalers continues to loom large.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Humpback.jpg)

No breach of etiquette . . . a humpback shows off to the appreciative crew of a whale-watching boat off the Gold Coast yesterday. Picture: Tim Marsden.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 31, 2007, 02:47:34 AM
KIDMAN MOVIE'S CATTLE BATTLE

Qconfidential....May 31, 2007 12:00am

PRODUCERS of the Baz Luhrmann epic Australia have locked horns with locals over parking in Bowen's main street during the period flick's regular cattle drives, with one vehicle already a casualty.

Witnesses report it all started when one stubborn gent parked his Toyota HiLux in front of the local bakery on Tuesday and then refused to budge.

"At first the film crew asked the man to remove his vehicle and he refused, and then police asked him to move it and he still refused," a witness told Qconfidential.

"So the producers went ahead with the cattle drive (headed by Aussie Hollywood hunk Hugh Jackman) anyway."

Apparently the vehicle also made the charging cattle see red. Some of the beasts head-butted the ute, denting the chassis and covering it in a thick layer of dust.

One of the movie's ringers, taking advantage of the dust haze, then jumped down from his horse and inscribed "sucked in" with his finger on the paintwork.

But it wasn't the first time cars parked in the main street have caused issues for the production, and it won't be the last. Filming was halted last week when producers were unable to find the owner of a backpacker HiAce van parked conspicuously in shot and not in keeping with the usual 1940s mode of transport.

Fortunately, although in the cattle drive's way, this time it did not matter because the vehicle was out of the cinematographer's view.

But yesterday proved locals still haven't learned from the ute owner's costly experience, with two drivers parking in similar spots. This time both escaped the cattle – and the movie men's wrath – unscathed.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on May 31, 2007, 03:41:29 AM
QANTAS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/gr_model_set.gif)

In 1919, two young airmen (Paul 'Ginty' McGinness and Hudson Fysh) returned to Australia from the Middle East after World War One. In thatyear the Australian Government offered 10,000 pounds (Sterling) to the first aviators to fly from England to Australia in less than 28 days. McGinness and Fysh were inspired and sought the sponsorship of Sir Samuel McCaughey who had presented a Bristol Fighter to No 1 Squadron in which this pair had flown. McCaughey agreed to the proposal, but died suddenly and the plan was cancelled. The Chief of the General Staff, was entrusted with choosing the route from Darwin to Melbourne and he called on McGinness and Fysh to chart the section from Darwin to Longreach.

On 18 August 1919, McGinness and Fysh set out from Longreach in a Model-T Ford with George Gorham as driver. No roads existed, the Aborigines were potentially unfriendly, timber was dense and no telegraphic communications existed. It was a hazardous mission. The proposed route required the intrepid explorers to head north to Burketown and then around the coastline of the Gulf of Carpentaria to Borroloola, then to Katherine and Darwin. Fortuitously, their journey began before the wet season which would have confounded their efforts.

The party reached Cloncurry on 20 August, after passing through Winton, Kynuna and McKinlay. On 24 August, they arrived in Burketown and set out again on 28 August for the 355 mile (568km) journey to Borroloola following a route first taken by explorer Ludwig Leichhardt in 1845. They reached their destination 24 days later after averaging 16 miles (26km) per day - hard going.

They arrived at Katherine on 8 October (a 51 day trip of 1354 miles or 2166km) and reported to General Legge that the route was unsuitable. They recommended an alternate route across the Barkly Tableland. McGinness was instructed to reconnoitre the alternate route while Fysh was instructed to proceed to Darwin. McGinness arrived in Cloncurry and awaited the return of Fysh. During this enforced stopover, McGinness met a lot of people and he generated interest in starting an air-service. In particular, he met two individuals who were to play their part in the history of QANTAS. One was a pioneer grazier, Alexander Kennedy, and the other was a Winton grazier, Fergus McMaster.

Fysh was caught by heavy rain on his return trip from Darwin, between Mt Isa and Cloncurry, and unable to cross the flooded Wills Creek. He spent the evening as a guest of Alexander Kennedy at Bushy Park Station. At about this time Fergus McMaster had a chance meeting with McGinness. McMaster's car broke a stub axle while crossing the Cloncurry River one Sunday afternoon. McMaster walked back to Cloncurry and came upon McGinness about to depart on a picnic. McGinness helped himself to an axle from a locked garage and proceeded to the river to fix McMaster's car.

After a number of meetings, the dream began to take shape. On 14 October 1920, the first bank account of the company was opened at the Bank of New South Wales, Winton with a deposit of 700 pounds into an "Aerial Account" by McMaster. QANTAS (Queensland and Northern Territory Aerial Service) was registered as a company on 16 November 1920, with its first head office at Fred Riley and Co. Elderslie Street, Winton. Three Winton identities served on the first Board of the Company and 10 other Winton personalities served the company in various capacities. The company's first plane was a Avro Dyak and it was collected in Sydney on 21 January 1921. McGinness flew the Dyak while Fysh took delivery of, and flew a BE2E for a stock agent in Longreach. Both aircraft arrived in Longreach on 6 February and flew to Winton the following day arriving at 12:30pm.

On the 10 February 1921, the first QANTAS board Meeting was held at the Winton Club, where it was determined that the company should relocate to the railhead at Longreach in 1922. Although it was a brief association between Winton and QANTAS the airline was to serve outback Queensland faithfully until the end of World War Two when it became an international carrier. Winton was to be part of these eventful first years. The first paying passenger on regular service was Alexander Kennedy (aged 84), who flew with Fysh from Longreach to Winton (and then Cloncurry) on 3 November 1922. On 31 October 1924, the Honorable S.M. Bruce, Prime Minister, embarked in the first DH-50 in Winton for a flight to Longreach and became the first Australian Prime Minister to fly in an aircraft. In July 1926, Governor-General Lord Stonehaven was flown from Winton to Longreach and became the first Head of State to fly with QANTAS.

MODEL OF THE AVRO 504K, THE FIRST QANTAS PLANE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Qantilda_Plane.jpg)



Longreach boasts the Qantas Founders Outback Museum, set within the original Qantas hangar at Longreach Airport. Once the formative headquarters of the world famous aerial service, there now sits, remarkably, a magnificent Boeing 747-200 jumbo jet, donated to the community thanks to the quiet connivance of one Joan Maloney.

The diminutive former mayor persuaded the leaders of Qantas to give the community one of its original jumbos, then extended the runway just long enough for it to land - but not so long that it could ever take off again and be brought back into service by Qantas. And so there now resides the City of Bunbury jumbo, adding to the Longreach aviation collection, the only spot in the world where full tours of that type of jet are offered.

THE BOEING 747-200 JUMBO JET

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Boeing747-200.jpg)

RIKI THE KOALA PILOT

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/RikiKoala.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 01, 2007, 02:46:58 AM
THE WILD WEST COAST OF TASMANIA

The Western region of Tasmania is a dramatic landscape that runs from the rugged mountains around Queenstown and Zeehan down to a coast that is awesome and beautiful at the same time. The winds of the ‘Roaring Forties’ rush ashore, bringing high rainfall and chill – but such times are contrasted with some of the most perfect days on earth. Clean air, waters teeming with life and a genuine feeling of being a long way from the cares of the city.

QUEENSTOWN'S "SHINBARK" OVAL
Surfaced in gravel as all vegetation had been killed off by fumes from the Smelting works.  Greenery is gradually returning and they may one day have a grass covered sports ground.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/QueenstownOval.jpg)

There’s also some wonderful history and unique natural and man-made wonders. The west coast is an unforgettable experience. Tasmania’s west coast was the first part of the island sighted by Europeans, yet the last part to be serviced by road.

GORMANSTONE HILL ON THE ROAD TO THE WEST COAST FROM HOBART

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/GormamstonHill1.jpg)

The west coast’s four main towns - Queenstown, Zeehan, Strahan and Rosebery, were for many years isolated from the rest of the State by the rugged forests and steep mountains of the region. One of the most beautiful rivers, the Gordon, is renowned for its mirror reflections.

GORDON RIVER REFLECTIONS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/gordonriver.jpg)

You can still trace the outlines of buildings on Sarah Island in Macquarie Harbour, site of Australia’s most infamous penal settlement.

SARAH ISLAND RUINS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/ruins_sarah_island.jpg)

One of the most conveniently located waterfalls in Australia is the Hogarth Falls, almost in the heart of Strahan on Macquarie Harbour. At Newell Creek, nine kilometres south of Queenstown on the Mt Jukes Rd, a visitor platform offers easy access to a fine example of thamnic rainforest, complete with King Billy and Huon pine, two species not normally seen so close together.

HELLS GATES AT THE MOUTH OF MACQUARIE HARBOUR

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/hells_gates.jpg)

Several different types of cruise boats operate from Strahan, on Macquarie Harbour. You can also sail to Sarah Island to walk among the historic ruins, and on to Kelly Basin. Up the Gordon River cruises stop at Heritage Landing where passengers can disembark and walk along a boardwalk to see a giant 2000-year-old Huon pine in its natural rainforest setting.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 01, 2007, 02:52:37 AM
MORE PICTURES FROM THE WEST COAST

STRAHAN BAY AND TOWNSHIP

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Strahan1.jpg)

FRANKLIN RIVER

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/franklin1.jpg)

RAFTING DOWN THE FRANKLIN RIVER

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/franklin-river-tasmania.jpg)

GRANVILLE HARBOUR

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Granville_Harbour.jpg)

SOUTHERN OCEAN

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/southern_ocean.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 02, 2007, 04:44:49 AM
HUON PINE

Huon Pine - Lagarostrobos franklinii, (formerly. Dacrydium franklinii) is only found in Tasmania Australia. The Huon pine derives its common name from the stands which once occurred along the Huon River, itself named after Huon de Kermandec, commander of the French ship, L'Esperance. The species is restricted to western and southern Tasmania, where it is largely confined to riverine habitats.

FOREST GIANT HUON PINE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/huon1.jpg)
This individual tree is an estimated 2000 years of age. It was seen by the many tourists that visit Heritage Landing on the Gordon River until it fell.
(Photography by Steve Johnson)

With unique qualities of durability, longevity, amazing grains, rich golden hues that darken with age and fine texture, Huon Pine is a truly beautiful softwood timber, deep in character with exquisite aroma. Huon Pine is extremely slow growing with growth rates averaging a mere 1mm per year. Trees may attain heights of over 40 metres and are amongst the longest living organisms on the earth, they often live in excess of 2000 years and have been known to reach 3,000 years. A tree merely 20 cm in diameter could be as much as 500 years old. Only the bristle-cone pine of North America lives longer.

COMPARISON OF SIZE OF LOGS AND SAMPLE OF BIRD'S EYE GRAIN

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/HuonPineLog.jpg)

Huon Pine is a relic of Gondwana – the first pollen records date back 135 million years. International headlines were made with the discovery of a stand of Huon pines on the west coast that is more than 10,000-years-old. All the trees are male and are genetically identical. The stand arose from one or a small number of individuals, and has maintained itself by vegetative reproduction. It is important to remember that no individual tree in the Mt Read stand is 10 000 years old -- rather, the stand itself has been in existence for that long.

LIVING HUON PINE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/huon_pine.jpg)

Convicts on Sarah Island in the west of Tasmania constructed ships from Huon Pine. The wood contains an oil which retards the growth of fungi, hence its early popularity in ship building.  The ‘Piners’, early timber getters, searched the inhospitable wilderness of Tasmania's West Coast on the Franklin and Gordon rivers to cut and haul out Huon Pine logs and floated them downstream. The timber was used for everything where durability and ease of working was required; in furniture and tables, in washtubs and ships and in machinery and patterns for casting. Remaining trees are found in the western and south-western parts of the state, growing along river banks, lake shores and swampy localities in mixed formations.

SAMPLE OF HUON PINE VENEER

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/huon.jpg)

The western and south-western Huon Pine stands are now wholly protected and cannot be felled. What timber is available comes from logs salvaged from rivers which can show additional rich orange tannin stain which is drawn into the timber as it lays for years in the water.  Also trees from areas flooded by hydro electric schemes or logs that are dead fallen  remains usable after hundreds of years and is still prized by modern woodworkers, not least because of its sweet aroma.

GORDON RIVER - TYPICAL OF HUON PINE COUNTRY

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/GordonR.jpg)

Huon Pine is the prince of Tasmanian timbers, the richness of its golden colour and features such as ‘birds eye’ and ‘fiddleback’, make it one of the world's most desirable furniture and veneering timbers. Its durability and workability make it one of the best boat-building timbers known. The wood contains a natural preserving oil with an unmistakable perfume which is also a natural insect repellent, its fine and even grain makes the wood exceptionally pleasant to work with hand tools.

TYPICAL HUON PINE COFFEE TABLE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Coffee-Table-1.jpg)

Estimates of the area of living Huon pine vary, but are in the order of 10 500 ha. In addition there are about 800 ha of standing, fire-killed pine. The current area of remaining pine is the remnant of a much wider original range that has been reduced by fire, inundation, logging and mining. Today, the remaining stands are well protected within reserves, the majority being within the World Heritage Area.

LOOKOUT AT TEEPOOKANA

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Teepookana.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 02, 2007, 04:52:09 AM
KING BILLY PINE

King Billy Pine - Athrotaxis selaginoides (Also called King William Pine) is thought to derive its common name from the Tasmanian Aborigine William Lanney, who was referred to as 'King Billy'.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/KingBilly.jpg)

Although related to the famous redwoods of California, the King Billy pine is only a medium sized tree, usually between 25 and 40 metres high with a diameter of 60 to 90 centimetres. It is one of the endemic Tasmanian softwoods along with Huon, celery-top and pencil pines. It does not bear branches for about three-quarters of its height and the bunchy tops give the tree its characteristic appearance. The bark is slightly furrowed and fibrous. The small, pointed leaves are thick and more or less overlap. They grow stiffly in rows and are quite prickly. The male and female cones are borne on the same tree and are about 20mm in diameter, have loose scales and stand erect at the tips of branches.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/billy.jpg)

King Billy pines are found in the more mountainous wetter areas of Tasmania. They are slow growing and can live for five hundred years or more if not burnt by bushfires, to which it is highly susceptible. The maximum growth rates are in the vicinity of 200mm per year.
The sapwood is yellow, but the heartwood is pink to reddish brown with distinct growth rings. It is a very soft, fine textured timber with a straight grain. It has good bending properties, works easily and seasons well with little shrinkage. The oils present in the timber preserve it very well. Present use is restricted by availability.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 02, 2007, 04:56:27 AM
RIVER CROSSING

EXPECT TO MEET SOME CHARACTERS IF YOU TRAVEL ON THE WEST COAST :

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/FunnyBargeSign.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: BTgirl on June 02, 2007, 11:28:05 PM
Thank you so much for posting all the wonderful photos and information. Every time I read this thread I want to leave immediately for Australia!


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 03, 2007, 03:29:18 AM
FULL STEAM AHEAD

Ten years ago an unlikely dream  to restore an improbable railway through Tasmania’s rugged West Coast wilderness started to become a reality. A promise of Commonwealth funding to restore the rusting Abt railway kick-started the project, but it would be another five years before the line opened as the West Coast Wilderness Railway in 2002, which is now undeniably one of the State’s great tourist drawcards.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/AbtTrain.jpg)

During that time a myriad of challenges and many people, including the Prime Minister, train enthusiasts and entrepreneurs played their part. The historic 34km railway of tight curves and spectacular bridges clambers through rugged wilderness, dense rainforest and steep gorges between Queenstown and Strahan.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/king_gorge1.jpg)

Trains conquer the steep terrain using the unusual Abt system – taking its name from Swiss inventor Roman Abt – which uses a third rail of rack and pinion. Somehow forged through the rugged wilderness in dangerous conditions, the Abt railway was originally opened in 1896.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/AbtRwy.jpg)

It stands as a testament to the spirit of the pioneers who built it, showcasing ingenuity and endurance in extreme surroundings. It took up to 500 men two and a half years to build the railway in treacherous conditions on the edge of plunging gorges, through massive rock faces and almost impenetrable forests – all by hand.  It took three years just to restore the railway, which showed what an amazing feat the original workers achieved. The railway ran reliably for many years transporting copper concentrates from the Queenstown mine to the Strahan port for the Mt Lyell Mining and Railway Co., but the high cost of maintenance led to its closure in 1963.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/dubbil_bridge.jpg)

Slowly falling into rusting disrepair, the track was forgotten until the early 1980s when a restoration push gained momentum, but economic concerns killed the railway a second time.  During this time the proponents talked to old gangers, fettlers and drivers of the railway.  The fettlers said that if the railway was not restored soon, everybody would die and no-one would remember how it was made and put together. Fortunately at the next attempt at restoration there were still two or three engine drivers and a couple of fettlers still around to help put it all together again.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/dubbil_sign.jpg)

Construction was a nightmare as the project required the building or repair of more than 40 bridges and significant earthworks to relay stable track on steep and unstable hillsides.  Theft was common and the materials for an entire station at Lynchford disappeared, and faults and derailments delayed the planned opening by another year.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/AbtRwyriver.jpg)

Millions were spent on buying and restoring locomotives, some over 100 years old, which were scattered around the country. Finally officially opened in 2002 the railway provides not only economic benefits but an identity to the region.  It is described as one of the major things that sum up the West Coasters, which are a unique breed, and the railway puts a major part of the portrait together.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/AbtBrushes.jpg)

A tight fit. The brushes help to ensure that passengers keep their heads in as the train enters the station, and another set on the inside save heads on departing trains.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 03, 2007, 03:34:48 AM
THE GOOD OLD DAYS

Dinah Wilson's wedding dinghy wasn't perhaps the most romantic wedding gift in the world, but this dinghy was no doubt much appreciated by John Wilson's bride Dinah when it was presented to her shortly after they married in 1872.  During the early years of their marriage she would row the 10 km from their home in Cygnet to her husband's work place in Esperance twice a week. Although not a sturdy work boat, the dinghy was a reliable vessel and was still being rowed by Mrs Wilson 65 years later. It is the only known convict-built dinghy in Australian collections.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/wilson_sml.gif)

The dinghy was built by ex-convict Walter Paisley who had been imprisoned as a youngster at Point Puer, the boys' prison near Point Arthur. Wilson and Paisley may have met when Wilson was employed as master shipwright at Port Arthur. Wilson was the founder in the 1860s of a wooden boatbuilding business that is still operating today.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/dinghy3.jpg)

Length of the dinghy: 12" 3'
Material: Huon pine, unknown Eucalypt.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 04, 2007, 04:04:42 AM
PIONEER WOMEN

by Craig Wilson

Much had been written describing the gold fields of the grand era in Australia during the two decades from 1850 -70, but little has been detailed of the trials and tribulations that all had to endure and suffer as they pioneered this great country. In particular the women of the era stand alone as great stalwarts at a time where great prosperity, was accompanied by unspeakable hardships.

These women came from all walks of life. Some born and bred in Australia, but a good percentage from more sophisticated European societies. The trials and tribulations they suffered and endured and in most cases conquered, is a testament to their pioneering spirit, tenacity and sheer guts and determination.

Accompanying their husbands into the gold fields as a good many did, her first task was to help construct some type of mean dwelling that would provide shelter to keep them warm and away from natures moods. In many places in Australia, timber and water was scarce, so selecting a suitable site for a dwelling was difficult in these locations. The dryness of the gold fields particularly in the summer months was always a concern, and certainly locating suitable water was of paramount importance.

Most structures had some sort of hearth for cooking, which was constructed of locally sourced stones. As timber was used for the construction of these early dwellings most had a substantial hearth to reduce the risk of fire. However, these dwellings were prone to fires and many lost their lives in such circumstances. Most could only be described as mean hovels, but they did serve a purpose. The roofs were constructed of all types of materials - with a favourite being bark peeled from stringy bark trees. If this material was no available, brush roofs were used. Remarkable these kept the inside of the dwelling relatively dry.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/hut1s.jpg)

Inside the only divisions were by hessian bagging sewn together and painted with whitewash to provide some privacy. These pioneering women then made the dirt floor as even as they could and stored their few possessions and in most cases started a family. Pregnancy in those early days was a difficult time for a woman. Perhaps not during the pregnancy itself, but as doctors were scarce in those times and their knowledge fundamental a considerable number of women lost their lives during childbirth. These women knew these risks but still accepted them gladly.

Most were attended by a midwife during childbirth, as it was accepted practice. No drugs as there are today, no clean hospitals, and in a great many cases, just their husbands to tend to them as they gave birth. They were tough, and in most cases retained their femininity, as can be seen from the photographs of the era. The mortality rates from childbirth were extremely high - not just for the women but for their unborn infants. If you visit some of these old cemeteries you will find a large number of headstones that detail these death rates. Some of these gravestones make compelling reading, and provide a substantial insight to the difficulties of the times.

The fireplace within these homes was of great importance to the entire family. As well as providing the source of heat in the winter, it was where all food was cooked, water boiled, and where the family spent most evenings. This was the hub that the pioneer women created to nurture and protect her family. As time progressed if she was lucky a Colonial Oven made of cast iron replaced the open fire. This was a giant step forward for her, as with an oven there was much more flexibility in what she could do with the stove including control the heat.

As these dwellings were in general open structures, and not completely sealed to outside elements, a daily routine was required to keep the dirt floor clean of debris and food scraps that enticed insects to a food source. Coupled with this the ever present dust during summer required a daily necessity to entirely dust the house and sweep unwanted dust outside. Early photos often show a straw broom propped outside, indicating it was a well used tool.

It was a woman's work to keep the essentials of the home in place. It was her duty to daily collect water, and either purchase or gather food for her family. The most pressing difficulty in Australia was water. It was often necessary for her to walk several miles to collect water, not just for drinking, but for washing, and for cooking purposes as well. If she was lucky a wooden water barrel would be placed outside the dwelling, and filled be her daily.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/hut2sClayOven.jpg)

Many women sourced and foraged through the bush for food and butchered animals to provide the necessaries for their young and growing families. Most grew vegetables near their homes to provide. In the gold fields there was an element of support as store holders quickly moved into these areas and provided a great deal of the necessities of life - at a price. Sharing resources was a common practice and a vital necessity for survival.

In a lot of cases although men were primarily involved in digging for gold their women often stood alongside them and shared the work load, particularly in the early gold rush days. This was not a common occurrence but some women provided total support to their men in undertaking this role as well as looking after their homes. They would dry sieve the gold and generally do those tasks that did not required heavy manual labour in the fields. There were some tough women out there, and many stories of their sacrifices abound.

Perhaps the most disastrous situation that arose from time to time was the difficulties that arose when serious diseases and epidemics swept through communities. With very little support from medical resources and no drugs to assist, many women lost children and in some instances, their own lives, while tending for them, catching the disease themselves.

As her children grew there was a necessity to educate them and if schools were not nearby it was her duty to provide the necessary instruction to ensure her children had a future. Providing the total necessities for her growing family herself was indeed a labour, but a labour of love for these great pioneering women. I salute them for what they as a group accomplished.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 04, 2007, 04:11:15 AM
THE WOMEN OF THE WEST

by George Essex Evans..(1863-1909)

They left the vine-wreathed cottage and the mansion on the hill,
The houses in the busy streets where life is never still,
The pleasures of the city, and the friends they cherished best:
For love, they faced the wilderness - the Women of the West.

The roar, the rush, and fever of the city died away,
And the old-time joys and faces - they were gone for many a day;
In their place the lurching coach-wheel, or the creaking bullock chains,
O'er the everlasting sameness of the everlasting plains.

In the slab-built, zinc-roofed homestead of some lately taken run,
In the tent beside the bankment of the railway just begun,
In the huts on new selections, in the camps of man’s unrest,
On the frontiers of the Nation, live the Women of the West.

The red sun robs their beauty, and, in weariness and pain,
The slow years steal the nameless grace that never comes again;
And there are hours men cannot soothe, and words men cannot say-
The nearest woman's face may be a hundred miles away

The wide Bush holds the secrets of their longings and desires,
When the white stars in reverence light their holy altar-fires,
And silence, like the touch of God, sinks deep into the breast-
Perchance He hears and understands, the Women of the West.

For them no trumpet sounds the call, no poet plies his arts-
They only hear the beating of their gallant, loving hearts.
But they have sung with silent lives the song all songs above-
The holiness of sacrifice, the dignity of love.

Well have we held our father's creed. No call has passed us by.
We faced and fought the wilderness, we sent our sons to die.
And we have hearts to do and dare, and yet, o'er all the rest,
The hearts that made the Nation were the Women of the West.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Settler.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 04, 2007, 04:17:00 AM
PIONEER HOME

Also considered a pioneer home this beautiful example was built in 1908 and has been kept in original condition.  Note the wide verandah with wrought iron lacework and railings.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/1908House.jpg)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/1908Verandah.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 05, 2007, 03:12:21 AM
THE STORY OF AUSTRALIAN COUNTRY MUSIC

This Story of Country Music in Australia was written by John Minson and Max Ellis. It does not claim to be a detailed history but rather tries to present an overview of where Australian country music came from, the individuals who created it, how it changed over the years and how it has influenced country music in Australia today.

THE FOUNDATIONS– 1788 to 1920s

In the beginning…. the didgeridoo, bullroarer, clap-sticks and the corroboree provided the music of our country. Then in 1788 new sounds were heard in the "timeless land". The first fleet brought convicts and their gaolers, exiles in a strange and unfamiliar continent. With their chains, the new arrivals brought folk melodies and music hall ballads from the old countries and soon they were adapting these songs to reflect their new lives. They told of the hardships and isolation endured in the harsh new land… and the injustice. Many of the first Australian songs told of bushrangers or bolters. The fiddle, concertina, banjo, mouth organ, penny whistle and tea chest were popular instruments.

TEX MORTON

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/texmorton_tn.jpg)

By the mid 1800's, the colony was expanding into the vast interior.  Free settlers joined the convicts and ticket of leavers and their children proudly called themselves Australians. The forests rang to the sound of the axe as land was cleared for the plough and the endless bush was fenced, stocked and settled. Then, the rush for gold. People came from all over the world but the songs that entertained the diggers were about Australia.  

As our nation’s story unfolded there was always a song or verse to accompany each chapter...
Like droving...
Loneliness and isolation...
Droughts and floods...
Stockmen and horsemanship …
and, of course, shearing...

In the 1880's and 90's writers for the Bulletin like Paterson, Lawson and Ogilvie, established a tradition of Bush Ballads, which is still a strong influence in Australian country music today.

SHIRLEY THOMS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/ShirleyThoms_sm.jpg)

The new century brought Federation. Australians were showing pride in their own music and this Waltzing Matilda by Banjo Paterson was beginning its climb into history.  Then World War one and Australia received its heroic baptism into nationhood at Gallipoli, immortalized in ceremony, story and of course, song. Looking back, we can see that today’s Australian country music was built on the same historic foundations that shaped our nation.

THE BIRTH OF COUNTRY MUSIC – 1920s to 1940s

In the 1920s. Two developments had a profound influence on the future of Australian country music... the introduction of radio in 1923 and the spread of the phonograph. By 1929 more than three hundred thousand Australians homes had a radio license, and many households had a wind-up gramophone. Meanwhile new music was taking shape in North America. In 1924 Vernon Dalhart recorded one of the first hill-billy songs on disc...  “The Prisoners Song”.. followed soon after by the famous Carter Family... and The Singing Brakeman, Jimmie Rodgers.

BUDDY WILLIAMS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/buddy.jpg)

By the '30s, country music was an established part of rural life.  Jimmy Rogers and other recording artists like Wilf Carter and Hank Snow soon had young Australians singing. The familiar Regal Zonophone label released some local country talent including Vince Courtney and Art Leonard.

But it was New Zealand born Robert Lane, who, as Tex Morton, earned the title "Father of Australian Country Music"  From his first recording session in February, 1936, Tex easily out sold the American stars. A talented and versatile showman, he initially sang American songs but he quickly realised people wanted him to write and sing about Australia too. He pioneered a genuine, original Australian style of country music, which had an enormous influence on aspiring young artists like Slim Dusty and Buddy Williams. Buddy, who grew up on a dairy farm near Dorrigo followed Tex into the Columbia Studios in Sydney in 1939, a boy from the country writing and singing his own songs about his life in the Australian bush. Then our first Australian country girl to record solo. Queenslander Shirley Thoms quickly became a favorite on the airwaves. Meanwhile in Melbourne a young singer and all-round entertainer started adding hill-billy music to his Hawaiian radio show, recording in 1941 and ending up some 65 years later as one of Australia's best loved country music characters, Smoky Dawson.
Australian Country Music was on the way.

SMOKY DAWSON AND YOUNG FAN

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/SmokyGrynetDot_tn.jpg)

COUNTRY COMES OF AGE – 1940s to 1960s

War dominated the early 40s but by 1946 a different legend was being born on a small dairy farm at Nulla Nulla Creek, in the peaceful Macleay valley near Kempsey, NSW, David Gordon Kirkpatrick turned himself into Slim Dusty and recorded the first of over a thousand songs he would put on disc during the next 55 years.  He became one of our most successful and enduring entertainers... an Australian icon, writing and singing about the land he loved.

SLIM DUSTY AND WIFE JOY McKEAN

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/SlimJoy1968_tn.jpg)

In the late 40s and 50s country music boomed as more new stars appeared including many artists who would be famous for decades to come. Country was seen in the cinema, it played in talent quests, show grounds and town halls. It even had its own magazine… Spurs. Country reigned on radio, with Tim McNamara, Reg Lindsay and the McKean Sisters in Sydney, the Trailblazers in Melbourne, Bob Fricker in Adelaide, the Harmony Trail in Shepparton and Lismore's Radio Ranch Club. The Adventures of Smoky Dawson was heard on hundreds of radio stations all over Australia and later, seen on TV. Circus and variety shows all had country acts too.  Country Music took to the road in a tradition that continues today, with the Buddy Williams Show being joined on the outback circuit by the Slim Dusty Show, the Rick and Thel Show and many others. The familiar Regal Zonophone and Columbia labels expanded their repertoires, and ARC launched the Rodeo label.

The 1950s saw consolidation of the Slim Dusty phenomenon... launched by Australia's first major radio chart hit, the Gordon Parsons penned "Pub With No Beer" recorded and released by Slim in 1957. "The Pub" became the best selling 78 record of all time, our only gold 78 and Australia's first international Number One Hit.

BUDDY AND SLIM ENJOY A CUPPA

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/BuddySlim.jpg)

In 1960 Johnny Ashcroft recorded the saga of a little boy lost near Guyra, topping charts nationwide. This was followed by "I've been every where", another huge hit written by Geoff Mack, which was, and still is, being recorded all around the world. 1960 ushered in the micro groove long play stereo record and the ubiquitous Phillips cassette, as well as new labels like RCA Festival, W & G, and specialty labels like Hadley and C M .  A new crop of performers appeared including Jean Stafford, The Singing Kettles, Johnny Heap, John McSweeney, Terry Gordon and many others. In the 60's country took to Television.  In 1964 The Country and Western Hour was produced in Adelaide, compered by Roger Cardwell and later Reg Lindsay. In New South Wales registered clubs supported country music while fan clubs flourished everywhere.

But in the '60s our country music was already reflecting the major changes which were re-shaping popular music around the world.... Rock and Roll. In a relatively short time from the late 50s, rock & roll had supplanted other genres of popular music, dominating the city stages and radio and TV airwaves. It drove country music into the backblocks where travelling shows struggled to keep it alive.  It took almost a decade for that decline to be reversed.

SLIM DUSTY

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Slim2001.jpg)

In 1965 country music found a new champion.  John Minson started an Australian country music program, "Hoedown" on Tamworth's Radio 2TM, playing predominantly Australian music. It was an immediate success with support from artists and fans alike and in 1969, the people at 2TM recognised the potential, and came up with the concept of Tamworth, as Australia’s "Country Music Capital".

Australian Country Music would never be the same.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 05, 2007, 03:43:44 AM
LITTLE BOY LOST

Johnny Ashcroft's hit song 'Little Boy Lost' was one of the top selling songs in 1960, and was inspired by Steven Walls' disappearance from his dad's ute on a property at Tubbumurra near Guyra in NSW. Johnny has been friends with Steven Walls ever since and remembers the time when Steven went missing.

Steven was only four years old when he went missing on 5 February 1960. According to Johnny, Steven was with his father Jacko and his dog the day he went missing. His dad decided that he was going to go into the gully to flush out some sheep. Jacko told Steven to stay with the dog in the ute. After what seemed like forever (in a child’s' mind), Steven decided that his father had been gone for far too long and that it was time to go and look for him.

His father returned to the ute to find that his son had gone. Steven's disappearance sparked what still remains to be the largest land and air search in this country's history.  Seven aircraft were involved in the search, as were over 5000 men and women.

According to Johnny Ashcroft, Steven had kept running from the search party because he had always been taught to not to talk to strangers. Considering the small size of Guyra, Steven had never seen so many people before. The Aboriginal tracker who was working on the case discovered that the boy was in fact doubling back on the search parties, and this is when everyone realised that the boy was actually running scared from the masses of people who were searching for him.

Steven was missing for three days and four nights before he was found saying 'Where's my daddy? Where's my daddy? Where's my daddy?' When asked why he was asking where his dad was, Steven apparently replied 'Because he is lost and I've been looking for him?' Steven was found on 8 February, over 12 kilometres from where he originally went missing.

A very quiet man, Steven declined to be interviewed for this 50th birthday story, and because of his previous major celebrity status, Steven now shies away from any media attention. But of his experience as a child lost for four nights... his line is that the only thing he remembers about it is what people have told him.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 06, 2007, 03:39:01 AM
DIGGER’S REMAINS ON WAY HOME

By Max Blenkin….June 04, 2007 08:37pm….Article from: AAP

THE son of an Australian soldier killed in the Vietnam War says the return of his father's remains is something he never thought would happen. The remains of two Australian soldiers, declared missing in action in the Vietnam War, were expected to be on their way home to Australia from Hanoi tonight. Lance Corporal Richard "Tiny" Parker, 24, and Private Peter Gillson, 20, were killed on November 8, 1965, during a battle in Dong Nai province, east of Saigon.

They remained unaccounted for until a team of Australian veterans unearthed their remains in South Vietnam in April. Robert Gillson, who was just four months old when his father was killed by enemy fire, said he never he knew his father but could now bring him home. "It's something that I thought that I would never get the opportunity to do," he said to ABC radio.

The soldiers were officially farewelled at a ceremony in Hanoi attended by relatives, some of their former comrades and Veterans Affairs Minister Bruce Billson.

Former platoon Sergeant Trevor Hagan said this was the 15,151st day since the two soldiers were lost. "Going back to bring them back is one of the greatest things that will ever happen to me," he said to ABC radio. "It is an unwritten law that you never leave anyone on the battlefield and we were forced through circumstances to leave two of our soldiers, especially Tiny because Tiny was doing my job on that day. I have believed that if things had been as normal I would have been lying where Tiny was and he maybe would be searching for me."

Lance Corporal Parker and Private Gillson were serving with the 1st Battalion of the Royal Australian Regiment (1RAR) when they were shot dead by Viet Cong forces. Intense enemy fire halted repeated attempts to retrieve their bodies. Although their mates reluctantly withdrew when ordered, they never forgot, until a search conducted by the group Operation Aussies Home located their bodies.

The crucial piece of information came from an old Viet Cong soldier who revealed that the bodies had been buried in a trench at the battle site and not moved elsewhere. Terrorism expert Clive Williams, who in 1965 was a platoon commander in the battle, said there were discrepancies between the Australian and Viet Cong accounts of where the fighting occurred. "What we did was we went back to the route we had taken going into the area because we knew where we had harboured the night before and we retraced our steps," he said to ABC radio. "It became fairly obvious when we got to the position that that was the right place."

Four other Australians remain missing from the Vietnam war. Mr Billson said work was continuing to try to locate the remains of another soldier, Lance Corporal John Gillespie. He said the prospects of locating other servicemen still missing remained distant, but fresh information was still being sought about another missing soldier and two RAAF officers whose bodies were never found.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/AVATARS/SlouchHat.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 06, 2007, 03:42:30 AM
LOST DIGGERS WELCOMED HOME

June 06, 2007 12:40pm….Article from: AAP

TWO Australian soldiers killed in the Vietnam War 42 years ago have been welcomed home in Sydney as "true heroes" and "soldiers in the finest Anzac tradition".

The remains of 24-year-old Lance Corporal Richard "Tiny" Parker and Private Peter Gillson, 20, were flown back to Australia from Hanoi on Monday, touching down in Darwin yesterday before arriving in Sydney this morning for an official repatriation ceremony.  A RAAF C-130 Hercules carrying the remains landed at Richmond airbase just before 10am (AEST) to applause from relatives and veterans.

Two wooden coffins draped in the Australian flag with wild flowers and army slouch hats on top were carried from the plane and through an honour guard.  The coffin carrying Pte Gillson was carried from the plane first, followed by Cpl Parker's coffin.

Veterans Affairs Minister Bruce Billson said the men were "soldiers in the finest Anzac tradition".  Mr Billson said the men's families had shed tears both of joy and sorrow.  "Today, two families and the broader community come together, united by tragic events so many years ago that have seen many different journeys now merge into a moment of collective mourning," he said.

"Not the kind of mourning that leaves people uneasy or uncertain about the future, but one that produces the opportunity for a sense of peace, of calm and of comfort. Denied for more than four decades, but now in the reach of many, is the prospect of a new-found serenity, certainty and closure."

Chaplain Ted McMillan said Cpl Parker was a "sincere, fun-loving and genuine guy" who loved serving in the army.  He said Pte Gillson, nicknamed Gilly, was a "lovable rascal" who enjoyed a practical joke. The two were both known for their courage, determination and valour, Mr Billson said.  "They put other people first, at the expense of themselves - even their lives," he said.

Land Commander of Australia Major General Mark Kelly presented the fallen diggers with United States Meritorious Unit Citations and Infantry Combat badges, before their former acting platoon sergeant, Trevor Hagan, read The Ode. A lone bugler played the Last Post and two Iroquois helicopters flew over the coffins during a minute's silence.

Following the ceremony, veterans from the soldiers' regiment carried their coffins to two silver hearses.  The band played Waltzing Matilda as relatives and veterans formed an honour guard to salute the cars as they left the base.  Cpl Parker and Pte Gillson will be buried in Canberra and Melbourne later this month.

.
They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old;
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.

Laurence Binyon (1869-1943)

.
(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/AVATARS/au-flag2.gif)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 06, 2007, 03:48:23 AM
MORE CLEVER MAILBOXES

TASMANIAN TIGER

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/wilmot_026S.jpg)

MAIL MODEL

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/wilmot_005S.jpg)

THIS LITTLE PIGGY

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/samford_dsc06839.jpg)

DOWN UP PEDALS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/wilmot_021S.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 07, 2007, 03:32:36 AM
THE ONE THAT GOT AWAY


Every fisherman has a story about the one that got away.  This story is about the one that got eaten by a croc.  A very big croc.  It happened on the Mary River flood plain, a labyrinth of waterways, billabongs and swampy land spilling into the sea east of Darwin.  It is the sort of place that is awesome for its vastness, beautiful for its swamps teeming with bird life and fish, and frightening for what lies beneath: it is estimated that Mary River has more crocodiles per kilometre than any other river in the Northern Territory.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/maryriver.gif)

Up there you have kilometres of flood plain, interspersed with muddy brown channels, some wide and fast flowing, others no more than a swollen creek that gushed when the Wet was in full fury and will cease to flow when the Dry takes hold.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/jumbo.jpg)

Where the channels are contained within banks, they are lined with a tangle of mangroves; where they have have spilled over, the muddy water has covered the grass plains with a silty sludge.  Nutrient-rich, it feeds the swamp grasses which grow to mid-thigh length, hiding who knows what.
Birds of prey circle lazily on the breeze, waiting for dinner to break cover; goose nests form perfect circles in flattened grass; crocs sun themselves on the banks and feral pigs wallow in the mud.  From the air, the grassy swath has a beginning and an end.  At ground level, it’s just impenetrable, the life and death struggle of daily life lost in a sea of green.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/crocodile.jpg)

A day’s work for the helicopter pilots can include mustering stock, taking tourists to remote camps and on joy flights, and piloting groups on heli-fishing expeditions.  Anglers on these expeditions are flown to tidal channels running through country devoid of trees die to the salt.  

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/barra5.jpg)

Barramundi are not dinner-plate size but party-sized and anything under 22 inches is thrown back.  When the fish stop biting they simple pack up and move on, flying low enough over the swamp to send crocs and feral pigs into muddy retreat and finally landing in long grass near a muddy channel lined with mangroves.  Once the fish start biting beware of lurking crocs.  You do not see them until  too late as they stalk silently through the swamp and the first warning is when they lunge and you hear their jaws snap shut.  They are so big and so confident that they just sit there with the fish in their jaws daring you to move.  When you finally gather your wits and run back out of strike range you can turn back to see the croc easing back sinking into the brown water as quietly as it arrived.  They may rise again metres away in the channel with the fish still in their jaws while slowly making their way up river.  An easy lunch.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/stevemick.jpg)

GOULDIAN FINCHES

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Gouldian.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 07, 2007, 03:40:09 AM
BARRAMUNDI

Lates calcarifer (Bloch, 1790)

The Barramundi is one of Australia's most well known freshwater species. It is prized by recreational anglers because it is a strong fighter, grows to a large size (60kg) and is an excellent table fish. It is also the most important freshwater commercial fish in Australia.

The Barramundi is recognised by its pointed head, concave forehead, large jaw extending behind the eye and rounded caudal fin. It has a first dorsal fin with seven or eight strong spines and an second soft-rayed dorsal fin of ten or eleven rays.

Adult Barramundi are blue to green-grey dorsally, silvery on the sides, and white below. Juveniles are mottled brown with a distinct white stripe from the dorsal fin to the snout.

This species has been recorded from the Persian Gulf to China and south through Asia to Australia. In Australia it occurs from the Kimberley and Pilbara regions of Western Australia and around the north of the country to the Mary and Maroochy River systems in southern Queensland. It lives in a range of conditions in creeks, rivers and estuaries in clear to turbid waters.

Males and females migrate into estuaries to breed, and then return to their original river systems. Males over five years of age usually go through a sex transformation to become female.

The Barramundi eats a range of foods including fishes, shrimps, crayfish, crabs and aquatic insects.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 08, 2007, 03:18:38 AM
STARS TURN OUT FOR ‘OSCAR’ EVENT

June 08, 2007 12:00am….Article from: The Courier Mail

IT'S been a holiday of firsts for Aussie actor Hugh Jackman's young son Oscar while in downtown Bowen. Not only did the seven-year-old learn the basics of pastry and bread-making at a local bakery on the sly, but he also passed an Australian male rite of passage – his first rugby league match.

Local mum Kylie Maddern says Hugh – on a break from Baz Luhrmann's Australia – his wife Deborra-Lee Furness, Oscar and daughter Ava arrived like any normal family, with Hugh proud as punch to see his boy play for the first time. Apparently, the junior kids thought it would be nice to extend an invitation to Hugh's son to play with them, Kylie says. No one thought they would actually come.

But come they did, with both Hugh and Deborra-Lee cheering loudly for their son and his team. Kylie reveals that Hugh was there for a good half-hour or so, but still in costume so it is believed he got a phone call and had to dash off. But wife Deb' and Ava stayed and watched Oscar finish his game. For the record, the seven-year-old didn't score a try, but his team did win.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/HughOscar.jpg)

MAN of the moment ... Oscar Jackman with his dad, Hugh, was an eager ring-in for Bowen's victorious local junior rugby league team, much to the delight of dad, his mum Deborra-Lee Furness and sister Ava. Picture: Cameron Laird


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 08, 2007, 03:28:20 AM
NIGHT HAWK SOARS OUT WEST

By Phil Hammond ….June 08, 2007 12:00am….Article from: The Courier Mail

THE world's only nocturnal hawk is on the increase in far western Queensland. The ghostly, elusive letter-winged kite is now nesting and breeding where autumn rains and floodwaters have brought the semi-arid zone back to life.

Bird locator John Young took The Courier-Mail  into the amazing parallel world of remote-area bird life, discovering six letter-winged kite nests in three days. "Every birdwatcher wants to see a letter-winged kite. They are one of the special birds of the desert," the Ingham-based conservationist said.

On an open flood plain, Young eased his LandCruiser 4WD across country, checking specific trees for signs of nesting. It had been 15 years since he had last seen a letter-winged kite in this area, but his instincts were on high alert. "If you don't understand the bird, don't know their subtle ways, you will never find them," he said. "I know they are around. I can smell them."

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/LetterWingedKite.jpg)

After half a dozen fruitless tree inspections, excitement peaked near a tall eucalypt, where binoculars caught the white of the bird in its nest. It was a male, in a nest built in anticipation of attracting a mate, Young explained. Minutes later, the distinctive, beautiful bird had launched itself into the air, showing off the black underwing markings which suggest the letter "M". First impressions were of a cross between an owl and a seagull – such is the kite's flying style on soft white downy wings. "These are the ghosts of the desert," Young said. "Here one day, gone the next, and for years, you might not see them. But it's a good season now and the rats have started." After rain and grass throws up seed, conditions are right for the native long-haired rat, rattus villosissimus, to start breeding. Checks of pellets below various raptors' nests confirmed they had been hunting the rodent, which Young said would develop to plague proportions. "There's a very strong theory letter-winged kites breed with their own offspring, because there's no other way they could breed so fast when the long-haired rats are plentiful," he said.

Long-haired rats are almost exclusively the diet of letter-winged kites, and conditions are right for two pairs of birds to increase their numbers to 50 in 12 months in a 10km wide area, he said. "Letter-winged kites go down to really low numbers when the desert is in drought. What is happening now, after such a great season, for the next two years we are going to have these birds breeding right across the desert regions," Young predicted.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/rat-vil_small.jpg)

Rod Bloss, president/secretary of the Gold Coast branch of Bird Observation and Conservation Australia, said birdwatchers could go years without seeing the bird. "I've seen two. When the rat plagues are on, they are not hard to find out Innaminka-Birdsville way, when you might see a number of birds perched in the same tree. But when there's drought, they move towards the coast sometimes, and there are unconfirmed reports they have been seen locally. "They are elusive creatures, very good at night hunting. They start hunting in the twilight and just before dawn is another main time when they are feeding."

The Letter-winged Kite is a resident of the interior of Australia, in drier and more open country generally than the Australian Black-shouldered Kite (Elanus notatus), with irregular irruptions especially into Western Australia.
A Small, mainly white, hawk unlike most Australian hawks, but difficult to distinguish from the Australian Black-shouldered Kite at rest, although it is larger, and paler grey. In flight it is distinguished at once by the under-wing pattern. The black shoulder patch is larger in fully adult individuals. The young of this species are plain brown, not streaky brown on the head, and have the black under-wing pattern well developed early. They can thus be distinguished as soon as they can fly.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/lwki3tt.jpg)

This is an inhabitant of the drier interior parts of Australia, generally less numerous in areas where it occurs together with the Australian Black-shouldered Kite. It is also much more gregarious than that species at all times, and is nomadic, suddenly appearing for a relatively short period in large numbers into new areas following upon good food years. They may breed during these irruptions, or disappear without breeding. It is possible that these movements are connected with mouse plagues, at least in that these may allow large-scale successful breeding in the normal range. They are also quite irregular.

Individually the bird is shyer than the Australian Black-shouldered Kite and flies faster. It flaps heavily near the ground, but can also soar very gracefully, and when hunting it regularly hovers, like others of the genus. It tends to be crepuscular, roosting during the day at breeding colonies, and hunting in the dusk and by moonlight; these habits are perhaps connected with its food supply of mice, and vary according to circumstances.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 09, 2007, 04:31:58 AM
AUSTRALIAN BUTTERFLIES.

The Australian Butterfly Sanctuary's 3666 cubic metre aviary is home to over 1500 magnificent tropical butterflies, all local to the area, including the electric blue Ulysses butterfly and the largest butterfly in Australia, the Cairns or Australian Birdwing.  The butterfly's beguiling aerial dances and their tendency to land on brightly coloured clothing, has inspired and delighted young and old alike.  The aviary, and the garden within it, took three years to design, build and landscape. At the time of opening in 1987, the sanctuary gained a place in the Guinness Book of Records as the largest butterfly aviary in the world. To date it still holds the record as the largest aviary in the southern hemisphere.

ULYSSES

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Ulysses.jpg)

Whilst living in Malaysia ,Paul Wright, who still owns and operates the sanctuary, was fascinated by the diversity of the tropical butterflies there, albeit that they were never seen often or for long enough. Knowing that a glimpse of these creatures lightens the hearts of all, he had a dream to create an environment where there was opportunity to experience these creatures in all their gracefulness and glory.

CAIRNS BIRDWING

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/CairnsBirdwing.jpg)

On visiting Kuranda in 1968, Paul became acquainted with the locals, people and butterflies alike, and realised that the diversity and beauty of north Queensland tropical butterflies was equal to all those he had seen in Malaysia.  Situated just 27 Km west of Cairns, Kuranda offered the advantages of being readily accessible to people, as well as easy living for the butterflies, it already being their natural habitat.  The landscaping within the aviary is often remarked upon, especially by keen gardeners. Much care has been taken to create a natural rainforest environment, with special attention to the needs of the Ulysses butterfly. Hence there is both a rainforest under-storey and canopy, as well as a running stream, complete with waterfalls, creating a natural looking and feeling rainforest setting.  

RAINFOREST AVIARY

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Rainforest.jpg)

As the butterflies are all rainforest species, the aviary is designed to re-create their natural habitat and the correct food plants on which the female can deposit their eggs. These eggs are collected regularly by staff, and taken to a specially-designed laboratory where the caterpillars are raised until they pupate and eventually emerge as fully formed butterflies - ready to be released back into the aviary. This intensive handling over many generations has resulted in the sanctuary’s butterflies being far more "domesticated", hence their propensity to land on people.

SPECIMEN ROOM

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Specimens.jpg)

Of all the eggs laid by a female butterfly on her foodplant, only 2% of the caterpillars in the wild will succeed to become adult butterflies. Caterpillars are easy prey for birds, and other larger insects, and are also exploited by certain wasps who will deposit eggs into a caterpillar, thereby utilising it as a host for it's young. Furthermore, some species of caterpillars easily fall victim to viral or bacterial diseases.  

LABORATORY

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Laboratory.jpg)

The laboratory established at the sanctuary is run under strict quarantine. Entry is limited to laboratory personal only, who observe strict hygiene regulations whilst carrying out their work of caring for the caterpillars. Food plants are changed daily to ensure that the caterpillar's diet is as close as possible to that which it would find in the wild, and the areas where they live are kept sterile. Laboratory staff consistently have a success rate of no lower than 80%. Food plant which is grown on the premises, is maintained by ground-staff, with close attention to using as little chemical intervention as possible in controlling pests.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 09, 2007, 04:36:42 AM
BUTERFLY LIFECYCLE
 
In the beginning, a female butterfly deposits her eggs onto a specific plant. The female has odour detectors which allow her to locate the plant, sometimes from as far away as two or three kilometres. The trick to encouraging butterflies into your garden is to cultivate these plants. You can easily find out which ones are tasty for the caterpillars in your area by ringing a reputable plant nursery.  Caterpillars are fussy eaters, and usually a species is limited to only one or two types of plants that the caterpillar will accept. If you were wondering why we don't see as many butterflies around as we used to, it's because the use of herbicides has reduced the availability of many of the weeds that caterpillars eat. No caterpillars, no butterflies!   

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Caterpillar.jpg)

   (photo courtesy Glover)

Approximately four to five days after the fertilised egg has been laid, the caterpillar eats it's way out of the shell, often turning around and ingesting it. If the female laid on the correct plant, the caterpillar then goes on to eat it's first meal, and with a few exceptions, this meal is basically uninterrupted - these guys are the original eating machine. Being very small when it first emerged, the caterpillar soon becomes too big for its skin, and within a week, will attach it's hind parts onto a leaf by way of silk, rest for a while, and then literally walk out of it's skin. The new skin has enough stretch in it to allow further growth, and during it's time as a caterpillar, it will repeat this process another three times. Often the new skin differs slightly in pattern or colour to the previous one.  

SALT-BUSH BLUE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Salt-BushBlue.jpg)

Each stage is called an "instar".When the caterpillar reaches the end of the 5th instar, a butterfly caterpillar will ready itself ,and letting go with all it's feet, hangs suspended from the "neck" and back feet. Some species are just secured by the hind parts and hang upside down. A day or two later, the head will dislodge and the skin will split open revealing the already complete pupa casing. The butterfly will form inside this case, and emerge some weeks/months/years later, again depending on what type of butterfly it is. Many butterflies use this period as a "hibernation" period.

RED SPOTTED JEZEBEL

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/RedSpottedJezebel.jpg)

When the butterfly finally emerges, it is a fully formed adult, with only the wings needing to be pumped up and dried. Then off it will fly, ready to play it's part in starting the whole cycle over again. And the reason for all this complexity? Two distinct advantages are that the adult form, eating nectar, rotting fruit or sometime sap, does not compete for food resources with the young. Being able to fly in the reproductive part of the cycle also means that the gene pool is greater than if restricted to a small area.

ORANGE PALM-DART

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/OrangePalm-Dart.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 10, 2007, 05:38:29 AM
YOU HAVE GOT TO BE KIDDING!

EUREKA HOPES TO WIN TOURISM EDGE WITH ITS BOX OF TRICKS.

Larry Schwartz…AAP.
 
WE'RE 285 metres above Melbourne when James Cockburn starts jumping up and down as if to dislodge us and send us hurtling from the highest "public vantage point" in the southern hemisphere. "Stop it!" someone begs.

Moments earlier, the Eureka Skydeck project director had cheerily taunted us: "Those of you who won't do it are chicken and should go home feeling very sorry for yourselves." Someone talks about writing a will — or having failed to do so — as the six-tonne glass cube on wheels called the Edge prepares to cantilever three metres out from the Skydeck, on level 88 of the city's tallest building, the 92-storey Eureka Tower.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/SkydeckExt.jpg)

It takes just 47.3 seconds and you're hovering in the air, where you remain for four long minutes. At first the glass on the floor is opaque. Then it suddenly clears. You can't help looking straight down to where Mr Cockburn says a colleague suggested they paint the outline of a fallen body. Before the glass clears, you hear the sounds of creaking chains and breaking glass. "We're trying to go … from comfortable to scary," Mr Cockburn says. Of why the bossa nova hit The Girl from Ipanema is playing, he says: "We're kind of sadistic, I suppose."

We're 30 metres higher than the previous highest vantage point in Melbourne, the observation deck on the 55th level of the Rialto Towers. The 2.1 by 2.6-metre cube of glass and reinforced steel, likened to a "giant matchbox", is designed to take up to 12 passengers at a time and hold at least 10 tonnes and withstand winds above 70km/h. The Edge was built from two tonnes of 45mm thick glass reinforced between steel framework.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/SkydeckInt.jpg)

But Mr Cockburn said the five minute ride is not for the faint-hearted. "It's a glass box that's sitting on wheels and we're rolling it out from the building," he said. "It's cantilevered into the building, so we don't actually structurally hold it into the building, it holds itself into the building." Mr Cockburn said the highest safety standards had been adhered to.

Organisers hope this world-first attraction will become one of Melbourne's biggest tourist drawcards. Visitors take a lift that deposits you on the 88th floor in 40 seconds. There you can wander about and, for an extra fee enjoy "the Edge experience".

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/pht-fed-square.jpg)

"The ones who scream their hearts out when they get in this thing just make me so happy," Mr Cockburn tells media on a guided preview. He dobs in several people who have declined to enter the cube. "It's very, very safe," Mr Cockburn says. The experience is "fairly roller-coaster-like".

He concedes that he has been trying to overcome a fear of heights. "I've been skydiving and bungee-jumping," he says. "Work on this project has almost cured me, but not quite." Mr Cockburn said Skydeck 88 also boasted a terrace, viewfinders positioned to take in places of interest around Melbourne and sloping floors designed to "play with people's senses".

http://www.eurekaskydeck.com.au

STATING THE OBVIOUS :

Skydeck 88 strongly recommends that you do not ride the 'Edge' if you have any of the following conditions:

- Fear of Heights
- Fear of Enclosed Spaces
- Sensitivity to Loud or Sudden Noises
- Pregnancy
- Heart Problems

My Note :  It has been mentioned this weekend that to date there have been several marriage proposals made in The Edge, all of which have been accepted.  Were they too petrified to say “no”?


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 10, 2007, 05:43:11 AM
MORE COLOURFUL BUTTERFLIES

MOONLIGHT JEWEL

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/MoonlightJewel.jpg)

MEADOW ARGUS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/MeadowArgus.jpg)

FIERY JEWEL

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/FieryJewel.jpg)

CHEQUERED SWALLOWTAIL

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/ChequeredSwallowtail.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 10, 2007, 05:46:11 AM
CAPER WHITE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/CaperWhite.jpg)

AUSTRALIAN PAINTED LADY

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/AustPaintedLady.jpg)

AMARYLLIS AZURE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/AmaryllisAzure.jpg)

AUSTRALIAN ADMIRAL

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/AustAdmiral.jpg)

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Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 11, 2007, 03:46:14 AM
ZANY MAILBOXES

NED KELLY

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/KellyBox320.jpg)

WATERING CAN

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/ron_00657.jpg)

THE LOCAL BREW

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/wilmot_004S.jpg)

PENNY FARTHING

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/wilmot_024S.jpg)

MILK FARM

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/maleny_dsc09278.jpg)

MOTOR CYCLE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/wilmot_002S.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 12, 2007, 02:57:13 AM
GIRRAWEEN OUT OF THIS WORLD

By Rosanne Barrett ….June 12, 2007 12:00am….Article from: The Courier Mail

ITS massive granite boulders are reminiscent of outer space and now the Darling Downs' Girraween national park has been officially recognised by astronomers. "Near Earth Object" 15723, circling in an elliptical orbit between Mars and Jupiter, was this month named Girraween. The region's unlikely celestial fame emerged after a pairing between two amateur astronomers – one in Japan and the other at a B&B in Ballandean on the Downs.

LOCAL LANDSCAPE AT GIRRAWEEN NATIONAL PARK

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/girraweenNP.jpg)

Twinstar Guesthouse and Observatory owner Eiji Kato said the asteroid naming was "quite exciting" for stargazers and the region. "I suggested the name Girraween so the name of this magnificent park is preserved eternally in space," he said.

ROCK WALK IN THE PARK

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/GirraweenRocks.jpg)

Mr Kato was invited to name the asteroid by its discoverer, Tsutomu Seki.
Girraween National Park is located high on the northern end of the New England Tableland. The 11 700ha park has an average elevation of 900m and is cold in winter, hot in summer. Not far from the Queensland-New South Wales border, it has more in common with cooler southern climes than with most of the Sunshine State. Snow sometimes falls on Girraween. In any year, it’s always cold in winter.

TURQUOISE PARROT

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Parrot_Turquoise.jpg)

The park’s eucalypt forests and heathlands support diverse birds, including the rare turquoise parrot and superb lyrebird. Common wombats graze on grassy areas fringing the heath and forest. Seeds in Girraween’s drier forests attract insects, birds and mammals. The glossy black-cockatoo uses its beak to crack sheoak nuts to get their seeds.

GLOSSY BLACK COCKATOO IN FLIGHT

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Black-Cockatoo.jpg)
[/b]


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 12, 2007, 03:10:43 AM
This article deserves to be filed under WTF, or "more money than sense"

BIRTHDAY BASH FOR KOALAS

By Greg Stolz ….June 12, 2007 12:00am….Article from: The Courier Mail

HE has entertained royalty, heads of state and global television audiences in their billions, and is working with Hollywood director Steven Spielberg on next year's Beijing Olympics. But Australian creative guru Ric Birch will interrupt his Olympics preparations to stage a birthday party for two koalas. This won't be an ordinary cake-and-streamers affair, however, because these are no ordinary koalas. In fact, Birch is promising a multimillion-dollar extravaganza.

In his most bizarre assignment, the Olympics "ringmaster" has been commissioned to put on the first birthday party for rare twin koalas, born last year in a Chinese zoo. The twins have caused a sensation since their birth last October at the Xiangjiang Safari Park in Guangzhou, southern China, attracting hundreds of thousands of excited Chinese visitors. Their parents are Murrumbidgee and Murray, two of six koalas sent to China last year by the Gold Coast's Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary.

SYDNEY OLYMPICS OPENING CEREMONY DISPLAY

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Arrivals.jpg)


The koalas are the first sent to mainland China and all six have had offspring, but the twins – the odds of which are as high as a million to one – have aroused huge interest. Such is the excitement that the safari park's billionaire owner, Su Zhigang, has hired Birch to stage the birthday party for the joey twins – dubbed Little Michelle and Little Amanda after their original Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary keepers.

Birch, who with Spielberg is artistic adviser for the Beijing Olympics opening and closing ceremonies next year, will take time out from Games planning to put on the koala party. "It seemed quixotic and oddball enough to fly halfway around the world to do," said the producer, who is based in Milan with an international events production company. "No koala will ever have had a birthday party like it, I can promise you that."

SYDNEY OLYMPICS DISPLAY

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Nature.jpg)

Birch is no stranger to working with animals, although not usually real ones. He made his name with Matilda, the giant winking kangaroo at the 1982 Commonwealth Games in Brisbane before going on to produce events on a grand scale, including the Los Angeles and Sydney Olympics ceremonies and Millennium celebrations on Sydney Harbour.

He plans to use Guangzhou's picturesque Pearl River as a backdrop to stage the party, which is likely to include a floating parade of giant Australian and Chinese animal effigies, as well as a fireworks spectacular. The koala party, in the first week of October, will coincide with China's annual Golden Week celebrations and is expected to attract millions of Chinese.

THE LUCKY BIRTHDAY TWINS WITH MOTHER KOALA

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/RichBirchKoalas.jpg)

Top Right : Matilda
Bottom Right : Millennium Fireworks, Sydney


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 13, 2007, 02:53:26 AM
BINDI IRWIN MEETS DALAI LAMA

Article from: AAP….June 13, 2007 11:45am

ABOUT 5000 people have gathered at the late Steve Irwin's Australia Zoo on Queensland's Sunshine Coast to hear the Dalai Lama talk about kindness to animals and the environment.

Monks at the 71-year-old exiled Tibetan spiritual leader's Dharamsala monastery are friends with the Irwin family.  Terri Irwin and daughter Bindi joined with the Dalai Lama at the talk, being held in the zoo's Crocoseum. The Dalai Lama will also use the visit to launch Kindness Week, a community project initiated by Karuna Hospice Services designed to nurture the spirit of kindness.

This afternoon about 15,000 people are expected to fill the Brisbane Entertainment Centre to hear the Dalai Lama speak on the issues of compassion and kindness. The free tickets were snapped up within two days of becoming available.

Premier Peter Beattie yesterday confirmed he would not be meeting the Dalai Lama as he had business on the Gold Coast and will be meeting with visiting New Zealand Prime Minister Helen Clark. But Queensland Governor Quentin Bryce will meet with the spiritual leader.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/DalaiLama.jpg)

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Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 13, 2007, 03:01:19 AM
HISTORIC AMPHITHEATRE REOPENS

June 12, 2007 12:00am….Article from: The Courier Mail

THE Carnarvon Gorge amphitheatre has re-opened following the completion of a three year, $409,000 project to make the iconic site safe and accessible. Environment Minister Lindy Nelson-Carr said the amphitheatre which is situated in Carnarvon Gorge, north west of Roma, had been closed since 2003. She said it became a safety hazard the rock to which the stairway was attached came away due to natural movement of the rock face. "Due to its remoteness and with about 40,000 people visiting the gorge section each year, public safety is paramount," Ms Nelson-Carr said. "The EPA (Environment Protection Agency) commissioned geotechnical surveys, built and installed a new access structure, put in visitor barriers, seating and pathways and upgraded walking tracks and interpretive signage."

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/CGAmph1.jpg)

The new walkway into the Amphitheatre at Carnarvon Gorge. It replaces a ladder which previously gave access. Pic courtesy EPA

"With the re-engineering and significant upgrade of access visitors can once again safely experience the splendour of the amphitheatre." Ms Nelon-Carr said the amphitheatre was one of many reasons the rugged 16,000ha Carnarvon Gorge section of Carnarvon National Park is the most popular tourist destination in Queensland's central highlands "The 300 million year old sandstone has weathered over time to form Carnarvon Gorge and this weathering continues today," Ms Nelson-Carr said. "The droughts and the floods that make this place what it is, also make it a very challenging place to manage. The new infrastructure had already proved its strength having survived flash flooding in February. The February flash flood certainly gave it a good workout and the engineers have given it the all-clear."

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The impressive Amphitheatre at Carnarvon Gorge is finally more accessible. Pic courtesy EPA

Carnarvon Gorge is an oasis in the semi-arid heart of Queensland. Here, in the Carnarvon Gorge Section of Carnarvon National Park, towering white sandstone cliffs form a spectacular steep-sided gorge with narrow, vibrantly coloured and lush side gorges. Boulder-strewn Carnarvon Creek winds through the gorge. Remnant rainforest flourishes in the sheltered side gorges while endemic Livistona nitida cabbage tree palms, ancient cycads, ferns, flowering shrubs and gums trees line the meandering main gorge. Grassy open forest grows on the cliff-tops. The park’s creeks attract a wide variety of animals including more than 173 species of birds. Aboriginal rock art on the sandstone overhangs is a fragile reminder of the Aboriginal people who used the gorge for thousands of years. Rock engravings, ochre stencils and freehand paintings at Cathedral Cave, Baloon Cave and the Art Gallery include some of the finest rock art in Australia


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 13, 2007, 03:07:34 AM
CARNARVON GORGE ROCK ART

As art galleries go, the ones at Carnarvon Gorge in central Queensland have to be among the more unusual - you have to be prepared for a good walk to see them. It is ancient Aboriginal rock art and worth the 5.6km trek from the camping area at the entry to Carnarvon National Park.
The Egyptian pyramids weren't even a gleam in their architect's eye when this art was created. Very little is known about the Aboriginal people who occupied this land up to 20,000 years ago. But the work of their stencil artists - at a spot in the gorge known as, appropriately, the Art Gallery - is reckoned to be among Australia's finest. Stencil art of hands, of matched pairs of boomerangs, of shields or coolamons, and of stone axes are present in reds and mauves sprayed on sandstone cliffs.

Up to 80,000 visitors come each year to Carnarvon Gorge, between Roma and Emerald, to walk the gorge and be amazed at the rock art, which also includes freehand and engraved art, at Baloon Cave and Cathedral Cave as well as the Art Gallery. In freehand art, pigment was applied to the rock surface with a finger or possibly a twig brush. Stencils were applied by blowing ochre pigment with water from the mouth over an object held against the wall. The rock art is extremely fragile and an irreplaceable part of our heritage. Boardwalks enable visitors to view and photograph the art from the best possible vantage points.

Aboriginal people often describe the gorge as a place of learning - an area of great spirituality. This land still teaches its many visitors. A cultural trail, for example, identifies many of the sources of Aboriginal food and lifestyle. Aboriginal interpretive ranger Fred Conway introduces park visitors to the history of his people and their connection with the area.
But Carnarvon Gorge is more, much more, than Aboriginal art. It's an oasis rising 200m above the parched, sparsely-vegetated plains of central Queensland. Its towering yellow sandstone cliffs hide lush gorges cut by a creek that has dried up only twice in memory. The sandstone has weathered over millions of years and sculpted fascinating shapes of caves and outcrops.

And, yes: footprints of dinosaurs have been found in layers of rock in the park. Just as water has shaped the gorge itself, so it has created a home to a wonderful array of plant life, relics of cooler, wetter times, including cabbage palms, swamp mahogany, spotted gum and what is claimed to be the world's largest fern, the King Fern.

The park boasts a healthy wildlife, including more than 173 bird species and 54 different types of mammal. You'll see kangaroos and might even glimpse a platypus or echidna. The gorge was a favoured place in times of bushrangers who liked to hide out in some of the more remote canyons.
Of the many characters and identities, the infamous horse-stealing and cattle-duffing Harry Redford (Captain Starlight) and brothers, James and Patrick Kenniff, are best remembered.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 13, 2007, 03:10:24 AM
AERIAL VIEW OVER CARNARVON NATIONAL PARK

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CARNARVON CREEK

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CARNARVON ART GALLERY

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CLOSE UP OF ROCK ART

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Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 14, 2007, 02:49:08 AM
VICTORIAN SHEEP BUCKING TO BE WORLD'S OLDEST

June 12, 2007 - 4:01PM

A Dorset-cross hand-raised ewe named Lucky is set to become the oldest sheep in the world when she turns 21 years and six months in October. Lucky got lucky when her owner Delrae Westgarth adopted her after she was abandoned by her mother at birth and raised on a mixture of warm milk and brandy, as well as keeping her warm with hot water bottles. She has been a prodigious producer of lambs for Delrae and her husband Frank on their property at Lake Bolac in south west Victoria but at the age of 15 Lucky was moved away from the rams after she was unable to care for her young. She now has her own paddock, and the toothless Lucky is living the high life with Delrae hand feeding her oats, barley and hay. Most of the Westgarth's flock over the years have been sent for slaughter when they reach nine years old but Lucky, as the family pet, has escaped the butcher's knife. "I told Frank that Lucky was part of our family and he was not killing her," Delrae said. "She was born here and she will die here."

Delrae first became aware that Lucky was looking at a world record when her grandson Ben had to write a story for his class and chose Lucky as the subject. He checked the internet to find the world's oldest sheep and found that a wether in NSW had lived to 21 years five months and three days. The Westgarths have worked out if Lucky can live to August, and she is in good health, then she would be 21 years six months old. In the meantime, Delrae will continue with Lucky's special diet while Frank will do his bit with the occasional shearing.....AAP

DORSET EWE AND LAMBS

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Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 14, 2007, 03:01:23 AM
ALBERT NAMATJIRA (1902-1959)

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William Dargie : Albert Namatjira 1956 oil on canvas Queensland Art Gallery

Albert Namatjira was the first indigenous Australian artist to paint and exhibit professionally in Western style. He painted his country and was both prodigious and successful, producing approximately two thousand pictures and founding a school of painting that continues today.

GLEN HELEN LANDSCAPE

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Namatjira, an Arrernte man, was born on 28th July 1902 near Ntaria (site of the Hermannsburg Mission, about 120 kilometres from Alice Springs) in the Northern Territory. Visiting artist Rex Battarbee first taught him the technique of watercolour painting. In 1936 Battarbee took Namatjira on an eight-week painting tour, giving him the only tuition he was to receive.

YOUNG GHOST GUM

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Namatjira’s first solo exhibition of 41 works was held in Melbourne in 1938. All works sold quickly. Over the next ten years exhibitions were held in various capital cities of Australia and Namatjira became a celebrity. He was awarded the Queen’s Coronation medal in 1953; was flown to Canberra to meet the Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh in 1954; his portrait, by William Dargie, won the Archibald prize in 1956; and in 1957 he was granted full citizenship rights for himself alone and not for his family (a status denied to most Aboriginal people at the time). Before his death in Alice Springs on 8 August 1959 at least three films had been made about him.

HEAVITREE GAP

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Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 14, 2007, 03:11:51 AM
ALBERT NAMATJIRA EXHIBITION

GALLERY NOTES AND PAINTINGS FROM A RECENT EXHIBITION

Introduction to the exhibition

Albert Namatjira is one of Australia's best-known artists, whose landscape paintings are iconic images synonymous with the Australian outback. However, one hundred years after his birth on 28 July 1902, Namatjira has become both a national symbol and a scapegoat for the social policies and aesthetic prejudices of the time, his art virtually ignored by the mainstream Australian art world.

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Albert Namatjira Mt Hermannsburg Finke River c.1946-51 watercolour over pencil on paper National Gallery of Australia  

Namatjira's paintings express his relationship with the Arrernte country, particularly the Western Arrernte lands, for which he was a traditional custodian. Through his intense scrutiny of specific places and his sensitive response to their individual qualities, Namatjira enables us to see the Centre as a multi-faceted region of Australia. A region of extremes, central Australia is far from a 'dead heart'.

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Albert Namatjira Kwariitnama (Organ Pipes) c.1945-53 watercolour over pencil on paper Ngurratjuta/Pmara Ntjarra Aboriginal Corporation

Water is a powerful presence; it is the central dynamic for change. Its absence or presence is the source of much of the diversity of visual forms and motifs that engaged Namatjira throughout his painting career. The 'red heart' is a misnomer for a land in which light and distance are key factors that shape perception, fragment forms and transform colour.  Namatjira developed a rich repertoire of compositional devices to express his experience of being in this world. In so doing, he expands our vision. He opens our eyes and our senses to new ways of seeing the Centre.

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Albert Namatjira Mount Sonder, MacDonnell Ranges c.1957-59 watercolour and pencil on paper National Gallery of Australia


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 15, 2007, 05:42:25 AM
$1.4M PAINTING STOLEN

Article from: The Courier Mail….June 15, 2007 12:00am

A VALUABLE 17th century painting stolen from the Art Gallery of NSW was expertly removed while the gallery was open to the public, police say. The $1.4 million work by Dutch master Frans van Mieris, titled A Cavalier (self portrait), was stolen from the Sydney gallery between 10am and 12.30pm on Sunday. Security footage from the gallery is being reviewed but police say there were no cameras in the small room from where the painting was taken. The artwork was about A3 in size, including its timber frame, and had an established value of $1.4 million, Art Gallery of NSW director Edmund Capon said. Police said it appeared someone had expertly removed it from its mounting before taking it from the gallery, which was open to the public at the time.

Mr Capon said the theft was not reported to police until Monday, because staff had looked for the missing artwork in the gallery's storage facilities.  Security at the gallery was now being reviewed, he said. "I am deeply shocked. Well over a million people visit the gallery each year and this is a very rare occurrence as security measures at the gallery are sound and proven," Mr Capon said.

The artwork, which was painted in 1657-1659, risked damage unless it was kept in a climate-controlled environment, Mr Capon said. Police said gallery staff had been interviewed and had not been ruled out of the investigation. The Australian Customs Service and Interpol also have been notified of the theft. "Someone must know about the theft or may have been in the area at the time and noticed someone acting suspiciously," The Rocks local area commander, Acting Superintendent Simon Hardman, said. "I strongly urge them to contact The Rocks police or Crime Stoppers with even the smallest bit of information."

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MISSING piece . . . Art Gallery of NSW director Edmund Capon with a print of the stolen 17th century Dutch master. / News Limited picture


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 15, 2007, 05:53:36 AM
MORE MAILBOX CURIOSITIES



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Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 16, 2007, 02:04:19 AM
HANGING ROCK, VICTORIA

Hanging Rock has been a favourite backdrop for social gatherings since the early days of European settlement, and was reputedly a hideout for bushrangers like ‘Mad Dog’ Morgan during the heady gold rush days. However, since Peter Weir’s film (1975) of Joan Lindsay’s novel (1967) Picnic at Hanging Rock, the mystery and intrigue surrounding the rock have been a drawcard.

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The rock itself rises 105 metres from the plain and is a small steep-sided volcano known as a mamelon that was formed six million years ago over a vent in the earth. The lava in Hanging Rock has a particularly high soda content and over time rainwater has created unusual rock formations such as the Black Hole of Calcutta and the Cathedral.

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Visitors can explore the history, mystery and geology of the rock and surrounding area through interpretive displays at the Hanging Rock interpretative centre. Enjoy a stroll around and up the rock or join a guided tour. There are also night tours during the summer months. The reserve is host to nearly 100 indigenous plants, and comes alive with colour in spring. There are many resident fauna, including 40 species of birds and nine mammal species, including koala, kangaroo, sugar gliders, echidna and wallabies.  Picnic races are hosted annually on Australia Day (January 26), New Years Day and Labour Day (March), a tradition lasting more than 80 years. In late February, enjoy a celebration of local food and wine at the annual Harvest Picnic.

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This is the actual formation called the Hanging Rock

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Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 16, 2007, 02:17:33 AM
PICNIC AT HANGING ROCK

© 1975 Picnic Productions Pty Ltd.
Starring Rachel Roberts Dominic Guard with Helen Morse and Jackie Weaver A McElroy & McElroy Production produced in association with Patricia Lovell....A film by Peter Weir....Screenplay by Cliff Green based on a novel by Joan Lindsay....Filmed with the South Australian Film Corporation & B.E.F. Distributors.



On Saturday 14th February 1900 a party of schoolgirls from Appleyard College picknicked at Hanging Rock, near Mt. Macedon in the State of Victoria. During the afternoon several members of the party disappeared without a trace ….........


Joan Lindsay's mysterious story was first published by F. W. Cheshire in 1967. While successful at the time, it was not until the adaptation of the story as a feature film by Producers Patricia Lovell, Hal & Jim McElroy, and Director Peter Weir in 1975 that the narrative became more widely known and acclaimed. Precise and evocative, Lindsay's narrative captures all too well the unique feeling at the Rock on a hot summers day - and this atmosphere, as well as the environment of a strict boarding school in 1900 were powerfully translated by director Peter Weir in a film that is now regarded as an Australian Classic.

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The stunning visuals of the film won Director of Photography Russell Boyd a BAFTA for his Cinematography and were well combined with an impressively adapted screenplay, and unique blend of score. The film is also remembered for its iconic costumes, art direction and editing. A critical and box office success in Australia and Europe upon its release, the film was part of a renaissance of Australian Cinema – and became a foundational work in the careers of many prominent Australian cast and crew. The film was re-released in 1998 with a slightly shorter running time. It is screened after twilight in the Picnic Grounds at the Rock each Valentine's day.


PRODUCTION NOTES

Shooting began on location at Hanging Rock 50 km. north west of Melbourne on February 4th, 1975. The weather was fine and shooting proceeded on schedule with Director Peter Weir extremely pleased with the way both the cast and crew settled down. There was, however, one eerie note. The watches and clocks of the cast and crew behaved in an erratic manner as Executive Producer, Patricia Lovell reported at the time - "We are having trouble with time here. All our watches seem to be playing up. Mine stopped at 6.00 p.m. on the Rock, and a brand new alarm clock is either early or slow, but never correct, no matter what time we set it. Everyone seems to be having the same trouble and to ask the time has become quite a joke". This note will have a rather chilling overtone to those familiar with the story of PICNIC AT HANGING ROCK. In both the book and the film the watches of the schoolgirls stopped at noon when they were on the rock and this was the cue for the strange and terrifying events that followed.

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The cast and crew travelled to Adelaide and arrived co-incidentally on February 14th - St. Valentine's Day, the day on which the action starts in both the book and film in the year 1900. The first location in South Australia was at Strathalbyn where the Art Director David Copping and his assistants transferred Albyn Terrace into a street of the turn of the century Australian country town complete with 400 tonnes of earth spread over the asphalt road surface to give authenticity.  In the film Strathalbyn is "Woodend" a small country town not far from Hanging Rock. Unfortunately, the real Woodend has become too modernized to appear in a film set in the 1900's. However, Woodend's misfortune was Strathalbyn's good-fortune and many of the Strathalbyn residents appeared in the film as extras in period costume.

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The next location in South Australia was Marbury School in Stirling in the Adelaide Hills. The fine main building of Marbury appears as the home of Col. and Mrs. Fitzhubert in the film. This time it was the school children who became deeply interested in the production of the film and the crew were kept busy answering their questions. 'Hamish", the School's pet labrador had a "bit" role in the film and we are sure everybody at Marbury will be looking out for him.

The most important location in the film, next to Hanging Rock itself, was Martindale Hall at Clare, South Australia. This magnificent two storey mansion was built for the Bowman family in 1877/79 and was the home of one of Australia's leading grazier families for many years. In the film Martindale Hall becomes Appleyard College presided over by the dominating presence of Mrs. Appleyard played by Rachel Roberts who took over the role at a few days notice when Vivian Merchant who was travelling to Australia became ill in Hong Kong.

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Most of the interiors were shot at Martindale Hall, however, it was necessary that a complete duplicate of Mrs. Appleyard's study be constructed in the South Australian Film Corporation's Studio at Norwood. This study is a precise replica of one of the main rooms in Martindale Hall. The duplication was complete in every detail - down to the carved mouldings around the windows and was yet another achievement of David Copping and his assistant Chris Webster. Of the schoolgirls' cast, 12 were budding young talent from South Australia most of whom had never acted before and 2/3rds of the sizable crew were also South Australian technicians.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 16, 2007, 02:20:40 AM
MARTINDALE HALL

Martindale Hall is one of South Australia's best known historic houses and notable pastoral homesteads. Built on gently rising ground it commands a wide view across the countryside. The entrance hall, with black and white marble floor, leads into the main hall which gives access via a carved staircase to the first floor. This Georgian style mansion, about three kilometres from Mintaro, was designed by London architect, Ebenezer Gregg, and completed in 1879 for the princely sum of $72,000. The building project was supervised by Adelaide architect E. Woods. Almost all tradesmen who worked on Martindale came from England and returned when the job was finished. The ornately moulded and carved stonework is a tribute to the skill and care of those craftsmen.

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The nearby Coach House and Stables, like the mansion itself, are all constructed of local Manoora sandstone and quartzite and have six stalls, two coach stores, a forage room and a groom's room. Most of the mansion walls are about a metre thick and the ceilings are nearly five metres high to combat the heat of the Australian summers. All the furniture, and whatever else was needed in and around the house, was bought in England and arrived on the ship India at Port Adelaide on 6 April 1880.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 16, 2007, 02:27:04 AM
NO PICNIC AT HANGING ROCK

Presented by Justin Murphy….Researcher: Lesley Holden….Broadcast 8 August 2004

Truth or Fiction? Justin Murphy investigates the fascinating characters in Peter Weir's masterpiece 'Picnic at Hanging Rock'.

Everyone agrees Hanging Rock, near Mt Macedon, exists. It is an eerie place and an extraordinary geological formation. But did events on Valentine's Day 1900, described in the book and the subsequent film by Peter Weir, really happen or did 'The Rock', in part, inspire the works that have become embedded in our cultural imagination.

MICHAEL CATHCART: Now, history and legend are very close relatives, and sometimes telling them apart is pretty much impossible. But Justin Murphy's been trying to disentangle fact from fiction in a great Aussie mystery - a mystery that's become part of our collective memory thanks to that beautiful and iconic Aussie film made by Peter Weir back in 1975 - 'Picnic at Hanging Rock'.

JUSTIN MURPHY, REPORTER: Since Joan Lindsay wrote the book and Peter Weir made the movie and Miranda turned that last corner, the question at Hanging Rock has been asked every day for over 30 years - what happened here? Where did those girls go? Why is this place so mysterious? The tourists flock, all wanting to see for themselves. And almost all of them believe the story.

MAN: I wanna know what rock they were under. And...

JUSTIN MURPHY: You believe the story?

MAN: I believe the story, yes.

GUIDO BIGOLIN, RANGER, HANGING ROCK: What they do, they all ask me where these girls had gone missing, but really, you know, it's a big area. They could have gone missing anywhere.

JUSTIN MURPHY: This is a first edition of Joan Lindsay's book 'Picnic at Hanging Rock', dated 1967. And prominent in the frontispiece is the following paragraph. "Whether 'Picnic at Hanging Rock' is fact or fiction "my readers must decide for themselves. "As the fateful picnic took place in the year 1900 "and all the characters who appear in this book are long since dead, "it hardly seems important." Clearly, she's leaving the mystery open.

PATRICIA LOVELL, PRODUCER: We wanted people to know... or to THINK it was a real story, because Joan was very enigmatic about it.

JUSTIN MURPHY: Patricia Lovell, who produced the film, also enhanced the myth.

PATRICIA LOVELL: I went through local newspapers of the time - back to the, um...to 1900, before. And three children were actually, um, found dead, but not on the rock, but close by.

JUSTIN MURPHY: Guido Bigolin has been the National Parks custodian of the rock for 23 years. Parts of the landscape are permanently frightening, he says, even to him.

GUIDO BIGOLIN: I mean, you do feel something's watching you.

JUSTIN MURPHY: Even you?

GUIDO BIGOLIN: Yeah, that's right. That's the truth.

JUSTIN MURPHY: And the rock is honeycombed with deep chimneys down which children might easily have slipped.  Do you believe it?

WOMAN: Yes.

JUSTIN MURPHY: You do?

WOMAN 2: They say it's true story.

WOMAN 3: I don't believe the outcome of the story of what they say, but I believe something happened. Someone killed her and they got rid of her body.

WOMAN 4: I believe maybe the girl...the girl, something happened in her life - maybe she was pregnant or she had another problem - and she killed herself.

WOMAN 5: So tell us the truth about it!

JUSTIN MURPHY: No, I'm not going to now. No.

WOMAN 5: Oh, please! (Laughs) You're not going to spoil our...mystery.

JUSTIN MURPHY: The other thing that fascinates me, that I hadn't heard before, is that...you were saying to me that you've seen almost all of the cast of the film back here from time to time.

GUIDO BIGOLIN: They have been back, yes. They have - in my time, yeah.

JUSTIN MURPHY: Just quietly. Unannounced.

GUIDO BIGOLIN: That's right.

JUSTIN MURPHY: Privately.

GUIDO BIGOLIN: Yeah.

JUSTIN MURPHY: One of those is Ann-Louise Lambert. Her character, the enchanting Miranda, had a surreal presence in the film - ethereal, untouchable, mysterious. One of her experiences on location connects eerily with that character. After one tough filming session where nothing went well, Lambert, in full costume, wandered off into the bush to be alone. She soon realised she was being followed. She turned to find an old woman clambering over the rocks towards her. Instantly, she recognised Joan Lindsay.

ANN-LOUISE LAMBERT, ACTOR: And she came up to me and just threw her arms around me immediately. And she said directly into my ear, um, "Oh, Miranda. It's been so long." And she was very emotional. And, um, and she just hung on to me for what seemed a long time. And finally she let me go and sort of stared at me. And she was, you know...she had tears in her eyes. And she was quite shaky. And it felt very...like a very powerful, very true thing, you know, that she was feeling. She was remembering somebody or something that was true.

JUSTIN MURPHY: So perhaps for Joan Lindsay, it wasn't all fiction. There is some truth after all. It hardly matters to Patricia Lovell. She won't be revisiting.

PATRICIA LOVELL, PRODUCER: My daughter insisted I went back in 1985. And we went up and we stood on a sort of lookout piece that I knew in one of those circles of rock faces. I said to her, "I've got to get off here. Very quickly. Now!" Which is exactly, you know, what we did. We packed up and she said, "What's wrong?" And I said, "I just am...afraid. I want to go. And I don't want to come back."


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Observer on June 16, 2007, 02:33:22 AM
Now thats a great country to visit!! :P


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 17, 2007, 03:40:18 AM
Yes *******. We like to look after our tourists and send them home safely, unless they insist on swimming with crocodiles.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 17, 2007, 03:50:25 AM
QUIRKY PLACE NAMES

Tasmania’s quirky and unusual place names reflect the island’s colourful history and appeal.

BAGDAD  

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The small rural community of Bagdad, 40 km north of Hobart, was bombarded by confused web users in 2003, after the Iraqi invasion began. Messages of sympathy and support were sent to the town’s Online Access Centre from around the world.  Whereas the besieged Iraqi city of Baghdad is home to around 5 million people, the population of the Tasmanian town is just 650.

BAY OF FIRES

In the far north-east, the Bay of Fires was named by Captain Tobias Furneaux in 1773 upon seeing the blaze of Aboriginal fires burning along the shore.

BUST-ME-GALL HILL & BREAK-ME-NECK HILL

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Situated on the road from Hobart to Orford, the precise derivation of these two names is not known for certain, however, early east coast settlers and travellers, with their bullock drays laden with supplies, had difficulty in negotiating the two steep sections of road. The assent of Bust-Me-Gall was so difficult that travellers often had to dismount from their horses or wagons in order to relieve the animals of some of their burden. The descent on the other side was just as steep and equally difficult to negotiate.

Legend has it that Break-Me-Neck was named after an exclamation uttered by a wagoner during his first experience of the hill. It is not surprising that after negotiating these two hills and the Gatehouse Marshes, the trip down the Prosser River Valley with its convict-built road was seen as, and accordingly named, Paradise Gorge.

D'ENTRECASTREAU CHANNEL

This area was named after French Rear Admiral Bruni d’Entrecasteaux, surveyor of much of south-eastern Tasmania in 1792.

DISMAL SWAMP

Named by early explorers for the ‘dismal’ (wet) experience they had surveying the swamp. Dismal Swamp today is one of Tasmania’s most novel tourist attractions – an exciting mix of fun-park and nature. Dismal Swamp is located on the north-west coast, between Smithton and Marrawah.

DOO TOWN

Just passed Eaglehawk Neck, on the way to Tasman’s Arch, the Blowhole and the Devil’s Kitchen is the holiday village of Doo Town. The homes have all been named in the ‘Doo’ theme: Gunadoo, This-Will-Doo, Doo-All, Doo-Come-In, Just-Doo-It, Doodle Doo, Love Me Doo, Doo Us, Doo Me, Doo Nix, Wee Doo, Xanadu, Rum Doo, Much-a-Doo, Didgeri-Doo, Doo-Drop-In  and, the house which reputedly started the fashion, Doo Little – a suitable name for a holiday home. There is one dissenting house in the town, daringly named Medhurst.

ELEPHANT PASS

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Named after Mount Elephant, which is said to look like the silhouette of this animal.

HELL'S GATES

Popular belief has it that this name refers to the fact that the entrance to Macquarie Harbour can be treacherous. In fact, it was named Hell’s Gates because of the hellish conditions of the penal colony in the harbour.

PARADISE

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Paradise, in north-west Tasmania, was named by its first white settlers, who were devout Calvinists.
The original name was Reuben Austen’s Paradise, after one of the settlers, who remarked upon seeing the sun glistening on the picturesque mountain vista, ‘This is Paradise.’

PENGUIN

This pretty seaside town overlooking Bass Strait was named by the distinguished botanist Robert Campbell Gunn after – unsurprisingly – the fairy penguins that still inhabit the local coastline.

PROMISED LAND

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Named by early settlers because of its promise of a better life, the area is today home of Tasmania’s International Rowing Course at Lake Barrington.

SNUG

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South along the Channel Highway from Hobart lies the adorably named town of Snug. Proclaimed a town in 1908, the name is believed to have come from sailors who found ‘snug’ anchorage for their ships in the D’Entrecastreauxi Channel. Interestingly, blocks of freestone cut from the quarry nearby were used in the building of the Melbourne General Post Office.

And there are more:

Daisy Bell, Egg and Bacon Bay, Flowerpot, Jetsonville, Milkshake Hills, Nook, Nowhere Else, Needles, Ouse, Squeaking Point, and Tomahawk… and many more to discover.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 17, 2007, 03:55:38 AM
THE MAN IN THE KANGAROO SKIN .....

A line of ferocious dogs and detachment of military guards kept a constant watch along the narrow isthmus at Eaglehawk Neck. They were on the lookout for escaped convicts from Port Arthur. Many convicts attempted escape but only a few ever made it via Eaglehawk Neck.

Some died in the thick bush or drowned whilst attempting a sea crossing on rafts and makeshift canoes. Many were deterred from trying to swim the shallow waters of Eaglehawk Bay as it was believed the waters were shark infested.

Some of the escape attempts were quite ingenious. The convict Billy Hunt disguised himself by draping himself in a kangaroo skin. He then attempted to hop across the 'Neck". He nearly made it except one of the soldiers who decided to shoot the big roo to supplement their supply of meat. Fortunately for Billy the shot went astray and he was forced to reveal himself before a second shot was fired.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 17, 2007, 04:01:42 AM
OUR EARLY AMERICAN VISITORS

1848:
William Smith O'Brien took part in the "Young Ireland" uprising and in consequence was deported to VDL and served time at Port Arthur. Among non-criminal convicts to Tasmania were 143 Canadians and Americans apprehended during the civil uprising in Canada in 1837-8 and five Maori leaders in 1846, after the insurrection in NZ.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 18, 2007, 05:29:13 AM
WHO WERE THE BUSHRANGERS?
 
The meaning of the word "Bushranger" has evolved over the years. In the early years of European settlement it referred to a good bushman with the hunting, horsemanship and survival skills needed to live in the Australian 'bush'.  Nobody can say accurately what the total number of bushrangers was, though there were probably hundreds, many of whom received little attention. Prison records show convictions for offences such as 'Robbery Under Arms' or 'Highway Robbery'.

NED KELLY

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Many books written about the Bushrangers identify three groups or 'waves' of bushranging, which helps us understand who they were.  

THE CONVICT BUSHRANGERS

'Better dead than living in hell.'
As the dumping ground for the worst of England's criminal system during the late 18th and early 19th centuries, Australia became a society outside of the law. The majority of early immigrants were convicts or their keepers, resentful of authority and the harsh conditions of life in the hulks and penal settlements of New South Wales and Van Dieman's Land (now Tasmania). 'Between 1788 and 1868, 140 000 males and 25 000 females were transported to Australia as convicts." (Disher 1981, p1) Most of them were thieves, though many had committed more serious crimes. All of them were poor, and lived a mean existence in crowded prisons or hulks (prison ships), with poor food, hard labour and brutal punishment for wrongs. They worked for the wealthy landowners and free settlers, as well as constructing the roads, bridges and buildings for the new colony. The usual sentence was seven years transportation, but many could not bear it and became 'bolters', preferring to take their chances escaping into the bush.

CAPTURE OF FRANK GARDINER (etching)

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Alone in rough country without possessions they 'bailed up' travellers and robbed farms for money, horses, food, guns and clothing, and became the first bushrangers. 'The years of brutal treatment in prison, lack of food, and the need always to stay ahead of the police and settlers' guns, meant that normal standards of behaviour no longer applied for them' (Disher 1981, p4). They had no respect for the rights of others, had nothing to lose for their robbery and murder and were greatly feared. Stories of their depravity take in murder and cannibalism, though this latter abomination was the vice of a minority who had no qualms using their fellow absconders as a mobile food supply.

Many escapees had little chance of surviving in the bush of their new country. Few lived long in freedom. Some died of starvation, sickness or exposure, or were killed by the police and landowners. Those who were captured alive were hanged or flogged and those that survived died in prison or exile.  

GOLD FEVER

The second factor that led to bushranging was the gold rush of the 1850's and 1860's which saw a mass exodus from the coastal cities to the ranges. Traffic on the roads to the early goldfields at Orange and Turon in New South Wales and Ballarat in Victoria was heavy. There were no banks on the gold fields, you carried your gold on you. Those who struck it rich became an easy target for those who preferred stealing to working. Many diggers were robbed or killed. 'On the Kiandra diggings in New South Wales in the 1860s, diggers formed the Miners' Protection Committee to protect their gold from the raids of Frank Gardiner's gang..' (Disher 1981 p19).

FRED WARD (CAPT. THUNDERBOLT)

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In Boldrewood's 'Robbery Under Arms' Dick Marston describes how he, like many bushrangers, examined the gold escort before it left the diggings: We used to go up sometimes to see the gold escort start...The gold was taken down to Sydney once a week in a strong express wagon- something like a Yankee coach, with leather springs and a high driving seat; so that four horses could be harnessed. One of the police sergeants generally drove, a trooper fully armed with rifle and revolver on the box beside him. In the back seat two more troopers with their Sniders ready for action; two more a hundred yards ahead, and another couple about the same distance behind.

Bushrangers held people up on the lonely roads near the gold fields and raided wealthy squatters with properties near the gold towns. The police of the time had little hope of keeping things under control and had a very poor image. Many of them had resigned the force to go after gold and the quality of new recruits was often dubious leading to the many newspaper cartoons of the time which portrayed them as bumbling, incompetent or corrupt. One sarcastic comment from the Argus , 13 December 1856 reads, The police reward fund has now accumulated to a very large amount, and cannot be better laid out than by handsomely rewarding those who so readily risked their lives in ridding society of its greatest curse...

DEATH OF BEN HALL (etching)

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THE WILD COLONIAL BOYS

Unlike the convicts who chose to take their risks in the bush to escape the harsh conditions of captivity, the next wave of bushrangers were native born, bush bred youths and young men, the sons in most cases of free poor settlers, who combined contempt for authority with a spirit of reckless adventure. They were stronger, healthier and better horsemen than their forebears, and some such as Captain Starlight, were eagre to acquire notoriety. Some like 'Mad' Dan Morgan were ruthless and vicious murderers, but others were almost admired for their daring, flashness and treatment of women. Four of the most notorious were Frank Gardiner, Ben Hall and Fred Ward and Ned Kelly.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: BTgirl on June 18, 2007, 11:34:58 AM
Thanks so much for all the information on Hanging Rock. I would love to visit there one day!


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 19, 2007, 02:48:26 AM
I found it interesting also, BT!  I have seen the movie a few times and it is eerie but not in a frightening way.  I think the setting around 1900 and the period costumes added to the air of mystery, along with the soundtrack. Then when I started to investigate some of the background to the book wondering if there was any basis to the original story or whether the author just had a vivid imagination, I found a few things that make you go hmmmm...


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 19, 2007, 03:15:09 AM
BACK TO THE SIXTIES

NIMBIN --  Australia's most famous hippie destination

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There was a time there was a sleepy little dairy village hidden in the hills behind Lismore and Murwillumbah. Being 785 km north of Sydney via the Pacific Highway and Lismore (it is 25 km north of Lismore), and being on the edge of the Nightcap National Park, it was an isolated settlement where things had barely changed since the arrival of Europeans in the 1840s. Then in 1973 the Australian Union of Students (AUS) chose the Nimbin Valley as the venue for an experimental Aquarius Festival. The festival was to be 'a total, cultural experience through the lifestyle of participation' and attracted students, alternative lifestylers and hippies from all over Australia. It was an extraordinary period when people put up tents and camped and talked and dreamed. Most of the weekend visitors returned to the cities and their regular jobs but a small number of idealists and visionaries stayed on and formed the basis of a lifestyle experiment which has attracted attention over the years.

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Before European settlement the area was inhabited by the Bundjalung, Nimbinjee and Whiyabul Aborigines. It has been suggested that the town's name comes from the Nimbinjee people. The early settlers in the area were timber cutters and farmers. The timber cutters moved through the area in the 1840s searching for cedar and other hardwoods. The town was subdivided in 1903 and gazetted in 1906. By 1908 the district was producing enough dairy products to justify the establishment of a local Dairy Co-operative. The town's dairy industry was in decline by the 1960s and in many ways, although the locals were initially resistant to change, the arrival of the alternative lifestyle community sustained the entire region.

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After the Aquarius Festival the Tuntable Falls Co-ordination Co-operative was established. It purchased 486 hectares for $100,000 and sold 500 shares in the co-operative for $200 each. This was the beginning of the radicalisation of the valley and it led to the establishment of other co-operatives including Paradise Valley Pastoral Company and Nmbngee. The 'alternative society' has been able to prosper because this is impossibly rich land with a rainfall which ranges from 1500-2000 mm per year and which is ideal, particularly in the pockets of rich rainforest, for the growing of bananas, paw paws, mangoes and kiwi fruit. Some of these fruit are grown commercially and sent to the markets in Sydney and Brisbane.

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It is equally true that many of the people who settled in the area were deeply committed to alternative forms of agriculture. Today, local practitioners of permaculture, organic food growing and energy efficiency are at the cutting edge of world developments.
 
In NSW, the cultivation, selling and possession of cannabis is illegal. In Nimbin, however, all three activities continue unabated. It has a high tolerance for cannabis plant (marijuana), with the open buying, selling & consumption of locally grown cannabis on the streets and laneways.

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.

NIMBIN ROCKS

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The remains of ancient, eroded volcanic dyke the Nimbin Rocks are located on the Lismore Road 3 km south of the town. It has been estimated that they are 20 million years old. It is claimed that the rocks have special significance to the local Aborigines who regard them as a sacred burial site. They can be seen on the west side of the road.

CULLEN STREET

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For most visitors Nimbin is a different world. A timewarp where bright psychedelic colours, people with their eyes firmly on the idealism of the 1960s, vegetarianism, alternative health therapies are all part of daily life. To wander along the main street of Nimbin is to experience this timewarp. The cafes are full of wholesome food. The shops are full of crafts. This is the heart of the Nimbin experience. Walk along the street and absorb the atmosphere. The Rainbow Cafe is probably the most famous of all the venues on the main street. The Nimbin Museum is a record of the town's hippie history.

MOUNT WARNING

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Mt Warning (known as Wollumbin to the Bundjalung people) is close by, the summit of which is the first point of mainland Australia to see the sunrise and can be climbed following an 8km track through forested slopes. Mount Warning is the solid plug at the centre of a caldera containing the Tweed River, where, millions of years ago, a volcano had stood instead. Nimbin is on the outside edge of that ancient volcano.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 20, 2007, 02:39:51 AM
NORFOLK ISLAND

Norfolk Island is a self governing Australian Territory situated in the South Pacific approximately 1,600km north-east of Sydney, 900 km north-east of Lord Howe Island and 1,100km north-west of Auckland. It is about 8 klong and 5 km wide with an area of 3,455 hectares. It is one of Australia's oldest Territories, with a history of European occupation as old as that of mainland Australia.

The Island was uninhabited when discovered by Captain Cook in 1774. However, there is archaeological evidence of Polynesian or Melanesian presence on Norfolk long before its settlement by Europeans, perhaps as long ago as the twelfth century. The Island was first occupied and settled by the British in 1788, by a party from the settlement at Sydney then itself only 5 weeks old. The settlement on Norfolk Island played an important role in supplying Sydney until it became self-supporting. Norfolk's first settlement lasted until 1814 when the community were resettled in Tasmania, or Van Dieman's Land. Norfolk was reoccupied by the British in 1825 and used as a penal station to house convicts sent from NSW and Tasmania. The penal station was closed in 1855 and its remains are today a major tourist attraction.

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Norfolk Island formed part of NSW until 1844 and then part of Tasmania from 1844 to 1856. In 1856, the British Government agreed to relocate the 193 descendants of the Bounty Mutineers from Pitcairn Island to Norfolk Island. To this end, Norfolk Island was severed from Tasmania and established as a separate and distinct settlement. From then until the end of the nineteenth century, Norfolk Island became the responsibility of the Governor of New South Wales acting as the agent of British colonial authorities in London. In practice, the Islanders looked after most of their own affairs and lived a self sufficient and largely subsistence existence.
In 1897, the British Government placed the Island under the direct administration of the colony of New South Wales with provision for its annexation to any federal body of which NSW might subsequently form part. This arrangement continued when New South Wales became an Australian State on Federation in 1900. In 1914, by a combination of the Australian Parliament's passage of the Norfolk Island Act 1913 and an Order in Council signed by King George the Fifth, Norfolk Island became an Australia Territory under the authority of the Australian Commonwealth.

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From 1914 until 1979 the local affairs of the Island were governed by an Administrator appointed by the Federal Government, supported by a locally appointed or elected advisory council. In 1979 the Federal Government granted a significant degree of self-government to the Island's 2,000 residents which continues today. Descendants of the original Pitcairn Islanders now make up about 48 percent of the permanent resident population of Norfolk Island.

MUTINY

Captain William Bligh set sail from England on H.M.S Bounty on 23 December 1787. Bligh had been given instructions to collect breadfruit and other plants from Tahiti, and transport the plants to the West Indies, where the English had intended to use the breadfruit as a cheap source of food for slaves.

Bligh was an inflexible disciplinarian, who regularly used his hostile tongue to unmercifully attack his shipmates. Despite his enormous intelligence, Bligh's people skills were virtually non-existent. Of the crew on board H.M.S Bounty, Master's Mate Fletcher Christian, a product of a wealthy and highly respected English family, was Bligh's closest companion. After 10 months at sea, the Bounty had reached Tahiti, where its crew received an overwhelming friendly welcome from the natives. The delights of Tahiti, such as its sandy beaches, exotic food, and enticing women, captivated the crew; so much so that the crew stayed for twenty weeks when it took just three to collect the breadfruit plants. Bligh had let discipline crumble during their stay in Tahiti.

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When the time came to resume their journey, Bligh immediately converted back to being a strict disciplinarian; continuing to use humiliating insults to scorn officers, including Fletcher Christian, in front of their ship mates. Christian, who had fallen in love and married a Tahitian woman named Mi'Mitti during his stay on Tahiti, took particular offence to Bligh's ongoing abuse. On 28 April 1789, Christian leads some of his fellow officers to mutineer. Bligh, and 18 of his loyal shipmates, were set adrift in a long boat near one of the Tongan islands. Some seven weeks later, having battled starvation and inclement weather, Bligh arrived at Timor.

Christian returned to Tahiti to collect the 'wives' of his remaining crew, and then proceeded to sail to Toobouai. Having withstood an attack by natives, they decided to return to Tahiti. Sixteen people remained on Tahiti, while nine of the original crew, including Christian, and their wives, six Polynesian men and a baby stayed on the Bounty is search of a sanctuary. They were to find tiny Pitcairn Island, where they settled. (Source: The Essential Guide to Norfolk Island, Peter Clarke)
 
ISLANDERS

The arrival of the Pitcairn people provided a fresh dimension to Norfolk Island. They have maintained and cultivated their distinctive culture and language, and preserved the rich history and natural magnificence of the Island. The Third period of occupation on Norfolk Island began when the descendants of the Bounty mutineers sailed from Pitcairn Island to settle on Norfolk Island. 194 people (40 men and 47 women, 54 boys and 53 girls) made this 3700 mile, five week journey to Norfolk Island; arriving on 8 June 1856. Almost all these new settlers were descendants of the most famous naval mutiny in modern history - HMS Bounty. Given this, most of the new settlers carried names such as Adams, Buffett, Christian, Evans, McCoy, Nobbs, Quintal, and Young.

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June 8 remains the most significant date on Norfolk Island calendar each year. Bounty Day, or Anniversary Day as it is more formerly called is a public holiday where the people of Norfolk Island celebrate the arrival of their forebears. Bounty Day has not altered over generations and even today the food, friendship and style of clothing still portray the traditions of yesteryear. One of the features of the day is the re-enactment of the landing of the Pitcairn people on Norfolk Island, and the procession march through the historic ruins at Kingston. Two small groups subsequently returned to Pitcairn Island, while the remainder made Norfolk their home.

For many years agriculture formed the basis of the Island's economy. The majority of the Islanders lived a subsistence lifestyle, growing their own food. In later years their incomes were supplemented by exporting produce and by whaling. They have a special connection with the Island, and a unique culture and heritage that has been preserved for future generations. The descendants of the Bounty and their Tahitian wives brought their own language with them when they migrated to Norfolk Island. Norfolk is a unique mixture of 18th Century English and Polynesian. English is the most commonly used language on the Island, however you will hear the Islanders talk to one another in Norfolk.

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Island dancing, music, singing, basket weaving, and arts and crafts also remain very important elements of the Norfolk Island culture. Norfolk Islanders also have their own unique cuisine. Visitors can sample many tasty local dishes such as Pilhai (baked kumera), Mudda (banana dumplings), and Hihi Pie (made with periwinkles). Due to there being so many shared surnames, many of the descendents are listed in the local telephone book by their nicknames for identification purposes - Lettuce Leaf, Spuddy, Bubby, Diddles, Loppy to name just a few.

During the Second World War and airstrip was built on the Island. This proved a catalyst for change. With easier access to Norfolk, tourism developed to the point where it became the mainstay of the economy. Tourism remains Norfolk's main industry, although farming and fishing are still important aspects of Island life.

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.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 21, 2007, 03:52:51 AM
NORFOLK ISLAND (continued)

PARADISE

Captain James Cook, on his second voyage around the world, discovered the uninhabited Island on 10 October 1774, some thirty thousand centuries after Norfolk Island propelled itself above the ocean's surface.  Norfolk Island was essentially uninhabited up until Cook discovered the Island in 1774. Upon discovery, Cook named the Island in honour of the Duchess of Norfolk - a wife of the noblest peer of England. While the Island was uninhabited at the time of discovery, evidence of previous occupation by Polynesians has since been found.

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Given the minute size and isolation of Norfolk Island, it's hard to imagine just how Cook managed to stumble across this Island Paradise. Cook was impressed by the native pine trees and flax on the Island. He judged (mistakenly) that the pines would be suitable for masts of large ships and that sail-cloth and cordage could be made from the flax. These resources were important factors in Cook's recommendation that Norfolk Island be secured for the British Crown. A monument to Cook's discovery stands at Duncombe Bay, where Cook first landed on Norfolk Island.

CONVICTS

First Settlement (1788-1814)

Norfolk Island is the site of one of the earliest European settlements in the Southwest Pacific. It is arguably the most famous place of secondary punishment for nineteenth century British Convicts. On 6 March 1788, less than two months after the establishment of the colony of New South Wales, Lieutenant Philip Gidley King and 22 settlers (including 9 male and 6 female convicts) landed at what is now Kingston, Norfolk Island. The produce from this settlement probably saved the Sydney inhabitants from starvation, but by 1804 it was no longer needed. However, the settlement met with mixed success. The soil was fertile, but clearing the rainforest proved difficult and early crops were attacked by rats and parrots. On 19 March 1790 HMS Sirius the flagship of the First Fleet, was wrecked on the reef at Kingston. Although there was no loss of life, the incident highlighted the settlement's vulnerability.

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Despite these difficulties, the settlement continued to grow, reaching a population of over 1100. However, the settlement failed to become self-supporting and proved to be both difficult and expensive to maintain. From 1806 onwards the inhabitants were gradually transferred to Van Diemen's Land (Tasmania). In 1814 the settlement was abandoned, following destruction of all buildings to discourage unauthorised occupation of the Island. Norfolk Island was to remain uninhabited for another 11 years.

Second Settlement (1825-1855)

In 1825 when a second penal settlement was established, without free settlers, for the worst convicts from New South Wales and Van Diemen's Land. It was officially described as a place of the extremist punishment, short of death.

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Conditions were harsh and inhumane; often triggering murders, mutinies and escape attempts by the convicts. The only exception was the period from 1840 to 1844 when the treatment of prisoners improved dramatically under Captain Alexander Maconochie, an enlightened prison reformer.
The following statements were written during the Second Settlement and they provide us with an insight into the horrendous treatment inflicted upon the convicts during this period:
Their sunken glazed eyes, deadly pale faces, hollow fleshless cheeks and once manly limbs shriveled and withered up as if by premature old age, created horror among those in court. There was not one of the six who had not undergone from time to time, a thousand lashes each and more. They looked less like human beings than the shadows of gnomes who had risen from their sepulchral abode. What man was or ever could be reclaimed under such a system as this?
Judge Sir Roger Therry - Source: The Essential Guide to Norfolk Island; Peter Clarke)
I have to record the most heart-rending scene that I ever witnessed. The turnkey unlocked the cell door and Ù. Then came fourth a yellow exhalation, the produce of the bodies of the men confined therein. I announced to them who were reprieved from death and which of them were to die. It is a literal fact that each man who heard of his reprieve wept bitterly, and each man who heard his condemnation of death went down on his knees, and with dry eyes, thanked God they were to be delivered from this horrid place. The morning came, they received on their knees the sentence as the will of God. Loosened from their chains, they fell down in the dust, and, in the warmth of their gratitude, kissed the very feet that had brought them peace.
Bishop Ullathorne - Source: The Essential Guide to Norfolk Island; Peter Clarke

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During the Second Settlement the convict population of the Island reached a maximum of about 2,000. The fine buildings at Kingston were built by convicts during this period. However, by 1855 public pressure finally led to the abandonment of the Island as a penal colony. Many of the convicts were transported to Port Arthur and New Norfolk in Van Diemens' Land (Tasmania).

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Over the past 35 years, the Australian and Norfolk Island governments have undertaken a comprehensive program to conserve the early buildings and ruins in the Kingston and Arthur's Vale Area. The Area is on the Register of the National Estate and is of international heritage significance. Visitors can wander around or take a guided tour through the many historic ruins and buildings, including the 'New Goal', with its solitary confinement apartments and cells designed to prevent the transmission of light or sound. Evidence indicates that such cells drove the occupant insane. Barracks, stores, offices and homes from this era can be visited, while four public museums and numerous private museums help give a perspective of Norfolk Island's fascinating history.

TODAY

Some things on Norfolk Island have changed little over the years. Many of the Islanders preserve their Pitcairn heritage and speak the distinctive traditional language passed down from the Bounty mutineers and their Tahitian wives. Cows still graze under the commonage system and goods from ships are still brought ashore in lighters, as the Island has no natural harbour. However, meeting the demands of the tourism industry has meant that a wide range of services and most modern comforts are now available.

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Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 22, 2007, 02:42:13 AM
COLLEEN McCULLOUGH

Colleen McCullough was born in western New South Wales in 1937. A neuroscientist by training, she worked in various Sydney and English hospitals before settling into 10 years of research and teaching in the Department of Neurology at the Yale Medical School in the USA. In 1974 her first novel, Tim, was published in New York, followed by the bestselling The Thorn Birds in 1977 and a string of successful novels.  In 1980 she settled in Norfolk Island, where she lives with her husband, Ric Robinson.

Colleen McCullough will battle blindness as she has battled any other obstacle - with vigour. She is calm, matter-of-fact. "I cross my bridges when I come to them," she says. "I haven't worked out how I'm going to write when I'm completely blind." At the age of 69, the best-selling author, creator of that monster hit The Thorn Birds and one of Australia's national treasures, has lost sight in her left eye. Her vision is "still hanging in there".

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"I have all sorts of weird symptoms. I've lost depth of field, so I can't tell the height of steps or drops in the floor. It's very difficult to walk." She has a terror of falling and injuring herself. "But I can still see to type, thank God." About two years ago, McCullough was diagnosed with macular degeneration, a disease that atrophies the retina. Though it can be treated, she expects to lose all her central vision in both eyes.

But despite her difficulties, nothing can keep McCullough from an author tour. This week she's in Melbourne to promote her latest novel, Angel Puss. With the help of her "seeing-eye humans", particularly her husband, Norfolk Islander Ric Ion-Robinson, and her assistant Angie, she can still be guided into literary lunches and interviews. And when I talk to her on the phone at her home in Norfolk Island, she sounds as indomitable as ever: full of strong opinions on everything from the recent Pitcairn Island rape trials - "the flipping Brits have set them up, they're supposed to be able to follow their own customs, it's Polynesian to break in your girls at 12" - to computers: "I don't like them, I don't want to be told by some inanimate piece of junk that it's right and I'm wrong. Hur-hur-hur."

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It's as if there are two women inside McCullough. One is the recluse and workaholic who reads and writes through the night. She first built up a career in three continents as a neurophysiologist, in the days when few women had careers in science or medicine, and went on to write 15 very different books, some of which required vast amounts of research: she's very proud of her encyclopaedic knowledge of ancient Rome.
To be quite honest, I found (men) a terrible waste of time.

The other woman is more gregarious: a forceful personality, a patron of causes with an infectious joie de vivre and an earthy sense of humour. She doesn't know where any of this comes from. All her family were dour bushies who loved sport. McCullough had always written for pleasure, but she started to write fiction for publication when she realised that she was heading for an impecunious old age. She wanted enough money to be able to pay for repairs if she broke the toilet bowl. So she was delighted, in 1974, when her first novel, Tim, made her $US50,000. Then, in 1977, came the totally unexpected phenomenon of The Thorn Birds, and McCullough, now a millionaire, had to quit her job because she had become a tourist attraction.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/23MCCULLOCH0.jpg)

McCullough does quite a bit of hur-hur-hur down the phone. "I'm feisty, too. I think there are a lot of us around," she says. "Thank God the world is not full of wimpish women." Big women all have great laughs, she says: "There's a bit of flesh there to make the laugh resonate." Angel Puss is based on the four years McCullough spent in King's Cross in the early 1960s. She had just left home and was delighted to have her own flat, although she had to share a toilet and bathroom and squash a lot of cockroaches. The rigid hierarchy of the hospital in which she worked, where nobody could even put up a funny poster on the wall without the dragonish matron's permission, contrasted with the "magic" of the Cross.  In those days, McCullough says, it wasn't the "sleazy, tawdry horrible place" it is now. "Up at the Cross, there were devil worshippers and all sorts, and everybody got on. It was the only place where lesbians could just bowl up to the bar at the Rex Hotel and have a schooner and nobody would bat an eyelid."

Her heroine Harriet gets into sex and has quite a few boyfriends. But McCullough says she wasn't like that herself: "I was such a bluestocking. Where Harriet was out doing things, I was there with my head buried in a book. I was one of those people who rather despised men, without being a lesbian. To be quite honest, I found them a terrible waste of time. If I did have a boyfriend, I used to boot him out ruthlessly before midnight, because I wanted to work - and they did get under your feet." One of her aims in writing the book was to show what "an awful world" Australia was for single women at that time: they earned half as much as men, couldn't get the pill, abortion was illegal, and if they had a child, they had to give it up for adoption. And if they married, they often had to give up their jobs. "I thought the world belonged to men, and that was a terrible thing. You were forced to make a choice between a career and a husband. I never had any doubts: I never intended to choose a husband."

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/thornbirds1.jpg)

Father Ralph de Bricassart ..............Richard Chamberlain
Meggie Cleary (adult)................................. Rachel Ward


Indeed, McCullough didn't change her mind about marriage until she met Ion-Robinson on Norfolk Island when she was 46. They have been married for over 20 years: "It was a lot easier than I thought it would be. We're still very happy - much to the chagrin of a lot of people who thought we'd last five minutes." There's a whodunit on the way, a seventh book in the Masters of Rome series, and an opera about Cleopatra she is working on with a German composer. Clearly, McCullough is not going to let impending blindness get in her way. "I'm firmly convinced I can train my peripheral vision to do a lot of what my central vision does," she says. "I'm going to get there. I'm determined."

.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 22, 2007, 03:31:49 AM
RARE DOLPHIN BABY BOOM

Article from: AAP….June 22, 2007 12:00am

A DOLPHIN has become a grandmother just weeks after giving birth herself in a rare event at SeaWorld on the Gold Coast. The 25-year-old bottlenose dolphin called Salty gave birth to a male calf, named Sunrise, nine weeks ago at Sea World, on the Gold Coast.

Two weeks ago, Salty's daughter Hallie gave birth to a yet-to-be-named female. Sunrise was Salty's second calf after she gave birth to Hallie in 1990. Sea World's marine sciences director Trevor Long said the arrival of a third-generation calf was extremely rare. "This third-generation breeding is a testament to Sea World's animal husbandry expertise," he said.

Bottlenose dolphins have a life span of about 30 years in the wild but can live to 50 in captivity. Both baby dolphins are currently on display in the park's dolphin nursery. It is hoped they will be reared at Sea World and take part in its interactive educational programs.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/DolphinBaby.jpg)

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Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 23, 2007, 03:20:26 AM
A MOTHER WAITS

Transcript of ABC Radio Broadcast: 05/12/2003
Reporter: Judy Tierney

JUDY TIERNEY: One of the most baffling cases of a missing person in Tasmania continues to interest police 34 years after it happened.

20-year-old Lucille Butterworth disappeared from a bus stop in 1969.

She was close to her family, about to become engaged and had everything to live for.

The cop who took over the case eight years ago is confident someone will be brought to justice and bring to an end the agony suffered by Lucille's Butterworth's ageing mother.

WIN BUTTERWORTH: She said goodbye normal and she used to set my hair and she just said “Wash your hair tomorrow “and when I come home I'll set it.”

Practically, that would be the last.

JUDY TIERNEY: That was the last time Win Butterworth would see her 20-year-old daughter Lucille.

It was 25 August 1969.

WIN BUTTERWORTH: Bubbly, she was full of life, loved.

WIN BUTTERWORTH, 1969: And I said, “Well have a nice time tonight, pet, ring me in the morning and let me know.”

And she said, “Yes I will do that Mum, don't worry about me.”

JUDY TIERNEY: After a day working at the local radio station, this vivacious and popular young woman accepted a lift from a colleague to a bus stop.

Lucille Butterworth was on her way to a Miss Tasmania fundraising meeting in New Norfolk.

REPORTER, 1969: This is where the trail of Lucille known movements ends.

What happened from here on no-one knows.

JUDY TIERNEY: For Win Butterworth, that dreadful day is as vivid now as it was all those years ago.

WIN BUTTERWORTH, 1969: Nearly out of my mind.

No-one knows, I feels as though I have had a limb torn away from me.

It is a terrible feeling.

Dreadful.

We were so close.

She was just our world.

WIN BUTTERWORTH : She had an orangey-coloured uniform that was the office uniform and the coat, that black coat with the white.

She used to model, she loved modelling.

And she modelled that coat and she walked around and then she came over to where I was sitting and she said, “I love this Mum -- can I have it?”

And I said, “Yes, you can have it.”

JUDY TIERNEY: It's a case that has never closed and eight years ago was passed on to policeman John Ward.

He's taken a particular interest because he wants it solved for Win Butterworth.

SERGEANT JOHN WARD, TASMANIA POLICE: Obviously Mrs Butterworth isn't getting any younger and I'd like to have a result for her.

The thing that she said that really left an impression in my mind when I first met her, she said she goes to bed every night thinking about her daughter Lucille and she wakes up thinking about it.

And she has done that for the past 34 years.

JUDY TIERNEY: The last 34 years have been hard on the whole Butterworth family.

Support for Win Butterworth now comes from her two sons Jim and John.

Her husband died in 1984.

JOHN BUTTERWORTH, BROTHER: We hope before my mother passes away that we do get an answer for her peace of mind.

Sure Jimmy and I will probably at some stage or another find out.

It's had an adverse affect on my father, it killed him in the end and we just hope that Mum can persevere and stick with it until we find an answer -- and we will, definitely.

JIM BUTTERWORTH, BROTHER: I suppose really she's lost a daughter and knows she's lost a daughter but she would like to know where she's lost her and who took her.

And after that I would imagine she'd have some feeling of relief that the person, if they're caught, is going to suffer like she's had to suffer all those years.

How she's stood up to it, I don't know.

There were a couple of times she lost it a little bit but she's been absolutely a rock.

JOHN FITZGERALD, FORMER BOYFRIEND: We had the world at our feet and that was just taken away from us.

JUDY TIERNEY: Lucille Butterworth's disappearance has also tormented her former boyfriend John Fitzgerald.

He lived in New Norfolk and on the evening of Lucille's disappearance he was waiting for her to arrive on the bus.

JOHN FITZGERALD: Sometimes if Lucille didn't turn up it didn't worry me and I used to just go and get ready and go to the meeting and then phone the next day and see what had happened -- whether she'd been sick or whatever.

So it's just one of those things.

To this day that really concerns me that I just went off to the meeting and if I had only phoned I would have known what had happened.

JUDY TIERNEY: The Butterworth family didn't realise Lucille was missing until the next morning until John Fitzgerald phoned to speak to his girlfriend.

The couple had planned their engagement, had identical rings crafted and were about to make the announcement.

JOHN FITZGERALD: As far as I know, that night she would have been wearing that ring -- as far as I know.

We were trying to keep it a bit of a secret about the engagement and it was very hard trying to keep a secret and yet be so excited about the whole thing.

JUDY TIERNEY: Still struggling to understand why his girlfriend could be seen one minute at a bus stop and gone the next has taken a toll on John Fitzgerald's health.

JOHN FITZGERALD: There was nothing, it was just as if she'd just disappeared, just zapped off the earth.

It's just like someone saying to you, “I know a secret and I'm not going to tell you what that secret is" and I think if we could find an answer to what happened to Lucille we would be able to settle a lot better.

JUDY TIERNEY: Finding the answer rests with Sergeant John Ward, who's running out of time.

But he has established suspects.

So you have got more than one?

JOHN WARD: Yes Three, possibly four?

JOHN WARD: Yes.

So you can't tell us how many suspects you might have?

JOHN WARD: No, I can't.

JUDY TIERNEY: The answer, John Ward believes, will come from a member of the public.

JOHN WARD: What you need to consider is that the people who may have been involved could be in their 60s and 70s now.

There's an enormous amount of evidence available within the file as you can see.

There's a lot of paperwork there and, again, I believe there is a member of the public out there who knows the answer.

And someone with some information if they can come to me and I can investigate it and I can certainly protect them people.

JUDY TIERNEY: What John Ward is banking on is information from the now-separated wives or partners of suspects.

It may be a long shot, but the Butterworth family too believes it could be their last hope.

WIN BUTTERWORTH: I'd plead to them as a mother to think about another mother that's suffered all those years and lost their child for all those years.

Just maybe they'd be good enough to give us some sort of hope, some sort of lead.

JOHN BUTTERWORTH: They may think of something and they may think it's about time they suggested their thoughts to the police which may help us.

JOHN FITZGERALD: Please, if anyone has the slightest bit of information that can put this to rest, I beg of them please do something about it now, particularly for mum Butterworth.

She's an old lady now and I feel it's a very cruel thing for her not to have an answer.

JUDY TIERNEY: Opposite the bus stop where Lucille Butterworth went missing there's now a rose garden.

A plaque on a seat is a sad reminder of that day in 1969.

JOHN BUTTERWORTH: When my dad died one of his wishes was to have his ashes spread out here in the rose garden.

JUDY TIERNEY: Win Butterworth's wish is the same, her ashes will be spread here, but not before, she pleads, she settles the years of anguish.

WIN BUTTERWORTH: Someone may talk and we'll have something to put it to rest that little piece of peace of mind, instead of the wondering, wondering.

.
My note :  New Norfolk is a small semi-rural town with a population about 5000 and is up river about 20 miles from Claremont, which is a northern suburb of Hobart.
I lived in Hobart at the time of Lucille's disappearance and it was a big story at the time and a most unusual event for sleepy Tasmania.
If I remember correctly (it is 38 years ago) the bus she expected to catch was late or may have been cancelled.  The local Police Force believed at the time that a taxi driver could have picked her up from the bus stop and they had their suspicions as to who the driver was, but could not prove anything.
Last month a skeleton was found in undergrowth near a Claremont bay and revived Lucille's story but it was identified as a missing male.

I hope the people who expect Beth to let go of her quest for answers and move on gain some small understanding from this story that a mother never forgets and never gives up hoping their prayers will be answered.  God bless Beth and Mrs Butterworth and all other families with missing loved ones.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 23, 2007, 03:30:27 AM
WHEN THE CHILDREN COME HOME

Henry Lawson
      
On a lonely selection far out in the West
An old woman works all the day without rest,
And she croons, as she toils 'neath the sky's glassy dome,
`Sure I'll keep the ould place till the childer come home.'

She mends all the fences, she grubs, and she ploughs,
She drives the old horse and she milks all the cows,
And she sings to herself as she thatches the stack,
`Sure I'll keep the ould place till the childer come back.'

It is five weary years since her old husband died;
And oft as he lay on his deathbed he sighed
`Sure one man can bring up ten children, he can,
An' it's strange that ten sons cannot keep one old man.'

Whenever the scowling old sundowners come,
And cunningly ask if the master's at home,
`Be off,' she replies, `with your blarney and cant,
Or I'll call my son Andy; he's workin' beyant.'

`Git out,' she replies, though she trembles with fear,
For she lives all alone and no neighbours are near;
But she says to herself, when she's like to despond,
That the boys are at work in the paddock beyond.

Ah, none of her children need follow the plough,
And some have grown rich in the city ere now;
Yet she says: `They might come when the shearing is done,
And I'll keep the ould place if it's only for one.'


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 24, 2007, 04:13:41 AM
WRECK'S NEW LEASE OF LIFE

Article from: The Sunday Mail…By Lou Robson …June 24, 2007 12:00am

ONE of Queensland's booming tourist attractions has been labelled an incredible wreck - and that's just the way visitors like it. More than 16,000 dive enthusiasts have plunged into the waters off Mooloolaba to explore the sunken metal carcass of the former guided missile destroyer HMAS Brisbane. The hull, blown up and sent to the ocean floor to create a reef in July 2005, stands upright in more than 20m of water about 10km offshore in what has now been made into a 35.5ha marine conservation park. The ship's gun turrets, smoke stacks and access doors were left intact, providing interesting features to explore, divers say. The ship's engine room, boiler room and sleeping quarters can all be accessed.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/HMASBne.jpg)

The site also is not subject to the strong currents battled by divers at some other wreck locations. And divers are flocking to the wreck from all around the world, according to local tourism operators. "Many divers used to go straight to north Queensland for dives such as the SS Yongala off Townsville," said Tourism Sunshine Coast boss John Fitzgerald. "Now they're coming to Maroochydore and Mooloolaba to see one of the best ship dives available."

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/HMASBneDiver.jpg)

Divers, who must be licensed, pay $15 to visit the wreck.
And in the two years since it was opened to the public, takings from divers and operators have contributed $240,000 towards offsetting the cost of sinking the vessel. The Federal Government donated the decommissioned destroyer, which saw action in Vietnam and the first Gulf War, before the State Government paid $3 million to strip the vessel of environmentally hazardous material. Scuba World owner Ian McKinnon said the dive was gaining global acclaim. "The chimneys start 4m below the surface, the main deck is 20m below and the keel is in the sand at 27m," Mr McKinnon said. "It's an amazing dive location."

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/HMASBneFish.jpg)

Mr McKinnon said a recent study found more than 270 species of fish and large invertebrates on and around the wreck such as reef trevally, tropical snapper, sea urchins, sea sponges as well as a host of crustaceans. "In less than two years, the entire wreck has been covered in marine life," he said.

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Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 24, 2007, 04:23:31 AM
MARGARET RIVER

The Augusta Margaret River region is blessed with a stunning array of natural attractions worth visiting year round. The spectacular caves, pristine beaches and majestic forests offer something for everyone. The wild,rugged beauty of the Leeuwin Naturaliste Ridge with its dramatic cliffs and rocks, the tranquil aqua waters of the many protected bays, the local vineyards covered in rising mist in the early morning all contribute to outstanding visual splendour. It’s a photographer’s dream.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/MargaretRvr.jpg)

Large stingrays grace the waters of Hamelin Bay. There are schools of dolphins, the occasional seal, and on land kangaroos, possums and bird life aplenty. The Blackwood and Margaret Rivers' meandering waterways are visited by pelicans, hundreds of black swans, red necked stints, egrets while onshore blue wrens, silvereyes, magpies and a number of species of cockatoos.  Out at the Leeuwin Cape and along the spectacular beaches view a variety of seabirds including the Yellow nosed Albatross, Great winged Petrel, the Australasian Gannet, and the Flesh-footed Shearwater to name just a few. The Blackwood and Margaret Rivers' also offer abundant water activities, ranging from canoeing to fishing and boating. The Blackwood is also becoming internationally renowned for its favourable kitesufing conditions.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/MargRvrCanoe.jpg)
 
In Spring the countryside comes alive with a huge variety of Australian wildflowers which lay a carpet of mesmerising colours through the forests and coastal heath. It’s wonderful for those who like to walk and explore.  The area is a fisherman’s paradise. With its abundance of waterways there’s something for everyone from the professional to the amateur and the family fun day out.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/MargRvrSurf.jpg)
 
Fishing from a boat, the jetty or the riverbank will reward you with Bream, Herring and Yellow Fin Whiting. Blue Manor crabs are found in season, but you may need to get friendly with the locals to find out where. Beach fishing all along the coast is extensive and worth the exploration and effort.  The serene aqua water of Hamelin Bay provides the perfect ambiance for relaxing in the sun, beach combing, swimming, snorkeling or scuba diving out on the shipwrecks. This bay is often graced with the presence of stingrays which can be hand fed. Beach combing in stormy weather will reap many treasures spilled onto the sand by incoming waves.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/MargRvrRoo.jpg)

Built on a history of timber, farming and combined with the areas traditional Aboriginal cultural, the Augusta Margaret River region has an intriguing  and captivating past. From the moment Mathew Flinders first spotted Cape Leeuwin and started mapping the Australian coastline in 1801, the Augusta Margaret River region is as culturally diverse as it has been intriguing.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/MargRvrVineyard.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 24, 2007, 04:30:44 AM
MARGARET RIVER AREA

WARDAN ABORIGINAL CULTURAL CENTRE

The Wardandi people are the traditional custodians of this region and have an affinity with the sea and multitude of local caves. It is through the caves that the afterlife is reached and where the sea spirit Wardandi, is found. The Wardandi people along with the other local Bibbulmum and Noongah Aborigines have a well-defined culture, richly endowed with music, art and legend.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/MargRvrLocals.jpg)


WHERE TWO OCEANS MEET

The historic Cape Leeuwin Lighthouse at Augusta is situated at the most south westerly tip of Australia, standing at the point where the Indian and Southern Oceans meet. This famous landmark is over 100 years old and remains an important working lighthouse. Cape Leeuwin Lighthouse is situated 10 minutes drive south of Augusta.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/CapeLeeuwinLhouse.jpg)

LAKE CAVE

Lake Cave is a stunning pristine chamber deep beneath the earth. Inside the cave a tranquil lake reflects delicate formations that will take your breath away. Visitors descend a staircase in time, gazing up at towering karri trees from a primeval lost world, before entering one of the most beautiful limestone caves in Western Australia.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/LakeCave.jpg)

JEWEL CAVE

One of the most spectacular show caves in Australia, Jewel Cave seems to defy nature and dwarf those who enter its lofty chambers. This spectacular recess with its intricate decorations, golden glow and sheer magnitude is home to one of the longest straw stalactites to be found in any tourist cave.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/JewelCave.jpg)

KARRIDALE

Once the hub of the south-west during the timber rush at the turn of the century Karridale is now a quaint little town with a rich history. Boasting the stunning Hamelin Bay and Boranup Forest on its doorstep one shouldn't think that there is little to do or see in this town. Karridale was built on the back of the majestic Karri and Jarrah trees that now border its western edge along the Leeuwin Naturaliste Ridge, the wood of which once paved the streets of London. Just a short drive along Brockman Highway one will find a rich collection of local artisans and wineries, as well as outstanding galleries nestled amongst the Karris on Caves Road.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Karridale.jpg)

For hidden treasures one can search for the few remnants of the bustling town that Karridale was in the late 1800s. Karridale was the original hub centre of the region, fuelled by the demand of the timber industry. However, tragically in 1961 a major bushfire swept through and destroyed the former timber town, thankfully there were no casualties. All that remains today are the chimney visible in the Karridale memorial park on Caves Road. Other points of interest include Arumvale and the old Boranup Mill. Nearby Boranup Maze is also a great way to spend the time for kids and adults alike.

HAMELIN BAY

A glimpse of Karridale's past can also be seen at Hamelin Bay with its remains of the wooden jetty that serviced the sailing ships. However its main claim to fame is that it is one of the most spectacular beaches in the area. With stunning limestone cliffs, white sandy beaches and blue water, Hamelin Bay

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/HamelinBay.jpg)

BORANUP FOREST

Karridale also boasts the majestic Boranup Forest. The stunning trees that line the roadside make a truly enjoyable scenic drive. Now all 100-year regrowth, the forest was originally milled during the late 1800s timber boom. What makes this point significant is the sheer size of these regrowth timbers, and one can only imagine the size of the giant karris that once grew along this ridge before taken by the timber mills. Scenic pull-off areas along the road make for great photo opportunities.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/BoranupForest.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 25, 2007, 03:03:18 AM
MORE MAILBOXES

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Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 25, 2007, 03:13:49 AM
(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Mailbox015.jpg)

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Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 26, 2007, 02:56:01 AM
WHALE OF A TIME FOR MIGALOO

Article from: The Courier Mail…Martin Philip…June 26, 2007 10:00am

MIGALOO the white whale has sparked a fresh whale-watching frenzy after being spotted frolicking off Heron Island off the central Queensland coast. The elusive albino – believed to be the only pure-white humpback in the world – has been a magnet for whale watchers since his first sighting off the Tweed coast in northern New South Wales in 1991.  Sightings of Migaloo have been so rare that there was once scientific debate about whether he really existed.  Migaloo was not seen again after the initial sightings until 1999, fueling speculation he had died of skin cancer or fallen prey to killer whales.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Migaloo2.jpg)

With more than 50 sightings from Victoria to the Whitsundays since 1991, Migaloo has become a phenomenon in the global whale-watching industry, estimated to be worth more than $1 billion annually.  Long-time Migaloo-watcher David Lloyd, of Lismore’s Southern Cross University Whale Research Centre, has said the white whale is "the one we look for every year. It’s almost become a competition between whale researchers to see who’s the first to spot it,’’ he said.

In August 2003, Migaloo survived a scrape with a yacht near Magnetic Island off Townsville.  The collision holed the trimaran and tore off the boat’s drop-down rudder, which was feared to have lodged in mammal’s back. But Migaloo was soon seen swimming freely in the waters between Magnetic Island and Palm Island, just north of where the incident happened.  A subsequent examination of Migaloo by Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service officers revealed only a slight wound, confirming the white whale had taken the collision in its stride.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Migaloo3.jpg)

It wasn’t until 2004 that Migaloo’s sex was confirmed - genetic tests on skins which peeled off the albino humpback showed beyond doubt he was male.  Fears Migaloo could be targeted by international hunters sparked a wave of protests across Australia in 2005, with then federal Environment Minister Ian Campbell claiming the whale ``could well be harpooned’’ that season.  Far north Queenslanders and visitors were later warned to keep their distance from Migaloo, or face fines of more than $12,000.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Migaloo1.jpg)

The latest sighting comes as the annual northern migration of the east coast humpbacks hits full swing, with up to 100 whales swimming past Point Lookout each day.  University of Queensland whale researcher Mike Noad said the local whale population was recovering after years of over-exploitation. "This population of whales is the fastest-growing whale population in the world we know of,’’ Dr Noad said. It is believed there are now 10,000 whales using the east coast migration route from Antarctica as far north as Torres Strait.

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Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 26, 2007, 03:00:53 AM
HERON ISLAND

Heron Island is a 8 hectare, densely forested sand cay, on the leeward edge of a flourishing coral reef platform in the Great Barrier Reef, Queensland. The island straddles the Tropic of Capricorn and is one of several that make up the Capricorn Bunker group  The dominant vegetation is Pisonia grandis forest which, with the surrounding dunes, provide nesting habitat for many thousands of migrant and resident birds. Heron Island is also a major green turtle nesting site.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/HeronAir.jpg)

Both Captain Cook (1770) and Matthew Flinders (1802) failed to locate Heron Island. It wasn't until January 12, 1843 that the HMS Fly anchored off the island and the ship's naturalist, Joseph Bette Jukes, noting the reef herons, named it after the herons which are part of the rich bird life which inhabits the island. The island is also home to flocks of mutton birds and terns.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/heron-island-14.jpg)

It is known that guano miners visited the island but unlike Lady Elliot (which was extensively mined) they moved on. Thus, until 1932, it remained virtually untouched. In that year Captain Christian Poulson was granted a lease over the island. His plan was to develop a tourist resort.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/NoddyChick.jpg)

From 1932 to 1977 the Poulson family ran a resort on the cay. In 1943 the entire island was declared a National Park. Four years later (1947) a regular Catalina flying boat service was operating from Brisbane and in 1950 a marine research station was established on the island.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/heron-island-15.jpg)

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Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 27, 2007, 03:47:12 AM
ROBERT GORDON POTTERY

An Australian family who over three generations has built a tradition of some of the best hand painted and decaled ceramics produced here in Australia.

Following is their History as detailed on their website.... www.robertgordonaustralia.com :

I am presenting this as a screenprint of their history page as I have been unable to copy the photographs in the usual way.


(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/RGShed.jpg)



Some of the beautiful designs in their range :

ARMADALE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/armadale_group.jpg)

FRENCH ROOSTER

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/french_rooster.jpg)

DOTTY

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/dotty_group.jpg)

COUNTRY LIFE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/country_life_group.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 27, 2007, 04:01:02 AM
MORE ROBERT GORDON DESIGNS

You are welcome to visit their website for more of this delightful and functional pottery.

My thanks go to Robert Gordon Aust and Hannah for their kind permission to feature their ceramics.

CHINOISE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Chinoise_Group.jpg)

GARDEN PARTY

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Garden_Party.jpg)

MOLLY

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/molly_group.jpg)

CREATURE COMFORTS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Creature_Comforts.jpg)

Some interesting  items for our Nonesuche :

VANILLA BAKERY

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/vanilla_r5_c20.jpg)

TEA PARTY

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/teaspo_r5_c20.jpg)

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Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 28, 2007, 02:19:24 AM
GLENELG, SOUTH AUSTRALIA

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/glenelg_beach1_300.jpg)

The area was originally inhabited by the Kaurna Aboriginal Tribe. Being not much more than a pile of sand dunes the area quickly developed into the main seaport for the town of Adelaide and the settlements beyond. Other coastal towns that sprung up in the region include Brighton, Somerton and Queenscliff.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/glenelg_foreshore.jpg)

Today the region is a holiday mecca with miles of white beaches and water activities to enjoy in the hot summers. Good transport links are available to the centre of Adelaide, which include the wonderful old vintage 1929 trams (soon to be replaced with modern air conditioned carriages). These transport links encourage thousands of day trippers to come and enjoy even for the day coastal delights.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/GlenelgTram.jpg)

The official proclamation of South Australia occurred at the 'Old Gum Tree' at Glenelg on 28 December 1836. It was during this ceremony that Governor Hindmarsh named the area Glenelg, after the Secretary of State for the colonies, Lord Glenelg. It had been previously known as 'Patawilya' by the Kaurna Aboriginal people who had inhabited it for thousands of years.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/glenelgsunset.jpg)

Although Adelaide was chosen by the Surveyor-General, Colonel William Light, as the site for the capital of the new colony Glenelg grew as a seaport town over the years following South Australia's settlement. It also developed as a coastal resort destination for residents of Adelaide.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/glenelg-city.jpg)

The foundation stone for the Glenelg Institute was laid in 1875 and the building was officially opened in 1877. It was acquired by the Glenelg Council in 1886-87 and converted to the Glenelg Town Hall.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/glenelg_sunset.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: nonesuche on June 28, 2007, 06:03:19 PM
Tib you got the Robert Gordon up  :D  :D

Those cupcake designs are heaven sent  (http://i86.photobucket.com/albums/k101/daisysistah/GIFS/smilies/dreamyeyesf.gif)

I love all this information on the caves and the forests and livestock, and the ocean and beaches are so beautiful. The aquamarine against the white beaches is as pretty as any I've ever seen! The albino whale wow, I hope they can protect him, what a wildlife global treasure he is.

I saw this today and thought I'd post it here, it seems even Koala bears have bad days?  :lol:
http://www.aolvideoblog.com/2007/06/28/koala-slap/

honest I was in on a conference call where one individual acted just like this today  :lol:


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 29, 2007, 02:50:28 AM
Nonesuche - that video is priceless!  Yes even Koalas can have their off days.  They are not always the sleepy, sweet cuddly animals they appear and can get quite argumentative and very noisy in their breeding season.  People living in Koala corridors complain about being kept awake by their roaring and growling, which may have been why they were originally called bears.

It will be interesting to see if the albino whale fathers albino calves.  They say he appears to have a girl friend so we may find out soon.

The light here gives such great contrast for photography and the very early settlers who were artists had some difficulty reproducing the light and even current painters find it difficult to depict accurately without a lot of experimentation.

Glad you enjoyed my Robert Gordon effort.  Their designs are beautiful.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 29, 2007, 03:01:01 AM
MACADAMIAS

When the continents of the earth were forming and South America, Africa, India, the Middle East and Australia were loosely joined, a tree evolved as a common ancestor of the family now known as the Proteaceae. The landmass separated into the form we know today and the Proteaceae developed into about 75 families or genera. This occurred by some combination of natural selection, hereditary variation and evolution. About 50,000,000 years ago one variation existed in a form we would today recognize as the genus Macadamia.   In Australia, the layman will see many trees which have a similarity to the Macadamia and it is easy to understand the difficulties in identification, which took almost 100 years to resolve. The genus Macadamia consists of two distinct, but allied groups divided into tropical and subtropical types. The tropical groups are native only to northeast Australia and the Celebes Island and according to current knowledge, consist of the species Macadamia grandus and Macadamia whelani. These are both big trees producing large, inedible fruit. Flowers have a pleasant, sweet smell and are borne on long sprays called racemes which hang from the axils of leaves. The mature racemes vary from 100mm to 300mm in length and carry 100 to 300 flowers. About 10% of these will eventually form ‘nutlets’ and ripen into nuts.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Macadamiaorchard.jpg)

For thousands of years before European settlement the aborigines of eastern Australia feasted on the native nuts which grew in the rainforests of the wet slopes of the Great Dividing Range. One of these nuts was called gyndl or jindilli, which was later corrupted to kindal kindal by early Europeans, while in the southern range of the tree it was known as boombera. We now know it as the macadamia. The high oil content of these nuts was a coveted addition to the indigenous diet. However, they were difficult to harvest in great quantities so probably were not a major staple food. The fallen nuts were collected in dilly bags and taken to feasting grounds. Some coastal, aboriginal middens contain large quantities of bush nut shells along with sea shells, often 15 - 20kms from the nearest trees. Nuts were eaten raw or roasted in hot coals. Many processing stones have been found in eastern rainforests, consisting of a large stone with a delicate incision for holding the nuts and sometimes a smaller, flat stone sits on top which is then struck by a larger ‘hammer’ stone.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Macaflowers.jpg)

Modern technology has not invented a better hand nutcracker than this. The more bitter species, particularly in north Queensland, were ground into a paste and washed in running water to make them edible. There were at least twelve tribes in the region where the trees grew and they were used as an item of trade with other tribes. With the arrival of white settlers nuts were bartered, often with native honey, for rum and tobacco. King Jacky of the Logan River clan, south of Brisbane, was probably the first macadamia nut entrepreneur as he and his tribe have been recorded as regularly collecting and trading them during the 1860’s.  The aborigines would express the oil from the nuts and use it as a binder with ochres and clay for face and body painting. This was a method of preserving clan symbols of the dreaming. The oil was also used neat for skin rejuvenation and as a carrier where it was mixed with other plant extracts to treat ailments.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/health_nuts.jpg)

The first European to discover this nut is now attributed to the explorer Allan Cunningham in 1828. The German explorer Ludwig Leichhardt recorded the tree in 1843 and took a sample to Melbourne which is now in the National Herbarium. However, it was not until 1858 that British botanist Ferdinand von Mueller and the director of the Botanical Gardens in Brisbane, Walter Hill, gave the scientific name Macadamia intergrifolia to the tree - named after von Mueller’s friend Dr.John MacAdam, a noted scientist and secretary to the Philosophical Institute of Australia. Walter Hill, so the story goes, asked a young associate to crack some nuts for germinating. The lad ate some and claimed they were delicious. Hill was under the impression that these bush nuts were poisonous and after a few days, when the boy showed no signs of ill-health, he tasted some himself, proclaiming he had discovered a nut to surpass all others.  These were the first recorded Europeans to eat these amazing nuts.  Hill cultivated the first Macadamia intergrifolia in the Brisbane Botanical Gardens, also in the year 1858. It is still alive and bearing fruit today. Some common names in use were ‘bauple’ or ‘bopple nut’ (after Bauple Mountain near Gympie), ‘bush nut’, Mullumbimby nut’ and ‘Queensland nut’. After plantations were established in Hawaii, the Americans also called it the ‘Hawaiian nut’.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Macatrees.jpg)

The first commercial orchard of macadamia nuts was planted at Rous Hill, 12km from Lismore, by Charles Staff in the early1880’s. After his death the farm changed hands twice before being bought up by a neighbour, Jens Christian Frederiksen, in 1910.  The Frederiksens main industry was dairying, but an advertisement in a 1932 edition of the local newspaper attests to the commercial viability of macadamia nut production.  The original orchard has recently been replaced by grafted trees, but the 120 year old trees that remain are still producing and the property is still owned by the Frederiksen family. In 1932 Greek migrants, Steve Angus and his brothers Nick and George, moved from Sydney to Murwillumbah and opened a fruit shop known as the Tweed Fruit Exchange. Steve was introduced to a Tweed farmer, John Waldron.  Waldron was cracking the nuts from his small plantation with a hammer, roasting and salting them to sell locally.  After adopting the same methods at the back of the fruit shop, this arduous practice eventually led Steve to tracking down a nut cracking machine from the USA which arrived in Australia in the mid 1940’s. (Hawaiian growers had already established a market in America).  After a few teething problems with the Wiley cracker, Steve began Macadamia Nuts Pty. Ltd. from his garage where his machine was installed. The business grew, although sourcing nuts was a major problem as most of the produce came from backyard trees. The Angus family moved to Brisbane in 1964 and opened Australia’s first purpose-built processing plant at Slacks Creek. In 1970 ill health forced Steve to retire and in 1971 CSR took over the factory. The Angus family had pioneered macadamia nut processing in Australia.  The Industry in Hawaii is based on some seedling nuts imported from Australia in the 1880’s to be used as a wind break for sugar cane. However, it was found that the macadamias also needed protection from wind.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/macadamias.jpg)

In 1967 Tom Hoult bought 20c. worth of macadamia nuts at a Brisbane department store and was amazed at how few nuts he received. These were very expensive nuts but the taste was superb. He was impressed.  Together with his business partner Mel Braham, Tom began on a journey which now sees them controlling one of the largest macadamia plantations in Australia. Their first plantation at Tuntable Creek proved to be too hilly for mechanised harvesting and the tree stock was successfully moved to a 280Ha property at Dunoon where their company, now called Macadamia Industries Australia Pty. Ltd., now has close to 50,000 trees. The industry has finally come of age so that today we can all enjoy the best nut in the world. The quality and pricing has improved and we don’t have to lift a hammer.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/PinWheelharvester_cu.jpg)

More than any other nut in recent times, the macadamia has found its way into exciting new recipes. Always on the lookout for something new, the world’s chefs have embracedthe Australian nut with enthusiasm.  There is a proliferation of cookies, cakes, confectionery, pastries, spreads, ice-creams and macadamias are also an ingredient in a host of brand foods. Apart from its health benefits, the macadamia has many other attributes. It is an ideal compliment to both sweet and savoury foods, its mellow flavour blends easily with others and it is delicious hot or cold.  The quest to find new ways to use the macadamia has only just begun and its present status as the world’s best is a tribute to the pioneers of the industry and their faith in Australia’s fabulous bush nut.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 29, 2007, 03:05:31 AM
MACADAMIA RECIPES

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/coffee_loaf.jpg)

For a great selection of all types of dishes featuring or including Macadamias this is an ideal website.  Just click on Recipes in the menu under the heading.

www.macadamias.org

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/CharGVeges.jpg)


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Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Sue on June 29, 2007, 07:20:07 PM

Here is a wonderful web site Of  Live Web cams Around Australia
 One interesting one to look at is Nobby Beach.. In the beginning of June
there was a horrible storm in Newcaste and a BIG freighter was washed
ashore there is a LIVE cam on the boat  they have been trying last couple nights to get the boat off the beach.. There going to TRY and make Big effort tonight as they are expecting a higher tide

http://www.coastalwatch.com/camera/NobbysBeach.htm


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 30, 2007, 01:55:16 AM
Thank you for that link, Sue.
I had wondered if you were keeping up with the story of the aftermath of the storms.
They have only managed to move the vessel a small amount and they keep breaking the cables.  It is a mammoth task for all involved.
I found a couple of still photos and will post them here as it gives you a better idea of the enormous size of this carrier compared to buildings, which does not show on the webcam.

This photo shows how close it is to the lighthouse which is on top of Nobbys cape :

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/nobbys2.jpg)

This photo really gives you an idea of the size compared to what looks like a schoolhouse.  They say everyone who has gone down to look have been overwhelmed by the size :

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/nobbys1.jpg)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 30, 2007, 02:07:45 AM
NEWCASTLE

Second largest city in New South Wales. Once a major industrial city, now an elegant and attractive destination full of historic buildings and interesting walks.  With a population of over 250 000 Newcastle is the second-largest city in New South Wales and the sixth-largest in Australia. 156 km north of Sydney via the freeway and at sea-level, Newcastle is located at the mouth of the Hunter River. It has the largest export harbour in the Commonwealth, by tonnage, and the second busiest. It is known, quite reasonably, as the 'gateway to the Hunter Valley' and certainly is the commercial, administrative and industrial centre of the region. It has numerous beaches, a rich heritage of Victorian architecture and a fabulous lookout at Mount Sugarloaf.  The Hunter Valley was once occupied by the Awabakal and Worimi Aborigines. Indeed the foreshore area adjacent what is now Newcastle Harbour was once a major campsite. They called the river 'Maiyarn', meaning 'river that comes from the sea'.  When Captain Cook sailed up the east coast in 1770 he noted what is now called Nobbys Head at the mouth of the Hunter River but did not investigate further. In 1797, while pursuing a group of escapees, Lieutenant John Shortland landed in the vicinity, 'discovered' the river, which he named after Governor Hunter (though it was known as Coal River for some time), and reported coal deposits. It was then that the potential of the area was recognised. The following year ships began collecting coal from the riverbanks and selling it in Sydney and in 1799 a shipment of local coal , which was sent to Bengal, was Australia's first export.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/NewcastleBeach.jpg)

In 1801 a convict camp known as King's Town (after Governor King) was established to mine the coal and cut timber. What is thought to be the first coal mine in the Southern Hemisphere was sunk at Colliers Point, below Fort Scratchley, in 1801 and the first shipment of coal (24 tons) dispatched to Sydney (by comparison, in 1997, the 272-metre S.G. Universe carried 148 000 tons of coal to the state capital). However, the settlement was closed less than a year later. Around this time timber cutting also began in the Hunter Valley.

CUSTOMS HOUSE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/CustomsHse.jpg)

The real beginning of the town was in 1804 when the administration in Sydney, under Governor King, decided that the site's isolation, combined with the hard manual labour of coalmining, lime-burning, salt-making, timber-cutting and construction work, would make the base for an ideal secondary penal colony for recidivists. The Lower Hunter was then covered in subtropical forest which was rich in cedar, so much so that the tributaries around Newcastle were then known as the Cedar Arms. The only initial source of lime were Aboriginal middens at Stockton while the salt was attained through the evaporation of the highly saline water of the Stockton mangroves.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/beachbath1.jpg)

The penal settlement was placed under the direction of Lieutenant Menzies though he soon resigned and Charles Throsby was in charge from 1805-08. The convict settlement, named Newcastle after the English city, rapidly gained a reputation as a hellhole. The regime was severe and the work arduous. From 1814 it became the major prison in NSW with over a thousand convicts. An early Australian novel, Ralph Rashleigh (written in the 1840s), by ex-convict James Tucker, describes dung-eating, flogging and murder at the penal colony. The settlement remained small but it did start to develop. In 1816 a public school was built at East Newcastle (the oldest public school in Australia) and the following year both a gaol and a hospital were erected, though no buildings survive from this rough-and-ready period.  The convict settlement only lasted for twenty years. The gradual movement of settlers up the coast and inland around the Hawkesbury meant that the original isolation of the 'undesirable elements' disappeared. The convicts were moved further up the coast to Port Macquarie in 1823 as settlement of the Hunter Valley began.

CHRIST CHURCH ANGLICAN COLLEGE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/ChristChurchAngColl.jpg)

When the town site was surveyed in 1822-23 there were 71 convict homes and 13 government buildings. The government initially managed the mines but the Australian Agricultural Company acquired sole rights to the coal in 1828 and opened the first modern colliery in 1831. By the 1850s the industrial base of the city had been established and the commercial sector began to grow. Demand built up with the growth of Melbourne and the development of the rail system (extended to Maitland in 1857). Newcastle rapidly became a major coal producer, port and railhead. Mining villages such as Stockton, Carrington, Cardiff, Swansea, Charlestown, Minmi, New Lambton, Wallsend, Hamilton, Adamstown, Abermain, Gateshead, Merewether and Waratah began to develop. Some of these names reflected the fact that many early immigrants were coalminers from northern England, Scotland and Wales.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/NewcastleWharf.jpg)

Copper smelting, potteries, shipbuilding, engineering and metal-working diversified the economic base. The extension of the rail system into the Hunter Valley also meant that Newcastle increasingly became a major service centre for the agricultural areas.  The prosperity of the 1870s and 1880s saw a flurry of substantial buildings emerge engendering a strong heritage of Victorian architecture. The population increased eight-fold between 1860 and 1890 and by the turn of the century it exceeded 50 000.   A major moment in Newcastle's history occurred in 1911 when BHP chose the city as the site for its steelworks due to the abundance of coal. It opened in 1915 with the government providing port facilities and roadways. The city was soon reoriented from coal to a predominant emphasis on steel production, iron-smelting and subsidiary industries.   Steel remained the lifeblood of the city but, despite record company profits, BHP, in 1997, announced plans to abandon most aspects of its steelmaking operations in Newcastle in the year 2000. However, the phase-out has been gradual and other aspects of the local manufacturing sector are still strong. Retail trade, health and education are the other major employment sectors.

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Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on June 30, 2007, 02:12:48 AM
HERE IS ONE WAY TO DISCOURAGE UNWANTED BOYFRIENDS :

BINDI SLEEPS WITH SNAKES!

Article from:… The Herald Sun….June 29, 2007 12:00am

AT an age when many girls are still playing with their Barbie dolls, Bindi Irwin has moved on to something a bit more challenging.
"I have Blackie my black-headed python. I also have Corny the corn snake. He sleeps with me at night," the 8-year-old-daughter of the late crocodile hunter, Steve Irwin, says proudly as she rattles off the names of the menagerie she keeps back home in Queensland, Australia.

It's a group she hopes to introduce to the rest of the world through her new television show, "Bindi the Jungle Girl," airing Saturdays on the Discovery Kids Channel.

"I also have Jaffa my koala and Ocker, my favorite cockatoo. And I have other birds that stay with me. And Candy, my pet rat, sometimes stays with me," the blonde-haired, pigtailed bundle of energy continues until her enthusiasm gets the better of her and her words begin to run together, finally tripping over one another in a heap.

"Sorry," she offers with a giggle as she comes up for air.

Then, a moment later, she's on a roll again, passionately recounting the horror stories her father would come home with about the way he saw exotic animals mistreated in shows around the world. He witnessed cobras in India, he told her, that had their teeth yanked out before they were put in baskets for snake charmers with flutes to coax them out of. He saw monkeys that had their young taken away as an incentive to perform.

"They take their babies away until the monkey does the trick, and then they give the baby back," he told her.

"It's terrible what people are doing," she says, her voice rising. "And they're just doing it for a living because they don't know any better. They've just grown up like that. I think we really need to teach all people, big or little, they should all know the message of conservation."

Her effort to teach them is "Bindi The Jungle Girl," which takes viewers around the world to see animals in their natural habitat while Bindi discusses things like the status of those in danger of extinction.

"There are only a few thousand left in the wild and they could all be gone by the time I'm old enough to drive," she says of tigers and cheetahs.

As her father did, she also frequently makes pitches not to use products that result in the needless deaths of animals.

Each show also returns home to Bindi's two-story tree house in Queensland, Australia, where the little girl with the soft Aussie accent interacts naturally with her exotic animals and where, Bindi says, she is always happiest.

"I love it in my tree house. It's the best place to be, pretty much," she says by phone. "I just go there to sleep over sometimes. My brother comes to visit me for a little sleepover as well. He has his own little snake, Basil. Basil is actually a girl. I know, that's a strange name for a girl," she says, letting loose with another giggle.

She also keeps a supply of videos of her father there.

"I'm ever so lucky because I have so much footage of my dad in the tree house with me," she says. Then she adds softly, "Which is very nice to have because some people only have like one or two pictures of their father or the one who died."

She was barely 8 when her father was killed by a stingray while filming an underwater documentary at Australia's Great Barrier Reef last September.

The two already had begun working together on what would become "Bindi The Jungle Girl," and Irwin is featured prominently in early episodes doing things like climbing trees to visit the nests of endangered orangutans. In one comical moment, a nest's startled resident briefly shakes a fist in Irwin's face before deciding he's all right.

Almost from the day Bindi was born, says her mother, Terri Irwin, she has embraced exotic animals with the same passion her father had.

"Steve was so excited," she recalls. "He kept saying, 'I'm really looking forward to the day when Bindi takes over for me and I can just kick back."'

Still, in many ways, she adds, her daughter is just a typical kid, one who keeps busy with school and pesters her family from time to time for a pony to go with Peru the iguana and the other exotic animals.

As for taking up her famous father's legacy at such a tender age, Bindi doesn't see it as a big deal. She began accompanying him on film shoots when she was just 6 days old and learned early on, she says, what her life's work would be.

"I've always wanted to teach people about animal conservation,"

she said. "I want to follow in my father's footsteps. I loved him so very, very much."

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Bindi.jpg)

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Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Sue on July 01, 2007, 02:58:27 AM

Tib, I have some prettt amazing pictures of the storm damage
My friend in Sydney sent me..problem is they are in power point and I dont know how to post them.. I have to great shocks of the ship grounded
If someone knows how to post powerpoint pics or knows how to save them just has seperate pictures i will send them
There are must see pics

Sue


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on July 01, 2007, 03:07:21 AM
Sue I do hope someone will help explain how to post those pics as it would be great to include them here.

I am a real amateur with this stuff - Klaas had to help me understand Photobucket and how to post the still pics, and I have not advanced beyond that point  :lol:

I am sure a lot of monkeys as well as myself are ooking forward to seeing your pictures.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on July 01, 2007, 03:17:12 AM
NEWCASTLE HISTORICAL AREAS

FORT SCRATCHLEY

From this intersection a small driveway heads up the steep hill to Fort Scratchley which is perched atop a large knoll that lies immediately behind, and overlooking, Nobbys Beach, the headland and the river mouth. Called Braithwaite's Head by Lt. Shortland in 1797 this eminence was later known by various names (Fort Fiddlesticks to the convicts). Being an obvious place for a warning beacon, a signal mast was set up in 1804, earning it the name Signal Hill. It was replaced by a coal-fire beacon in 1813 which burned until Nobbys Lighthouse was set up in 1858.  The army gained use of the site from 1843 and it was, for some time, used as a training ground. When fear of a Russian invasion gripped the colony in the 1870s it was decided that Newcastle, because of its strategic importance as a coal and steel producer, needed to be properly fortified. The fort, designed by Lt-Col. Peter Scratchley, was built between 1881 and 1886 though it was, of course, upgraded in the twentieth century. The Heritage of Australia notes that Fort Scratchley 'is one of only two examples of late 19th-century military fortifications in New South Wales'. The fort's moment came in June 1942 when a Japanese submarine attacked Newcastle which, as a coal port, was an obvious target. The guns of the fort (which, at this point, had been waiting for action for sixty five years) then fired the only shots ever launched at an enemy vessel from the Australian mainland.  The military finally departed from the site in 1972.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/FortScratchley.jpg)

NOBBYS

Immediately below Fort Scratchley, off the roundabout at the end of Nobbys Rd, is a kiosk and a large carpark adjacent Harbourside Park. From this point a very narrow finger of land extends out from the mainland to the knoll known as Nobbys Head whereon sits a lighthouse standing sentinel over the southern side of the Hunter estuary. Beyond the headland the rocky mass of the southern breakwater lends a sheltering arm to ships entering the harbour.  Captain Cook, passing up the coast in 1770 described Nobbys as a 'small round rock or Island, laying close under the land'. This refers to the fact that it was then disconnected entirely from the mainland.  Lieutenant Shortland sought shelter at Nobbys while searching for escaped convicts in 1797 and named it Hackings Point. There he found coal and this resulted in a subsequent visit by Lt James Grant who called it Coal Island. Coal was mined there until 1817 but the hillock was known as Nobbys by 1810.  Utilising convict labour and rock fill from the Fort Scratchley area, work began on the construction of a pier out to the island in 1818, thought to be the oldest rock-fill breakwater in the Southern Hemisphere. It was named Macquarie Pier after Governor Macquarie who laid the foundation stone. Work was halted in 1823, recommenced in 1836 using rocks from Nobbys, completed in 1846 and rebuilt in 1864. In 1855 Nobbys was reduced in size from 61 m to 27 m and the lighthouse erected in 1857 to replace the coal-fire beacon of Fort Scratchley. The original lighthouse was designed by Edmund Blacket though it has since been replaced  Not far from the northern breakwater, clearly visible on the shoreline of the beach, is the 1974 wreck of the Sygna.

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BOGEY HOLE

One of the roadways which winds through the park leads down to the Bogey Hole at the very bottom of the cliffs below the fortifications. This large excavation in the rocks tells us something of the nature of Newcastle in the early 19th century. It is, in fact, a bathing pool which was built by convict labour for the personal pleasure of Major James T. Morriset, the military commandant from 1819-1822 who did much to improve the breakwater, roads and barracks in the settlement. Known for many years as Commandant's Bath it became a public pool in 1863. As one stands and watches the waves ceaselessly washing over the pool the extent of the achievement and the grossness of the indulgence becomes apparent, for the convicts must have dug this hole between waves, waist high in water.

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Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on July 01, 2007, 03:31:48 AM
AUSTRALIA'S BIGGEST SHIPWRECK


THE waters off the east coast of Australia are renowned for their often sudden, unpredictable and violent storms. Testimony to their power lies in the dozens of sunken ships that litter these waters, often in only a few metres. Typical of these is the 53,000-tonne Norwegian bulk carrier Sygna.

During May 1974 the NSW coast was battered by storm-force winds and heavy seas. The ports of Sydney and Newcastle were closed and Newcastle reported swells of more than 17m at the entrance. On May 26, Sygna, on her maiden voyage, was anchored four kilometres off Newcastle, waiting to enter port to load 50,000 tonnes of coal for Europe.

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Synga aground - note 1970's beach buggy

As she waited, the Bureau of Meteorology issued a storm warning.  All ships anchored off the ports were advised to head to sea. Seven of the 10 ships anchored off Newcastle immediately did so, but Sygna remained at anchor. By 1am the following morning, the wind had increased in strength to 165km/h and, with the huge seas and a lee shore, the captain decided to sail. He weighed anchor and the ship got under way.

He was too late. Even with her engines full-ahead, Sygna was unable to make any headway and the force of the storm turned her parallel to the beach. Within 30 minutes she was aground on Stockton Beach. Heavy seas broke over the stricken ship and her captain radioed a Mayday and ordered his crew to prepare to abandon ship.

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Close-up showing break in ships hull

Rescue authorities contacted RAAF Base Williamtown, which scrambled an Iroquois helicopter. Its crew was FLTLT Gary McFarlane, CPL Geoff Smith, LAC Maurie Summers and Army CAPT Brian Hayden, who acted as a second *******. FLTLT McFarlane and CPL Smith had flown together previously with 9SQN in Vietnam.

As they approached the stricken ship, they realised they were facing a significant problem. They would have to hover to rescue the crew and although the winds had dropped to about 50km/h, they faced a black night, total cloud cover with a base at only a few hundred feet, severe turbulence and a combination of driving rain and spray from the waves breaking over the ship driving 150m into the air, which severely reduced visibility. To effect a safe rescue they would have to close to within just a few metres of the ship and remain as stationary as possible to operate the winch.

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Wreck as it appears today

As the Iroquois approached Sygna, FLTLT McFarlane noticed that the crew was huddled in the aft section of the ship, where the accommodation was. The wind was blowing most of the spray clear of that area, so he decided to make his approach there.  This presented him further hazards from the superstructure, masts and other fixtures, any of which placed the chopper at risk if it struck them or they fouled the rotors. For the next 75 minutes the crew winched the Sygna’s 28 men and two women from the deck in groups of two or three and flew them all without casualty some 200m to the safety of the nearby beach.  The storm passed and salvage operations began. However, after Sygna was swung round, the heavier stern section settled into deeper water and broke the ship’s back. The bow section was eventually recovered and taken to Japan but the stern remains, the largest shipwreck in Australia’s history.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on July 02, 2007, 02:32:11 AM
NEW DANISH PRINCESS NAMED ISABELLA

This story is from our news.com.au network Source: AAP ..July 01, 2007

THE daughter of Princess Mary and Prince Frederik of Denmark has been named Isabella. According to the royal couple's official website, the princess has been christened Isabella Henrietta Ingrid Margrethe.  Born on April 21, Princess Isabella is third in line to the throne, after her father and older brother, two-year-old Prince Christian. The christening, taking place in Fredensborg Palace Church, north of Copenhagen, was expected to be a low-key affair compared to that of her brother. Christian's birth in October 2005 caused enormous fuss and excitement in Denmark and Australia.  He is second-in-line to the Danish throne behind his father Crown Prince Frederik, while his Australian mother was born and raised in Hobart.

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Despite the christening being more of a family affair than a state occasion, it is being broadcast live across Denmark. One of the favourite names touted for the little princess was Henrietta after Princess Mary's mother, who died of a heart condition in 1997. But bookies had said the money was on Margrethe, after the Danish queen.  Princess Mary's sisters Jane Stephens and Patricia Bailey, who live in Hobart, and her brother John Donaldson, from Western Australia, did not attend the christening.  But her Scottish-born Australian father, John Donaldson, who now lives in Denmark, where he works as a mathematics lecturer at the University of Aarhus, was expected to be there.

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The Tasmanian government has honoured the close link created when Crown Prince Frederik married Mary Donaldson in 2004 with gifts celebrating the birth of their children.  A beautiful custom-made white gold and red enamel charm bracelet, made to fit her daughter's tiny wrist at the christening, was last week sent express post from the state to Denmark.  It features the red and white colours of the Danish flag, depicted in small white-gold apple seeds and nine red hearts.  The government presented Copenhagen Zoo with two healthy Tasmanian Devils when Christian was born, along with some custom-made suede booties.

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Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on July 02, 2007, 02:40:15 AM
For all those who dream of meeting their Prince Charming, and all those who can remember .............

CROWN PRINCESS MARY OF DENMARK

Upon the announcement of her engagement to Danish Crown Prince Frederik, Australian-born marketing executive Mary Donaldson shared one of her early royal experiences – watching Lady Diana wed the Prince of Wales on TV in 1981. She admits she didn't necessarily see herself taking a similar trip down the aisle, however.
"My biggest memory is of Diana walking up the red carpet with a very, very long train," she says "but I don't recall wishing that one day I would be a princess. I wanted to be a veterinarian."

Mary Elizabeth Donaldson was born on February 5, 1972, in Hobart, Tasmania, the youngest of Scottish-born maths professor John Donaldson and university secretary Henrietta Clark Donaldson's four children. The princess-to-be's parents had emigrated from Edinburgh to Australia in the early Sixties, becoming citizens of the country in 1975. (Mum Henrietta passed away in 1997, and John married author Susan Elizabeth Moody four years later.)

An avid athlete at Taroona High School, Mary was captain of the girls' hockey and swimming teams and very involved in equestrian pursuits. She continued her education at Hobart Matriculation College – where she scored a spot on the basketball team – before wrapping up her studies at the University of Tasmania, from which she graduated in 1994 with a Bachelors degree in Commerce and Law.

The fresh-faced young graduate dived into professional life, moving to Melbourne, where she accepted a position at an international advertising agency. Her career would eventually lead her into the world of public relations, and culminate in her last pre-royal post as a project consultant for Microsoft Business Solutions in Denmark.

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Her life was to change forever when she met a sporty young man who introduced himself as "Fred" at a Sydney hotel pub in October 2000. They'd each arrived with a separate group of friends – the king of Spain's nephew, Bruno Gomez-Acebo, was the link between the two cliques – but by the end of the evening Mary and Frederik were deep in conversation, seeming to have eyes only for each other. "The first time we met, we shook hands," she recalled. "I didn't know he was the prince of Denmark. Half an hour later someone came up to me and said, 'Do you know who these people are?'."

Over the next three years, the two were often seen together in both Australia and Denmark. "Frederik is one of those people who being around you makes you happy. His intelligence and kindness – and he's quite funny as well. We have a connection of the mind," says Mary. However, it wasn't until April 2003 that Queen Margrethe publicly acknowledged the relationship, fuelling rumours of a pending engagement. Six months later the palace announced a royal wedding would take place the following spring.

Despite having to fulfil a demanding series of requirements – she agreed to relinquish her Australian citizenship, convert from her Presbyterian faith to the Danish Lutheran Church, learn fluent Danish and agree to give up her rights to the couple's children in case of divorce – Mary tackled the challenge of her new position with aplomb. "Today is the first day of my new role," she said after appearing on the palace balcony as Frederik's fiancée for the first time. "It is something that will evolve over time and I have much to learn and experience."

On May 14, 2004, the pretty brunette with the captivating smile walked down the aisle with her prince in a wedding ensemble which encompassed both her Australian heritage and the history of the family she would now be joining. A gown by Danish designer Uffe Frank was topped off with a veil first used by Crown Princess Margret of Sweden in 1905, and Mary's bouquet consisted of Australian eucalyptus – known as Snow gum – sprinkled among flowers from the palace garden. Their first child, Prince Christian Valdemar Henri John, was born October 15, 2005.

Mary's grace, beauty and professionalism have won over her new homeland, with one poll finding that 75 per cent of Danes believed she would make a good queen. "Wow! Isn't she wonderful?" exclaimed one Copenhagen newspaper. "She's fantastic. It will be no wonder if in the future Danish schoolgirls choose to mimic Mary in the mirror instead of Britney Spears."

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Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on July 03, 2007, 02:39:53 AM
BRIDES ON THE WARPATH

Article from: The Courier Mail….Peter Mitchell….July 03, 2007 12:00am

HUNDREDS of elderly Australian war brides across the US have been left deflated and disappointed by the Immigration Department. The women, aged in their 80s and 90s, had yesterday circled on their calendars as the first day they could apply to the Federal Government to reclaim Australian citizenship.  But the Government's citizenship website did not offer the application form as expected.

"For the women, it's like being a kid and waking up on Christmas morning and finding out Santa Claus didn't come," Ken Lankard, whose 83-year-old Los Angeles-based mother, Nancy, is keen to re-claim her citizenship.
There were about 15,000 war brides who left Australia after World War II. They met US servicemen stationed in Australia during World War II and moved to the US with their new husbands. Many, like Mrs Lankard, became US citizens but did not realise they would lose their Australian citizenship. She found out she wasn't legally an Australian just a few years ago.

The new Australian Citizenship Act 2007, which came into force on July 1, allows the war brides and their children to apply to regain their Australian citizenship. Ken Lankard, a 58-year-old pilot, also based in LA, plans to move to Australia to retire. He has worked with the Southern Cross Group, which represents Australian expatriates, campaigning since 2000 to help the war brides reclaim their citizenship. He said the group understood the forms would be available on the Federal Government's citizenship website from midnight on Sunday when the new act came into law.

Applicants in the US need to fill out the forms and send them to the Australian embassy in Washington DC. With many of the women in their 80s and 90s, they want to apply as soon as possible. "I checked the website first thing this morning at 7am, which would have been midnight Australia time and there was nothing," Mr Lankard said. "Then I checked three hours later and still nothing. It's now the evening and there's still nothing. It's very disappointing for me and my mother and the other brides. A lot of the war brides have email and they said: 'We'll be on the internet to get the forms'. There's a lot of disappointed people today."

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AN issue since the 1940s ... this clipping from a 1946 copy of The Courier-Mail shows how Australian women who married US servicemen were upset they had to surrender their Australian citizenship.

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Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on July 03, 2007, 02:51:41 AM
THE AUSTRALIAN BALLET

Versatility, technical excellence and a warm, friendly style are the trademarks of The Australian Ballet, qualities that have earned both critical and audience acclaim. For over four decades The Australian Ballet has been the defining the face of ballet in our country. It is one of the companies which have helped create the modern culture of Australia. But it is, by world standards, a new company. It gave its first performance in 1962, building on a strong and rich tradition of ballet in Australia, and on the efforts of many dedicated pioneers in ballet and dance. The company’s founding Artistic Director, Peggy van Praagh, brought with her initiative, astute direction, exacting standards and dedication, enabling The Australian Ballet to flourish and achieve international status early in life.

LUCINDA DUNN AND ROBERT CURRAN

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The Australian Ballet’s first season had as Principal Dancers, Kathleen Gorham, Marilyn Jones and Garth Welch, all stars from the Borovansky Ballet; as Ballet Master, Ray Powell on loan from The Royal Ballet, and as Teacher, Leon Kellaway, who first came to Australia with the Pavlova company. The repertoire was firmly based on a mixture of the popular classics, other international works of proven quality and a proportion of ballets created especially for the company. Renowned dancers such as Sonia Arova, Erik Bruhn, Margot Fonteyn and Rudolf Nureyev were happy to be guests of the young company. Nureyev so enjoyed working with The Australian Ballet that not only did he regularly tour with the company, but in 1972 he directed and performed with them in a film said by many critics to be the finest classical ballet film ever produced, his Don Quixote.  

SWAN LAKE

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The other requirements van Praagh laid down as essential were that the company must have its own school - which was established in 1964 under the direction of Margaret Scott - and that the dancers must be offered the security of year-round contracts. Through the consistent excellence of the Ballet School, and through the close-knit ensemble nature of the company, she and her successors have enjoyed the benefits of well-trained and highly motivated dancers.  Peggy van Praagh ran the company for its first 12 years, for much of the time with Robert Helpmann as Associate Director. Anne Woolliams was Artistic Director for 1976/77 during which time she produced two of John Cranko’s greatest works for the company, Romeo and Juliet and Onegin, which she brought with her from the Stuttgart Ballet. Dame Peggy van Praagh returned as Artistic Director for 12 months in 1978 and was followed by a former ballerina of the company, Marilyn Jones, in 1979. She founded The Dancers Company as a second company comprising graduating students of The Australian Ballet School and dancers from The Australian Ballet; it tours Australia annually. Maina Gielgud was The Australian Ballet’s Artistic Director from 1983 to 1996. Under her guidance the company extended its contemporary repertoire and grew in strength and international reputation. She also strongly encouraged works by Australian choreographers and appointed in 1995, Stephen Baynes and Stanton Welch as Resident Choreographers. Then in 1997 Ross Stretton returned to his alma mater after working in key artistic posts in the US, bringing with him a vision of creativity, energy and passion.

KIRSTY MARTIN AND DAMIEN WELCH .. "LES PRESAGES"

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The company’s present Artistic Director, David McAllister, was appointed in 2001 following Ross Stretton’s move to The Royal Ballet, Covent Garden. A former student of The Australian Ballet School and Principal Artist with the company, David has moved from Principal Artist to Artistic Director with the same poise and enthusiasm which characterised his years as one of our leading dancers. All of these Artistic Directors have worked to make The Australian Ballet not only one of the busiest ballet companies in the world, but an outstanding ambassador for Australia on its visits to world ballet centres in Europe, Asia and America. Versatility, technical excellence and a warm, friendly style are the trademarks of The Australian Ballet, qualities that have earned both critical and audience acclaim here and overseas. These qualities keep the company in such demand that its ensemble of dancers present over 180 performances annually both in Australia and abroad.  

STEVEN HEATHCOTE ...'SPARTACUS'

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The title of Principal Artist is the highest honour the company can bestow.  Our dancers are supported by professional and enthusiastic ballet, music and technical staff, and a company management team in which every member plays a part in taking ballet to the Australian and world stages. The secret of The Australian Ballet’s international reputation is not hard to find. It lies partly in a repertoire that gives scope to the many talents in the company as well as in the quality of its dancing. As John Percival, dance critic of The Times (London) and editor of Dance & Dancers stated, “This is a company with a spirit of its own, and one that is very easy to like and enjoy”.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on July 04, 2007, 02:31:14 AM
WHITEHAVEN BEACH, QUEENSLAND COASTAL ISLANDS

Sixteen nautical miles from the mainland is a place which has become one of the world’s most famous beaches.  Whitehaven Beach is a pristine beach on Whitsunday Island, the largest of the 74 islands in the Whitsundays. Bordered by pristine water, which looks a mix of topaz, azure and even sometimes emerald, Whitehaven Beach stretches over nine kilometres, fringed by lush tropical rainforests. It is heralded as one of the most beautiful beaches in the world and the dazzling white sand is almost 99% pure silica.

WHITEHAVEN AND SURROUNDING ISLANDS

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At the northern end of Whitehaven Beach is Hill Inlet, a stunning inlet where the tide shifts the sand and water to create a beautiful fusion of colours. Many people claim Hill Inlet and Whitehaven Beach are the most beautiful places they've ever seen.

HILL INLET

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There's a lookout on Whitsunday Island where you can view both Whitehaven Beach and Hill Inlet. Most people moor their boats in Tongue Bay, take a dingy ashore and make the short walk to the lookout for the breathtaking views. If possible, try to reach the lookout when the tide is changing, as the golden sand and aqua water hues blend seamlessly into a mosaic of colours.

WHITEHAVEN BEACH

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Tropical plants and palm trees round out the requirements for an isolated tropical island hideaway — perfect for the lone adventurer washed ashore, or for the day-tripper seeking a unique spot to bask in the sun and a leisurely splash.

DIVING WITH TURTLES AND CORAL

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Getting to Whitehaven Beach is half the experience. Several crewed charter companies in the area offer services to escort you ashore Whitsunday Island, and on to Whitehaven Beach. You can jump aboard an ultra-sleek and fast Ferry or a cruising yacht for a day trip. For those who like to approach things from above, seaplanes and helicopter charter services are also available. This option allows you the opportunity to see overall the natural splendour of the Whitsundays and, in particular, the unique loveliness of Whitehaven Beach.

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QUIRKY FACTS :

·   In the '60s the ultra fine sand of Whitehaven Beach, which is 99 percent quartz, was mined and exported to make high-quality glass, such as lenses in Japan.

·   The 99 percent quartz aspect of the sand makes it literally "squeaky".

·   About 14,000 people visit Whitehaven Beach every year.

·   At some points during the year, tiny, near invisible irukandji jellyfish appear in the water around Whitehaven Beach. Wearing a protective suit should allow unlimited and sting-free access to the water.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on July 04, 2007, 02:36:30 AM
MAXI YACHT : RAGAMUFFIN

Maxi Ragamuffin was built by Kelly and Haugh boat builders in Mona Vale, Sydney, Australia. She was launched in 1979 as Bumblebee 4 for Sydney yachtsman John Kahlbetzer. At the time she was the worlds state of the art maxi yacht. The first offshore race that she entered was 1979 Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race in which she took out a convincing line honours victory.In 1980 she competed in the Long Island Sound Series and the New York Yacht Club Series and took out line and handicap honours in both events and line honours and 3rd on handicap in the Greenwich to Newport race on the East Coast of USA.

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1981 saw Bumblebee take out line and handicap honours at the Mediterranean Maxi Championships and the World Cup in Sardinia. Other achievements that year included gaining Line Honours and 2nd on handicap in the Middle Sea Race.In 1982 she competed at the Southern Ocean Racing Conference in Florida  and gained 2nd place overall. The Maxi World Championships were held again in 1982 and Bumblebee was placed second.In 1983 Bumblebee was purchased by Australian yachtsman, Syd Fischer, and renamed Ragamuffin. Mr Fischer made alterations to the hull and incorporated a new longer stern, a new keel and added 3 metres (10 foot approx.) to the height of the mast. With the new configuration Ragamuffin took out line honours at Hamilton Island Race Week 1984, and line honours in the Sydney to Hobart 1988 and 1990. Other placings in the Sydney to Hobart include a 2nd in 1986 and two 3rds 1985 & 1989, giving her six placing from eight starts. In the two races that she did not gain a place she was retired due to gear failure.

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Ragamuffin gained 4th place at the Clipper Cup in Hawaii in 1986. In 1988 the event was renamed the Kenwood Cup and Ragamuffin was placed 7th. Later that year she returned to Sydney to dominate the Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race.Anton Starling, of Joico Hair Care Products, purchased the vessel in 1993 and renamed her 'Maxi Ragamuffin'. He found that a then 14 year old maxi could not match the speed and agility of the newer, lighter maxis (up to half the weight of Maxi Ragamuffin) and put her up for sale having owned her for less than 12 months.In 1994, she was purchased by Whitsunday yachtsman Bernard Heimann and converted to being a day charter yacht. She now runs scheduled day trips sailing to glorious island destinations, offering snorkelling and SCUBA diving, and cruises to beautiful Whitehaven Beach and Blue Pearl Bay.Most recent racing achievements include Line Honours in The Great Whitsunday Fun Race, September 1996, 1997, 1998, 2000 and 2003 and achieving the coveted Line and Handicap double in the 1998 Whitsunday Vista Cup.

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Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on July 05, 2007, 03:05:49 AM
SYDNEY SALUTES USS KITTY HAWK

Thursday 5 July 2007

The Prime Minister John Howard has today officially welcomed the crew of the USS Kitty Hawk to Sydney.  Mr Howard addressed about 200 members of the crew inside the ship's hanger, saying that America and Australia share a common outlook. "You come as the sailors of a great nation, a nation that shares so much with Australia, so much by way of a common set of values, a common history, but most importantly in this part of the world, a common future," he said. "Australians and Americans have fought together in defence of freedom and against threats to our way of life on many occasions.  We continue to do it today and work together around the world defending our way of life and fighting terrorism.'' Directly after the speech, Mr Howard spoke with a number of the sailors who surrounded him and responded to his speech with an enthusiastic round of applause.

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The ship and its 5,300-strong crew came through the Sydney Heads this morning and docked at Garden Island. One of the largest warships ever to visit the city, the Kitty Hawk is longer than three football fields and sits 61 metres above the water level at its highest point It operates 70 aircraft, and displaces around 80,000 tonnes of water. Commissioned in 1961, it is the oldest active service warship in the US Navy.

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The Kitty Hawk has been part of a joint operation with the Australian Defence Force over the past few weeks. The aircraft carrier has just completed the Talisman Saber 2007 Exercise and was accompanied into the harbour by the USS Juneau, the USS Tortuga, the USS Cowpens and the USS Stethem. It is likely to be the final visit of the Kitty Hawk, which last came to Sydney in 2005. While the public will not be allowed on board, Mrs Macquarie's Chair and The Domain will provide the best vantage points for one last look at the boat before it returns to the US to be decommissioned next year.

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Mrs Macquarie's Chair, otherwise known as Lady Macquarie's Chair, provides one of the best vantage points in Sydney. The historic chair was carved out of a rock ledge for Governor Lachlan Macquarie's wife, Elizabeth, as she was known to visit the area and sit enjoying the panoramic views of the harbour.  Mrs Macquarie's Point, directly east of the Opera House on the eastern edge of the Royal Botanic Gardens, provides excellent views west across the harbour to the Bridge and the Mountains in the far distance. Looking north and east you can see Kirribilli House, Pinchgut Island and the Navy dockyards at Wooloomooloo. The views from Mrs Macquarie's Chair are still enjoyed today, over 150 years later, by hundreds of Sydney siders and tourists each day.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on July 05, 2007, 03:29:32 AM
NAVAL HISTORY OF GARDEN ISLAND

1778-1810 Garden Island and produce  

Ø   The log of HMS SIRIUS records under the date of 11 February 1788:
Sent an officer and party ashore to the Garden Island to clear it for a garden for the ships company’
Ø   In the first garden corn and onions were planted.  The garden was situation between the hummocks on the island and was probably near the museum and chapel.
Ø   While the exact identity of the first gardeners remains unclear they were no doubt a combination of convicts and sailors.  Interestingly on the knoll area to be opened to the public is the oldest white graffiti in Australia – consisting of carved initials – ‘FM’, ‘IR’ and ‘WB’ that have the year 1788 engraved beneath them. ‘FM’ was most likely Frederick Meredith who belonged to the Sirius and went on to become a police constable.
Ø   These initials were lost to public consciousness until 1920.  At that time newspapers speculated that the rock on which they were cut was said to be the tomb of Judge Advocate Ellis Bent and of Major John Ovens.  You should note that this may not be correct and that the remains were removed to the cemetery in the grounds of St Thomas’ Church North Sydney sometime after 1886
Ø   The identity of one of the early gardeners is known.  He was Australia’s first bushranger called ‘Black Caesar’ a Jamacian negro who was transported and sentenced to seven years of penal servitude in 1785
Ø   The island continued as a vegetable garden until about 1810 – although one of the problems for the garden was a lack of fresh water.

NAVY DOCKYARDS WITH GUIDED MISSILE FRIGATES

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1810-1856 Garden Island-the picnic area for Sydney residents

Ø   From 1810 until 1856 Garden Island was used essentially as a picnic area for the residents of Sydney – today it is returned to that purpose.
Ø   In the 1850s there were rumours that the Island was the favoured place for Naval Officers of various ships to fight their duels

1856-Garden Island as the dedicated Naval Base

Ø   In 1856 the NSW Government suggested that the Island be given over to use by the Royal Navy as a Naval Base and in 1858 the admiralty approved an outlay between 200 and 300 pounds to render the Island available for repair of ships.
Ø   On 10 July 1911 the title Royal Australian Navy was granted by King George V to the Naval Forces of the Commonwealth of Australia. On 1 July 1913 all naval establishments in the Australia Station were handed over by the Admiralty to the RAN.  These facilities included Garden Island and the buildings that had been erected by the Government of NSW in the years before federation
Ø   Considerable litigation followed when in 1923 the NSW Government claimed the island as its property.  After seven years the High Court and the Privy Council ruled that the NSW claim as valid.
Ø   This was somewhat unfortunate for the Commonwealth as in the meantime the naval installation on the island had been greatly extended
Ø   With the outbreak of WW II in 1939 the Commonwealth Government resumed the island under wartime powers and in 1945 purchased it from NSW for the sum of 638,000 pounds.

GARDEN ISLAND WITH SYDNEY CBD IN BACKGROUND

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/GardenIsCBD.jpg)

1940’s-Joining Garden Island to Potts Point

Ø   During the War Garden Island started to take on the shape visible today.  The Captain Cook Engraving Dock – the largest in the Southern Hemisphere was built as a matter of wartime emergency.  Work proceeded in shifts, round the clock employing between 3000 and 4000 workers for four years.  It opened in early 1945.  The principal feature of the plan for the dry dock was the reclamation of 33 acres of sea bed between Potts Point and the southern shore of Garden Island that effectively joined the island to the shore.

Not within the public access but within sight of the public access area is the site when HMAS KUTTABUL was sunk on 1 June 1942 by a torpedo from a Japanese Midget submarine impacting the wharf below her.  This resulted in the deaths of 21 sailors and was the time that war came to Sydney. Hundreds of war ships have berthed at Garden Island over the past two hundred years, including many that have docked for repairs and maintenance.

USS KITTY HAWK AT GARDEN ISLAND DOCKYARDS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/KHawkGardenIs.jpg)
 
The two main users of Garden Island are the Navy and Thales Australia. Garden Island is the main base for the Navy Fleet on Australia's East Coast. Thales Australia manages and operates a graving dock (dry dock), a floating dock and a range of ship engineering and maintenance facilities at Garden Island. Garden Island is part of the rich fabric of the Port of Sydney and one element fulfilling the stated desire of the State Government to have a working harbour.  The general population at Garden Island varies depending on the work that is being done and the number of ships that are in port, including visiting foreign war ships, at any one time. The normal workforce consisting of Naval and non-Naval personnel can vary between 3000 and 4000 people. Where a number of visiting ships arrive at the same time the population can increase by a further 5000 to 6000. Activities on Garden Island make a significant economic contribution to the local and state economy.

.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on July 06, 2007, 03:04:25 AM
MUSIC'S CULTURAL MERGER

Article from: The Courier Mail….Tonya Turner….July 06, 2007 12:00am

DIDGERIDOO player William Barton is changing the world of classical music. The 26-year-old indigenous musician and composer originally from Mount Isa will perform his own compositions written for string quartet and didgeridoo tonight to kick off the Australian Festival of Chamber Music in Townsville. Playing at the biggest chamber music festival in the southern hemisphere for the fifth time, Barton is largely responsible for building the profile of the didgeridoo in classical music around the world and sharing a message of reconciliation.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/WilliamBarton.jpg)

"The didgeridoo is part of a very significant and magical culture," he said. "My elders always taught me that playing is about sharing the culture and connecting with people from all walks of life, whether it's in the concert hall of London or New York or the pub down the road.  If you connect with just one person you can change their perception of Aboriginal people or music. You always come up against resistance but that's your job to change it. If you think about defeat you've already lost the battle before you've started."

Tonight's concert will open with Barton playing the didgeridoo with four indigenous players from Townsville's Cowboys rugby league team. He will then be joined on stage by Melbourne's Hamer String Quartet and his mother, indigenous opera singer Delmae Barton.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/william_barton.jpg)

Violinist Rebecca Chan, 25, said she has played in orchestras where the didgeridoo has been featured in a small segment but playing with Mr Barton was unlike anything else she had done. "We try to produce sounds the didgeridoo can make and make sounds that are compatible with it. It's amazing what William can do and the sounds he can produce he's just such a wonderful musician," Chan said.

Based in the Brisbane suburb of Moorooka, Barton has played with world-leading orchestras including the London Philharmonic, Bavarian Radio Symphony and Brooklyn Philharmonic in New York.  This year he will travel to Paris, Italy and the US to perform.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on July 06, 2007, 03:07:50 AM
DELMAE BARTON'S DREAMTIME

Delmae Barton is widely recognized as Australia’s Dreamtime Opera Diva, performing as a solo artist and collaborating with her son William Barton in the group DREAM TIME SPIRIT. She also works with national and international artists and is involved in a number of recording/performance projects with unique concepts.

DREAMTIME SPIRIT has created and performed pieces including "DREAM TIME OPERA" and "DREAM TIME SPIRIT". These combine mystically woven lyrical harmonies and operatic harmonies with traditional didgeridoo, guitar and percussion, taking the listener on a spiritual and inspirational journey into ancient song lines of the universe.

Included among Delmae’s many career highlights is representing Australia and New Zealand with William at the Canadian Arts Festival in 2002. She has performed at numerous festivals including collaborating with Sean O'Boyle for River Festival's River Symphony 2000; Millennium eve rhythm festival and world link up, Woodford Folk Festival; Goanna Band, Melbourne International Festival of the Arts the National Didgeridoo Festival, Melbourne 1998 and the International Cultural Festival, Laura.
Delmae has collaborated in prestigious performances with the Queensland Ballet Company and Eclectic Light Orchestra. She aided with the compositions, advised on traditional cultures and performed both with traditional and contemporary styles.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/delmae_barton_1.jpg)
 
She has acted and sung in a number of plays and films including ‘”10 Great Characters of Queensland”, - Greg Granger of "Maynard Productions" and  “Jail Bird Run” filmed by Village Roadshow.

Delmae did studio work for Federation Centenary Celebrations Barambah collections and has recorded numerous radio and tv interviews throughout Australia. “Delmae’s Song”, has played on JJJ Sydney on the World Music Program. She has also played an integral part in many sound installations, including at the newly opened Judith Wright Centre of contemporary Art Brisbane.  

Delmae has also had notable success with her poetry. One of the highlights was in MT ISA Irish Club, penning and reciting the Welcome poem for the former Prime Minister Bob Hawke.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on July 06, 2007, 03:18:00 AM
AUNTY DELMAE BARTON - CULTURAL ADVISOR

Aunty Delmae Barton is an Aboriginal Cultural Advisor in the Office for Community Partnerships and works closely with the Professor of Indigenous Policy.  Aunty Delmae was born in Emerald on Christmas Day in 1942 and went to school in Emerald where she completed a commercial education.  Aunty Delmae has led a diverse life and has worked as a cook, a cleaner, an assistant nurse and even a dingo trapper.

A gifted artist, Aunty Delmae is world renowned singer and composer.  Aunty Delmae has performed throughout Australia and Europe and is the mother of William Barton, one of Australia's most prominent didgeridoo performers.  Aunty Delmae's strong spirit inspires her singing and traditional singing and she a traditional Aboriginal song woman.  

Aunty Delmae also takes pride in her painting, which she considers 'tactile art'.  While growing up, Aunty Delmae's father was blind, and her painting style, using her fingers rather then brushes is both therapeutic and provides a tactile.

An inspirational speaker and poet, Aunty Delmae has a strong commitment to education and believes that for indigenous people education includes both conventional western-style education and also involves traditional wisdom and knowledge. Aunty Delmae is an ambassador of the Kidney Support Network and has donated several artworks that are on display at the Royal Brisbane and Women's hospital.
"Art is from the heart and soul.  I paint at night when it is silent and I become lost in a world of my own"

In 2005 Aunty Delmae was appointed as an Elder in Residence under Griffith University's innovative Elder-in-Residence Program.  Aunty Delmae provides inspiration and leadership through culturally-based mentoring, counselling and advice to staff and students.

My note : I have had the privilege of meeting both Delmae and William in a private setting where they were both kind enough to perform for us.  Delmae has the most beautiful contralto voice and her renditions of aboriginal songs were spellbinding.  The songs although sung in her native dialect were so expressive that it was possible to follow the story they told without understanding the words. Most of our small gathering were in tears by the end of her songs.
All respected older women of aboriginal tribes are called "Aunty".

.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on July 06, 2007, 03:29:41 AM
MOUNT ISA - WESTERN QUEENSLAND

Mount Isa is the largest and most impressive township in western Queensland. Unlike Longreach (its only competitor), which has a very rural feel, Mount Isa is a mining town with an air of self-confidence and sophistication which is rare in outback Queensland. Thus, although the mining complex is the town's raison d'etre and though it dominates the skyline and the local economy, Mount Isa does not feel like a settlement nestling under 'dark satanic mills'. It is a centre with high quality accommodation, good restaurants, excellent facilities, and enough activities to keep even the most enthusiastic visitor busy for a week. Located 1829 km from Brisbane, 883 km from Townsville and 356 m above sea-level, Mount Isa proudly claims to be the largest city in the world; a fact born out by its accreditation in the Guinness Book of Records. The argument is that the city extends for 40 977 sq. km, and that the road from Mount Isa to Camooweal, a distance of 189 km, is the longest city road in the world.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Scenery-mtisa.jpg)

Prior to white settlement the area was occupied by the Kalkadoon Aborigines, who produced large numbers of axes and other tools in the area, using them as trade. They fiercely resisted the encroachment of pastoralists in the 1870s and early 1880s but their resistance and raids were effectively ended when native police and white settlers retaliated with a bloody massacre in 1884. Copper was mined in the area from the 1880s but a price slump in the early 1920s saw the venture collapse. However, in February 1923 vast silver-lead-zinc deposits were discovered by the prospector John Campbell Miles. Miles named the site after Mount Ida, a Western Australian goldmine. Within months over 500 claims had been lodged in Cloncurry but slowly these claims were amalgamated into two major companies. Mount Isa Mines Ltd was formed in 1924 and by 1925 it had taken over all the leases to the field. Isolation and lack of facilities proved an early problem so MIM began to build a company town with low-rent housing and amenities in 1927. Matters were further aided when the railway arrived from Townsville in 1929.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/mtisa.jpg)

The cost of developing the mine in such a remote location proved too much for the original Australian and British shareholders and, in mid-1930, the American Smelting and Refining Company (now ASARCO Incorporated) rescued the operation by providing millions of dollars to complete the treatment plant and commence the production of lead, although profits did not emerge until 1937.  When a partcularly large copper deposit was proven to exist in 1942 the Australian government, enduring wartime shortages of the strategic material, encouraged its expoitation. Copper would prove the main source of revenue in the 1950s.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/OutsideBuffs.jpg)

In 1958 the Leichhardt River was dammed to provide a guaranteed water supply for the town and mine. Mount Isa was declared a city in 1968.  The novelist Vance Palmer wrote a trilogy of books about Mount Isa (Golconda, Seedtime, and The Big Fellow) and his descriptions of the town are a reminder of its harsh beginnings. In Golconda he writes of the town: 'There's nothing much to catch the eye at the first glance. It's bone-dry country, twisted shrubs and spinifex, and the hills are mostly humps of rock where a goat would find it hard to pick up a feed. But there's a life about the air of a morning that makes you feel that the few trees there are might pull up their roots and float away while you're looking at them.'

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/SunsetMtIsa.jpg)

Today Mount Isa Mines Ltd is one of the most highly mechanised and cost efficient mines in the world. It's the world's biggest single producer of silver and lead and is amongst the world's top ten for copper and zinc. It is also one of the few areas in the world where the four minerals are found in close proximity. As Australia's largest underground mine, it has a daily output of around 35 000 tonnes of ore. The underground workings extend approximately 4.5 km in length and 1.3 km in width. Inevitably the mine has had its problems. In the early 1960s large sections of Mount Isa's residential area were removed because they were located on useful ore bodies. Major industrial action occurred in 1964-65. The dispute became so heated that the Queensland government actually declared martial law in the town.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on July 07, 2007, 03:28:06 AM
ALPACAS IN AUSTRALIA

Alpacas are rare and precious animals. Treasured by the ancient Inca civilisation, their fine fleeces were reserved for Incan royalty. Together with their close relatives, the llamas, alpacas provided clothing, food, fuel and, no doubt, companionship as domesticated animals as long ago as 5,000 years.  Alpacas were close to annihilation after the Spanish conquest of the Incas. That they survived was due to their importance to the Indian people, and SURIto the animals' ability to tolerate extraordinarily harsh climatic conditions. It was not until the mid 1800s that the beauty and resilience of alpaca fleece was 'rediscovered' and re-awoke the world's interest.  Today, alpaca farming is concentrated in the Altiplano - the high altitude regions of Southern Peru, Bolivia and Chile where life is difficult. Alpacas not only battle a harsh climate - burning sun by day, freezing conditions at night - but also receive few of the benefits of modern animal husbandry. Yet, they survive, although in relatively small numbers. In their homeland of South America, Peru has approximately 2.5 million, Bolivia around 500,000 and there are only some 50,000 in Chile and Argentina combined.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/alpaca-herd-lg.jpg)

In 1984, the United States and Canada imported their first alpacas, followed by Australia and New Zealand in 1989. These countries, with their (relatively) more temperate climates and more sophisticated animal husbandry techniques, have proven beneficial for the species.  In the year 2001 there were approximately 40,000 alpacas in Australia and increasing rapidly. While the outlook for fibre sales is excellent, the emphasis in this young Australian industry will be on breeding for the foreseeable future. To increase alpaca numbers is a 'home grown' challenge that will not be met by importing from South America. Limited imports may arrive from Peru and Bolivia, however some quarantine restrictions and export limits control the number of animals leaving South America.  We are fortunate that our own interest in alpacas is mirrored by that of New Zealand. There is already significant information sharing between the two countries and mutual access to research results. This is particularly valuable for the accumulation of information on breeding, fibre production and various aspects of the 'Australianisation' of alpacas.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/pic_lakeside.jpg)

Again, Australia finds itself in the forefront of new rural industry development. Alpacas, for a whole host of reasons, are one of the most exciting herd options available in this country today Most major agricultural shows now feature alpaca judging, in addition fleece classes have been introduced to Royal Shows in Melbourne, Sydney, Canberra, Adelaide, Perth, Hobart, Brisbane and major regional centres.  In 1991, Dalgety Farmers conducted the first Classic Auction of alpacas, which attracted great interest and excellent sale prices. It is now an annual event that attracts a large crowd of enthusiastic buyers, quality animals and strong prices. The Australian Alpaca Association trains judges, conducts field days and seminars. Its aim is to promote the industry by providing information and advice to its members and on a broader scale, to educate the public about these amazing animals.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/teamTN.jpg)

Although still young, the alpaca industry is one of the most progressive and energetic in Australia. That there is a place in the Australian fibre production scene for alpacas is beyond dispute. The Australian Alpaca Association aims to ensure that the potential of the alpaca is developed to the full. Already, our talent for efficient fibre production is being channelled into the development of strong, Australian bred alpacas. Eventually there will be top quality fleece in quantities sufficient to supply both local and international demand.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/alpaca-skeins.jpg)

The Alpaca fibre comes in a wide range of natural colours including: white, off-white, shades of grey, fawn, silver, champagne, red brown, deep chocolate brown and jet black. Although the fibre can be dyed, the use of the natural colours means an absence of dye products and minimal exposure to allergens, for even the most sensitive of wearers. The silkiness and luxury of the alpaca yarn and finished knitwear is comparable to cashmere wool and the all time classic fashion clothing favourite the "cashmere sweater". The less sought after portions of the fleece are used to make some of the lightest and warmest duvets (or doonas) available anywhere in the world. The light touch of a doona (duvet, comforter or doonah) made with alpaca fleece, combined with its high insulation properties, make it one of the warmest bedding products available.

ALPACAS AS THERAPY

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/alpacaCar.jpg)

In medical research, there's growing evidence that patting an animal e.g a dog, can help you recover after an operation. So what about an alpaca? What role might it play in therapy for the elderly, the disabled or disadvantaged? Glen Riley visits such groups with his alpaca and we found The Rough Diamonds group loved the experience. And even though some with disabilities can't speak, you can see they're moved by patting the alpaca.

HUACAYA

Pronounced wua'ki'ya, this is the most common alpaca type in both South America and Australia.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/huacaya.jpg)

It has a soft bonnet of fibre on the forehead and its cheeks boast 'mutton chops' whilst the dense body fibre grows straight out from the body, not unlike Merino fleece. Ideally, fleece coverage is even and extends down the legs. Its fleece should show a uniform crimp along the length of the staple

SURI

As a type, the suri (soo'ree) is very much less common than the huacaya, and in Australia only a small percentage of alpacas are suris.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/suri.jpg)

This alpaca has fleece with a strongly defined lock. The suri is covered in long, pencil fine locks, not unlike dreadlocks, that hang straight down from the body. The fleece has lustre and its feel is more slippery and silky than that of the huacaya. The predominant suri colours are white or light fawn. Suri numbers continue to grow in Australia, and like the huacaya, the suri responds well to our gentler climate and husbandry practices.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on July 07, 2007, 03:36:43 AM
Here is a popular song we all like to sing, with appropriate actions.  I am sure Sleuth has heard this many times when she lived here.

HOME AMONG THE GUM TREES

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Arborlee.jpg)


I've been around the world a couple
of times or maybe more
I've seen the sights, I've had delights
On every foreign shore
But when my friends all ask me
the place that I adore
I tell them right away

(Chorus)
Give me a home among the gum trees
With lots of plum trees
A sheep or two, and a kangaroo
A clothes-line out the back
Verandah out the front
And an old rocking chair

You can see me in the kitchen
Cookin' up a roast
Or Vegemite on toast
Just you and me, a cup of tea
Later on we'll settle down
And mull up on the porch
And watch the possums play

(Chorus)

Some people like their houses
With fences all around
Others live in mansions
And some beneath the ground
But me, I like the bush, you know
With rabbits running 'round
And a pumpkin vine out the back

(Chorus Twice)


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on July 08, 2007, 02:32:27 AM
WEST AUSTRALIAN WILDFLOWERS

Mention wildflowers and most people think of Western Australia - and it is no wonder. With up to 12,000 species found within its borders and many unique to the State, Western Australia's wildflower season draws visitors from all over the world.

The wildflower season ranks as one of Western Australia's most fascinating and precious natural treasures. For several months of each year wildflowers are scattered across 2.5 million square kilometres of mysterious terrain. As diverse and colourful as the locals, the uniqueness and natural beauty of the wildflowers attract thousands of tourists and scientists every year.

Rains and sunshine greatly influence the timing of the wildflower season, causing it to span several months and regions. In the north of the State, wildflowers will appear in July with early rains hastening their arrival. As late as November a blaze of wildflower colour will take over the south where the warmer weather produces a totally different collage of species.

Many varieties are still being discovered and many already identified are as yet unnamed.  Here is a small selection :

BRIGHT PODOLEPIS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/BrightPodolepis.jpg)

BLUE FAIRY ORCHID

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/BlueFairyOrchid.jpg)

SOUTHERN CROSS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/SouthernCross.jpg)

MULLA MULLA

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/MullaMulla.jpg)

DAVIESIA TRIFLORA

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Daviesiatriflora.jpg)

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Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on July 08, 2007, 02:38:01 AM
ROADSIDE EVERLASTINGS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Everlastings.jpg)

STAR OF BETHLEHEM

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/StarofBethlehem.jpg)

CATS PAW

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/CatsPaw.jpg)

SILVER EYE ON BANKSIA

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/silvereye_small.jpg)

PINK ENAMEL ORCHID

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/PinkEnamelOrchid.jpg)

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Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on July 08, 2007, 02:41:14 AM
WILDFLOWER FLORAL DISPLAYS

An exhibitor provided about ten species of verticordia which were included in vases such as this. The species present are V. monadelpha var. monadelpha, and var. callitricha, dichroma var. syntoma, muelleriana ssp. minor, lepidophylla var. lepidophylla, comosa, albida, blepharophylla hybrid, helmsii, × eurardyensis.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Vertivase.jpg)

Another exhibitor provided  fresh blooms of at least eleven species of Western Australian banksias (B. attenuata, baxteri, caleyi, coccinea, grandis, ilicifolia, lemanniana, nutans, petiolaris, praemorsa, speciosa. Here they are used as part of the stage decoration together with yellow kangaroo paw  Anigozanthos pulcherrimus,  hybrid red kangaroo paws, the silvery-grey leaves of E. rhodantha, bright-red bottle-brush (Callistemon phoeniceus) and  Barrens Regelia (Regelia velutina) with its crimson flowers and silky leaves

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/banksiavase.jpg)

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Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: CJ1 on July 08, 2007, 02:24:06 PM
I love wildflowers.  These are beautiful.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on July 11, 2007, 03:24:20 AM
Thank you CJ1.  I am glad you enjoyed them. My biggest problem is selecting which ones to use as there are so many.
More of them today for your enjoyment.

Monkey Friends

My apologies for dropping off the radar without any warning but the computer crashed so unable to contact anyone.

I will also be away for a few days this coming weekend.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on July 11, 2007, 03:33:34 AM
WEST AUSTRALIAN WILDFLOWER TRAILS

West Australia have many wildflower trails, a lot of them through National Parks.  I will post a selection of photos from various trails and I will post more in the future.

ALBANY TRACK

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/AlbanyTrack.jpg)

CALEY'S BANKSIA

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/CaleysBanksia.jpg)

BLUFF KNOLL

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/BluffKnoll.jpg)

GRASS TREES

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/GrassTrees.jpg)

CAPE RANGE NATIONAL PARK

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/CapeRangeNP.jpg)

COWSLIP ORCHID

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/CowslipOrchid.jpg)

KARRI TREES

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/KarriTrees.jpg)

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Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on July 11, 2007, 03:39:20 AM
HANCOCK GORGE

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/HancockGorge.jpg)

MELALEUCA

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Melaleuca.jpg)

MOUNT AUGUSTUS

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/MtAugustus.jpg)

MOUNT BARRON GREVILLEA

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/MtBarronGrevillea.jpg)

WARREN NATIONAL PARK

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/WarrenNP.jpg)

PINK BORONIA

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/PinkBoronia.jpg)

SWAN RIVER, PERTH

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/SwanRvrPerth.jpg)

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Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on July 12, 2007, 03:10:35 AM
THREDBO ALPINE VILLAGE

Champagne corks are popping as Thredbo turns 50 in 2007. What a journey over those 50 years it has been, taking Thredbo from a few chalets and rope tows in 1957 to the thriving year round village it is today. Thredbo was established back in 1956, when the first chairlifts and lodges transformed the snowy terrain into a snow riders dream. Thanks to this early vision, Thredbo has taken off and developed into the ripping year round resort it is today.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/ThredboVillage.jpg)

Aboriginal History

The Aborigines made their way to Australia around 50, 000 years ago, entering through Cape York Peninsula. Back then the Kosciuszko Plateau was the ultimate winter playground, set deep within the ice age. Life was scarce due to the big freeze, but as the earth gradually warmed the Snowy Mountains blossomed. It is believed that Aborigines saw this potential and took up permanent residence on the Monaro between 5,000 to 10,000 years ago.  The Aborigines that moved to the base of the mountains formed 4 major tribal groups: the YA-itmathang, the Wolgal, the Waradgery and the Ngarigo. The upper slopes were regarded as no-mans land, held in trust for the tribes and because of the winter chill remained uninhabited. The changing of seasons brought on a new lease of life for the Aborigines. In Spring the peaks became the perfect meeting place where thousands would gather for ceremonies, share in the wonder of the alpine environment and hold the annual feasting on the Bogong moth, which was considered a delicious delicacy. These moths (Agrotis infusa) breed on the plains between Queensland to Victoria and migrate to the Alps in spring to escape the heatwave and chill in the rocky crevices. The Bogong moth was a crucial part of the Aborigines diet. After a long winter of fasting the moth was seen as the ideal meal, rich in proteins and containing 50-75% fat.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/BogongMoth.jpg)

The Village

Thredbo Village, set within the magic Kosciuszko National park is one of Australia’s highest alpine towns. It’s perched among the awesome mountains between 1365 to 1930 metres above sea level. (Cabramurra being the highest). The Thredbo area was originally used by graziers, when in 1955, a Czechoslovakian with great vision saw the potential for a wicked mountain resort. Tony Sponar was working as a hydrographer for the Snowy Mountains Authority and was captivated by the snow capped peaks and their ski-ability. Sponar had been a ski instructor at the renowned St Anton Resort, Austria from 1941 to 1948. He saw Thredbo developing as an Australian equivalent, with super snow riding and an electric atmosphere to match.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/ThredboSlopes.jpg)

In May 1955, the Kosciusko Chairlift and Thredbo Hotel Syndicate was formed. The directors Tony Sponar, Charles Anton, Eric Nicholls and Geoffrey Hughes attained a lease from the state government with a year round resort in mind. In the winter of 1955 a study of snowfall and weather patterns was carried out, and by the years end it was decided the Friday Flat/ Crackenback Peak was the best place to kick of Thredbo’s snow riding sanctuary. A line was cleared and surveyed for the proposed chairlift on Crackenback Peak and in October Andrew Thyne Reid joined the syndicate.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/ThredboBldg.jpg)
 
In January 1957 the good news came through. The State Park Trust gave the syndicate an option for a lease, and in the summer of 1956-57 work began on a chairlift and basic accommodation.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Village.jpg)

The man with the vision, Tony Sponar was the first area manager. In 1957 he was handed the task of building a road from the Alpine Way to the present site of the Thredbo Alpine Hotel on a budget of just 4000 pounds. To make things ever tougher he had a budget of 1000 pounds to build a lodge.  In May 1957 the syndicate was given a new name Kosciuszko Thredbo Limited and with the new name came a fresh change. Andrew Thyne Reid was named Chairman and thanks to his experience with James Hardie Asbestos, the money was raised to continue the development of Thredbo.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/ThredboAlpsjpg.jpg)

To obtain a 99 year lease the group had to build a ski lift and 100 bed hotel within five years. After three and a half years it was clear the group needed a partner with more financial strength and construction expertise. Tyne Reid negotiated with the bidders, McGrath Coach Houses and Lend Lease. In 1961, Lend Lease acquired the lease and up until 1987 developed Thredbo into the most unique alpine resort in Australia.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/onthemountain.jpg)

In January 1987, Amalgamated Holdings Limited, known to most as the Greater Union Organisation, purchased the lease and since then Thredbo has charged into the 21st century. During the summer of 1987/88 over $30 million was invested, installing the largest snowmaking facility in the southern hemisphere along with two state of the art detachable quad chairs. These moves not only ensure great snow when mother nature takes a break, but provide a comfortable and fast means to explore the great outdoors and rip up the slopes.

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Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on July 13, 2007, 02:51:22 AM
THREDBO LANDSLIDE OF 1997

The road above the village, the Alpine Way, had been built as a temporary service road during the 1950’s to access Murray 1 and 2 power stations. Once the power stations were completed, the Snowy Mountains Authority upgraded the road with fill and planted vegetation on the downhill hillside. Maintenance of the road was then transferred to the State Park, now Kosciuszko National Park.

On the Night of 30 July 1997 the Alpine Way collapsed under pressure from heavy rain, melting snow and transported weathered material. Carinya Lodge was pushed by the road collapse into the lodge below and both it and Bimbadeen Staff Lodge were completely destroyed. The collapse occurred late at night when most residents were in bed.

2000 square metres of liquefied soil with a water flow of 1.7 litres per second took barely a few seconds to move 250 metres. Carinya moved downhill so rapidly that it crossed the road separating it from Bimbadeen causing its total collapse.

In the aftermath the area was unstable with an underground stream flowing through the remains of the two lodges. Rescuers were hampered by possible collapse of flattened walls and concrete floorings. Eighteen people perished in the collapse and one, Stuart Diver, was pulled out alive after three days buried beneath interleaved concrete slabs, liquified soil and chilling water.

The resultant emergency rescue effort brought volunteers and specialists together from all over Australia. They worked night and day to clear the debris from the two lodges and prevent further mishap. The State Emergency Service rotated 1350 crew with about 250 on the site at any one time.

In the aftermath all aspects of the physical geography of the site were examined by engineers, geologists, civil contractors, technical experts such as the geomophologists, climatologists, geotechnical advisors and landscaping specialists.

By February 1998 Stage One reconstruction had begun with a fully retained cut and fill embankment. The Alpine Way itself was closed early in the year and a 15m wall built at the back of the site including extensive gabion work and drainage. Three terraces with gabions and reinforced fill were constructed on the site. This was completed by June 1998.

In October 1998 Stage Two began with the reconstruction of 600 metres of the Alpine Way and the building of upslope retaining walls. At the site a Contemplation Platform was built and the area landscaped.

The site plus 900 metres of the Alpine Way is now monitored for runoff with 25 inclinometers, which detect any down slope movement, and 12 piezometers, which keep track of water fluidity and the water table in general.

A coroner's inquest was conducted into the events surrounding the road collapse. The inquest found that:" The causes of the tragic deaths, which occurred as a result of that landslide, are complex. "

The Coroner concluded that, at the time of the road collapse, no individual government authority had responsibility for the maintenance of the Alpine Way. The fill embankment was in a marginally stable state at the time due in the main to it having been originally built as a construction access road by the Snowy Mountains Hydroelectric Authority, not the public road that it subsequently became.

Funding constraints on the National Parks and Wildlife Service limited what could be done to maintain roads operationally. The NPWS had been "inheriting roads not designed for the purpose to which they were later put".  Responsibility for the Alpine Way and the Kosciuszko Road into Perisher Blue has subsequently been handed over to the Road and Traffic Authority (RTA).

Coroner Derrick Hand found that a leaking water main triggered the fatal slippage, but reserved ultimate blame for the New South Wales National Parks and Wildlife Service and the Roads and Traffic Authority for 40 years of neglect of unstable land around Thredbo.

My note : Photobucket appears to be not working so I will post the photos later for this and the following article.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on July 13, 2007, 02:55:01 AM
HERO OF THREDBO RESCUE

"Legendary" Ambulance Paramedic – renowned for his work in the rescue of Stuart Diver in the Mt Thredbo disaster, the Granville Train Disaster and most recently the Beaconsfield Mine Rescue.

Paul Featherstone was the paramedic who psychologically held Diver's hand for 12 hours until he was freed from his concrete tomb after the disastrous Thredbo landslide in 1997. During the three–day ordeal the rescuers had little rest or sleep and Paul was seen as going beyond what anyone could expect in giving the sole survivor the best possible care and support during the extrication. The danger was real and imminent. If the concrete slabs had slipped to any significant degree, both men would certainly have perished. Yet even when the site had to be evacuated each time the rubble shifted, Paul would stay below ground to keep Stuart talking and distract him from the predicament. He did this in spite of the risk for himself as it helped the man stay calm and avoided making his condition worse.

Featherstone says he will never forget the grand–final–like roar that rolled down the mountain when the word spread that Diver had been pulled out alive. The crowd of locals that had spent the day mourning the loss of 18 friends, colleagues and loved ones – including Diver's wife, Sally – could now celebrate the sparing of at least one life.

Paul Featherstone is really a unique individual. He has spent the last 30 years perfecting skills in the recovery and care of people in life threatening situations.

Joining the NSW Ambulance Service in 1972, Paul pioneered the Ambulance Service's acclaimed Paramedic system in 1976. He conceived and developed the Special Casualty Access Team (S.C.A.T.) in 1986, and has since been a team leader in developing patient access methods and high levels of care under hostile environments.

Paul's experience positions him as a specialist in situations where lives may be at stake. Situations where perfect planning, quick assessment and responses are critical for the prevention of injury. In situations where injuries have occurred, Paul is skilled and equipped to access, treat, recover and transport injured individuals whether by foot, road, air or sea.

Paul has developed unique training methods in high–risk areas based on "real world" experience, with emphasis on self–motivation and teamwork. Paul's specific skills and experience are from heart attacks in domestic environments to severe multiple victim industrial accidents; and he has been at the forefront of literally thousands of emergency situations.

Twice the recipient of the Ambulance Service's highest award for bravery, the Distinguished Service Medal as well as the Australian Bravery Medal, the Humane Society's bronze, silver and gold medals and the Prince Phillip Helicopter Rescue Award, Paul Featherstone is a man who can be depended on.

Whether at Thredbo, or with Pat Portlock, pinned by the leg for 10 hours under a teetering crane at Kyeemagh, crawling through the rubble at Granville in 1977, or in boiling seas at Malabar miraculously plucking a fisherman to safety, everything he does is based on intensive and expert training of many years, and on experience which has grown in him an invaluable sixth sense.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on July 13, 2007, 08:09:30 PM
Looks like Photobucket is cooperating again so here are photos of the landslide.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Roadslide.jpg)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/Cliff.jpg)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/auThred.jpg)

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/auThred1.jpg)

Stuart Diver being rescued.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/StuartDiver.jpg)

Paul Featherstone

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q263/Coonowrin/FeatherstonePaul.jpg)

Will be back in a few days, Monkeys.


Title: Australia by Tibrogargan
Post by: Tibrogargan on July 19, 2007, 06:20:47 AM
RARE GIBBON SURVIVES AT PERTH ZOO

WEIGHING just 500g at birth and abandoned by her mother, a rare baby gibbon is beating the odds with round-the-clock intensive care at Perth Zoo. The tiny white-cheeked gibbon, named Li-Lian, now weighs 800g and is thriving on a diet of formula milk eight times a day.

(http://i210.photobucket.com/albums/bb256/coonowrin1/LiGibbon.jpg)

The species is critic