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Author Topic: Malaysia Airlines 777 Flight MH370 - Missing - March 7, 2014  (Read 374451 times)
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MuffyBee
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« Reply #20 on: March 09, 2014, 09:29:38 PM »

Thanks for the updates Muffy.

Off to a family gathering at the home of my brother and sister-in-law.  I will check in later tonight.

Janet


You're welcome Janet.   Thank you for starting the thread and posting updates and photos too! Have a good time at your family gathering.  I personally believe it's going to take a long time to get answers about this plane crash.   
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« Reply #21 on: March 09, 2014, 11:58:22 PM »

Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 mystery: Jet's door may have been found, officials say
Published March 09, 2014


Vietnamese aircraft spotted what they suspected was one of the doors belonging to the ill-fated Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 on Sunday, as troubling questions emerged about how two passengers managed to board the Boeing 777 using stolen passports.

The discovery comes as officials consider the possibility that the plane disintegrated mid-flight, a senior source told Reuters.

The state-run Thanh Nien newspaper cited Lt. Gen. Vo Van Tuan, deputy chief of staff of Vietnam's army, as saying searchers in a low-flying plane had spotted an object suspected of being a door from the missing jet. It was found in waters about 56 miles south of Tho Chu island, in the same area where oil slicks were spotted Saturday.[/b]

<snipped>

http://www.foxnews.com/world/2014/03/09/malaysia-airlines-loses-contact-with-plane-carrying-23-people/

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« Reply #22 on: March 10, 2014, 09:41:56 AM »

http://www.wfaa.com/news/local/tarrant/Sons-describe-dad-aboard-missing-flight-He-embodied-love-249228181.html
Sons describe dad aboard missing flight: 'He embodied love'
Posted March 9, 2014, Updated March 10, 2014


The Wood family seeks some kind of closure as still very little is known about the disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370. They are not concerned with accident theories or terrorist plots, but rather, properly remembering their loved one, Philip Wood (pictured, center). Philip has two sons, Chris and Nic

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« Reply #23 on: March 10, 2014, 09:49:42 AM »

This article is a bit older, and I believe it predates the possibility of finding what may be debris from the plane.  I'm so sorry for the families of the flight.     I think at this point there is no happy ending.  Perhaps at the time of the interview, Tom Wood may have thought the plane had been taken somewhere or it had a water landing or something, I don't know.  I'm not able to put myself in his place and I think it would be difficult to accept a loved one is gone in these circumstances. 

http://www.wfaa.com/news/local/tarrant/Brother-of-North-Texas-man-on-missing-flight-maintains-faith-249213761.html
Brother of North Texas man on missing flight maintains faith
March 9, 2014

KELLER -- Tom Wood is a self-professed believer in miracles.

But keeping the faith in the fate of his 50 year old brother, Philip Wood - among the missing on Malaysian Airlines Flight MH370 - is his greatest test.

“We're pretty calm and pretty strong, and y'know, we're hanging in there," Wood said.

After two days, authorities still can't answer whether Philip Wood is alive.

Did the flight crash? Was it a terrorist attack? Or, as Tom has heard through Internet conspiracies, hijacked?

“That would be a whole lot better than what we've been thinking, so I am crossing my fingers, hoping that maybe there's a happy ending to this," Tom Wood said.
 
Tom said the family wants closure, whether the news is good or bad.

He isn't sure if he'll fly to East Asia, where the search for his brother and 238 other passengers continues. His family might.

“You know, the last thing you wanna do is get on a plane right now, after something like that," Wood said. “That's something I don't want to do, don't know about everybody else."
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« Reply #24 on: March 10, 2014, 12:27:54 PM »

I was listening to the news on my car radio this morning and a Maylasian official denied debris from the flight was found, as was reported by the Vietnam.  I believe they thought it might be a door or possibly a window.  We're getting conflicting information along with rumors and etc. 


http://www.chron.com/news/crime/article/Investigators-chase-every-angle-in-missing-jet-5302622.php?cmpid=hpbn
Investigators chase 'every angle' in missing jet
March 10, 2014

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (AP) — Rescue helicopters and ships searching for a Malaysia Airlines jet rushed Monday to investigate a yellow object that looked like a life raft. It turned out to be moss-covered trash floating in the ocean, once again dashing hopes after more than two days of fruitless search for the plane that disappeared en route to Beijing with 239 people on board.

With no confirmation that the Boeing 777 had crashed, hundreds of distraught relatives waited anxiously for any news. Thai police and Interpol questioned the proprietors of a travel agency in the resort town of Pattaya that sold one-way tickets to two men now known to have been traveling on flight MH370 using stolen passports.

There has been no indication that the two men had anything to do with the tragedy, but the use of stolen passports fueled speculation of foul play, terrorism or a hijacking gone wrong. Malaysia has shared their details with Chinese and American intelligence agencies.

Malaysia's police chief was quoted by local media as saying that one of the men had been identified.

Civil aviation chief Azharuddin Abdul Rahman declined to confirm this, but said they were of "non-Asian" appearance, adding that authorities were looking at the possibility the men were connected to a stolen passport syndicate.

Asked by a reporter what they looked like "roughly," he said: "Do you know of a footballer by the name of (Mario) Balotelli? He is an Italian. Do you know how he looks like?"

A reporter then asked, "Is he black?" and the aviation chief replied, "Yes."

The search operation has involved 34 aircraft and 40 ships from several countries covering a 50-nautical mile radius from the point the plane vanished from radar screens between Malaysia and Vietnam, he said.

Experts say possible causes of the apparent crash include an explosion, catastrophic engine failure, terrorist attack, extreme turbulence, pilot error or even suicide.
 
The two stolen passports, one belonging to Austrian Christian Kozel and the other to Luigi Maraldi of Italy, were entered into Interpol's database after they were stolen in Thailand in 2012 and last year, the police body said.

Electronic booking records show that one-way tickets with those names were issued Thursday from a travel agency in the beach resort of Pattaya in eastern Thailand.

Thai police Col. Supachai Phuykaeokam said those reservations were placed with the agency by a second travel agency in Pattaya, which told police it had received the bookings from a China Southern Airlines office in Bangkok.

The owners of the second Pattaya travel agency refused to talk to reporters. Thai police and Interpol officers went in to question the owners.

A telephone operator on a China-based KLM hotline confirmed Sunday that passengers named Maraldi and Kozel had been booked on one-way tickets on the same KLM flight, flying from Beijing to Amsterdam on Saturday. Maraldi was to fly on to Copenhagen, Denmark, and Kozel to Frankfurt, Germany.

As holders of EU passports with onward flights to Europe, the passengers would not have needed visas for China.

Interpol said it and national investigators were working to determine the identities of those who used the stolen passports to board the flight.

Interpol has long sounded the alarm that growing international travel has underpinned a new market for identity theft: Bogus passports are mostly used by illegal immigrants, but also pretty much anyone looking to travel unnoticed such as drug runners or terrorists. More than 1 billion times last year, travelers boarded planes without their passports being checked against Interpol's database of 40 million stolen or lost travel documents, the police agency said.

Azharuddin also said the baggage of five passengers who had checked in to the flight but did not board the plane were removed before it departed, he said. Airport security was strict according to international standards, surveillance has been done and the airport has been audited, he said.
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« Reply #25 on: March 10, 2014, 12:30:52 PM »

http://www.chron.com/news/world/article/Air-force-chief-Malaysia-jet-may-have-turned-back-5301204.php
Vietnam says cannot find object from missing jet
Posted March 9, 2014, Updated March 10, 2014

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (AP) — Vietnamese searchers on ships worked throughout the night but could not find a rectangle object spotted Sunday afternoon that was thought to be one of the doors of a Malaysia Airlines passenger jet that went missing more than two days ago.

Doan Huu Gia, the chief of Vietnam's search and rescue coordination center, said Monday that four planes and seven ships from Vietnam were searching for the object but nothing had been found.
 
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« Reply #26 on: March 10, 2014, 02:14:22 PM »

It appears that there are no clues that would shed some light on this missing airliner and its 239 passengers.  UNBELIEVEABLE!!!  It must be a h--- on Earth for loved ones who are pleading for answers.

Janet

++++

Investigators chase 'every angle' in missing Boeing jet
Published: Mar 10, 2014 at 6:51 AM PDT
Last Updated: Mar 10, 2014 at 10:02 AM PDT


<snipped>

On Sunday afternoon, a Vietnamese plane spotted a rectangular object that was thought to be one of the missing plane's doors, but ships working through the night could not locate it. Then on Monday, a Singaporean search plane spotted a yellow object some 140 kilometers (87 miles) southwest of Tho Chu island, but it turned out to be some sea trash.

Malaysian maritime officials found some oil slicks in the South China Sea and sent a sample to a lab to see if it came from the plane. Tests showed that the oil was not from an aircraft.

As relatives of the 239 people on the flight grappled with fading hope, attention focused on how two passengers managed to board the aircraft using stolen passports.  Interpol confirmed it knew about the stolen passports but said no authorities checked its vast databases on stolen documents before the jet departed.

Warning that "only a handful of countries" routinely make such checks, Interpol Secretary General Ronald Noble chided authorities for "waiting for a tragedy to put prudent security measures in place at borders and boarding gates."

<snipped>

http://www.komonews.com/news/national/Investigators-chase-every-angle-in-missing-Boeing-777-249276001.html
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« Reply #27 on: March 10, 2014, 02:28:47 PM »

Malaysia Airlines 777 Flight MH370 Goes Missing 2 Hours After Take-off, 227 Aboard Including 3 Americans (VIDEO) (Update: Oil Slicks Spotted)

Posted March 8, 2014 by Scared Monkeys

http://scaredmonkeys.com/2014/03/08/malaysia-airlines-777-flight-mh370-goes-missing-2-hours-after-take-off-227-aboard-including-3-americans/



Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 Still Missing: New Leads Explored in Plane Disappearance … Possibility Plane Turned Around and Went Down in the Andaman Sea, near Thailand’s Border

Posted March 9, 2014 by Scared Monkeys


http://scaredmonkeys.com/2014/03/09/malaysia-airlines-flight-mh370-still-missing-new-leads-explored-in-plane-disappearance-possibility-plane-turned-around-and-went-down-in-the-andaman-sea-near-thailands-border/#comments




Officials Identify Plane Passenger Who Used Stolen Passport … ‘Identity of One of the Two Suspects has Been Confirmed, He is not a Malaysian

Posted March 10, 2014 by Scared Monkeys

http://scaredmonkeys.com/2014/03/10/officials-identify-plane-passenger-who-used-stolen-passport-identity-of-one-of-the-two-suspects-has-been-confirmed-he-is-not-a-malaysian/#comments
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« Reply #28 on: March 10, 2014, 04:45:32 PM »

Doing OK Tamikosmom I check in a few times a week 
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« Reply #29 on: March 10, 2014, 04:47:33 PM »

Malaysia Airlines flight MH370: China plays down terrorism theories
Malaysia Airlines flight MH370's disappearance has lit up Chinese social media with speculation that Uighur separatists are to blame. Chinese and Malaysian authorities have found no evidence to support the idea that terrorists are behind Malaysia Airlines flight MH370's disappearance.


http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Asia-Pacific/2014/0310/Malaysia-Airlines-flight-MH370-China-plays-down-terrorism-theories
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« Reply #30 on: March 10, 2014, 07:17:48 PM »

http://www.statesman.com/news/business/at-austin-headquarters-freescale-officials-watch-w/nd9R2/
At Austin headquarters, Freescale officials watch, wait for word on missing employees
March 10, 2014

At Freescale Semiconductor Ltd.’s Austin headquarters, employees were keeping a close eye on news outlets Monday, waiting for any word on their 20 colleagues aboard the missing Malaysia Airlines passenger jet.
The Freescale employees, among 239 people on flight MH370, were mostly engineers and other experts working to make the company’s chip facilities in Tianjin, China, and Kuala Lumpur more efficient, said Mitch Haws, vice president, global communications and investor relations.
“These were people with a lot of experience and technical background and they were very important people,” Haws said. “It’s definitely a loss for the company.”
Out of respect for their privacy, Freescale isn’t releasing any additional details about the employees, company spokeswoman Jacey Zuniga said Monday.
“Just like the rest of the world, we are watching the news and awaiting new developments,” Zuniga said.
Over the weekend, local teams organized transportation and accommodation for the employees’ families, and facilitated grief counseling and other assistance, Zuniga said.
None of Freescale’s most senior executives were on board the Boeing Co. 777-200ER airliner that vanished from radar screens about an hour after it took off from Kuala Lumpur for Beijing on Saturday.
 
While the employees on the flight account for less than 1 percent of Freescale’s global workforce of close to 17,000, they were working toward the same goals and their loss will reverberate throughout Freescale, Haws said. The company, which employs 5,000 people in Austin, is a leading supplier of semiconductor chips for the automotive and digital network industries.
The employees aboard the Malaysia Airlines had been working to streamline facilities in Tianjin and Kuala Lumpur that Freescale uses for testing and packaging microchips used in automobiles, consumer products, telecommunications infrastructure and industrial equipment.
 
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« Reply #31 on: March 11, 2014, 09:28:42 AM »

I must need more coffee...When I first read the article headline I thought it meant this would be the last day Maylasian Airline passengers would be flying with stolen passports.  In other words, I thought it said they were going to begin checking passports against the Interpol lists for lost and stolen passports like the U.S. does.   Silly me.  They've had that option for a long time, they just don't.  Whether it's to obtain entry into another country (and leave current one) for asylum, for work, for possible illegal activity including terrorism, this very simple checking of passports needs to be implemented just for starters.  If the two young men that flew with stolen passports were not a part of a terror plot, it still highlights a glaring hole in security.     I've read articles indicating it can be difficult to ascertain if the person presenting the passport is truly the person it belongs to. That is another problem that can eventually be overcome, but for me, just starting with scanning passports that are lost and stolen cuts down the numbers.  I've come into the U.S. from overseas and had to press my thumb on an electronic device to verify my identity.  Of course, there's probably some way that can be circumvented, and I think retina scans and such may be the future.  JMHO Now, back to more coffee...


http://abcnews.go.com/US/day-malaysia-airline-passengers-stolen-passports/story?id=22852454
The Last Day of Malaysia Airline Passengers With Stolen Passports
March 11, 2014

A man claiming to be the friend of two Iranians who used fake passports to board the missing Malaysia Airlines flight told ABC News that the men stayed at his home the night before the flight vanished.

Mohammad Mallaeibeasir told ABC News that he is an 18-year-old student living in Malaysia who went to high school with one of the men who is believed to have used a fake passport to board the missing flight. He said the other man was a friend of the friend's, and the pair stayed at Mallaeibeasir's the night before the flight took off.

Mallaeibeasir identified the men as Pouria Nour Mohammadi and Reza Devalar, both around age 18 or 19 and both from Iran. He said he went to high school with Pouria, but had not seen him for a couple of years.

They stayed with Mallaeibeasir and his roommate Friday night, and then Mallaeibeasir drove them to the airport, where they used stolen Italian and Austrian passports to board Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 on Saturday morning, he said.
 
Mallaeibeasir said he did not know the men were using fake passports until the news stories broke and Pouria's mother called him and told him about it. Mallaeibeasir says he then called Malaysia Airlines and told them all of the information he knew.

Today Malaysian Police Chief Khalid Abu Bakar identified one of the two men with stolen passports as Pouria Nour Mohammad Mehrdad, 19, and said he was likely trying to enter Germany to seek asylum. His mother contacted authorities after he didn't arrive in Frankfurt.

Interpol later identified the other man as Delavar Syed Mohammad Reza, 29.

Law enforcement sources told ABC news today that the men's tickets were purchased by an Iranian man known as "Mr. Ali."

Mallaeibeasir said that when Pouria and Reza were staying at his house, he heard them briefly talking to an "Ali" on the phone.

"The last night when they were in my home they were talking on the phone for a long time. They were talking in Persian, in their room, and I heard them say 'OK Ali' like that in Persian. I didn't understand because it was like, five seconds. I went into the room to take water from my fridge and I came out and they said, 'Be quiet, we're talking.'"

Besides the hushed phone conversations, Mallaeibeasir said that the pair just hung out with him and his housemate and watched movies. Then Mallaeibeasir drove them to the airport.

"They stayed here only the last night before the flight. They were supposed to stay in Malaysia for three days but I think they stayed for one week," Mallaebeasir said. "They were with me because I had a car and I told them I will take you to the airport. They came to my house."

Mallaeibeasir and Pouria went to high school together in Tehran two years ago, before Mallaebeasir moved to Malaysia to study business information technology. He said he did not know Reza until the two arrived at his home for a quick night's stay.

Mallaeibeasir said he did not ask Pouria or Reza why they were in Malaysia. Pouria said he was heading to Germany or Copenhagen after Malaysia in order to visit his mother because they were having family problems, Mallaeibeasir said.

The two men traveled lightly, Mallaebeasier said. Pouria had a mountain climbing-type backpack and a laptop, while Reza carried a suitcase and a laptop, he said.

After he dropped them at the airport, Mallaebeasier called the men on their cell phones. Pouria answered but hung up quickly, and Mallaebeasier ended up talking to Reza for about three minutes, he said.
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« Reply #32 on: March 11, 2014, 09:53:54 AM »

http://www.cnn.com/2014/03/10/travel/malaysia-airlines-stolen-passports/
Who travels with a stolen passport?
March 11, 2014

(CNN) -- How difficult is it to board a plane with a stolen passport?
Not as hard as you might think.
In any major international airport, it's not uncommon to have your passport checked four times or more between check-in and boarding the aircraft. But if passenger documents aren't checked against Interpol's database of stolen and lost travel documents, travelers using those documents can slip through layers of security.
Reports that two passengers on missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 were traveling on stolen Austrian and Italian passports have highlighted security concerns that have troubled Interpol for years, the international law enforcement agency said Sunday. The flight, carrying more than 200 passengers, disappeared from radar Saturday and hasn't been seen or heard from since.
Interpol identified the men using the stolen passports as Pouri Nourmohammadi, 18, and Delavar Seyed Mohammad Reza, 29, both Iranians. Malaysian police believe Nourmohammadi was trying to emigrate to Germany using the stolen Austrian passport. The men entered Malaysia on February 28 using valid Iranian passports, Interpol said.
"Interpol is asking why only a handful of countries worldwide are taking care to make sure that persons possessing stolen passports are not boarding international flights," Interpol Secretary General Ronald K. Noble said in a statement.
What happened to Flight 370?
Before the departure of Flight 370, no country had checked the stolen passports against Interpol's list since they were added to the lost-documents database in 2012 and 2013, Interpol said.
Countries, but not airlines, have access to Interpol's data, and many governments don't routinely check passports against the database.
In 2013, passengers were able to board planes more than 1 billion times without having their travel documents checked against Interpol's data, the agency said. Airlines carried more than 3.1 billion passengers globally in 2013, according to estimates from the International Air Transport Association.

Are stolen passports related to plane's disappearance?
Interpol head Noble said Tuesday that the disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 does not appear to be related to terrorism.
"The more information we get, the more we're inclined to conclude that it was not a terrorist incident," Noble said at a news conference in Lyon, France.
There's no evidence to suggest either of the men traveling on the missing Malaysia Airlines flight was connected to any terrorist organizations, according to Malaysian investigators.
On any given day, many people travel using stolen or fake passports for reasons that have nothing to do with terrorism, aviation security expert Richard Bloom told CNN.
They might be trying to immigrate illegally to another country, or they might be smuggling stolen goods, people, drugs or weapons or trying to import otherwise legal goods without paying taxes, said Bloom, director of terrorism, intelligence and security studies at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.
 
Noble said Sunday that the fact that any passenger was able to board an international flight using a stolen passport listed in Interpol's databases is a big concern.
"This is a situation we had hoped never to see," he said. "For years Interpol has asked why should countries wait for a tragedy to put prudent security measures in place at borders and boarding gates?"
Few countries look up stolen passports
Interpol does not charge countries for access to its databases, but some of the 190 Interpol member countries may not have the technical capacity or resources to access the network, according to Tom Fuentes, a former FBI assistant director.
"It's just up to the will of the country to set it up and do it," Fuentes said.
Interpol's Stolen and Lost Travel Documents database was created in 2002, following the September 11, 2001, attacks, to help countries secure their borders. Since then, it has expanded from a few thousand passports and searches to more than 40 million entries and more than 800 million searches per year.
About 60,000 of those 800 million searches yield hits against stolen or lost documents, according to Interpol.
The United States searches the database more than 250 million times annually, the United Kingdom more than 120 million times annually and the United Arab Emirates more than 50 million times annually, Interpol said. (Some 300,000 passports are lost or stolen each year in the United States, according to the U.S. State Department, which collects reports of stolen passports and sends them to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection and Interpol.)
According to the Department of Homeland Security, Customs and Border Protection vets all travelers booked on flights to, from and heading through the United States through the Advanced Passenger Information System.
It conducts a thorough review of all relevant domestic and international criminal databases, including Interpol's, for any issues of concern. This review includes reports of stolen documents.
"If Malaysia Airlines and all airlines worldwide were able to check the passport details of prospective passengers against Interpol's database, then we would not have to speculate whether stolen passports were used by terrorists to board MH 370," Interpol's Noble said.
 
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« Reply #33 on: March 11, 2014, 03:15:14 PM »

https://twitter.com/MMoon_WREG3
March 11, 2014 Tweets

melissa moon ‏@MMoon_WREG3  3m
Missing Malaysia Airlines plane sparks conspiracy theories. Plane landed at mysterious location? http://nydn.us/1fS4FOt

 melissa moon ‏@MMoon_WREG3  11m
Getting stranger & stranger. Families: Cellphones of passengers from missing Malaysian plane still ring http://usat.ly/1iwgaJb
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« Reply #34 on: March 11, 2014, 03:18:33 PM »

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/world/2014/03/11/malaysia-airlines-370-passengers-cell-phones/6285325/
Families: Cellphones of missing passengers still ring
March 11, 2014

 
A few family members said dialing the numbers resulted in ringing tones on the other end, even though the calls weren't picked up. Bian Liangwei, sister of one of the passengers, told the International Business Times that she reached her older brother's phone Monday afternoon. "If I could get through, the police could locate the position, and there is a chance he could still be alive," she said.

But industry experts say ringing phones don't necessarily mean that the calls are going through.

"The ringing is not actually ringing at the other phone yet," industry analyst Jeff Kagan said. "It's just telling you that the network is in the process of finding and connecting to it."

Locally placed calls may connect almost instantaneously, he said, but long-distance or international calls may "ring" several times before the phone is found or the system can't find it and disconnects the call.
 
The ringing keeps callers from hanging up when they hear no sound, said Amy Storey, spokeswoman for CTIA, the Washington, D.C.-based trade group for wireless carriers. "The ringing sound has nothing to do with the actual 'ringing' of the called party's device," she said.

The ringing is "part of the process of wireless" communication, Kagan said. "In this particular case it's painful because it gives people false hope."

During a meeting with passengers' families, Malaysia Airlines' Hugh Dunleavy said the company had similar results — it tried calling mobile phones of crewmembers, which also rang.
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« Reply #35 on: March 11, 2014, 03:20:26 PM »

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/world/2014/03/11/malaysia-airlines-investigation/6282557/
Reports: Missing jet flew hundreds of miles off course
March 11, 2014



KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia — Military radar data shows the Malaysia Airlines jet that disappeared last week flew hundreds of miles off course after civilian systems last recorded the plane's location, an official told Malaysian media.

The Malaysian military radar indicates Flight 370 flew at least as far as the Malacca Strait west of Malaysia, air force chief Gen. Rodzali Daud told local media.

"After that, the signal from the plane was lost," he told the newspaper. The primary focus of the search previously had been off the eastern coast of Malaysia and Vietnam based on where air controllers lost track of the Boeing 777.

Malaysian authorities have said the plane's electronic signaling transponder apparently stopped working at about the time civilian flight controllers lost contact with it, near the coast of Vietnam. Daud said Malaysian Air Force radar data shows the track of the plane then turning sharply and eventually flying over the island of Pulau Perak -- hundreds of miles off course.
 

See diagram in article at link.
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« Reply #36 on: March 11, 2014, 03:28:21 PM »

http://www.businessweek.com/ap/2014-03-11/interpol-shows-image-of-2-iranians-on-missing-jet
2 airlines to check passports on Interpol database
March 11, 2014

LYON, France (AP) — Interpol is allowing two airlines to check passenger passports against its vast database of lost and stolen travel documents — in a test project aimed to let private sector companies help authorities crack down on criminals who travel with fake documents, the police organization's leader said Tuesday.

It's not known whether stolen passports had to do with Saturday's disappearance of a Boeing 777 bound from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, to Beijing with 239 people on board. But Interpol on Tuesday released an image of two Iranians who used valid Iranian passports to get to Malaysia, then boarded the flight with stolen European passports.

Up to now, only national authorities such as border police have been allowed to verify whether passengers' passports turn up in the database of some 40 million stolen or lost passports in the computer systems of the Lyon, France-based international police agency — not airlines or other private sector companies.

STORY: Biometric Privacy Trade-off Exposed in Missing Jet's Passports
"I have announced today that Qatar Airways and Air Arabia are two airlines that have committed themselves to making sure that all passengers boarding their planes will have their passport data screened against Interpol's database," Interpol Secretary General Ronald K. Noble told reporters at its headquarters.

In essence, the two airlines will be able to query the database but not gain direct access to it, in a program called I-Checkit for private sector companies — which could one day include financial institutions or hotels too, officials said.

While the database has been available to authorities for more than a decade, only a handful of countries actively use it — primarily the United States, Britain and the United Arab Emirates. Noble said that more than 1 billion times last year, travelers boarded planes without their passports being checked against the database.

Air Arabia and Qatar were chosen to test the idea because they approached Interpol and expressed an interest, said Michael O'Connell, director of Interpol's operational police support directorate.

The Interpol chief said stolen passports have been a known problem since at least the 1993 bombing of the World Trade Center: "We know that the terrorist mastermind in that bombing was carrying a stolen Iraqi passport to cross borders."

It takes less than a second for countries to query the database via Interpol software and an Internet connection, once a passport is scanned. Interpol says some of its 190 member countries have cited a lack of police resources, privacy concerns, or political hostilities for their failure to check passports against the global data.
 
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« Reply #37 on: March 12, 2014, 05:02:40 PM »

REPORT: Chinese satellite images may show missing plane
NewsRadio 850KOA-4 minutes ago
Crews may have discovered the wreckage of a missing Malaysian airliner. CNN reports satellite images out of China might show the crash site ...
Read more: http://www.850koa.com/articles/national-news-104668/report-chinese-satellite-images-may-show-12149744#ixzz2vmkYZnC9
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« Reply #38 on: March 13, 2014, 07:57:22 PM »

   We still don't know.  I'm so sorry for the family, friends and co-workers of the passengers & crew on Malaysia Airlines Flight 370.


http://abcnews.go.com/International/malaysia-airliner-pinging-indication-crashed-indian-ocean/story?id=22894802
Malaysia Airliner Communications Shut Down Separately: US Officials Say
March 13, 2014

Two U.S. officials tell ABC News the U.S. believes that the shutdown of two communication systems happened separately on Malaysia Airlines Flight 370. One source said this indicates the plane did not come out of the sky because of a catastrophic failure.

The data reporting system, they believe, was shut down at 1:07 a.m. The transponder -- which transmits location and altitude -- shut down at 1:21 a.m.

This indicates it may well have been a deliberate act, ABC News aviation consultant John Nance said.

U.S. investigators told ABC News that the two modes of communication were "systematically shut down."

That means the U.S. team "is convinced that there was manual intervention," a source said, which means it was likely not an accident or catastrophic malfunction that took the plane out of the sky.
 
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« Reply #39 on: March 13, 2014, 09:22:40 PM »

http://in.reuters.com/article/2014/03/14/malaysia-airlines-idINDEEA2900B20140314
Search for Malaysian plane may extend to Indian Ocean - U.S.
March 14, 2014

(Reuters) - A new search area for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 may be opened in the Indian Ocean, the White House said, significantly broadening the potential location of the plane, which disappeared nearly a week ago with 239 people on board.

Expanding the search area to the Indian Ocean would be consistent with the theory that the Boeing 777 may have detoured to the west about an hour after take-off from the Malaysian capital Kuala Lumpur en route to Beijing.

"It's my understanding that based on some new information that's not necessarily conclusive - but new information - an additional search area may be opened in the Indian Ocean," White House spokesman Jay Carney told reporters in Washington.

Carney did not specify the nature of the new information and Malaysian officials were not immediately available to comment.
 
Satellites picked up faint electronic pulses from the aircraft after it went missing on Saturday, but the signals gave no information about where the jet was heading and little else about its fate, two sources close to the investigation said on Thursday.

But the "pings" indicated its maintenance troubleshooting systems were switched on and ready to communicate with satellites, showing the aircraft was at least capable of communicating after losing touch with air traffic controllers.

The system transmits such pings about once an hour, according to the sources, who said five or six were heard. However, the pings alone are not proof that the plane was in the air or on the ground, the sources said.

Malaysian authorities have said the last civilian contact occurred as the Boeing (BA.N) 777-200ER flew north into the Gulf of Thailand. They said military radar sightings indicated it may have turned sharply to the west and crossed the Malay Peninsula toward the Andaman Sea.
 
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