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Author Topic: Secession bids...poor governance and the failed state...  (Read 275 times)
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WhiskeyGirl
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« on: January 20, 2013, 09:34:55 PM »

"Secession bids in Africa are a result of poor governance"

Quote
International law

In terms of international law, a major invocation of "group rights" appears in articles 1 and 2 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and the International Covenant on Economic and Social and Cultural Rights. Article 1 of each covenant declares that all peoples have the right to self-determination. Article 21 of the African Charter on Human and Peoplesí Rights backs that view.

Perhaps the calls for secession should be addressed to some international legal body?

Quote
Civil conflict is often driven by a concentration of power in the centre and the insatiable desire by the leadership to control and determine the lives of its citizens. As a result, failed or failing states emerge. Their major features are collapsed state institutions such as the army, the police and the civil service, and a breakdown of law and order. A collapsed state can no longer perform its basic security and development functions and has no control over its territory and borders.

Symptoms in the US?  No border security?  Invasion by illegal aliens and terrorists?  No control over vast tracts of land and borders?  Breakdown of law and order?

Quote
...Stability in a nation state can only be sustained if it is inclusive and has a solid foundation of respect for fundamental rights that encompass a willingness to coexist with differences, respect for the rule of law, political tolerance and protection of all citizens regardless of ethnicity and geographical region.

Perhaps the US needs to be de-colonialized?  Rid itself of lingering colonial fascism?  Racism? 

Return to the Constitution?  Rule of law?  Political tolerance?  No more race based enforcement of the laws?  Racial or ethnic preferences?

Take the colonial attitude out of Washington and return to states rights? 

If small groups in Africa can secede, why not states?  Counties within states?  Large urban cities?

an interesting read.  more here - http://www.bdlive.co.za/indepth/AfricanPerspectives/2013/01/16/secession-bids-in-africa-are-a-result-of-poor-governance

just my humble opinions
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WhiskeyGirl
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« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2013, 09:39:59 PM »

Colonialist leftovers?  What comes to mind?

Central bank?  Federal Reserve?  Do they serve Main St.?  Or, are they servants and enablers of big banks, global banking, other central banks, and big global companies?

When does Main St. earn a fair shot at prosperity?
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It doesn't do any good to hate anyone,
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WhiskeyGirl
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« Reply #2 on: January 21, 2013, 09:21:25 AM »

What about that living, evolving constitution favored by liberals?  Progressives?  Anyone have some experience with that concept?  What about Sudan?

"Constitution .. Peoples' Vehicle for Stability"

Quote
Since 1956; the constitution remained the biggest incomplete step in the road for stability in the country. Every government would write a constitution and the one following it would annul it and write a new one, and so forth. Sudanese politics has since been controlled by temporary constitutional decrees for which military governments were renowned.

After two years of democratic rule, a military coup brought a military government to power headed by Ibrahim Abood in 1958 and lasted 6 years. An interim government was put in place followed by a second democratic government from 1965 to 1969. Another coup brought another military government under whose rule the country had undergone a new constitutional phase for 16 years. On April 6, 1985 the people revolted against the rule of Nimeiri and a interim government, again, had been put in place for a year. In 1986 a democratic government was elected until it was ended by a military coup in 1989 under which the country underwent what was known as "revolutionary legitimacy", followed by constitutional decree phase. This phase was followed by what was known as "constitutional legitimacy" which produced the constitution of 1998, famously known as the Political succession constitution.
  Emphasis added. 

How stable has the always evolving constitution been for Sudan?  No one knows when it changes, what the changes will be?  How's that poverty rate?  How do you nail jello to a tree?

What do we have in the US?  Increasing poverty?  Every changing rules?  Increasing poverty, nepotism, despotism, cronyism, favoritism, fraud, waste...?

The farther the nation strays from the founders Constitution, the worse life seems to get for those at the bottom.  The rich seem to get richer and more powerful the farther the nation strays.  Progress for whom?

Quote
The Sudanese state is in need of a constitution to end the 57 year-long constitution crisis given how importantly the state regards the constitution and the respect it holds for it.

read more here - http://news.sudanvisiondaily.com/details.html?rsnpid=217817

Why not keep the government out of families, pocketbooks, business, and return it to it's small place in our daily lives?

The evolving/changing/upheaval temporary constitution?  Leading to a brighter future for America?  I don't think so.

just my humble opinions
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All my posts are just my humble opinions.  Please take with a grain of salt.  Smile

It doesn't do any good to hate anyone,
they'll end up in your family anyway...
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