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Author Topic: Pakistani girl Malala Yousufzai shot by Taliban being treated in England  (Read 2263 times)
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« on: October 16, 2012, 06:17:57 AM »

October 16, 2012 at 1:00 am
Girl shot by Taliban has good chance of recovery

    By Sebastian Abbot and Martin Benedyk
    Associated Press




From The Detroit News:

Pakistanis light candles in front of a banner showing Malala Yousufzai, a schoolgirl who was shot last Tuesday by the Taliban for speaking out in support of education for women in Peshawar, Pakistan, on Monday. (Mohammad Sajjad / Associated Press)

Birmingham, England — A teenage Pakistani activist shot in the head by the Taliban arrived in Britain on Monday to receive specialized medical care and protection from follow-up attacks threatened by the militants. Officials said she is stable and has a chance at "a good recovery."

The attack on 14-year-old Malala Yousufzai as she was returning home from school in Pakistan's northwest a week ago has horrified people across the South Asian country and abroad. It has also sparked hope that the Pakistani government would respond by intensifying its fight against the Taliban and their allies.

Malala was targeted by the Taliban for promoting girls' education and criticizing the militant group's behavior when they took over the scenic Swat Valley where she lived. Two of her classmates were also wounded in the attack and are receiving treatment in Pakistan.   ::snipping2::

From The Detroit News: http://www.detroitnews.com/article/20121016/NATION/210160347#ixzz29SH0tDEb

We are not one world!

Edit to add Malala Yousufzai's name to subject line.   I think we'll be hearing a lot more about this young lady.  MB
« Last Edit: October 17, 2012, 02:03:29 PM by MuffyBee » Logged


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« Reply #1 on: October 16, 2012, 08:28:39 AM »

http://transcripts.cnn.com/TRANSCRIPTS/1210/15/acd.01.html
ANDERSON COOPER 360 DEGREES

Tax Cut Math; Prepping for A Showdown; Clinton Takes Blame for Libya Attacks; Decoding Debate Body Language; Teen Activist's Fight for Life; Austrian Skydiver Breaks the Sound Barrier

Aired October 15, 2012 - 20:00   ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


ANDERSON COOPER, CNN ANCHOR: Erin, thanks. Good evening, everyone.
 ::snipping2::
Anderson is back next with a story of a Pakistani girl just 14 years old, shot in the head by the Taliban for defying its ban on education for girls. He'll have the latest on the fight to save her life. That's just ahead on 360.
 ::snipping2::
All right, another story coming up. A 14-year-old Pakistani girl shot in the head by the Taliban. This is just a horrific story. Good news is she has arrived in England for treatment. We're going to get an update on her condition from Dr. Sanjay Gupta.

Her name is Malala Yousufzai. She is brave beyond her years, she's incredibly heroic. Here's the advice she had last year for any girl who's afraid to stand up to the Taliban.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

MALALA YOUSUFZAI, 14-YEAR-OLD ACTIVIST: I tell her that don't stay in your room because God will ask you on the day -- on the day of judgment, where were you?

(END VIDEO CLIP)
 ::snipping2::COOPER: Malala Yousufzai, the 14-year-old Pakistani schoolgirl gunned down by the Taliban last week, was airlifted today to England for treatment and rehabilitation.

You may know Taliban gunmen stormed on to her school van, shot her in the head at point-blank range. Now for years, Malala has defied the Taliban's ban on girls attending school. She's dared to speak out publicly for every girl's right to an education.

Here's what she told CNN's Reza Sayah last year.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

REZA SAYAH, CNN INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENT: So why do you risk your life to raise your voice?

YOUSUFZAI: Because I thought that my people need me and I shall raise my voice because -- because if I don't raise my voice now, so when will I raise my voice?

SAYAH: Some people might say you're 14, you don't have any rights. You just have to listen to mom and dad.

YOUSUFZAI: No, I have rights. I have the right of education. I have the right to play. I have the right to sing. I have the right to talk. I have the right to go to market. I have the right to speak up.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

COOPER: Malala also wrote a blog for the BBC describing her fears and her hopes for the future. Well, the Taliban clearly sees this young girl's voice as a threat. They have vowed that if she survives her latest injuries, they will come after her again and they said they will kill her.

Today, Pakistan's Interior minister told CNN's Christiane Amanpour there's now a $1 million bounty on the Taliban spokesman who took credit for the attack.
Malala's shooting has ignited outrage across Pakistan and the entire world. Tens of thousands of protesters attended a rally yesterday in Karachi, which is Pakistan's largest city.

Malala's doctors say her condition is good but that her recovery could take months.

Reza joins me now along with our chief medical correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta.

Sanjay, you're a trauma neurosurgeon, you operate on gunshot victims regularly. What can you tell us about her injury based on the information that what we know publicly so far?

DR. SANJAY GUPTA, CNN CHIEF MEDICAL CORRESPONDENT: Well, you know, the doctors say they spent about three hours doing an operation after she was shot point-blank. We understand with a nine-millimeter weapon, is my understanding.

You know, it's a pretty significant injury, as you might guess. Fewer than 10 percent roughly of all patients who suffer this kind of injury even survive and of that, a smaller percentage with meaningful neurological recovery.

There was a good piece of news I read yesterday, though, I heard about, and that was that she was moving her hands and her feet, plural. Both hands, both feet. And that's really important, Anderson. I think we talked about this a little bit in the context of Congresswoman Giffords previously. But just that kind of movement on both sides means that if she was following a command, doing it in response to someone telling her to do that, that would be a very -- a much better sign but just moving them at all is a very good sign.

At this point, Anderson, just really quick, they usually leave -- give the patient a lot of sedation, sort of put the brain to rest a little bit, let it sort of recover on its own, even remove some of the bone around the brain to allow some swelling as they did with Congresswoman Giffords as well.

COOPER: And how long before they know kind of the extent of damage?

GUPTA: Well, you know, this is a little bit of a judgment call. I will say that her young age helps her, you know, a fair -- a considerable amount. You know, we talk about something known as plasticity of the brain, the idea that the brain can sort of rewire itself. It's true and in a younger person it's even better.

What doctors do at this point is they sort of lift the sedation up every now and then, and allow her to wake up and sort of see how she's doing. Even with a significant bullet wound to the brain, it really more depends on those clinical exams, you know, in the days and weeks to follow -- Anderson.

COOPER: Reza, you met with her, you talked to her, you interviewed her. What was she like? I mean just her -- I've just been blown away by her courage over the years. And did she have any security? Because clearly there were a lot of people who wanted to do her harm.

SAYAH: She didn't have security. And the government here says they offered her security and her family turned it down. Your question, what was she like? I would best describe her as half child, half ferocious human rights activist. I mean just incredible courage, determination. We put to her some tough questions and she didn't back down to us. Just a remarkable child.

COOPER: And, Reza, I know Pakistani authorities, they've made some arrests but the suspected attacker still remains at large, right?

SAYAH: That's not clear. They say they've made some arrests. It's not clear if the suspected attacker was among those arrests. They've also named the alleged mastermind. A man by the name of Ataullah in northwest Pakistan. They say they're close to getting to the bottom of this.

But here's what we need to point out. In the past, this government has made lofty, grand claims like that before and it hasn't materialized. The 2007 assassination of Benazir Bhutto, they still haven't convicted anyone in that case. So you have to wonder how much of these claims by the government have any substance, how much of them are pushback to some of the criticism that they're anticipating.

COOPER: They say there's now a $1 million bounty. Is that just -- I mean is that for real, is this public relations thing? What is it, Reza?

SAYAH: Here's what's strange. There's a $100,000 reward for the attacker, a $1 million bounty for the Taliban spokesperson. Why is the bounty for the attacker less than the bounty for the spokesperson? I don't know, but it's another example why you have to take these claims by the government early on in this investigation with a grain of salt.

They are under a lot of pressure not just here in Pakistan but from the world to get to the bottom of this. So we have to wait and see if these claims have substance.

COOPER: Sanjay, this is probably a dumb question but -- I mean, if she was shot point-blank with a nine millimeter, how is she still alive? Was it a bad shot, you think? I mean how can that happen?


GUPTA: Well, you know, there are certain parts of the brain which are just going to be much more vulnerable and critical than other parts of the brain. You know, someone who, for example, has an injury on the right side of the brain typically that involves primarily the right frontal area, that's not as significant an injury and that's -- you know, obviously, you think about brain injuries overall and certainly penetrating brain injuries, they are all critically, you know, treated but it just -- you know, we saw the same thing with Congresswoman Giffords. People can survive these types of injuries if they get early treatment and they reduce the swelling around this quickly.

I will say that from what we heard, Anderson, it sounded like she was shot and the bullet ended up somewhere near the back of her neck so I don't know where the entry point was, but it took about three hours, again, for surgeons to try and remove the bullet and some of the bleeding around that. COOPER: And, Reza, the Taliban, and what's so just insidious, they have vowed if she survives they are going to come after her again and they are going to kill her, is -- I mean, I guess obviously she will have protection -- if she does survive, she will have protection from now on.

SAYAH: Yes, that's what the government says. The Taliban says not only are we going to come after her, we are going to come after the family. She along with her parents and her little brother are safe in England. She has other family members here. The Interior minister saying they have protection. The other two girls injured in the attack, the government says they have protection as well.

COOPER: We'll continue to follow it. Reza, appreciate your reporting. Sanjay, as well. Thanks.

GUPTA: Thank you.
 ::snipping2::


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« Reply #2 on: October 17, 2012, 01:59:19 PM »

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/world/uk/Pakistani-girl-stable-in-UK-hospital-as-support-floods-in/articleshow/16855226.cms
Pakistani girl stable in UK hospital as support floods in
October 17, 2012

LONDON: The 14-year-old Pakistani girl shot in the head by the Taliban was in a stable condition in a British hospital Tuesday as well-wishers from around the world left her messages of support.

Malala Yousafzai "remains stable", according to doctors monitoring her at the specialist Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham, central England, which treats British soldiers wounded in Afghanistan.

"She spent a second comfortable night at the hospital and continues to be cared for," the hospital said.

Malala was shot on a school bus in the former Taliban stronghold of the Swat valley last week as a punishment for campaigning for the right of girls to an education, in an attack which outraged the world.

She came to prominence with a blog for the BBC highlighting atrocities under the Taliban, the hardline Islamists who terrorised the Swat valley from 2007 until an army offensive in 2009.

The teenager had a bullet removed from her skull during an operation in Pakistan last week.

Donations towards her care, which is being funded by the Pakistani government, are being received by the Queen Elizabeth Hospital's charity while hundreds of people have left messages of support on the hospital's website.

The well-wishers are from countries including Pakistan, Britain, India, the United States, Canada, Brazil, Myanmar, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, New Zealand, Rwanda and the Netherlands.
 ::snipping2::
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« Reply #3 on: October 17, 2012, 02:01:53 PM »

http://www.cnn.com/2012/10/17/world/asia/pakistan-teen-attack/index.html
Girl shot with Malala: Memory of attack 'still in my head'
October 17, 2012

Swat Valley, Pakistan (CNN) -- After the Pakistani Taliban shot her along with Malala Yousufzai, Kainat Ahmad couldn't sleep for two days.
By now, millions around the world know how 14-year-old Malala and her classmates were attacked in their school van in the Swat Valley, a bastion of traditional Muslim practices in Pakistan.

Her attackers have vowed to kill Malala for demanding education for girls. Now she's fighting for her life at an English hospital, listed in stable condition Wednesday and unable to speak.
But lesser-known Kainat can, and she shared her story in an exclusive interview.

Speaking from her hospital room in Mingora, the 16-year-old described her startled reaction and lingering fears over the attack.
Kainat, who was shot in the upper right arm, displayed a thoughtful demeanor as she chatted with CNN journalists
She vocalized what her friend Malala long preached: Girls, go to school and study, an idea violently opposed by the Taliban.
More...

Video at Link
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« Reply #4 on: October 18, 2012, 04:07:07 PM »

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/10/19/world/asia/pakistani-police-detain-family-of-suspect-in-attack-on-malala-yousafzai.html?_r=0
Pakistani Police Detain Family of Suspect in Attack on Girl
October 18, 2012

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan — Pakistani security forces have detained relatives of a man accused of attacking Malala Yousafzai, the schoolgirl who became an icon of resistance against Taliban oppression and who is now being treated at a British hospital, neighbors of the man’s family said on Thursday.
The authorities in the Swat Valley, where the attack happened on Oct. 9, said they were still searching for the man who shot Ms. Yousafzai and wounded two other girls on a school bus. The suspect has been identified as a member of the Pakistani Taliban named Attaullah, and the authorities are seeking an accomplice as well.

One senior provincial official said Attaullah had been arrested before, on suspicion of militant activity in 2009 during a military operation in Swat, in northwestern Pakistan, but was freed because of a lack of evidence. “Then we got to know that he was back in Swat and was planning some mischief,” the official said.

At Attaullah’s family home in Sangota, a hillside hamlet four miles from Mingora, the valley’s main town, neighbors said the security forces had detained his brother-in-law, an uncle and a brother — a common tactic employed by the police to force a fugitive to surrender.

One relative said that one of the detainees, Attaullah’s brother Ehsanullah, 18, had been picked up over a month ago — suggesting that the Taliban fugitive was being sought long before Ms. Yousafzai was shot.
More...
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« Reply #5 on: October 18, 2012, 06:33:58 PM »

As I work with my students daily, I wonder if they realize how lucky they are to live in a country where education is available to all without regard to gender, religious affiliation, or financial status.  These girls are truly an inspiration.   
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« Reply #6 on: October 19, 2012, 11:23:02 AM »

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/world/2012/10/19/pakistani-girl-walking/1643441/
Doctors say shot Pakistani girl standing with help
October 19, 2012

LONDON (AP) — Doctors treating 15-year-old Pakistani shooting victim Malala Yousafzai said Friday that she is able to stand with help and to write, though she still shows signs of infection.

The girl is "well enough that she's agreed that she's happy, in fact keen, for us to share more clinical detail," said Dr. Dave Rosser, medical director at Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham.

"She is also keen that I thank people for their support and their interest because she is obviously aware of the amount of interest and support this has generated around the world."

The infection is probably related to the track of a bullet that grazed her head when she was attacked by Taliban gunmen, he said.

"She is not out of the woods yet," Rosser said.

"Having said that, she's doing very well. In fact, she was standing with some help for the first time this morning when I went in to see her.
More...
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« Reply #7 on: October 20, 2012, 01:29:54 PM »

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-33816_162-57536653/heros-reception-awaits-pakistani-teen-back-home/
"Hero's reception" awaits Pakistani teen back home
October 20, 2012

(CBS News) Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani 15-year-old shot by the Taliban for advocating education for females, has come out of her coma and was able to stand Friday, in her hospital room in England.

She was described as looking bright and alert.

Word of that set off celebrations in Pakistan.

The daughter of the late Pakistani leader Benazir Bhutto tweeted, "Miracles of today! Malala able to stand."

Malala's story "really has galvanized both that country and the world," says Gayle Lemmon, deputy director of the Women and Policy program of the Council on Foreign Relations and author of the best-seller on life under the Taliban, "The Dressmaker of Khair Khana."
 ::snipping2::
Lemmon told "CBS This Morning: Saturday" co-hosts she doesn't expect Malala to cower in the face of Taliban threats to kill her. "Look," Lemmon said, "if they threatened her and she didn't give up before they shot her, you can imagine that, after they shot her, she's not going to be quiet. She said in 2009 that 'they cannot stop me.' And I cannot imagine now, that the word has actually been forced to pay attention to the fight of these brave young girls, who have really been armed only with backpacks in their struggle to go to school, that shoe' going to back down now."

When Malala returns home, after a long recovery and rehabilitation in England, "I think she will be greeted with a hero's reception because, really, there are so many young women who have the same story," Lemmon said. "You know, they fight all the time -- with the support of their fathers, just as Mala did. And yet, almost no one pays attention to their struggle until something this extreme and this awful really forces the world to pay attention to these homegrown role models.
 ::snipping2::
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« Reply #8 on: October 21, 2012, 11:09:13 AM »

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-33816_162-57536653/heros-reception-awaits-pakistani-teen-back-home/
"Hero's reception" awaits Pakistani teen back home
October 20, 2012

(CBS News) Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani 15-year-old shot by the Taliban for advocating education for females, has come out of her coma and was able to stand Friday, in her hospital room in England.

She was described as looking bright and alert.

Word of that set off celebrations in Pakistan.

The daughter of the late Pakistani leader Benazir Bhutto tweeted, "Miracles of today! Malala able to stand."

Malala's story "really has galvanized both that country and the world," says Gayle Lemmon, deputy director of the Women and Policy program of the Council on Foreign Relations and author of the best-seller on life under the Taliban, "The Dressmaker of Khair Khana."
 ::snipping2::
Lemmon told "CBS This Morning: Saturday" co-hosts she doesn't expect Malala to cower in the face of Taliban threats to kill her. "Look," Lemmon said, "if they threatened her and she didn't give up before they shot her, you can imagine that, after they shot her, she's not going to be quiet. She said in 2009 that 'they cannot stop me.' And I cannot imagine now, that the word has actually been forced to pay attention to the fight of these brave young girls, who have really been armed only with backpacks in their struggle to go to school, that shoe' going to back down now."

When Malala returns home, after a long recovery and rehabilitation in England, "I think she will be greeted with a hero's reception because, really, there are so many young women who have the same story," Lemmon said. "You know, they fight all the time -- with the support of their fathers, just as Mala did. And yet, almost no one pays attention to their struggle until something this extreme and this awful really forces the world to pay attention to these homegrown role models.
 ::snipping2::

How sad that it took something this extreme to get the world's attention.  It is amazing this child is not dead.  And sadly, there are many other places in the world where the same type of treatment is common for girls and women.   
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« Reply #9 on: October 25, 2012, 10:43:31 PM »

http://www.cnn.com/2012/10/25/world/europe/uk-pakistan-teen-activist/index.html
Malala's parents arrive in Britain
October 25, 2012

London (CNN) -- The parents of Pakistani teen activist Malala Yousafzai arrived Thursday in Britain to reunite with their daughter, who has become an international symbol of courage after being shot by the Taliban for demanding education for girls.
The 15-year-old, who at times has been unconscious, is being treated in a Birmingham hospital for a gunshot wound to the head.
Her father, Ziauddin Yousafzai, has been a central influence for Malala. He ran a school in Pakistan's conservative Swat Valley that kept its doors open to girls -- in defiance of the Taliban.
Her parents' arrival on Thursday came 10 days after Malala was flown to Britain.
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« Reply #10 on: October 25, 2012, 10:45:16 PM »

 

http://www.thenews.com.pk/Todays-News-2-139635-Minister-tried-to-block-Malala-family-from-leaving-Pakistan
Minister tried to ‘block’ Malala family from leaving Pakistan
October 26, 2012

LONDON: As Malala Yousafzai continues to make dramatic recovery in Queen Elizabeth Hospital, some political players in Pakistan have been desperately trying to draw mileage out of this national tragedy to advance their own publicity.
 
The News has learnt from highly credible sources that attempts were made by a powerful cabinet minister to prevent her father Ziauddin Yousafzai and other family members from coming to the UK. It was said widely by the minister in high profile meetings, according to a senior Foreign Office official who spoke to The News on condition of anonymity, that Malala’s family will seek asylum in Britain if allowed to leave Pakistan.
 
These meetings, spread over several days, were attended by senior military officers, interior and exterior ministry officials and diplomats from the foreign office.
 
The minister told the officials that Malala’s father should be kept in Pakistan “until Malala gets better and then she will be shifted to another country where her family will not be able to claim asylum”. The minister was of the opinion that Pakistan’s enemies might use the family to malign the country.
 
The minister proposed that he should take the lead in this matter and volunteered himself visit the hospital on behalf of the family. He told the officials that he will take Foreign Secretary William Hague with him to the hospital to visit her and interact with the media.

 ::snipping2::
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« Reply #11 on: November 04, 2012, 11:43:06 AM »

http://www.foxnews.com/world/2012/11/04/malala-recovery-very-satisfactory-following-shooting-pakistani-diplomat-says/
Malala recovery 'very satisfactory' following shooting, Pakistani diplomat says
November 4, 2012

DUBAI, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES –  A Pakistani ambassador says the 15-year-old girl activist shot in the head by a Taliban gunman last month is making a steady recovery and is starting to walk, talk and read.

Jamil Ahmed Khan, Pakistan's ambassador to the United Arab Emirates, made the comments Sunday after speaking with British officials and the father of Malala Yousufzai, who is being treated at Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham, England.
 ::snipping2::
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« Reply #12 on: November 10, 2012, 07:08:39 PM »

http://www.dailytimes.com.pk/default.asp?page=2012%5C11%5C11%5Cstory_11-11-2012_pg13_1
Malala Day meets with befitting expression of love
November 11, 2012

LAHORE: “Malala! We are with you... We love you... We salute you... Nation is proud of you... We are Malala... We support you to accomplish your mission... Long live Malala!”

“Malala is not simply a 14-year-old girl. She is a thought, which has stirred the whole society... She is a symbol of enlightenment... the beacon of hope... for us and our future generations... for peaceful life and equal rights for girls to education.”

Echoes of these words were heard everywhere in the city on Saturday while the residents marked the Malala Day, declared by the United Nations in the honour of young rights activist, Malala Yousufzai, who was shot in the head by the Taliban last month for campaigning for girls’ education.

Human rights organizations and educational institutions organized special ceremonies and rallies to pay tribute to the courageous young girl from Sawat, who braved the guns and savagery of religious fanatics and declared: “Even if they kill me, I will first say to them: what you are doing is wrong.”

 ::snipping2::
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« Reply #13 on: December 26, 2012, 08:11:23 PM »

http://www.cnn.com/2012/12/08/world/pakistan-zardari-malala-yousafzai/index.html
Pakistani president visits Malala in British hospital
December 8, 2012

(CNN) -- Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari on Saturday visited Malala Yousufzai -- a 15-year-old schoolgirl and girls' education advocate who was targeted by Taliban militants in Pakistan's restive Swat Valley.
Yousufzai is currently being treated in the United Kingdom at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham, after she was shot in the head by gunmen in October in retaliation for her advocacy.
Zardari went "to see for himself the health condition ... and also to pay tributes to her for her courage and steadfastness," his office said in a written statement.
 ::snipping2::
On her blog, the schoolmaster's daughter wrote about her life in the region, a center of militant activity where girls' schools were shuttered and strict Islamist rules imposed.
In her writings, which earned her Pakistan's first National Peace Prize, Malala encouraged young people to resist the Taliban, and was later featured in two documentaries.
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« Reply #14 on: December 26, 2012, 08:12:58 PM »

http://ibnlive.in.com/news/malala-yousufzai-asks-pakistan-not-to-rename-college-in-her-honour/311643-56.html
Malala Yousufzai asks Pakistan not to rename college in her honour
December 21, 2012

Mingora: An official says Malala Yousufzai, who was shot by the Taliban for promoting girls' education, has urged Pakistan to reverse a decision to rename a college in her honour to avert militant attacks on students.
The 15-year-old who became a symbol of youth resistance to the Taliban made the request after students broke into the school, tore down Malala's pictures and boycotted classes in her home town of Mingora. They say renaming the college endangers their lives.
 ::snipping2::
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« Reply #15 on: December 27, 2012, 02:55:56 PM »

As I work with my students daily, I wonder if they realize how lucky they are to live in a country where education is available to all without regard to gender, religious affiliation, or financial status.  These girls are truly an inspiration.   

Yes they are, I hope she recovers soon 
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« Reply #16 on: January 04, 2013, 07:00:27 PM »

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/05/world/asia/malala-yousafzai-shot-by-pakistani-taliban-is-discharged-from-hospital.html
Pakistani Girl Shot by Taliban Is Discharged From British Hospital
January 4, 2012

LONDON — Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani schoolgirl shot in the head three months ago by the Taliban for advocating the education of girls, has been discharged from a British hospital. Doctors said she had made “excellent progress” and would be staying with her family nearby before returning for further surgery to rebuild her skull in about four weeks.
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  " Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not his own facts."  - Daniel Moynihan
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« Reply #17 on: February 03, 2013, 09:42:09 AM »

http://www.foxnews.com/world/2013/02/03/uk-hospital-pakistani-girl-shot-by-taliban-in-stable-condition-after-2/
UK hospital: Pakistani girl shot by Taliban in stable condition after 2 successful surgeries
February 3, 2013

LONDON –  The British hospital treating a Pakistani girl shot in the head by the Taliban says she has undergone two successful operations and is making good progress in her recovery.

Birmingham's Queen Elizabeth Hospital says that 15-year-old Malala Yousufzai had skull reconstruction and a cochlear implant surgery to restore her hearing on Saturday. The two operations lasted a total of five hours, and doctors are said to be "very pleased" with her progress.
 ::snipping2::
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  " Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not his own facts."  - Daniel Moynihan
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« Reply #18 on: February 08, 2013, 11:20:18 AM »

http://abcnews.go.com/International/wireStory/girl-shot-taliban-discharged-uk-hospital-18439324
Girl Shot by Taliban Discharged From UK Hospital
February 8, 2013

Malala Yousafzai, the teenage Pakistani education activist shot in the head by the Taliban, was discharged from a British hospital Friday after undergoing skull reconstruction and receiving a cochlear implant to restore her hearing.

The 15-year-old had been released for a few weeks in January but re-entered Birmingham's Queen Elizabeth Hospital to undergo the latest procedures last weekend. The hospital said Malala is "making good recovery" and will now continue her rehabilitation at her family's temporary home in Birmingham.
 ::snipping2::
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  " Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not his own facts."  - Daniel Moynihan
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« Reply #19 on: March 28, 2013, 01:18:12 PM »

http://www.latimes.com/features/books/jacketcopy/la-et-jc-teenage-girl-shot-by-taliban-to-publish-i-am-malala-20130328,0,2742714.story
Teenage girl shot by Taliban to publish 'I Am Malala'
March 28, 2013

Malala Yousafzai, the girl who was shot in the head by Taliban gunmen while riding the bus to school in Pakistan, will publish a book in the fall. "I Am Malala" will be published in English in the U.S. in October by Little, Brown and also in England, where Yousafzai has been hospitalized.

On Oct. 9, 2012, Malala was shot in the head while riding on her school bus in Pakistan's Swat Valley, as vengeance for her bold and public stand on education, which contravened the Taliban's policies. The bullet passed through her head, but she survived, undergoing skull reconstruction surgery in England last month. Since then, Malala has become a symbol of courage and peaceful protest. Earlier this month, she returned to school -- this time, in Birmingham, England.

In a release about the book, Malala said: "I hope the book will reach people around the world, so they realize how difficult it is for some children to get access to education. I want to tell my story, but it will also be the story of 61 million children who can't get education. I want it to be part of the campaign to give every boy and girl the right to go to school. It is their basic right."

The memoir will recount in detail what occurred when Malala was shot, as well as her determination, supported by her family, to resist and remain firm in the face of extremism.  ::snipping2::
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  " Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not his own facts."  - Daniel Moynihan
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