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Author Topic: Dylan Redwine, 13yrs old, last seen 11/19/12, Vallecito, CO Remains found #3  (Read 332623 times)
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texasmom
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ARUBA: It's all about Natalee...we won't give up!


« Reply #680 on: March 19, 2020, 07:11:57 AM »

A status conference is scheduled for today, I'm praying they aren't going to delay the trial again due to COVID-19.
If everything moves forward, trial is currently scheduled to start April 2nd.
Please be in prayer and/or send your good thoughts to Dylan's family!

https://www.courts.state.co.us/dockets/index.cfm#results

3/19/20
10:00 AM   1Hr   REDWINE, MARK   Status Conference   D342017CR343   La Plata County   Division 1
4/2/20
8:00 AM   1D   REDWINE, MARK   Jury Trial   D342017CR343   La Plata County   Division 1
 

https://youtu.be/ybmo1qaZZNM

KRQE

Colorado law passed with help of Dylan Redwine's mom, now used in high-profile cases
Mar 17, 2020

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/ybmo1qaZZNM" target="_blank">https://www.youtube.com/v/ybmo1qaZZNM</a>

Justice for Dylan!

 
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I stand with the girl, Natalee Holloway.

"I can look back over the past 10 years and there were no steps wasted, and there are no regrets,'' she said. "I did all I knew to do and I think that gives me greater peace now." "I've lived every parent's worst nightmare and I'm the parent that nobody wants to be," she said.

Beth Holloway, 2015 interview with Greta van Susteren
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« Reply #681 on: March 19, 2020, 03:37:18 PM »

I'm so sick of that evil POS getting all the breaks!  The first trial date was 11/26/18, this is the fifth and it probably won't be the last. 
It should be over by now, I can only imagine how hard this is for Dylan's family.   
jmo

https://durangoherald.com/articles/318778-trial-for-mark-redwine-accused-of-killing-son-dylan-postponed-as-pandemic-spreads

Trial for Mark Redwine, accused of killing son, Dylan, postponed as pandemic spreads
 
Social distancing could be difficult for a jury, judge says

By Bret Hauff City government & crime reporter

Thursday, March 19, 2020 1:16 PM Updated 4 minutes ago

The trial of Mark Redwine, a Vallecito man accused of killing his 13-year-old son, Dylan, in 2012, has been reset to begin May 26 as the COVID-19 pandemic surges through Colorado and the rest of the country.

Prosecutors and defense attorneys each said Thursday they’re ready to begin trial, which was scheduled to start April 2, but 6th Judicial District Chief Judge Jeffery Wilson ordered the trial reset to avoid unsettling prospective jurors or facilitating the spread of the coronavirus causing COVID-19.

The court plans to summon hundreds of people as potential jurors.

“The court is concerned about public health,” Wilson said. “The community is severely concerned about COVID-19.”

The judge recognized a shelter-in-place order in San Miguel County, about an hour and a half drive from Durango, that is scheduled to continue through at least April 3.

Public defense attorney Justin Bogan, in his argument to reset Redwine’s trial, said selecting a 12-person jury with three alternates would violate state orders from the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment barring gatherings of more than 10 people.

“If any one of the jurors is symptomatic, all of the jury would have to quarantine for 14 days,” Bogan said. Any problems with a jury could lead to the case ending in a mistrial almost three years after it started.

And even if the court could ensure social distancing, people summoned for jury duty may be upset about being gathered with others when public health and government officials specifically ordered against it.

Since Redwine is “one of the most loathed individuals in the community,” Bogan said jurors’ anger about being summoned to jury duty during a pandemic could be directed toward his client.

District Attorney Christian Champagne told Judge Wilson, “We’re ready to go” with the trial; Bogan said, “For us, sooner is better.” But starting the trial on May 26 could be ambitious with projections that the spread of COVID-19 could last months, Wilson said.

“I can see this date being a problem,” he said.

bhauff@durangoherald.com
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I stand with the girl, Natalee Holloway.

"I can look back over the past 10 years and there were no steps wasted, and there are no regrets,'' she said. "I did all I knew to do and I think that gives me greater peace now." "I've lived every parent's worst nightmare and I'm the parent that nobody wants to be," she said.

Beth Holloway, 2015 interview with Greta van Susteren
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« Reply #682 on: May 02, 2020, 04:22:09 AM »

Justice for Dylan! 

https://www.courts.state.co.us/userfiles/file/Court_Probation/06th_Judicial_District/La_Plata/Redwine/Order%20After%20Status%20Conference%20C-46.pdf

DISTRICT COURT, LA PLATA COUNTY, COLORADO
Court Address:
1060 EAST 2ND AVENUE, ROOM 106, DURANGO, CO, 81301-5157
THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF COLORADO
 v.
Defendant(s) MARK ALLEN REDWINE
COURT USE ONLY
Case Number: 2017CR343
Division: 1 Courtroom:
Order After Status Conference C-46

A status conference was held on April 20, 2020, after the Chief Justice of the Colorado Supreme Court ordered that juries
could not be called for any case in the State of Colorado until June 1, 2020, due to the COVID-19 pandemic. For the reasons
stated on the record, the Court declared a mistrial pursuant to CRCrimP 24(c)(4) and reset the case for jury trial on July 8,
2020, at 8:00 AM
with a pretrial conference scheduled for June 11, 2020, at 9:00 AM
. At the status conference, no adequate
reasons were given to the Court not to start the trial on July 8, 2020. If either party can show good cause why the trial should
not commence on July 8,2020, they shall file a written motion explaining their reasons within 7 days.

Issue Date: 4/20/2020

JEFFREY RAYMOND WILSON
District Court Judge
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I stand with the girl, Natalee Holloway.

"I can look back over the past 10 years and there were no steps wasted, and there are no regrets,'' she said. "I did all I knew to do and I think that gives me greater peace now." "I've lived every parent's worst nightmare and I'm the parent that nobody wants to be," she said.

Beth Holloway, 2015 interview with Greta van Susteren
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« Reply #683 on: May 13, 2020, 09:26:10 PM »

https://durangoherald.com/articles/324575-mark-redwines-trial-is-again-delayed-because-of-coronavirus

Mark Redwine’s trial is again delayed because of coronavirus
 
Judge schedules new start date for July
By Jonathan Romeo County & environment reporter
Wednesday, May 13, 2020 3:25 PM
 Follow @jonathandherald

The trial for Mark Redwine, who was arrested nearly three years ago for allegedly killing his 13-year-old son, has once again been postponed because of complications with the coronavirus pandemic.

On May 5, the Supreme Court of Colorado suspended all jury trials in Colorado, based on health guidelines to slow the spread of COVID-19, namely, by avoiding large gatherings of people.

Anticipating the order, 6th Judicial District Judge Jeffery Wilson held a conference hearing for Redwine on April 20, pushing his trial date back to July 8.

This is the second time Redwine’s trial has been delayed as a result of complications associated with the coronavirus outbreak: In March, a jury trial set for April 2 was postponed to May 26.

Redwine was arrested July 22, 2017, on suspicion of killing his 13-year-old son, Dylan, who disappeared from his father’s home in Vallecito in November 2012. Dylan’s remains were found in June 2013, 10 miles from his father’s home.

Since his arrest, Redwine’s case has been plagued with setbacks.

At first, Redwine’s defense attorneys asked for several postponements to prepare for trial, said 6th Judicial District Attorney Christian Champagne.

“We didn’t object because we wanted a fair process to make sure justice is done,” Champagne said. “We’ve been ready for trial.”

Redwine was supposed to go to trial in September, but then one of his public defenders, John Moran, was arrested on suspicion of domestic violence. The charges were ultimately dismissed, but court proceedings were further delayed.

Justin Bogan, Redwine’s other public defender, did not return a call seeking comment.

The delays have resulted in the now 58-year-old Vallecito man spending nearly three years in La Plata County Jail. He is being held on $750,000 bail.

“It’s frustrating to the prosecution, to the victims and to the defendant,” Champagne said of the delayed trial.

State court officials are working on a plan to reopen jury trials, but in a manner that will ensure the safety of jurors and all those present at court hearings.

Champagne said people may be brought in waves during jury selection or court officials may use larger buildings, such as those at the La Plata County Fairgrounds, to allow for greater social distancing.

The court has previously said it plans to summon hundreds of people as potential jurors for Redwine’s highly publicized case.

Once selected, the 12-person jury with three alternates will likely have to sit 6 feet apart, with everyone in the courtroom wearing masks.

“It’s a challenge and new territory,” Champagne said. “It’s critically important to our democracy for the criminal justice system to work, but we have to ensure ... it’s a safe process.”

Eric Hogue, 6th Judicial District court administrator, did not immediately return a call seeking comment Wednesday afternoon. Rob McCallum, spokesman for the state judicial system, also did not immediately return a request for comment.

Redwine has a pretrial conference hearing set for June 11. His trial is scheduled to begin July 8 and is scheduled to last 27 days.
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I stand with the girl, Natalee Holloway.

"I can look back over the past 10 years and there were no steps wasted, and there are no regrets,'' she said. "I did all I knew to do and I think that gives me greater peace now." "I've lived every parent's worst nightmare and I'm the parent that nobody wants to be," she said.

Beth Holloway, 2015 interview with Greta van Susteren
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« Reply #684 on: June 23, 2020, 07:42:38 PM »

My heart goes out to Dylan's family, this has got to be so hard.  Four more months of waiting for trial. 

https://durangoherald.com/articles/329280-trial-delayed-again-for-father-suspected-of-killing-dylan-redwine

Trial delayed again for father suspected of killing Dylan Redwine
 
State banned jury trials until Aug. 3 over coronavirus concerns
By Jonathan Romeo County & environment reporter
Tuesday, June 23, 2020 5:37 PM
 
Once again, the trial has been delayed for Mark Redwine, who was arrested nearly three years ago for allegedly killing his 13-year-old son.

Redwine was scheduled to start a 28-day trial July 8.

The Colorado Supreme Court this month, however, extended a ban on jury trials until Aug. 3 because of the novel coronavirus outbreak, necessitating another push back in Redwine’s long-awaited trial.

After a brief discussion Tuesday between prosecutors, Redwine’s defense attorneys and Judge Jeffery Wilson, who is overseeing the case, a new trial was scheduled to begin Oct. 28.

Judge Wilson said under current conditions, “it would be impossible to safely assemble a jury pool due to the public health crisis” for Redwine’s trial, which is expected to bring in an estimated 600 people to the high-profile case.

“There’s really no good time (to reset the trial) when we don’t know what’s going to happen,” Wilson said. “But my personal opinion is the longer we wait, the less likely it’ll go if we see a resurgence of the virus (in the fall).”

Wilson said there is only one courtroom in the La Plata Courthouse that can accommodate such a large jury pool while at the same time adhering to social-distancing guidelines.

He said the earliest availability for the courtroom was Aug. 31, and initially suggested starting the trial on that date.

But 6th Judicial District Attorney Christian Champagne, prosecuting the case, said his office has “major scheduling” issues over the next few months, and wouldn’t be able to start Redwine’s trial until early November.

Justin Bogan, one of Redwine’s public defenders, said he would be ready Aug. 31.

But Champagne said if a trial were set for August, his office would have to replace a special deputy district attorney assisting with the case, which would result in further delays.

“It would take a substantial amount of time for a new member of the team to catch up,” Champagne said.

All sides agreed to an Oct. 28 start date. A pre-trial conference hearing is scheduled for Oct. 8.

This is the third time Redwine’s trial has been delayed as a result of complications associated with the coronavirus outbreak. The trial has also undergone several other postponements since his arrest in 2017.

“We’ve delayed this and delayed this and delayed this, mostly to make sure Mr. Redwine has a fair trial,” Wilson said. “And then other things happened.”

Redwine was arrested July 22, 2017, on suspicion of killing his 13-year-old son, Dylan, who disappeared from his father’s home in Vallecito in November 2012. Dylan’s remains were found in June 2013, 10 miles from his father’s home.

Speaking via teleconference, Elaine Hall, Dylan’s mother, voiced frustration with the setbacks that have plagued Redwine’s case.

“I understand what’s going on with the pandemic,” she said. “But ... it’s very frustrating. And there’s nothing we can say or do about it.”

 
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I stand with the girl, Natalee Holloway.

"I can look back over the past 10 years and there were no steps wasted, and there are no regrets,'' she said. "I did all I knew to do and I think that gives me greater peace now." "I've lived every parent's worst nightmare and I'm the parent that nobody wants to be," she said.

Beth Holloway, 2015 interview with Greta van Susteren
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« Reply #685 on: September 18, 2020, 11:39:22 PM »

 

https://durangoherald.com/articles/339586-mother-of-dylan-redwine-pushed-new-law-now-used-in-highprofile-crimes

Mother of Dylan Redwine pushed new law now used in high-profile crimes
 
Tampering with a deceased body went from misdemeanor to felony
By Jonathan Romeo County & environment reporter
Friday, Sept. 18, 2020 2:52 PM Updated 1 hour 2 minutes ago
 
Though the pain of losing her son will never heal, Elaine Hall said a law she helped pass, making tampering with a deceased body a felony, offers at least a little respite.

“The healing process is obviously day-by-day, and I’m not sure I’ll ever fully heal,” Hall said. “But ... seeing it used, I’m happy with that. It puts some meat behind the other charges.”

Thirteen-year-old Dylan Redwine went missing in November 2012, a day after he arrived in La Plata County to visit his father, Mark Redwine, in Vallecito, about 25 miles northeast of Durango, as part of a court-ordered visit.

Dylan’s remains were found in June 2013, about 10 miles from Mark Redwine’s home, in a mountainous, wooded area. Mark Redwine was arrested in 2017 on suspicion of second-degree murder and child abuse resulting in death.

Redwine’s trial, which has experienced numerous postponements, is scheduled to start Oct. 28.

Hall, however, started working around 2016 with another mother, Laura Saxton, whose child, Kelsie Schelling, was murdered and her body never found, to make tampering with a dead body a more severe crime. The two mothers would talk to state politicians and spoke at a Colorado legislative committee meeting in favor of making the punishment harsher.

In 2016, their efforts were successful, elevating tampering with a body from a misdemeanor to a Class 3 felony. The charge now carries a sentence of up to 12 years in prison, and is usually tacked onto more serious crimes, like murder.

“I couldn’t believe it wasn’t already a felony in Colorado,” Hall said. “To me, it was very common sense.”

Tampering with a body is usually charged when a person intentionally “destroys, mutilates, conceals, removes or alters” a human body to impair legal proceedings, according to the bill. It is often tacked on to high-profile cases.

The charge was used in the case of Chris Watts, who pleaded guilty in 2018 to killing his pregnant wife and two young daughters. Watts reportedly buried his wife in a shallow grave and put his daughters’ bodies in oil tanks.

Watts was sentenced to several life sentences, 48 years for unlawful termination of pregnancy and 12 years for three counts of tampering with a deceased body, according to Denver CBS.

In March, Letecia Stauch, who is accused of killing her 11-year-old stepson earlier this year, was also charged with tampering with a deceased body, according to KKTV 11 News.

A report in the Montrose Daily Press in January said there have been 34 charges and 12 convictions for tampering with a deceased body since it became a felony in 2016.

Sixth Judicial District Attorney Christian Champagne said it is important to make the crime a felony instead of a misdemeanor.

“When we see someone who is doing inappropriate things with the remains of our loved ones, I think it strikes many people as a very serious crime,” he said.

Champagne also said prosecutors can use the charge if there’s a lack of evidence for more serious crimes in a case.

“It’s a tool we can use when we don’t have the evidence ... and still get some accountability for someone who has hidden a body or moved someone’s remains to avoid detection,” he said.

Champagne said Redwine’s alleged crimes happened in 2012, before the tampering law became a felony, and prosecutors can only charge for crimes in place at the time of the incident. He doesn’t plan to add the charge at this time.

For Hall, she said she’s happy to have helped future victims get more justice.

“We knew our children were victims, and there was no severe penalty in Colorado for tampering with remains,” she said. “We felt it needed to be more severe.”

jromeo@durangoherald.com
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I stand with the girl, Natalee Holloway.

"I can look back over the past 10 years and there were no steps wasted, and there are no regrets,'' she said. "I did all I knew to do and I think that gives me greater peace now." "I've lived every parent's worst nightmare and I'm the parent that nobody wants to be," she said.

Beth Holloway, 2015 interview with Greta van Susteren
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« Reply #686 on: October 03, 2020, 08:22:13 AM »

 

https://durangoherald.com/articles/347428-judge-rules-october-trial-for-mark-redwine-remains-a-go

Judge rules October trial for Mark Redwine remains a go
 
Defense attorney sought postponement
By Jonathan Romeo County & environment reporter
Friday, Oct. 2, 2020 4:22 PM Updated 9 hours 13 minutes ago
 
The trial for Mark Redwine, the Vallecito man accused of killing his 13-year-old son, Dylan, remains on track to begin later this month.

In a recent motion, Redwine’s defense attorneys requested to delay the trial until “after the COVID-19 pandemic has been resolved,” arguing the pandemic presents “unreasonable” public health risks that would prevent a fair trial.

“Defense counsel argues that due to the COVID-19 pandemic, it will prevent a jury panel that represents a fair cross-section of the community,” according to court records.

Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, certain people who qualify may be excused upon request from jury duty, including those who are immunocompromised, have certain illnesses or live in a nursing home.

Sixth Judicial District Judge Jeffery Wilson, however, ruled Friday the regulations in place do not violate any constitutional rights, determining Redwine will still stand trial Oct. 29.

“While the trial will certainly be longer and different than jury trials prior to the COVID-19 pandemic ... none of these minor inconveniences impinge on the defendant’s rights to due process or a fair trial,” Wilson wrote.

Wilson said court officials will continue to monitor infection rates, and hold the authority to postpone the trial should pandemic conditions require it.

Wilson added that during a previous six-day trial, jurors reported to court officials they were comfortable and appreciative of the precautions at the La Plata County Courthouse to ensure everyone’s safety.

Redwine was arrested in July 2017 on suspicion of killing Dylan in 2012. Since then, his trial has been delayed several times, including three times for reasons related to the COVID-19 pandemic.

jromeo@durangoherald.com
Logged

I stand with the girl, Natalee Holloway.

"I can look back over the past 10 years and there were no steps wasted, and there are no regrets,'' she said. "I did all I knew to do and I think that gives me greater peace now." "I've lived every parent's worst nightmare and I'm the parent that nobody wants to be," she said.

Beth Holloway, 2015 interview with Greta van Susteren
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« Reply #687 on: October 08, 2020, 05:19:29 PM »

Justice for Dylan! 

https://durangoherald.com/articles/348817-redwines-defense-attorneys-try-and-fail-again-to-delay-upcoming-trial

Redwine’s defense attorneys try – and fail – again to delay upcoming trial
 
Public defender says ‘very dangerous’ to hold trial amid pandemic
By Jonathan Romeo County & environment reporter
Thursday, Oct. 8, 2020 1:06 PM

Mark Redwine’s defense attorneys tried once again on Thursday to delay the Vallecito man’s upcoming trial – to no avail.

Redwine, who is accused of killing his 13-year-old son, Dylan, in 2012, is on track to start a 30-day trial on Oct. 29 after countless delays and postponements that have resulted in the 59-year-old man sitting in jail for three years.

Recently, Redwine’s defense attorneys requested to delay the trial until “after the COVID-19 pandemic has been resolved,” arguing the pandemic presents “unreasonable” public health risks that would prevent a fair trial.

Prosecutors for the 6th Judicial District Attorney’s Office have objected to any further delays and said they are ready for trial.

Sixth Judicial District Judge Jeffery Wilson, however, ultimately ruled the regulations in place do not violate any constitutional rights, determining Redwine will still stand trial Oct. 29.

At a pretrial conference hearing Thursday, John Moran, Redwine’s appointed public defender, argued again that a trial would put the health of attorneys, the jury, witnesses and the community at risk.

Many witnesses will be traveling to La Plata County from COVID-19 hot spots, Moran said, which may spread the virus throughout the community and “put all of our lives at risk.”

“It’s a very dangerous situation,” Moran said. “This is a real health risk and danger to every one of us.”

Moran also reiterated concerns that local media coverage of the Redwine case has tainted the jury pool in La Plata County. Attempts to move the trial in the past have failed, with Wilson saying it’s an issue that can be worked around.

Wilson maintained Thursday the trial will go on as planned.

“Mr. Redwine has been in jail for three years, and Dylan’s been gone longer than that,” Wilson said. “There needs to be resolution on this case.”

Wilson said neither situation is “palatable” – because of the pandemic, there is a concern about losing witnesses and evidence, but there is also concern about Redwine “rotting in jail” until the pandemic is over.

Dylan’s mother, Elaine Hall, told The Durango Herald on Thursday she is supportive of the trial going forward.

“Dylan has been gone for eight years and we have been at a standstill since then,” she said. “I am relieved that the trial will finally proceed so maybe I can put my son in his final resting place.”


The trial is set to go on as planned, though many court procedures were tweaked to take into account best health practices surrounding social distancing, limiting group sizes and wearing face coverings.

Jury selection is expected to take longer than normal, over the course of about seven days. Potential jurors will be called in waves and will be held in different rooms as the selection process goes on in the courtroom.

It’s unclear how many people will be called for jury duty.

Another aspect discussed Thursday was about Redwine’s constitutional right to see the faces of the jury, and for the jury to see Redwine’s face, complicated by the fact people are required to wear face coverings at the courthouse.

Wilson gave Redwine the option to either waive his constitutional right and wear a face covering, or instead choose a plastic shield.

Wilson said he also retains the right to postpone the trial should COVID-19 conditions worsen in the community. Opening statements are expected to begin on Nov. 9, according to court documents.

Redwine has a status conference hearing set for Oct. 16.

Dylan, who lived with his mother in Colorado Springs, went to stay with his father on a court-ordered visit on Nov. 18, 2012. Dylan was reported missing the next day.

Despite a massive search effort, Dylan was not located until 2013 when his remains were found in a mountainous area, about 10 miles from Redwine’s Vallecito home.

Redwine was arrested July 22, 2017, and has been in custody at the La Plata County Jail ever since. Countless delays, which included one of his attorneys being arrested and the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, have pushed back the trial.


-  -Justice for Dylan! 
Logged

I stand with the girl, Natalee Holloway.

"I can look back over the past 10 years and there were no steps wasted, and there are no regrets,'' she said. "I did all I knew to do and I think that gives me greater peace now." "I've lived every parent's worst nightmare and I'm the parent that nobody wants to be," she said.

Beth Holloway, 2015 interview with Greta van Susteren
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« Reply #688 on: October 29, 2020, 01:21:09 PM »

After 2900+ days and 9 delays, here we go! 

Justice for Dylan! 

https://durangoherald.com/articles/352006

Jury selection begins in Mark Redwine trial
 
Judge: ‘We are living in different times. We’ve taken every safety precaution to ensure your safety.’
By Jonathan Romeo County & environment reporter
Thursday, Oct. 29, 2020 11:05 AM Updated 1 hour 11 minutes ago
Follow @jonathandherald

Potential jurors started filtering in Thursday morning for the trial of Mark Redwine, who is accused of killing his 13-year-old son, Dylan, in 2012.

Because the case has been so highly publicized over the years, and because of the need to have a jury that, for the most part, is unfamiliar with the details of the case, a total of 2,625 people have been summoned.

Starting Thursday, through Nov. 6, jury pools will come in three waves throughout the day at 8 a.m., 11 a.m. and 2:30 p.m.

A total of 19 potential jurors were in the courtroom for the 8 a.m. Thursday wave – social distanced and wearing face coverings because of COVID-19 protocols.

“We are living in different times,” said District Judge Jeffery Wilson, who is overseeing the trial. “We’ve taken every safety precaution to ensure your safety. ... It’s as safe as we can make it.”

In recent weeks, Redwine’s public defenders – Justin Bogan and John Moran – have attempted three times to delay Redwine’s trial, arguing it’s too dangerous during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Wilson, repeatedly, has disagreed.


“This is a trial I’ve decided can’t wait until sometime in the future when the COVID-19 pandemic is gone,” Wilson told the potential jury pool. “The trial needs to occur.”

Redwine was arrested in July 2017 for allegedly killing his son, but various delays and postponements have kept Redwine awaiting trail in the La Plata County Jail.

Redwine’s trial is expected to last until Dec. 11, Wilson said, a huge time investment for potential jurors. Thursday’s jury selection was the first of several rounds of questioning to weed out people who don’t qualify or can’t serve.

Right off the bat, five people were excused because they could not serve that much time, mostly for work-related reasons. Another person was excused after he said personal health reasons were a concern amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

At the end of the brief hearing, potential jurors were handed a list of witnesses to look over and see if they had any relationship with people on the list. The jury pool will be called back at a later time.

In the meantime, people should act like they are on the jury, Wilson said, by not reading or watching anything about the case in the media, or talking about the trial with anyone, including other potential jurors.

Though a total of 2,625 people have been summoned to the Redwine trial (which is about 6% of La Plata County’s total eligible jury pool), only about 40% to 60% actually show up to court, said Eric Hogue, court administrator.

“Usually, hovering on the lower side of that range,” he said.

Another factor that is likely to exclude a number of potential jurors is the fact the case has garnered significant attention from media outlets and social media platforms over the years, including a two-part, drama filled “Dr. Phil” show.

“This case has been highly publicized over the years and many people (have an opinion about it),” Wilson said.

Redwine’s public defenders had previously attempted to move the trial outside La Plata County, a request that was denied by Wilson.

Redwine faces two charges: second-degree murder and child abuse resulting in death. If convicted, Redwine faces up to 48 years in prison.

Redwine, for his part, has maintained his innocence and pleaded not guilty.

Redwine is accused of killing Dylan in November 2012 while his son was on a court ordered visit for Thanksgiving. The day after Dylan arrived, he was never heard from and vanished without a trace.

It wasn’t until June 2013 that some of his remains were found in a mountainous area about 10 miles from Redwine’s home. After years of investigations, prosecutors say Redwine killed his son, resulting in his arrest in 2017.

jromeo@durangoherald.com
Logged

I stand with the girl, Natalee Holloway.

"I can look back over the past 10 years and there were no steps wasted, and there are no regrets,'' she said. "I did all I knew to do and I think that gives me greater peace now." "I've lived every parent's worst nightmare and I'm the parent that nobody wants to be," she said.

Beth Holloway, 2015 interview with Greta van Susteren
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« Reply #689 on: October 30, 2020, 08:10:34 PM »

Remember the trial delays when John Moran was arrested, removed from the defense after not showing up for two hearings, and then REAPPOINTED TO THE CASE?
That whole mess never passed the smell test imo.  I think it was a deliberate delay of the trial, and so it continues. 

https://durangoherald.com/articles/352201

Tempers flare at Redwine trial over background checks on potential jurors
 
Sheriff’s Office did background checks on potential jurors
By Jonathan Romeo County & environment reporter
Friday, Oct. 30, 2020 5:33 PM Updated 1 hour 6 minutes ago

The trial for Mark Redwine experienced unexpected drama Friday when attorneys argued over background checks performed on potential jurors.

Redwine’s trial began Thursday with jury selection, a process that is expected to take a week to sift through 2,625 people who were summoned to serve on the 12-person jury with two alternates in the highly publicized case.

Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, potential jurors are being brought to the courthouse in waves throughout the day.

At Friday’s 8 a.m. session, Redwine’s public defender, John Moran, raised concerns about a document with background histories of potential jurors he was just provided by prosecutors with the 6th Judicial District Attorney’s Office.

Moran said the document included “extremely private information” on 1,094 people who were called for jury duty, such as if the person had a history of child abuse, sex abuse, drug use or had previously attempted suicide.

“This rises to the level of outrageous governmental conduct,” Moran said. “It is illegal for them to have taken this information in the first place ... it is criminal, your honor.”

Moran also took issue that it remains unknown how long the District Attorney’s Office had the document before providing it to the defense, which he claimed gave prosecutors an advantage at trial and in the jury selection process.

District Judge Jeffery Wilson, overseeing the case, ended the discussion this morning because it was happening in front of potential jurors. The court reconvened later, outside the presence of potential jurors, to take up the matter.

At that session, as Moran continued with concerns about the document, District Attorney Christian Champagne broke in.

“These allegations are so outrageous, and so over the top, I can’t hold my tongue your honor,” Champagne said.

Judge Wilson responded: “Well, you’re going to hold your tongue.”

When it was his turn to speak, Champagne said the allegations made against the District Attorney’s Office were “wild and reckless.”

“To cast such an aspersion, I think it’s unethical, I think Mr. Moran should be personally sanctioned,” Champagne said. “He knows better, and ... he’s using this streaming platform to prejudice this community.”

Jury selection is being streamed on a web-based platform.

Champagne said the La Plata County Sheriff’s Office, on its own accord and without request from the District Attorney’s Office, conducted the background checks and compiled the document “to be helpful in the jury selection process.”

“When we were made aware of it, we immediately released (it to the defense),” Champagne said.

Champagne said the information in the background checks was taken from the “Record Management Services” program, an internal record-keeping program within the Sheriff’s Office.

“There’s nothing wrong with anything that’s happened by looking at these records and proactively giving it to the defense,” he said.

Judge Wilson called the whole matter a “big ado about next to nothing.”

“We’re done for the day on this issue,” he said. “I just don’t see it being an issue.”

At the end of the court hearing, Moran and Champagne engaged in a heated exchange.

Moran asked Champagne to name the specific ethical violation he violated, in reference to Champagne’s earlier claim that Moran was possibly in violation of the attorney ethics.

“I’m done, I have nothing to say to you. I don’t want to hear you talk,” Champagne responded.

“Follow the law,” Moran quipped back.

Christopher Mueller, a professor at the University of Colorado Law School, who has been teaching law for 50 years, said he’s never heard of a sheriff’s office taking it upon itself to compile background checks on potential jurors, let alone a list of more than 1,000 people.

“That’s pretty extraordinary,” he said.

In jury selection, both the prosecution and the defense are looking for people who may be sympathetic to their case, Mueller said. For example: If a juror is married to someone in law enforcement, perhaps that person is more likely to side with the prosecution.

So, knowing as much as possible about potential jurors is incredibly important, Mueller said, and attorneys will even go so far as to pay private companies to look for as much information as possible.

“Both sides would love to know about the history of anyone on the jury,” he said.

Still, Mueller said it’s unusual for a sheriff’s office to do its own research, and he questioned the exact contents of the information on the background checks, and whether it was more slanted to help the prosecution.

“Then the defense does have something powerful to complain about,” he said.

The document is not available to the public. Sheriff Sean Smith referred all questions to La Plata County spokeswoman Megan Graham, who declined to comment on specifics of the situation, saying it could impact the trial.

Ultimately, background checks on potential jurors are not illegal, Mueller said, and Friday’s flare-up at trial was likely the defense trying to make noise and claim something was done wrong in the process to garner sympathy.

Mueller said defense attorneys are always looking for ways to detract from a case or cause a mistrial, because the more expensive you can make it for prosecutors, the more likely you are to reach a favorable plea deal or compromise.

“Anything a defense can do to throw a monkey wrench in a proceeding going forward, they’re going to do it,” he said.


It’s unclear if the issue in the Redwine trial will go any further. No formal motions were filed as of Friday afternoon. Champagne and Judge Wilson both declined to comment.

jromeo@durangoherald.com
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I stand with the girl, Natalee Holloway.

"I can look back over the past 10 years and there were no steps wasted, and there are no regrets,'' she said. "I did all I knew to do and I think that gives me greater peace now." "I've lived every parent's worst nightmare and I'm the parent that nobody wants to be," she said.

Beth Holloway, 2015 interview with Greta van Susteren
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« Reply #690 on: November 10, 2020, 01:14:34 PM »

Heartbroken for Dylan's loved ones, another delay on the Journey to Justice for Dylan. 

https://www.9news.com/article/news/investigations/dylan-redwine/mark-redwine-trial-ruling/73-c915cee8-8fba-4fb7-aca9-3c8b89a6dd64

Judge declares mistrial in murder case of 13-year-old Dylan Redwine
The defense team for Mark Redwine, who was indicted in 2017 on a charge of second-degree murder, requested a mistrial based on COVID-19 concerns.

Author: Jennifer Campbell-Hicks
Published: 1:01 PM MST November 9, 2020
Updated: 5:01 PM MST November 9, 2020

DURANGO, Colo. — The murder trial of Mark Redwine in the 2012 death of his 13-year-old son Dylan was declared a mistrial on Monday afternoon.

Redwine, 59, was indicted on charges of second-degree murder and child abuse resulting in death in July 2017 and has been held at the La Plata County Detention Center ever since.

Dylan Redwine disappeared in November 2012 while visiting his father in Vallecito. His partial remains were found in June 2013.

Mark Redwine's attorneys had requested the mistrial based on concerns about COVID-19. In a court hearing Monday morning, the defense team told the judge that members of their team were showing COVID-19 symptoms.

The defense team said they wanted to quarantine for 10 to 14 days, according to a spokesperson for the La Plata County District Attorney's Office.

According to the mistrial order from Chief Judge Jeffrey Wilson, the La Plata County district attorney, Christian Champagne, made allegations in a hearing Monday concerning recent behavior by one of Redwine's attorneys.

That allegation was "a report that a member of the defense team was seen interacting with others over the weekend in a manner not consistent with quarantine protocols," according to the DA's Office spokesperson.

The prosecution also said in the hearing that Redwine said in a phone call this past weekend from the La Plata County Detention Center that his defense was seeking to prolong the proceedings, the spokesperson said.

Wilson said in the mistrial order that he wasn't making a finding on the veracity of the allegations.

"If such allegations are true, the Court has no choice but to grant D-180 and declare a mistrial to ensure that Mr. Redwine has effective assistance of counsel," the order says.


Since Redwine's indictment, his trial has been delayed multiple times. It was first postponed in November 2018 as a judge worked to rule on a number of pretrial motions.

A trial date in September 2019 was postponed again after his attorney was arrested on assault and domestic violence charges.

Finally, an April 2020 trial was postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Jury selection began last last month. More than 2,600 people received a jury summons. The goal was to select 12 jurors and two alternates.

Jury selection was put on hold last week, though, after Wilson experienced possible symptoms of COVID-19. According to Court Executive Eric Hogue, the chief judge experienced a lack of taste and smell Thursday morning. The symptoms subsided later in the day.

A new trial date for Redwine will be discussed during a meeting set for 11 a.m. Friday.
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I stand with the girl, Natalee Holloway.

"I can look back over the past 10 years and there were no steps wasted, and there are no regrets,'' she said. "I did all I knew to do and I think that gives me greater peace now." "I've lived every parent's worst nightmare and I'm the parent that nobody wants to be," she said.

Beth Holloway, 2015 interview with Greta van Susteren
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« Reply #691 on: November 13, 2020, 12:58:55 PM »

https://www.koaa.com/news/covering-colorado/judge-sets-january-2021-trial-date-for-mark-redwine-following-mistrial

Judge sets January 2021 trial date for Mark Redwine following mistrial
Mistrial was declared Monday because Redwine’s public defenders were experiencing COVID-19 symptoms

By: Blair MillerPosted at 11:56 AM, Nov 13, 2020 and last updated 12:56 PM, Nov 13, 2020

DENVER – A 6th Judicial District judge on Friday set a tentative trial date for Mark Redwine for Jan. 25, 2021 after a mistrial was declared Monday because Redwine’s public defenders were experiencing COVID-19 symptoms and had to quarantine.

Redwine, who is charged with second-degree murder and child abuse resulting in the 2012 death of his 13-year-old son, Dylan Redwine, appeared remotely in the courtroom, as did his attorney, Justin Bogan.

Bogan, Sixth Judicial District Attorney Christian Champagne, and Judge Jeffrey Wilson walked through the number of days already used under the speedy trial statute, and the court agreed to set a tentative trial start date of Jan. 25.

Judge Wilson said he was unsure if the Jan. 25 trial date would be “realistic” with the current spike in COVID-19 in Colorado and across the country, and agreed with a request from Champagne to have a status conference on Jan. 5, 2021 to see if the trial date later in the month will be feasible.

The mistrial declared Monday in the latest attempt at a trial for Redwine came because some of Redwine’s public defenders were showing symptoms of COVID-19, they said in a motion to the court, and would need to quarantine for 10-14 days even if they did not test positive based on protocols from the Office of the Colorado State Public Defender and state public health department.

The trial has been delayed several times over the years, and COVID-19 has continually pushed the trial date back this year.

Judge Wilson had also exhibited symptoms of the coronavirus last week, though he tested negative over the weekend ahead of Monday's hearing.

The mistrial was declared Monday while the trial was still in the jury selection process. The defense team estimates they need two weeks to make their arguments – something that also came up in Friday’s hearing, when Bogan said he was worried a trial starting in late January could potentially run into the third week of March, when Spring Break is scheduled for many districts in La Plata County.

Dylan Redwine’s family told Denver7 on Monday they were disappointed in the mistrial after for waiting years for the case to come to trial.

“We rented a house down here. We’re taking time off of work and pretty much left our lives to come down here, and then have this happen and here we are again going home empty-handed. It’s just so frustrating,” said Cory Redwine, Dylan’s brother. “It’s just heartbreaking that victims’ rights and everything like that get ignored.”


Dylan Redwine, 13, was on a court-ordered visit to see his father, Mark Redwine, around Thanksgiving Day 2012. The teenager was last seen alive on Nov. 18, 2012.

The partial remains of Dylan Redwine were found 10 miles from his father's home north of Vallecito Lake in La Plata County in June 2013, according to an indictment. His skull was located more than two years later, on Nov. 1, 2015, about a mile and a half from the previously located remains.

Anthropologists who studied the skull determined the injuries were consistent with blunt force trauma in two locations, according to an indictment. The skull also had two small markings consistent with tool marks from a knife, the indictment shows.

Redwine, then 55 years old, was arrested in July 2017 in Washington on a fugitive warrant with the underlying charges of second-degree murder and child abuse resulting in death and was later extradited back to Colorado, where he has been awaiting trial for more than three years.

To date, Mark Redwine has denied his involvement in his son's disappearance and death.
« Last Edit: November 13, 2020, 01:04:07 PM by texasmom » Logged

I stand with the girl, Natalee Holloway.

"I can look back over the past 10 years and there were no steps wasted, and there are no regrets,'' she said. "I did all I knew to do and I think that gives me greater peace now." "I've lived every parent's worst nightmare and I'm the parent that nobody wants to be," she said.

Beth Holloway, 2015 interview with Greta van Susteren
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« Reply #692 on: February 05, 2021, 05:32:08 PM »

A new trial date scheduled...

https://www.thedenverchannel.com/news/local-news/mark-redwine-trial-moved-to-april-after-2nd-mistrial-is-declared-due-to-the-coronavirus-pandemic

Mark Redwine trial moved to April after 2nd mistrial is declared due to the coronavirus pandemic
Posted at 8:58 PM, Jan 05, 2021 and last updated 9:58 PM, Jan 05, 2021

LA PLATA COUNTY, Colo. – The trial for a Colorado man accused of murder in the death of his 13-year-old son was moved to April on Tuesday after a mistrial was declared due to the high number of infections of the novel coronavirus in La Plata County.

Tuesday’s mistrial is the second for Mark Redwine, who is charged with second-degree murder and child abuse resulting in the 2012 death of his 13-year-old son, Dylan Redwine. Back in November, a 6th Judicial District judge declared a mistrial after Redwine’s public defenders were experiencing COVID-19 symptoms and had to quarantine.

Redwine’s trial was expected to begin on Jan. 25 but in a court order filed Tuesday, Judge Jeffrey Wilson determined “that in order to protect the health and safety of the public, as well as litigants and staff of the Sixth Judicial District, that the suspension of jury trials in the Sixth Judicial District would be extended for an indefinite period of time,” until the rates of COVID-19 infection throughout the county could be decreased to levels where jury trials would be safe to resume.
 
Redwine’s trial is now scheduled for April 12, 2021 at 8 a.m.
 
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