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grace-land
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« Reply #60 on: March 04, 2013, 03:00:45 PM »

Two cardinals share their experiences during the 2005 conclave which elected Pope Benedict XVI.

http://www.catholicsun.org/2013/03/04/prayer-and-trembling-cardinals-recount-experience-of-conclave/

Prayer and trembling: Cardinals recount experience of conclave
Catholic News Service | March 4, 2013

VATICAN CITY (CNS) — Chanting the Litany of the Saints, asking a host of holy men and women to help them, the cardinals enter the Sistine Chapel in procession, aware of their enormous responsibility to elect a new pope.
 
Less than half of the 117 cardinals eligible to vote for a successor to Pope Benedict XVI were in the 2005 conclave that elected him.
 
Two of those that were — Honduran Cardinal Oscar Rodriguez Maradiaga of Tegucigalpa and South African Cardinal Wilfrid Napier — described the scene as being one of deep prayer and some trembling.
 
Cardinal Rodriguez Maradiaga told Catholic News Service that, during the conclave, the cardinals spend most of their time in the Sistine Chapel, even though they cast ballots only four times a day.
 
The time in the chapel includes prayer, writing names on ballots and counting them. But when casting each vote, each cardinal must stand and publicly swear, in Latin, that he is voting according to his conscience. With 115 cardinal-electors expected, that will take time.
 
“In front of the crucifix and in front of the ‘Final Judgment’ painting, we say, ‘I call Jesus as a witness, and he will judge me that I have elected according to my conscience,’ so you can imagine … why it takes so long. And in the meantime, when everybody is casting their votes, we are praying, so it is like a big cenacle of prayer.”
 
“This is beautiful,” Cardinal Rodriguez Maradiaga said. “This is the most loving experience, how an election should be. I wish all the elections in the world could be like that: in an atmosphere of prayer.”
 
Cardinal Napier told CNS that even the way the cardinals are dressed — in choir dress like they dress for liturgies — contributes to the atmosphere of prayer.
 
Although he has the experience of the 2005 conclave, he said, “It’s probably going to be just as frightening, just as (much) anxiety” this time, especially because “I’d say there’s a wider field of choices, there are younger cardinals who I believe have real qualities of leadership. At the same time perhaps we don’t know each other that well, but we have to put a lot of faith in the presence and activity in the Holy Spirit.”
 
Cardinal Napier said that when the cardinals arrive in the chapel, they make a formal vow of secrecy, then each cardinal goes up and puts a hand on the Bible, confirming his oath.
 
Once each cardinal sits down, he said, he thinks “this is it,” and sees on his table the list of names of the cardinals, the ballot paper, the instructions and a small biography of each cardinal.
 
“Then you know you really are about to get down to business very soon,” he said. There is “a sense of excitement, a sense of anxiety,” wondering “how is it all going to work out?”
 
“But probably the most solemn, the most difficult, frightening (moment) is when you go with your ballot paper in your hand and hold it up in front of the altar and say, ‘I call on the Lord Jesus, who will be my judge, to witness that I am voting for the one I believe to be worthy.’
 
“That’s really a moment of intense emotion, faith, all these emotions come together at that point. If I’m voting for unworthy reasons I’m actually asking Jesus to judge me, to condemn me, so it’s a very, very solemn moment,” Cardinal Napier said.
 
After each cardinal casts his ballot, the papers are opened and read out, one by one, he said. Since each cardinal has a complete list of cardinals, “you’re ticking off as the votes are being cast for one person or another and then totting it up at the end.”
 
If no candidate has reached the two-thirds required for a valid election, the ballots and all the lists with their counts “are all gathered and taken to the back of the chapel to be burned. The smoke goes up black (for no pope). It’s very touching,” the South African cardinal said.
 ::snipping2::



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grace-land
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« Reply #61 on: March 05, 2013, 01:16:10 PM »

Daily press briefing by Fr. Federico Lombardi

http://en.radiovaticana.va/news/2013/03/05/general_congregations:_no_rush_to_fix_date_for_conclave/en1-670549

2013-03-05 15:41:14
General congregations: No rush to fix date for Conclave

Vatican Radio) As of Tuesday morning 110 cardinal electors are present in Rome . Five cardinal electors arrived late Monday evening taking their oath of secrecy during the second general congregation, two more on Tuesday morning. They are Spanish cardinal Rouco Varela and Polish cardinal Grocholewski, meaning five cardinal electors have yet to arrive before a date for conclave can be set. The cardinals yet to arrive are Naguib, Pham, Nycz, Lehmann and Tong. Emer McCarthy reports Listen: 

In the daily press briefing, Fr. Federico Lombardi also told journlists that the cardinals are in "no rush" to fix a date for Conclave and that tomorrow Wednesday at 5pm Rome time, the Universal Church is called to prayer for the cardinal electors as they approach this monumental task.

Fr. Lombardi noted there were 11 interventions Tuesday morning, by various cardinals both heads of the Roman Curia and its dicasteries and local bishops representing all 5 continents, expressing the universality of the Church. The cardinals, he said ‘sign up’ to make an intervention. 33 cardinals have thus fare made interventions.

These interventions focused on Holy See activities, different dicasteries and their relations with local bishops around the world, the renewal of the Church in light of Vatican II, the New Evangelization, the Church and new cultures.

Fr. Lombardi noted that another issues under discussion Tuesday morning was the Constitution governing the Vacant See and papal transition and how it was modified by the Motu Proprio. Fr. Lombardi said note no. 37 was discussed and the issue of bringing forward the date of the start of Conclave remains ‘open’, no proposal has been made.

Fr. Lombardi, one of the few people present during the Congregations, but not directly involved, added that he sensed that the Cardinals want to “understand how long is needed to properly prepare for such an important event without hurrying things in anyway”.

He added that the fact that the Cardinals have opted not to hold afternoon sessions Tuesday and Wednesday in the general congregations is “significant” of the cardinals intention to take their time.

The general congregation also approved a moment of Universal prayer established for Wednesday afternoon at 5pm at the Altar of the Chair in St. Peter’s basilica. The liturgy will include Vespers and the adoration of the Blessed Sacrament. It will be presided by the Cardinal Dean, Angelo Sodano.

Moreover, Tuesday afternoon the Sistine Chapel closes to visitors as the Vatican workers begin to prepare it for Conclave.
The College of Cardinals also approved the final text of a message sent on behalf of the cardinals to Pope emeritus, Benedict XVI. In conclusion, the text of a telegram for Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI, which was signed by Cardinal Dean Sodano, was approved. It reads: “To His Holiness, Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI, Castel Gandolfo.”

“The Cardinal Fathers, gathered at the Vatican for the General Congregations in view of the next conclave, send you their devoted greetings and express their renewed gratitude for all your illustrious Petrine ministry and for your example of generous pastoral care for the good of the Church and of the world. With their gratitude they hope to represent the recognition of the entire Church for your tireless work in the vineyard of the Lord. In conclusion, the members of the College of Cardinals trust in your prayers for them, as well as for the whole Church.”

 ::snipping2::

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MuffyBee
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« Reply #62 on: March 06, 2013, 08:51:50 AM »

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/world/2013/03/06/pope-conclave-cardinals-vatican/1966591/
Talkative U.S. cardinals shut down the 'American show'
March 6, 2013


 ::snipping2::
The day after stories in world media that the U.S. leaders daily press conference, mobbed with reporters, were exerting influence in the advisory meetings now underway, the Wednesday conference was cancelled.

Tuesday, the Associated Press had described the scene with more than 100 journalists from the US, Britain and European countries "packing an auditorium for what has become the daily 'American Show' at the North American College, the U.S. seminary just up the hill from the Vatican."

Sister Mary Ann Walsh, spokeswoman for the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, said in a statement, "Concern was expressed" in the daily meetings of the College of Cardinals "about leaks of confidential proceedings reported in Italian newspapers. As a precaution, the cardinals have agreed not to do interviews."

Lombardi said the Vatican did not intervene to shut down the show but that cardinals make that decision talking among themselves.

No date has been set for the conclave, where 115 cardinal electors will be cut off from any communication with the outside world.

At the morning Vatican press conference, spokesman Rev. Frederico Lombardi said there's no hidden meaning in the delay. They are waiting for two more electors -- cardinals under the age of 80 -- to reach Rome and they are in a "journey" of prayer and discernment, he said.

Meanwhile, representatives from the Survivors Network of Those Abused by Priests (SNAP) called a press conference in Rome to announce a "dirty dozen" names of cardinals whose record on dealing with the abuse crisis disqualifies them for voting for the pope or being elected to the papacy. The list includes many of the names on top of media and betting site short lists for the next pope.
 ::snipping2::
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« Reply #63 on: March 06, 2013, 09:33:57 PM »

Daily press briefing by Fr. Federico Lombardi, Wednesday, March 6, 2013

http://en.radiovaticana.va/news/2013/03/06/general_congregations:_profile_of_future_pope_emerging_from_sessions/en1-670821

2013-03-06 13:29:02     
General congregations: Profile of future Pope emerging from sessions

Vatican Radio) The fourth general congregation got underway Wednesday morning at 09:30 with 153 Cardinals present. Four more cardinals arrived in Rome overnight, three of them cardinal electors, cardinal Lehman from Germany, the Egyptian cardinal Naguib, and from Hong Kong cardinal Tong Hon. This brings the number of cardinal electors present in Rome to 113, with two cardinals still to arrive, cardinal Nycz from Warsaw (due to arrive Wednesday afternoon) and Vietnamese cardinal Pham (due to arrive Thursday). Emer McCarthy reports Listen: 

In the daily press briefing Vatican spokesman Fr. Federico Lombardi, who attends the Congregation sessions, revealed that birthday greetings were also exchanged for cardinals Kasper on his 80th birthday Tuesday and Coccopalmiero who is 75 Wednesday .

On Wednesday there were 18 interventions from different cardinals representing the Church in different parts of the world, for a total of 51 thus far. Due to the large number of people wishing to speak a time frame of 5 minutes was established for each intervention.

The order of interventions, noted Fr. Lombardi, is not selected according to geographical origins or precedence. The main themes discussed were: the Church in the world, needs of New Evangelization, the Holy See, the different dicasteries of the Roman Curia; relations with local churches and bishops, what’s beginning to emerge, the Vatican spokesman noted "is the profile for the future Pope".

Fr. Lombardi noted the variety of the interventions, from organizational questions pertaining to the Holy See to local issues of pastoral action. He also added that the cardinals have decided to meet both morning and afternoon, holding two congregation sessions and with a smile, he reiterated that no date has yet been set for Conclave.

Journalists were also shown a screening of the area of the Apostolic Palace where Conclave takes place. Images where projected from the Pauline Chapel where the procession of cardinals into Conclave begins from through the ‘Sala Reggia’, which is crossed by the processing cardinals and then of the Sistine Chapel which is undergoing a radical overhaul in preparation for the voting. This includes the building of an artificial platform over the ancient pavement to protect the antique marble and mosaic.
 ::snipping2::
In conclusion, responding to a question regarding the cancellation of a daily press briefing by US cardinals, Fr. Lombardi stated: “The cardinals journey toward conclave is not a convention or synod. It is a journey, that is above all a time of reflection for the College of Cardinals. The College has decided to maintain reserve over proceedings. But we are try to give as much information as possible”.
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« Reply #64 on: March 07, 2013, 02:30:39 AM »

http://ncronline.org/blogs/ncr-today/comic-sans-brings-attention-pope-e-book

Comic Sans brings attention to pope e-book
Mar. 6, 2013

The Vatican released a 62-page e-book in honor of Pope Benedict XVI. Each page contains a photo of the pope emeritus -- mainly at various points in his papacy -- as well as reflective and insightful words from his past messages. For example: "The Gospel is not an exclusive possession of whoever has received it but a gift to share, good news to communicate."
 
You can find it here.
 
(No word yet on why Comic Sans was chosen as the font. Although reviled by designers for its light-hearted appearance and purpose, some say Comic Sans has an approachable tone and is an easy font for some to read. In any case, by using the font, the book perhaps is getting more attention than it would had it been written in, say, Times New Roman.  ::snipping2::
--------------------
Link to e-book:  http://www.vatican.va/bxvi/omaggio/index_en.html


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grace-land
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« Reply #65 on: March 07, 2013, 04:44:20 PM »

http://www.catholicregister.org/news/international/item/15951-ring-of-retired-pope-benedict-no-longer-can-be-used-as-seal

Ring of retired Pope Benedict no longer can be used as seal
Thursday, 07 March 2013 12:27

 ::snipping2::
According to the rules governing the interregnum and election of a pope, the College of Cardinals must "arrange for the destruction of the fisherman's ring and of the lead seal with which apostolic letters are dispatched."
 
On March 6, Jesuit Father Federico Lombardi, Vatican spokesman, told reporters that this "destruction" had been completed, although he explained that the ring is not smashed or destroyed completely; rather, two deep cuts are made in its face so that it can no longer be used as a seal.
 
Retired Pope Benedict received the ring at his inauguration Mass along with his pallium, the woolen stole symbolizing a bishop's authority. Both were based on ancient designs.
 
The gold ring, similar to the old rings that popes used also as seals, was designed by the Rome Association of Goldsmiths. It had Pope Benedict's name etched on it and a scene of St. Peter casting out his net, symbolizing how popes are successors of the apostle Peter.
 ::snipping2::

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grace-land
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« Reply #66 on: March 07, 2013, 04:54:42 PM »

Daily press briefing by Fr. Federico Lombardi, Thursday, March 7, 2013

http://en.radiovaticana.va/news/2013/03/07/general_congregations:_with_all_electors_present_still_no_date_fo/en1-671221

2013-03-07 15:49:08
General congregations: With all electors present still no date for Conclave

(Vatican Radio) The very first issue on Fr. Federico Lombardi's agenda Thursday during his daily briefing with international press was to reiterate once again that no date has yet been set for Conclave. He noted that news reports of St Peter's Basilica having been booked Monday afternoon next at 5pm, for a Mass for the election of the Roman Pontiff are unfounded. Fr. Lomabrdi pointed out to press that the Missa pro eligendo pontifice can be celebrated by any priest during the interregnum, or Vacant See, as part of the Universal Church's call to prayer during this period.Emer McCarthy reports Listen: 

152 Cardinals were present for the 5th general congregation that began at 9:30 with prayer. There were two new arrivals overnight: Cardinal Nycz from Warsaw, Poland, who is an elector; and Italian Cardinal Coppa, who is not. The Vietnamese Cardinal Pham of Hồ Chí Minh City is due to arrive in time for Thursday afternoon’s session. His arrival will bring the number of Cardinal Electors present in Rome to the total 115 men who can vote in Conclave for the Pope.

On Thursday morning, the particular congregation, or executive that aids the camerlegno, Cardinal Bertone, and is chosen by lot every three days, was renewed: The names extracted were Cardinal Rai for the order of bishops, Cardinal Monsengwo for the order of priests and Cardinal De Paolis for the order of deacons.

Also Thursday morning the Cardinal-Dean, Angelo Sodano, read the text of a telegram that the College of Cardinals will send to Venezuela marking death of President Chavez.

There were 16 interventions, the first three by Cardinals in charge of the economic affairs of the Holy See; Cardinal Versaldi who is in charge of economic affairs, Cardinal Calcagno in charge of APSA (administration of the Holy See’s patrimony) and Cardinal Bertello from the Governatorate of Vatican City State. Paragraph 171 of the Apostolic Constitution on the Roman Curia Pastor Bonus demands the College of Cardinals receive a report on the patrimonial and economic status of the Holy See during the Vacant See.

The remaining 13 interventions were wide ranging: touching on topics from the Church’s commitment to evangelization, relations with local bishops, ecumenical dialogue and the Church’s charitable commitment to the poor. Further discussion concerned the talents, qualities and characteristics required of the next Pope.
 ::snipping2::
The sixth general congregation will continue Thursday evening from 5 to 7 pm.
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« Reply #67 on: March 08, 2013, 11:08:11 AM »

http://www.cnn.com/2013/03/08/world/europe/vatican-pope-selection/?hpt=hp_t3

Cardinals to vote on date for election of new pope
updated 9:39 AM EST, Fri March 8, 2013

Rome (CNN) -- The Catholic cardinals gathered in Rome will vote later Friday on the date for the secret election, or conclave, to elect a new pope, a Vatican spokesman said.
 
The conclave is not expected to begin before Monday but could start some time next week, said the Rev. Federico Lombardi.
 
There will be 115 cardinal-electors taking part in the conclave, the Vatican confirmed. Only those younger than 80 are eligible to vote.
 ::snipping2::

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« Reply #68 on: March 08, 2013, 11:22:27 AM »

Daily press briefing by Fr. Federico Lombardi, Friday, March 8, 2013

http://en.radiovaticana.va/news/2013/03/08/general_congregations:_cardinals_to_vote_on_conclave_friday_pm/en1-671477

2013-03-08 15:06:34     
General congregations: Cardinals to vote on Conclave Friday PM

Vatican Radio) The College of Cardinals could vote this evening to establish a date for the beginning of the Conclave. That was the news from Vatican Press Office Director, Fr. Federico Lombardi, SJ, on Friday as he briefed journalists on the proceedings of the VIII General Congregation of the College this morning. He also explained that the earliest the Conclave could reasonably be expected to begin would be the start of the coming work week. One hundred fifty-three Cardinals were present for the Friday morning session, including all one hundred fifteen Cardinal Electors who will be participating in the Conclave. Listen to our report: 

The first order of business in the Friday morning session was to give official acceptance to the reasons offered by the two Cardinals with a right to participate in the Conclave, who have declined to present themselves. They are: Archbishop emeritus of Jakarta, Indonesia, Card. Julius Riyadi Darmaatmadja, SJ, who is too ill to attend; Card. Keith O’Brien, emeritus of St. Andrew’s and Edinburgh, who cited well-known personal reasons for his decision. Eighteen were the official interventions of the participants, on a broad range of topics: Fr. Lombardi, SJ’s English-language consultant, Fr. Thomas Rosica, CSB, elaborated. “Among the themes that were addressed [Friday] morning – and this by no means is breaking the secret of what takes place, but is to help [illustrate] the scope of the discussions - [were]: inter-religious dialogue, bioethics, justice in the world, a positive proclamation of love and mercy, especially remembering [Bl. John Paul II] in his teaching on mercy, and collegiality,” he explained.

Fr. Lombardi also had a special greeting for the women journalists participating in the briefing, on occasion of International Women’s Day, celebrated in many countries around the world on March 8th.   ::snipping2::
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« Reply #69 on: March 08, 2013, 12:00:17 PM »

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/03/08/papal-conclave-new-pope-vatican_n_2806379.html

Papal Conclave Date To Elect New Pope Will Be Tuesday, March 12 Says Vatican
Posted: 03/08/2013 11:41 am EST

The Vatican announced Friday that the Catholic church's College of Cardinals will begin the start closed-door papal conclave meetings to elect the new pope on Tuesday, March 12.

All cardinals under 80 years old are eligible to vote for the successor to Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI, who retired on February 28. That leaves 115 cardinals who will vote at the Sistine Chapel up to four times a day until a supermajority (two-thirds plus one additional vote) agree on who the new leader of the Roman Catholic Church should be.
 ::snipping2::

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« Reply #70 on: March 08, 2013, 12:06:21 PM »

http://en.radiovaticana.va/news/2013/03/08/conclave_to_begin_tuesday_march_12th_/en1-671593

2013-03-08 17:39:59     
Conclave to begin Tuesday March 12th

(Vatican Radio) The eighth General Congregation of the College of Cardinals has decided that the Conclave will begin on Tuesday, 12 March 2013

A “pro eligendo Romano Pontifice” Mass will be celebrated in St. Peter’s Basilica in the morning. In the afternoon the cardinals will enter into the Conclave.

More to follow...
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« Reply #71 on: March 08, 2013, 12:56:31 PM »

http://en.radiovaticana.va/news/2013/03/08/conclave_to_begin_tuesday_march_12th_/en1-671593

2013-03-08 17:39:59     
Conclave to begin Tuesday March 12th

 ::snipping2::
Tuesday afternoon the 115 Cardinal Electors will gather in the Pauline Chapel for a moment of collection and prayer and from there they will process in order of precedence through the Sala Regia to the Sistine Chapel invoking the Holy Spirit.

There they will take their seats, again observing the order of precedence, to elect the 265th Successor to St Peter. Once they have taken their seats they will hear the second meditation established by the Apostolic Constitution governing the papal transitions. It will be given by the Maltese Augustinian, Cardinal Prospero Grech.

Following the mediation, the 115 cardinals will swear an oath to observe the rules of Conclave which include to maintain fidelity to the election of the Pope, to maintain secrecy, never to support or favor interference. The Cardinal Dean Angelo Sodano, reads aloud the formula of the oath, the Cardinal electors respond: I do so promise, pledge and swear.

After all the Cardinals have taken the oath, the Master of the Papal Ceremonies, Msgr. Guido Marini orders all individuals other than the Cardinal Electors and conclave participants to leave the Sistine Chapel. He stands at the great wooden doors and pronounces the phrase: "Extra omnes!" He then closes the door.

According to the Apostolic Constitution, on the afternoon of the first day, one ballot may be held. If a ballot takes place on the afternoon of the first day and no-one is elected, four ballots are held on each successive day, two in the morning and two in the afternoon. If no result is obtained after three vote days of balloting, the process is suspended for a maximum of one day for prayer, meditation and reflection. A two thirds majority is required for the election of a Pope.

Of the 115 Cardinal Electors, more than half are European with the largest single nationality represented by the 28 Italian Cardinal Electors. In a geographical breakdown: 60 come from Europe, 19 from Latin America, 14 from North America, 11 from Africa, 10 from Asia and 1 from Oceania.

The average age of the Cardinal Electors is 71 while 67 of the Cardinals who will enter in the Conclave Tuesday were appointed by Pope emeritus, Benedict XVI.

There were eight Conclaves in the 20th century, only three of which lasted longer than three days. The longest Conclave in the last two hundred years was 1830-1831. It lasted 50 days for a total of 83 ballots resulting in the election of Gregory XVI, the last religious elected to the papacy. The shortest Conclave in the 20th century took place in 1939. Eugenio Pacelli was elected Pius XII after just three ballots.
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« Reply #72 on: March 08, 2013, 03:29:37 PM »

Two-page article
From page 2...

http://www.deseretnews.com/article/865575220/Electing-a-new-pope-Catholic-heirarchy-follows-proceess-rituals-developed-over-centuries.html?pg=1

Electing a new pope: Catholic heirarchy follows process, rituals developed over centuries
Published: Friday, March 8 2013 9:50 a.m. MST

 ::snipping2::
Wister said the word "conclave" is Latin for "locked up in a room," and its Catholic origins are in the papal elections of the 13th century, when one election dragged on for two years. The townspeople of Viterbo, a village outside of Rome, got tired of feeding and housing the churchmen, so they locked the cardinals in the episcopal palace, feeding them just bread and water, and a decision was made promptly.

The tradition of locking up the cardinals has continued, although the motive has changed. Conclaves now usually last a day or two, during which a strict voting ritual is observed.

The voting process

Following a special mass calling on the Holy Spirit to guide the decision, the cardinal electors, who must be younger than 80 years of age, file into the Sistine Chapel, where a sophisticated anti-bugging system is installed under an elevated floor to block communication from inside and outside the chapel, Wister said.

Each cardinal is given a pre-printed ballot on which he writes the name of his preference for pope. "And one by one they walk up and take an oath that they are voting for the man they consider the most suitable candidate without pressure, then the ballot is placed in (an) urn," Wister said.

After all the ballots have been cast, two cardinals who have been appointed as "scrutineers" over the election read each ballot aloud, while the electors keep their own personal scorecards.

If no one receives at least two-thirds of the vote, then another round of balloting takes place. Wister said as many as four rounds of voting can take place in one day.

After each round, the ballots are burned in a stove, which is stocked with pellets to assure the smoke snaking out of the chapel's chimney is either black (meaning no decision) or white (a pope has been elected).

"Given these cardinals are not very good at domestic chores, they have had problems with the stove. In the last conclave the damper didn't work and smoke filled the chapel," Wister said. "As solemn and important as (the conclave) is, it has its funny sides, too."

'A great joy'

Technically, any male in good standing can be elected to the position of pope — the official Bishop of Rome and successor of the ancient apostle Peter, the head of the church. But, Wister said, the last time a noncardinal was elected was in 1378 with the controversial Urban VI, whose papacy led to a schism in the church.

When a cardinal receives two-thirds of the vote, he is formally asked to accept and to declare what name he will be known by. The results are then notarized and sealed. The new pope is vested with a white cassock and red cape, and each cardinal individually promises obedience. The ballots are burned with pellets producing white smoke and the bell of St. Peter's rings.

The final event of the papal election occurs when the senior cardinal deacon declares in Latin, “I announce to you a great joy: We have a pope!” and the pope appears on the balcony overlooking St. Peter's square.
 ::snipping2::
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« Reply #73 on: March 08, 2013, 03:38:36 PM »

http://en.radiovaticana.va/news/2013/03/08/conclave:_a_few_dates_with_history/en1-671628

2013-03-08 18:57:01     
Conclave: A few dates with history

Vatican Radio) Below we publish a few fun facts about Conclaves in modern history provided for us by Dr. Donald Prudlo, Associate Professor of History at Jacksonville State University, Alabama:

1740 election of Benedict XIV (d. 1758).
51 electors, 4 died during conclave
18 Feb - 17 August (181 days) (LONGEST IN MODERN HISTORY)

1758 election of Clement XIII (d. 1769)
45 electors, 44 at final ballot.
15 May - 6 July (53 days)

1769 election of Clement XIV (d. 1774) (Clement was O.F.M. Conv.)
46 electors
15 Feb - 19 May (94 days)

1774-1775 election of Pius VI (d. 1799)
44 electors, 2 died
5 Oct 1774 - 15 Feb 1775 (133 days)
 ::snipping2::
1846 Bl. Pius IX (d. 1878) (beginning of the short conclaves)
50 electors
14-16 June (3 days)

1878 Leo XII (d. 1903) (First non European Cardinal arrives too late, John McCloskey of NYC)
61 electors
18-20 Feb (3 days)

1903 St. Pius X (d. 1914) (First non-European elector, Gibbons, Baltimore; last ius exclusivae -- the so-called 'veto' which was formally abolished by Pius X)
64 electors
7 Ballots
31 Jul - 4 Aug (4 days)

1914 Benedict XV (d. 1922) (2 Americans and 1 Quebecer locked out of Conclave having arrived late; 1st Latin American Cardinal)
57 electors
10 ballots
(31 Aug - 3 Sep)

1922 Pius XI (d. 1939) (2 Americans and 1 Quebecer locked out of Conclave AGAIN -- after this Conclave, a 15 day rule was intituted to allow all Cardinal electors time to arrive)
53 electors
14 ballots
2-6 Feb (5 days)

1939 Piux XII (d. 1958) (1st Eastern Rite Patriarch participates)
62 electors (all living cardinals)
3 ballots (FEWEST BALLOTS and SHORTEST CONCLAVE
1-2 March (2 days)

1958 Bl. John XXIII (d. 1963) (First Chinese, Indian, and African Cardinals)
51 electors
11 ballots
25-28 Oct (4 days)

1963 Paul VI (d. 1978)
80 electors
6 ballots
19-21 June (3 days)

1978(1) John Paul I (d. 1978) (First conclave where over -80s didn’t participate)
111 electors
4 ballots
25-26 Aug (2 days)

1978(2) Bl. John Paul II (d. 2005)
111 electors
8 ballots
14-16 Oct (3 days)

2005 Benedict XVI
115 electors (EQUALS LARGEST NUMBER, 115 this time)
4 ballots
18-19 April (2 days)

2013 First conclave in Lent since 1829
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« Reply #74 on: March 08, 2013, 05:54:53 PM »

An article from February 11--

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-11141340

11 February 2013 Last updated at 07:24 ET
Profile: Pope Benedict XVI

In a shock announcement on Monday the Vatican said Pope Benedict XVI would resign as head of the Catholic Church on 28 February.

Speaking in Latin the Pope, aged 85, told cardinals in Rome that his "strengths due to an advanced age are no longer suited" to the role.

It is extremely rare for a Pope to resign. In the Middle Ages, Pope Celestine V resigned in 1294, after only five months as pontiff. He died nearly two years later as a hermit. The last pope to resign was Pope Gregory XII in 1415.

There is a clause in Church Canon Law saying that a papal resignation is valid if the decision is made freely and manifested properly.

At 78, Benedict XVI was one of the oldest new popes in history when he was elected in 2005.

A piano-playing professor, Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger was looking forward to retirement when Pope John Paul II died in 2005. He has said he never wanted to be Pope.

If he or any of the cardinals who elected him imagined a brief, uneventful reign, paving a transition to a new era, they were to be disappointed.

Benedict took the helm as one of the fiercest storms the Catholic Church has faced in decades - the scandal of child sex abuse by priests - was breaking.
 ::snipping2::
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« Reply #75 on: March 08, 2013, 05:58:43 PM »

http://www.northjersey.com/news/international/196485831_Vatican_goes_high-tech_to_ensure_conclave_secrecy.html

Vatican goes high-tech to ensure conclave secrecy
Friday March 8, 2013, 4:08 PM

VATICAN CITY (RNS) The secrecy and security measures that surround a papal election are designed to "make the conclave safe for the Holy Spirit," as the saying goes.

But the high-tech defenses the Vatican is deploying for next week's conclave are so impressive that it will be a miracle if even the Holy Spirit can slip in to the Sistine Chapel.

On Friday (March 8 ), the Vatican's chief spokesman, the Rev. Federico Lombardi, confirmed that special jamming devices will be surround the Sistine Chapel and the Santa Marta guest residence where cardinals will be sequestered during the conclave.

This will not only prevent electronic eavesdropping on the secret proceedings, but will also stop cardinals from communicating via telephones or computers with the outside world.

Church law regulating the conclave forbids cardinals from communicating, "whether by writing, by telephone or by any other means" during a papal election. The conclave is scheduled to open on Tuesday, and is expected to last for several days.

During the 2005 Conclave, a German cardinal informed a German television channel of the election of Joseph Ratzinger as Pope Benedict XVI well ahead of the official announcement from the balcony of St. Peter's Basilica, according to the Italian daily La Repubblica.

All of the staff that will assist the cardinals during the conclave — from priests standing by ready to hear confessions to the sisters serving meals in the Santa Marta — will take an oath of secrecy, Lombardi said.

Should they breach it, they will incur automatic excommunication, the harshest penalty for Catholics.
 ::snipping2::
 
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« Reply #76 on: March 08, 2013, 09:35:12 PM »

http://worldnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/03/08/17226115-it-takes-as-long-as-it-takes-how-the-next-pope-will-be-chosen-step-by-secret-step?lite

3 hours ago
'It takes as long as it takes': How the next pope will be chosen, step by secret step

 ::snipping2::
A (relatively) new way of doing things

Benedict's election was unusually quick, coming after only four ballots. More commonly, the balloting takes a few days, and because of a change Benedict instituted in 2007, there's the potential for a long conclave this time.

Benedict was elected under rules stipulating that after about 30 ballots, depending on how many votes are taken on the first day, the cardinals could choose to drop the threshold for election to a simple majority.

Benedict threw out that stipulation, meaning a two-thirds vote will be needed for all of the ballots. After 33 or 34 ballots, and occasional one-day breaks for prayer and reflection, the election is narrowed to the two leading vote-getters — but even then, Benedict ordered, the winner has to get two-thirds.

Many "Vaticanisti" — the pundits and journalists who obsessively follow the political goings-on of the church — predict that this change will result in a compromise pope, with the leader in early balloting ultimately fading.

Eventually, someone will be chosen, at which point the senior cardinal will ask the winner, "Do you accept your canonical election as Supreme Pontiff?" If he says yes (accepto), he is the pope, just like that. The new pope will then declare his papal name.

"Then he goes out," Murphy-O'Connor said. "There's a papal tailor outside with three cassocks, white cassocks — large, medium and small — and then after 10 minutes or so he comes back and he's put in the middle and we all go up and kiss his ring.
 
"It doesn't matter how you voted, whatever. He's the pope now," Murphy-O'Connor added. "It's very dramatic, it's very moving, and it's very faithful."

After the white smoke appears — historically triggering extended cheers from the thousands gathered outside — a senior cardinal will step onto the balcony of St. Peter's Basilica and declare: Annuntio vobis gaudium magnum. Habemus papam. ("I announce to you news of great joy. We have a pope.")

The new pope, whoever he is, then appears before the throng and performs his first official public act. It is a simple apostolic blessing called Urbi et orbi ("to the city and the world"):
 
May the Holy Apostles Peter and Paul, in whose power and authority we have confidence, intercede on our behalf to the Lord.
 
Through the prayers and merits of the Blessed Mary ever-virgin, of Blessed Michael the Archangel, of Blessed John the Baptist and of the Holy Apostles Peter and Paul and of all the saints, may Almighty God have mercy on you, and with your sins forgiven, may Jesus Christ lead you into everlasting life.
 
May the Almighty and merciful Lord grant you indulgence, absolution and remission of all your sins, time for a true and fruitful penance, an always repentant heart and amendment of life, the grace and consolation of the Holy Spirit and final perseverance in good works.
 
And may the blessing of Almighty God, and the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit descend on you and remain with you always.
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« Reply #77 on: March 09, 2013, 11:36:16 AM »

http://en.radiovaticana.va/news/2013/03/08/conclave:_expectations_in_light_of_recent_history/en1-671573

2013-03-09 08:59:40     
Conclave: expectations in light of recent history

(Vatican Radio) Senior Fellow at Georgetown University’s Woodstock Theological Center, Fr. Thomas Reese says he believes the conclave will be a short one because the Cardinals have had one month to get to know each other and sound out their colleagues on the issues of concern to the Church. He told Vatican Radio's Tracey McClure that the lengthy interval between the announcement of Benedict XVI's resignation and the start of the Conclave will have provided ample opportunity for different kinds of discussion among the Cardinals. Listen: 

"Theoretically," said Fr. Reese, "the longer they have to talk to one another, especially informally…that’s where the really important thing happens. Where the Cardinals meet over dinner, over coffee, just you know, visiting each other. (It’s) an opportunity to get to know each other, to ask questions: ‘what do you think are the issues facing the Church, what do you think the qualities we should have in a new pope?’ And what do you think of this man or that man - this kind of informal discussion. Typically, after a while, two or three names start to surface. The Cardinals all hear form each other and so these become kind of the leading candidates. Now, the longer they have to do that, you figure the better they know each other so once they get into the conclave, it’s gonna be quick. Unless – unless: let’s say the top two candidates block each other…you’ve got to have that two-thirds majority. And if the top candidates cannot get a two-thirds majority, if one third plus one of the Cardinals don’t like him, that’s it… so they’re going to be watching the votes. The more people move up, if they have momentum, then that’s a good sign. But if they suddenly don’t get anymore votes and then they start to decline, well that’s the end of that candidacy.”

Q. So is there a cut-off point for a conclave- a maximum time period?
 ::snipping2::
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« Reply #78 on: March 09, 2013, 11:41:23 AM »

http://en.radiovaticana.va/news/2013/03/09/conclave:_timetable_for_first_days/en1-671748

2013-03-09 14:09:13     
Conclave: timetable for first days

(Vatican Radio) During the course of the briefing for journalists on Saturday in the Press Office of the Holy See, Fr. Federico Lombardi, SJ, outlined a timetable for the ceremonies and proceedings on the first days of the upcoming Conclave. The times given below are tentative and approximate.

Tuesday, March 12th, 2013 (all times Rome local: GMT + 1)

15:45 – Transfer from Domus Sanctae Marthae to Pauline Chapel
16:30 – Procession from Pauline Chapel to Sistine Chapel
16:45 – Oath administered and Extra omnes! Proclaimed

Followed by meditation by Card. Prosper Grech, OP
Eventual 1st vote

19:15 – Vespers
19:30 – Cardinals return to Domus Sanctae Marthae

Wednesday, March 13th, 2013 (all times Rome local: GMT + 1)

06:30 – Breakfast served in Domus S. Marthae (until 7:30)
07:45 – Transfer from Domus S. Marthae to Sistine Chapel
08:15 – Mass
09:30 – Hora Media in Sistine Chapel

Morning vote(s) (scrutiny(ies) taken

12:30 – Cardinals return to Domus Sanctae Marthae
13:00 – Lunch
16:00 – Cardinals return to Sistine Chapel
16:50 – Scrutinies taken
19:15 – Vespers
 ::snipping2::
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« Reply #79 on: March 09, 2013, 11:46:34 AM »

Daily press briefing by Fr. Federico Lombardi, Saturday, March 9, 2013

http://en.radiovaticana.va/news/2013/03/09/fr_lombardi,_sj:_briefing_to_journalists_on_ix_general_congregation/en1-671773

2013-03-09 15:14:53     
Fr Lombardi, SJ: briefing to journalists on IX General Congregation

Vatican Radio) The Director of the Press Office of the Holy See, Fr. Federico Lombardi, SJ, briefed journalists on Saturday, after the morning session of the IX General Congregation. During the course of the question and answer session, one journalist asked whether there is a projected duration of the Conclave. Fr. Lombardi explained that the general spirit among the participants in the General Congregations, and their readiness to enter into Conclave, tend to suggest that the Conclave itself will not last more than a few days, at most. “It is not my place to tell the Cardinals what to do,” he said, adding, “a lengthy duration of the Conclave would evidently be a sign of an impasse," i.e. that consensus had not been reached. “It is not up to me,” repeated Fr. Lombardi, SJ, “but I have no reason [to foresee such a situation].” Listen to our report: 

Among the details that emerged, there was confirmation of the dissolution – the rendering useless – of the Fisherman’s Ring and other official seals of Benedict XVI’s pontificate. Fr. Lombardi, SJ’s English-language consultant, Fr. Thomas Rosica, CSB, elaborated. “Fr. [Lombardi, SJ] saw with his very own eyes this (Saturday) morning, five objects that were ruined – scratched [and] rendered useless, because the image was destroyed,” he said. Fr. Rosica went on to say, “First of all, there’s the ring – the Fisherman’s Ring that was destroyed – the image was scratched – secondly, there was [also destroyed] a stamp of the Fisherman’s Ring, a seal, which was used to seal official documents.” There were, in addition,  ::snipping2::
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