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Author Topic: Stacy Ann Peterson 23, Bolingbrook IL - Missing 10/28/07 #1  (Read 650732 times)
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pdh3
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« Reply #960 on: December 26, 2007, 03:08:21 AM »

Welcome RiverWalk!

Thanks for the info. Very interesting reading.

I hope Kathleen and Stacy get the justice they deserve. It looks like DP had plenty of people covering for him in the past. Hopefully, those days are gone.
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« Reply #961 on: December 26, 2007, 11:17:50 AM »

No sure or this is post early. When its not, now it is.

Questions but Few Answers in Peterson Case

BOLINGBROOK, Ill. —  A mysterious blue barrel. Divers searching the murky, frigid waters of an industrial canal. A woman's body exhumed for clues three years after her death.

Nearly two months after Stacy Peterson was last seen, the investigation into her disappearance and suspicions surrounding her husband, former Bolingbrook police Sgt. Drew Peterson, have produced many intriguing questions. But few answers.

All the story lines, though, have led back to one house on a quiet street, and to Sunday, Oct. 28, the day the 23-year-old mother of two small children vanished.

The last time anyone outside the Peterson home talked to her was around 10:15 a.m., when she spoke briefly with a friend, Bruce Ziderich, about helping to paint an apartment he owned in nearby Yorkville.

Ziderich told her to wait until she heard from her sister, Cassandra Cales, before going to the apartment, according to Pamela Bosco, a longtime family friend.

After that, the trail goes cold.

Drew Peterson, 53, who resigned from the police department after being named a suspect in his wife's disappearance, has told reporters that when he awoke around 11 a.m., his wife already had left.

About noon, Sharon Bychowski, a neighbor and friend of Stacy's, phoned Drew and told him she'd been to the market and had some candy for the kids.

Drew Peterson stopped by about 1:15 p.m., saying he had to run a brief errand, and returned about 15 minutes later, Bychowski said.

By mid-afternoon, around 2:30 or 3 p.m., Bosco said, Cales tried to call her sister.

Cales said Stacy had told her two days earlier that she feared Peterson might harm her and that she planned to talk to a divorce attorney on Monday.

Stacy Peterson had told family and friends that her husband — whom she'd met six years earlier, when she was 17 and he was married to his third wife — had become increasingly controlling, following her, tracking her with GPS and calling her incessantly on her cell phone.

Two weeks before she disappeared, she had gotten a new cell number after she found her phone bill in her husband's briefcase, some of the some numbers highlighted, Bosco said.

But one thing didn't change: her insistence on always keeping her phone turned on, Bosco said.

So when Cales couldn't get through that afternoon, she began to worry.

At 2:30 p.m. that day, Peterson — a 29-year Bolingbrook Police veteran — called work, saying he could not work his 5 p.m.-to-5 a.m. shift because his wife was gone and he needed to stay home with his children, Lt. Ken Teppel said.

But other stories have emerged to contradict Peterson's account.

Around 10 p.m. that night, a friend of Drew Peterson's stepbrother Thomas Morphey said he was home watching the World Series when Morphey called in a panic, saying he needed to talk.

Walter Martineck said Morphey told him that just hours earlier he'd helped Peterson move a large blue container from an upstairs bedroom into Peterson's SUV. Morphey said he never looked inside the container, but it was warm to the touch and he had a terrible feeling, Martineck said.

"He took me by my shoulders, told me I can't say anything, and he just told me that he thinks he helped dispose of Stacy's body," Martineck said on NBC's "Today" program.

Peterson has denied that Morphey helped him move anything.

He has told reporters that his wife called him around 9 that night, telling him that she was leaving him. Later, in one of several television interviews, Peterson said his wife told him, "She found somebody else."

Investigators have never confirmed reports of a container, but volunteers from the Texas-based group EquuSearch who helped look for her have said police asked them to watch for a large blue plastic barrel.

For weeks, police divers searched a canal south of Chicago looking for evidence.

Cales went to Peterson's house around 11 p.m. on Oct. 28 looking for her sister, Bosco said. Drew was not home, but his kids were.

"They said their parents had a fight and that Stacy had gone to Grandpa's house," Bosco said.

At 11:26, Cales said she reached Peterson on his cell phone.

"He said, 'Your sister left me,'" Cales recounted on the Web site, findstacypeterson.com. She recounted what he told her next: "She called me at 9 p.m. and said she was leaving me and going on a lil vacation ... and she left the car somewhere in Bolingbrook."

Bosco said Peterson told Cales even more.

"He said, 'She took $25,000 from the safe, her bikini is missing and her passport is missing, she's disappeared just like your mom,'" said Bosco, the last comment referring to Cales' and Stacy Peterson's mother, who vanished when Stacy was a teenager.

Cales said she didn't believe any of it — starting with Peterson's contention that he was home. She knew that wasn't true, she wrote, because she had just been there and was sitting around the corner.

At 1:36 a.m. on Oct. 29, Cales went to the Bolingbrook Police Department to report her sister missing, then filed another missing person's report around with the Illinois State Police, Teppel said.

By Nov. 9, police were calling Drew Peterson a suspect in his wife's disappearance and said it was a possible homicide. They also said that they would exhume the body of Peterson's ex-wife, Kathleen Savio, saying a 2004 death that was originally ruled an accidental bathtub drowning likely was a homicide. They have not called Peterson a suspect in that case and have not released results of a new autopsy.

But a parade of people have been called to testify before a grand jury.

And the case has become a media sensation, with news outlets reporting even the smallest development and staking out the once-quiet Bolingbrook neighborhood where Peterson still lives with four of his children, including two from his marriage to Savio.

But for all the searches by police and volunteers, all the tidbits of information and speculation, there still have been no charges — and no indication that they're imminent.

Drew Peterson's attorney, Joel Brodsky, even raised the possibility that Stacy Peterson's disappearance might never be solved.

"Not every mystery gets solved," Brodsky said. "This is not TV, it's real life."

Many Questions but Few Answers in Peterson Case
Tuesday, December 25, 2007

 E-Mail Print Digg This! del.icio.us
BOLINGBROOK, Ill. —  A mysterious blue barrel. Divers searching the murky, frigid waters of an industrial canal. A woman's body exhumed for clues three years after her death.

Nearly two months after Stacy Peterson was last seen, the investigation into her disappearance and suspicions surrounding her husband, former Bolingbrook police Sgt. Drew Peterson, have produced many intriguing questions. But few answers.

All the story lines, though, have led back to one house on a quiet street, and to Sunday, Oct. 28, the day the 23-year-old mother of two small children vanished.

The last time anyone outside the Peterson home talked to her was around 10:15 a.m., when she spoke briefly with a friend, Bruce Ziderich, about helping to paint an apartment he owned in nearby Yorkville.

Ziderich told her to wait until she heard from her sister, Cassandra Cales, before going to the apartment, according to Pamela Bosco, a longtime family friend.

After that, the trail goes cold.

Drew Peterson, 53, who resigned from the police department after being named a suspect in his wife's disappearance, has told reporters that when he awoke around 11 a.m., his wife already had left.

About noon, Sharon Bychowski, a neighbor and friend of Stacy's, phoned Drew and told him she'd been to the market and had some candy for the kids.

Drew Peterson stopped by about 1:15 p.m., saying he had to run a brief errand, and returned about 15 minutes later, Bychowski said.

By mid-afternoon, around 2:30 or 3 p.m., Bosco said, Cales tried to call her sister.

Cales said Stacy had told her two days earlier that she feared Peterson might harm her and that she planned to talk to a divorce attorney on Monday.

Stacy Peterson had told family and friends that her husband — whom she'd met six years earlier, when she was 17 and he was married to his third wife — had become increasingly controlling, following her, tracking her with GPS and calling her incessantly on her cell phone.

Two weeks before she disappeared, she had gotten a new cell number after she found her phone bill in her husband's briefcase, some of the some numbers highlighted, Bosco said.

But one thing didn't change: her insistence on always keeping her phone turned on, Bosco said.

So when Cales couldn't get through that afternoon, she began to worry.

At 2:30 p.m. that day, Peterson — a 29-year Bolingbrook Police veteran — called work, saying he could not work his 5 p.m.-to-5 a.m. shift because his wife was gone and he needed to stay home with his children, Lt. Ken Teppel said.

But other stories have emerged to contradict Peterson's account.

Around 10 p.m. that night, a friend of Drew Peterson's stepbrother Thomas Morphey said he was home watching the World Series when Morphey called in a panic, saying he needed to talk.

Walter Martineck said Morphey told him that just hours earlier he'd helped Peterson move a large blue container from an upstairs bedroom into Peterson's SUV. Morphey said he never looked inside the container, but it was warm to the touch and he had a terrible feeling, Martineck said.

"He took me by my shoulders, told me I can't say anything, and he just told me that he thinks he helped dispose of Stacy's body," Martineck said on NBC's "Today" program.

Peterson has denied that Morphey helped him move anything.

He has told reporters that his wife called him around 9 that night, telling him that she was leaving him. Later, in one of several television interviews, Peterson said his wife told him, "She found somebody else."

Investigators have never confirmed reports of a container, but volunteers from the Texas-based group EquuSearch who helped look for her have said police asked them to watch for a large blue plastic barrel.

For weeks, police divers searched a canal south of Chicago looking for evidence.

Cales went to Peterson's house around 11 p.m. on Oct. 28 looking for her sister, Bosco said. Drew was not home, but his kids were.

"They said their parents had a fight and that Stacy had gone to Grandpa's house," Bosco said.

At 11:26, Cales said she reached Peterson on his cell phone.

"He said, 'Your sister left me,'" Cales recounted on the Web site, findstacypeterson.com. She recounted what he told her next: "She called me at 9 p.m. and said she was leaving me and going on a lil vacation ... and she left the car somewhere in Bolingbrook."

Bosco said Peterson told Cales even more.

"He said, 'She took $25,000 from the safe, her bikini is missing and her passport is missing, she's disappeared just like your mom,'" said Bosco, the last comment referring to Cales' and Stacy Peterson's mother, who vanished when Stacy was a teenager.

Cales said she didn't believe any of it — starting with Peterson's contention that he was home. She knew that wasn't true, she wrote, because she had just been there and was sitting around the corner.

At 1:36 a.m. on Oct. 29, Cales went to the Bolingbrook Police Department to report her sister missing, then filed another missing person's report around with the Illinois State Police, Teppel said.

By Nov. 9, police were calling Drew Peterson a suspect in his wife's disappearance and said it was a possible homicide. They also said that they would exhume the body of Peterson's ex-wife, Kathleen Savio, saying a 2004 death that was originally ruled an accidental bathtub drowning likely was a homicide. They have not called Peterson a suspect in that case and have not released results of a new autopsy.

But a parade of people have been called to testify before a grand jury.

And the case has become a media sensation, with news outlets reporting even the smallest development and staking out the once-quiet Bolingbrook neighborhood where Peterson still lives with four of his children, including two from his marriage to Savio.

But for all the searches by police and volunteers, all the tidbits of information and speculation, there still have been no charges — and no indication that they're imminent.

Drew Peterson's attorney, Joel Brodsky, even raised the possibility that Stacy Peterson's disappearance might never be solved.

"Not every mystery gets solved," Brodsky said. "This is not TV, it's real life."

Many Questions but Few Answers in Peterson Case
Tuesday, December 25, 2007

 E-Mail Print Digg This! del.icio.us
BOLINGBROOK, Ill. —  A mysterious blue barrel. Divers searching the murky, frigid waters of an industrial canal. A woman's body exhumed for clues three years after her death.

Nearly two months after Stacy Peterson was last seen, the investigation into her disappearance and suspicions surrounding her husband, former Bolingbrook police Sgt. Drew Peterson, have produced many intriguing questions. But few answers.

All the story lines, though, have led back to one house on a quiet street, and to Sunday, Oct. 28, the day the 23-year-old mother of two small children vanished.

The last time anyone outside the Peterson home talked to her was around 10:15 a.m., when she spoke briefly with a friend, Bruce Ziderich, about helping to paint an apartment he owned in nearby Yorkville.

Ziderich told her to wait until she heard from her sister, Cassandra Cales, before going to the apartment, according to Pamela Bosco, a longtime family friend.

After that, the trail goes cold.

Drew Peterson, 53, who resigned from the police department after being named a suspect in his wife's disappearance, has told reporters that when he awoke around 11 a.m., his wife already had left.

About noon, Sharon Bychowski, a neighbor and friend of Stacy's, phoned Drew and told him she'd been to the market and had some candy for the kids.

Drew Peterson stopped by about 1:15 p.m., saying he had to run a brief errand, and returned about 15 minutes later, Bychowski said.

By mid-afternoon, around 2:30 or 3 p.m., Bosco said, Cales tried to call her sister.

Cales said Stacy had told her two days earlier that she feared Peterson might harm her and that she planned to talk to a divorce attorney on Monday.

Stacy Peterson had told family and friends that her husband — whom she'd met six years earlier, when she was 17 and he was married to his third wife — had become increasingly controlling, following her, tracking her with GPS and calling her incessantly on her cell phone.

Two weeks before she disappeared, she had gotten a new cell number after she found her phone bill in her husband's briefcase, some of the some numbers highlighted, Bosco said.

But one thing didn't change: her insistence on always keeping her phone turned on, Bosco said.

So when Cales couldn't get through that afternoon, she began to worry.

At 2:30 p.m. that day, Peterson — a 29-year Bolingbrook Police veteran — called work, saying he could not work his 5 p.m.-to-5 a.m. shift because his wife was gone and he needed to stay home with his children, Lt. Ken Teppel said.

But other stories have emerged to contradict Peterson's account.

Around 10 p.m. that night, a friend of Drew Peterson's stepbrother Thomas Morphey said he was home watching the World Series when Morphey called in a panic, saying he needed to talk.

Walter Martineck said Morphey told him that just hours earlier he'd helped Peterson move a large blue container from an upstairs bedroom into Peterson's SUV. Morphey said he never looked inside the container, but it was warm to the touch and he had a terrible feeling, Martineck said.

"He took me by my shoulders, told me I can't say anything, and he just told me that he thinks he helped dispose of Stacy's body," Martineck said on NBC's "Today" program.

Peterson has denied that Morphey helped him move anything.

He has told reporters that his wife called him around 9 that night, telling him that she was leaving him. Later, in one of several television interviews, Peterson said his wife told him, "She found somebody else."

Investigators have never confirmed reports of a container, but volunteers from the Texas-based group EquuSearch who helped look for her have said police asked them to watch for a large blue plastic barrel.

For weeks, police divers searched a canal south of Chicago looking for evidence.

Cales went to Peterson's house around 11 p.m. on Oct. 28 looking for her sister, Bosco said. Drew was not home, but his kids were.

"They said their parents had a fight and that Stacy had gone to Grandpa's house," Bosco said.

At 11:26, Cales said she reached Peterson on his cell phone.

"He said, 'Your sister left me,'" Cales recounted on the Web site, findstacypeterson.com. She recounted what he told her next: "She called me at 9 p.m. and said she was leaving me and going on a lil vacation ... and she left the car somewhere in Bolingbrook."

Bosco said Peterson told Cales even more.

"He said, 'She took $25,000 from the safe, her bikini is missing and her passport is missing, she's disappeared just like your mom,'" said Bosco, the last comment referring to Cales' and Stacy Peterson's mother, who vanished when Stacy was a teenager.

Cales said she didn't believe any of it — starting with Peterson's contention that he was home. She knew that wasn't true, she wrote, because she had just been there and was sitting around the corner.

At 1:36 a.m. on Oct. 29, Cales went to the Bolingbrook Police Department to report her sister missing, then filed another missing person's report around with the Illinois State Police, Teppel said.

By Nov. 9, police were calling Drew Peterson a suspect in his wife's disappearance and said it was a possible homicide. They also said that they would exhume the body of Peterson's ex-wife, Kathleen Savio, saying a 2004 death that was originally ruled an accidental bathtub drowning likely was a homicide. They have not called Peterson a suspect in that case and have not released results of a new autopsy.

But a parade of people have been called to testify before a grand jury.

And the case has become a media sensation, with news outlets reporting even the smallest development and staking out the once-quiet Bolingbrook neighborhood where Peterson still lives with four of his children, including two from his marriage to Savio.

But for all the searches by police and volunteers, all the tidbits of information and speculation, there still have been no charges — and no indication that they're imminent.

Drew Peterson's attorney, Joel Brodsky, even raised the possibility that Stacy Peterson's disappearance might never be solved.

"Not every mystery gets solved," Brodsky said. "This is not TV, it's real life."

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,318346,00.html
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I am glad hear this media attention from the Netherlands. ‘Recherche verdraait informatie te vaak’
Investigators in a black breach and again a bad name of the Dutch police. It smells again to Corrpution and a negative researching in missing persons cases
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« Reply #962 on: December 27, 2007, 07:59:36 AM »

Chicago Sun Times
 
December 27, 2007 Thursday
Final Edition 
Stacy's neighbor finds map of cemetery in her front yard; Cops call odd display a 'sick prank'  

A "sick prank" or a possible lead in the disappearance of Bolingbrook mother Stacy Peterson?

Sharon Bychowski wasn't sure what to make of the odd display in her front yard Wednesday, including dozens of photographs of gravestones, a map of a cemetery, a Christmas stocking and a hand-scrawled letter that read in part: "Please fully investigate this grave site" and "Find the Truth."

But Bychowski says she suspects someone targeted her for a reason. "I'm right next door to Stacy, and [the public] has known from the beginning that my purpose is to find Stacy," Bychowski said Wednesday. "She's my best friend."

Bychowski called Bolingbrook Police Chief Ray McGury after she and her husband found the assortment of objects Wednesday morning. The objects, some of which were in her mailbox, included copies of a National Enquirer story about the Peterson case with the headline: "Mystery of Cop's Missing Wife . . . Solved!"

McGury said two of the Petersons' neighbors found "non-threatening letters" in their mailboxes Wednesday. McGury said both offered a "possible location" for Stacy Peterson. All of the materials were turned over to State Police. McGury called the letters upsetting, but said they appeared to have been written by "somebody playing a pretty sick prank."

Bychowski doesn't know who left the mysterious materials, which included a hand-drawn map of a cemetery and a square within the graveyard, indicating where to search. Bychowski wouldn't say where the cemetery is. "I believe [investigators] can check out the site," she said.

Stacy Peterson has been missing since Oct. 28. Her husband, former Bolingbrook Police Sgt. Drew Peterson, is considered a suspect in her disappearance. Drew Peterson has repeatedly denied any involvement in the case and has said his wife has left him, possibly for another man.
http://www6.lexisnexis.com/publisher/EndUser?Action=UserDisplayFullDocument&orgId=574&topicId=100020825&docId=l:721237969&start=2
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« Reply #963 on: December 27, 2007, 12:13:26 PM »

Just FYI -

Nancy Grace will feature this case tonight.
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« Reply #964 on: December 27, 2007, 07:09:04 PM »

http://www.wbbm780.com/Peterson-Famiy:-Creepy-Notes-Not-A-Lead/1396157

Peterson Family: Creepy Notes Not A Lead

BOLINGBROOK, Ill. (WBBM)  -- As we've been reporting, two neighbors of Drew Peterson received disturbing notes about the disappearance of Stacy Peterson - and one of those neighbors received graveyard photographs strewn in the driveway and yard.

WBBM's Steve Miller reports.

Now authorities apparently have some new information about those notes.  Information suggesting they were the product of a mind obsessed with the Peterson case - but of no real value.

Notes about Stacy Peterson.  A map.  Photographs of gravesites.  What does it all add up to?

Pamela Bosco, a spokeswoman for Stacy Peterson's family, says they add up to nothing.

"It turned out it wasn't a real lead.  Illinois State Police found out who the person was who'd done it.  It was a man.  And it seemed like he was just a little bit emotionally involved into this case, and not completely stable.

"They found him and questioned him, and it turned out not to be anything of use for the case."

A spokesman for Illinois State Police would not comment

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« Reply #965 on: December 28, 2007, 11:47:31 AM »

what a creep or creeps! Shocked
Those poor neighbors must be already so creeped out by DP!
One of them wanted to stay somewhere else when he kept calling her over - remember?

I am hoping some Sherlock Holmes sort will come forward with some clues they pulled out from DP's strange behavior and strange comebacks he says and put together some clues that solve the case and frame this guy. scratch
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« Reply #966 on: January 05, 2008, 01:47:43 PM »

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,320449,00.html

Former Illinois Police Officer Suspected in Wife's Disappearance Named in Brutality Suit

Saturday , January 05, 2008

 CHICAGO  —

A former police officer suspected in the disappearance of his wife will be defended in a police brutality lawsuit by an attorney hired by the town that employed him, his personal attorney said Friday.

Former Bolingbrook police Sgt. Drew Peterson, who is a suspect in the disappearance of his wife, Stacy Peterson, and two other Bolingbrook officers are accused in a federal lawsuit by a man who claims they broke his thumb while he was in police custody.

In his lawsuit filed last month, Timothy Brownlee accused police of having used excessive force, committed assault and battery and conspiracy, and falsely arrested and imprisoned him on May 28, 2007.

He claims Peterson and two other officers dragged him from the booking area and threw him to the ground. He said after he was handcuffed Peterson "grabbed his right thumb and twisted it, breaking it."

Police say Brownlee was arrested after a neighbor complained he was using vulgar language and was uncooperative, and that Brownlee's actions in the booking room required officers to restrain him. Brownlee was initially charged with disorderly conduct and obstruction of justice, but the charges were later dismissed, according to his lawsuit.

Brownlee referred questions to his attorney, Jon Loevy. Loevy did not immediately return calls for comment Friday.

Village attorney James Boan declined to comment on the lawsuit.

Peterson's attorney, Joel Brodsky, provided The Associated Press a copy of a letter in which Boan said the village would provide Peterson an attorney.

Brodsky said Brownlee included Peterson in the lawsuit in an "attempt to make money off the fact that Drew Peterson is being investigated and Stacy Peterson is missing and (Peterson's former wife) Kathy Savio died tragically in her bathtub."

He said the incident in the booking room was videotaped and Peterson was not on duty.

Peterson has been named a suspect in his wife's disappearance, which authorities have called a possible homicide, but he has not been charged. Stacy Peterson was last seen Oct. 28 and was reported missing by her family the next day.

Peterson has denied any involvement in her disappearance. He has said he believes she left him for another man and is alive.

The investigation prompted the exhumation of the Peterson's third wife, Savio. Prosecutors have said evidence indicates her 2004 death may have been a homicide staged to look like an accident. Results of a new autopsy have not been released. Peterson has not been named a suspect in her death.

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« Reply #967 on: January 07, 2008, 02:37:40 PM »

Chicago Sun Times
 
January 7, 2008 Monday
 
Letter claims Stacy sighting (New Letter  Rolling Eyes )
 

An anonymous letter from a man who claimed to have spoken to missing Bolingbrook mom Stacy Peterson was waiting in the mailbox of her husband when he returned with his children from vacation Sunday.

The letter was mailed from Cincinnati and postmarked Dec. 29. It arrived at the home of Peterson's husband, embattled ex-cop Drew Peterson, but was addressed to "Mr. Joel Peterson." Drew Peterson's attorney is Joel Brodsky of Chicago.

The author of the letter claimed to have spotted Stacy Peterson together with an unidentified man in the parking lot of the mall in Florence, Ky., Nov. 18. Florence is about 15 miles from Cincinnati.

The letter writer claimed to recognize Stacy from pictures in newspapers.

The author of the letter tells of encountering a Boone County sheriff's deputy and reporting the Stacy sighting, but "he said, 'Yeah OK, if it is I'm not going to help him that crooked cop' I assume meaning you."

The Boone County Sheriff's Department could not be reached for comment Sunday.

The anonymous letter is at least the second sent to Drew Peterson or his attorney claiming contact with his wife, who last was seen Oct. 28. 
http://www6.lexisnexis.com/publisher/EndUser?Action=UserDisplayFullDocument&orgId=574&topicId=100020825&docId=l:725077518&start=1
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« Reply #968 on: January 08, 2008, 03:53:02 PM »

The last post should read:
"The anonymous letter is at least the second allegedly sent to DP . . ."
Quite interesting that it is anonymous, don't you think?
If you saw a missing person, wouldn't you want to help their family find them?
Hmmmmmm .  .  .

I am not ok with SP disappearing off the face of the earth and
DP going on living with their kids and KS's kids either who was shown killed by one famous doctor who did another autopsy.
They questioned the boys in the middle (KS's sons) and they said their parents were fighting the day SP disappeared.
Surely the boys know something?
How can DP make her disappear and get away with it? shaking

Isn't there anything they can frame him on?
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« Reply #969 on: January 13, 2008, 06:50:32 PM »

Stacy's Birthday Vigil - Celebration of Stacy's Life
Living Water Community Church
190 Lily Cache Ln
Bolingbrook, IL 60440
Time: 4:00pm
There will be a brief program

The above was posted on the findstacypeterson.com website

Are they still following leads on the case?
or is DP just getting away with it? Neutral
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« Reply #970 on: January 14, 2008, 11:29:38 AM »

Peterson relaxes as press backs off
BOLINGBROOK | Reporters no longer swarm home of ex-cop with missing wife

January 14, 2008
The convoy of TV trucks was gone. Not a single reporter was in sight.
Only the fluttering "Caution. Do Not Enter" tape encircling a neighbor's front yard hinted at the frenzy that, until recently, enveloped Pheasant Chase Court.

And Drew Peterson liked it that way.

"It's a great break -- it's almost like I can live a normal life," said a relaxed-looking Peterson, sitting in a burgundy leather chair behind a wooden desk in his home office one morning last week.

"A normal life" is, of course, a relative term for a man whose friends and family appear weekly before a Will County grand jury investigating Stacy Peterson's disappearance and the mysterious bathtub drowning of his third wife, Kathleen Savio.

"They're hot on the trail of my family and friends," a sarcastic Peterson said of the grand jury.

In the adjoining living room, Anthony and Lacy -- the two young children he has with Stacy -- squabbled in front of a huge TV that played cartoons.

"Anthony and Lacy, I'm talking to people," Peterson called out in a voice more fatherly than stern. "What happens if you're bad? Go up to your room."

Prepared to sell his story
Lacking the media swarm, and apparently with no place to be, Peterson chatted about a range of subjects, from his love of flying to the actor he'd most like to see play him in the movie version of his life.

"I look a lot like Denzel [Washington]," he joked.

And what about flying? Peterson owns an ultra-light plane he had imported from South Africa.

"You ought to let me take you for a ride," he offered. "You'd really get a kick out of it."

Unprompted, Peterson pointed to a figurine on a shelf in his office. It was of a man standing next to a little girl.

"That's me and Stacy in 1988," he said, chuckling. "Somebody gave it to us as a joke."

In fact, Peterson met his future wife when she was a teenager and he was a middle-aged Bolingbrook cop.

There are some subjects that are off-limits with Peterson. When asked about his cop days, he said he probably shouldn't go into that.

"If the networks are paying for it, I can't give it away," he explained. "Then I've got to listen to [his attorney Joel] Brodsky yell at me. It's like he's my mother."

Peterson gave out the phone number of his Florida publicist. Peterson said he would happily chat if the publicist said it was OK. Later, the publicist politely explained Peterson wasn't available to talk about his cop days -- there's a deal in the works for someone else to tell that story.

"If the networks are paying for it, I can't give it away.


http://www.suntimes.com/news/peterson/739676,CST-NWS-boling14.article
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« Reply #971 on: January 17, 2008, 04:39:41 PM »

Chicago Sun Times
 
January 17, 2008 Thursday

Did Stacy receive raunchy message?; Attorney says text on cell phone may clear Drew Peterson
 

Drew Peterson and his attorney claim Stacy Peterson received a racy text message last September from a man who might be the key to discovering the missing Bolingbrook mother's whereabouts.

The message, supposedly sent to Stacy Peterson's cell phone at 9:47 a.m. Sept. 20, reads: "You my love are the hottest b ---- in the world. Thanks for ridding [sic] me like a bucking bronco last night."

Joel Brodsky, Peterson's attorney, said the message may be the break Brodsky needs to clear his client's name. Peterson has been named a suspect in Stacy's disappearance. The mother of two vanished Oct. 28.

Ever since his wife disappeared, Drew Peterson has insisted she ran off, possibly with another man.

"This investigation isn't all about trying to prove Drew did something wrong," Brodsky said this week. "There are leads out there that have nothing to do with Drew."

Both Brodsky and Drew Peterson said they don't know the identity of the man who sent Stacy the text message.

Peterson said this week that he stumbled across the message in mid-December, while he was fiddling with the phone.

"I was just playing with the phone one day and I found it," Peterson said. "I was like, 'What the heck is this?' "

Peterson said he gave the purple cell phone to Brodsky, who then gave it to Illinois State Police.

A search warrant issued Jan. 3 grants police the authority to seize, search and analyze Stacy's purple phone.

"Basically, what this shows is that Stacy had a secret lover," Brodsky said. "Who is this guy? Is he missing? If this person is missing, then the mystery is solved."

Charles B. Pelkie, a spokesman for the Will County state's attorney's office, declined to comment on the matter. Mark Dorencz, a spokesman for the State Police, could not be reached for comment.

This is not the first instance of a racy message showing up on one of Stacy Peterson's cell phones.

Scott Rossetto, a Shorewood man, admitted after testifying before a Will County grand jury that Stacy had called him out of the blue three weeks before she vanished and they exchanged "perverted and flirty" messages before she vanished. But Rossetto has denied he and Stacy Peterson were having a relationship, and he says he doesn't know where she is. 
http://www6.lexisnexis.com/publisher/EndUser?Action=UserDisplayFullDocument&orgId=574&topicId=100020825&docId=l:730031508&start=9
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« Reply #972 on: January 18, 2008, 01:35:24 AM »

yeah right you dingbat attorney -
like one cell message will clear DP after all the contradictions by him in this case.
Somehow, no matter how good or bad you are at Math, nothing quite adds up with this dude.

I think this is just another phoney plot by DP like the anonymous letters he supposedly received.

Sorry, I am just not a believer of DP & his attorney only says what he is paid to say.
Hope they nail him Stacy.
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« Reply #973 on: January 18, 2008, 10:50:18 AM »

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,323738,00.html

Experts: Despite No Body, Peterson Case Could Go to Trial

Friday , January 18, 2008



CHICAGO —

Twelve weeks of combing woods and construction sites on foot and horseback, diving into ponds and canals, and retracing Stacy Peterson's last contact with family and friends have shed little light on the 23-year-old mother of two's whereabouts.

Neither investigators nor volunteer searchers have reported finding any trace of the woman — not a shred of clothing, a piece of jewelry or, most significantly, her body. And they're facing the very real possibility they never may.

So although authorities labeled Peterson's disappearance a possible homicide and named her husband, former Bolingbrook police Sgt. Drew Peterson, a suspect less than two weeks after she vanished, the question is whether anyone could ever be charged or tried in the case.

"Without a body, the average U.S. citizen would probably tell you that it is impossible," said Daniel Bibb, a former New York assistant district attorney who helped prosecute Dr. Robert Bierenbaum, a plastic surgeon convicted of killing his wife and dropping her body into the ocean from a small plane.

Suspects have been brought to trial — and convicted — in cases where not only is the body missing, but physical evidence linking the suspect to the crime doesn't exist.

"A body is such a critical component of a homicide case ... but it is something you can overcome," said Deborah Denno, a Fordham University law professor who has researched so-called "no-body cases." With or without a body, she said, "you need circumstantial evidence."

Trying no-body cases can be very different than those in which a pathologist explains in minute detail how a victim was killed and police officers testify about weapons, blood stains and fingerprints.

Prosecutors who have won convictions in such cases say they first must overcome the suggestion the purported victim is alive and simply walked away from his or her life.

"We brought as many friends and relatives as we could find to show she was making plans," Bibb said of Gail Katz-Bierenbaum, who was killed in 1985. That included presenting evidence about her preparation for college examinations and excitement about graduation.

And to head off defense attorneys suggesting the woman committed suicide, "we put her gynecologist on to show she recently had an IUD placed," Bibb said. "She's not going to get an IUD, thinking about being sexually active if at the same time she's going to commit suicide."

Before successfully prosecuting Steven Sherer for the murder of Jami Sherer in 2000 in Washington state — 10 years after she vanished — prosecutor Marilyn Brenneman contacted every state in the country to make sure nobody using Jami Sherer's name, birth date or Social Security number had ever applied for a driver's license.

During trial, Brenneman presented evidence the woman didn't use a credit card, cash a check or do any of the countless things people do every day to leave some kind of trail.

She called family and friends who testified the woman never once contacted them and told jurors about her devotion to her young son and how much she enjoyed her job.

"You have to show she's not somewhere else," Brenneman said. "It's a process of elimination."

The Will County State's Attorney's office won't discuss the Peterson case, but if it does come to trial, there is little doubt that Stacy Peterson's life will take center stage. Much that has been discussed since she disappeared — from her own devotion to her children to her nursing school attendance to her comments to her sister that she was about to see a divorce lawyer — likely would be used by prosecutors to demonstrate she is not a woman who would voluntarily disappear.

Prosecutors also appeal to jurors' common sense.

"There's a reason that after seven years someone is declared legally dead in this country," Brenneman said. "If you have a close relationship with your parents, your siblings or your child, you might take off for a week or two if you're terrified but you'd make contact. You'd have to make contact."

Drew Peterson has long maintained his wife left him for another man and that he believes she is alive.

His attorney, Joel Brodsky, said Thursday that a message sent to Stacy Peterson's cell phone in September shows she was having an affair, which he said lent credence to his client's theory.

In the text message, the anonymous author referred to Stacy Peterson as "my love" and thanked her for a sexual encounter the previous evening, according to a transcript provided by Brodsky. But a family friend said the message could have been sent by anyone, even someone who didn't know Stacy Peterson.

Brenneman and Bibb say the more time that passes, the less willing jurors are to believe missing persons left on their own.

"Ultimately, jurors don't believe that disappearing and starting a new life is possible," said Bibb, who prosecuted Bierenbaum 15 years after his wife disappeared.
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« Reply #974 on: January 18, 2008, 03:26:51 PM »

So how do we know that the text message did'nt set Drew off and give him a reason to start planning her murder?  It would give him a month + to plan it all out.  I don't bellieve for one minute that this exonerates Drew in any way.  I agree that it is another ploy to try to make it look like someone else is/was involved with her disappearing.  I am still standing firm in my opinion that this man is guilty of, not only Stacy's disappearance, but Kathleen Savio's death as well.  I believe that the truth will come out and everyone will see this man's true monster side.  He has gotten away with too much already.  There comes a time when karma gets involved and that is not something he can prevent.
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« Reply #975 on: January 20, 2008, 03:06:33 PM »

http://www.saukvalley.com/articles/2008/01/20/news/state/330408749316162.txt

Published on: Sunday, January 20, 2008
Police say husband is still suspect


CHICAGO (AP) - Illinois State Police say former police officer Drew Peterson remains a prime suspect in his wife's disappearance.

Sergeant Thomas Burek says investigators have new information that only reinforces that the suburban Chicago man is a suspect in Stacy Peterson's disappearance.

The state police spokesman didn't provide details. The comments come as relatives prepared to mark Stacy Peterson's 24th birthday today. She went missing in October.

The comments also come after Drew Peterson's attorney said a racy message sent to Stacy Peterson's cell phone in September supports the claim she left her husband for another man.

But in his Friday statements, Burek said it's clear she didn't voluntarily end all contact with her children, family and friends.
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« Reply #976 on: January 25, 2008, 06:04:53 PM »

DREW PETERSON WALKS OFF ON SHEPARD SMITH

-FOX NEWS- MID INTERVIEW

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rZCJJUsHePI
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« Reply #977 on: January 25, 2008, 08:39:42 PM »

http://www.nbc5.com/news/15140963/detail.html

BREAKING NEWS: Crews Find Human Remains, Blue Garbage Can

POSTED: 5:18 pm CST January 25, 2008
UPDATED: 6:15 pm CST January 25, 2008

CHICAGO -- Authorities say they have found human remains near the Illinois Sanitary Ship Canal. A human foot and leg were apparently discovered -- along with a blue garbage can.

The site is at 34th and Kedzie, and at least six officials can be seen from Sky5 combing through snowy woods. An city inspector was touring the site and made the discovery Friday afternoon. 

Lyons police and the Cook County Medical Examiner’s office confirmed that human remains were found there, but additional information was not available. An autopsy is scheduled to be performed Saturday.

Stay tuned to NBC5 for updates on this story.


According to Greta's blog - they don't think it's Stacy Peterson but they won't know for sure until at least tomorrow.
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« Reply #978 on: January 25, 2008, 10:53:33 PM »

Did anyone read the article in the Chicago Sun-Times about DP & JB contacting radio DJ Steve Dahl of Jack FM 104.3 radio station about a date DP contest?  DP pix made front page Thursday 1/24 of the Sun Times and there was an article that day about how he and attorney had contacted the radio station to sponser a contest.  Talk about bad taste and disgusting bahaviour.  Ugh.  Thank god the management at Jack FM heard about this disgusting contest and pulled the plug.  What next disgusting thing are they gonna pull?  JMO
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« Reply #979 on: January 25, 2008, 11:49:27 PM »

Did anyone read the article in the Chicago Sun-Times about DP & JB contacting radio DJ Steve Dahl of Jack FM 104.3 radio station about a date DP contest?  DP pix made front page Thursday 1/24 of the Sun Times and there was an article that day about how he and attorney had contacted the radio station to sponser a contest.  Talk about bad taste and disgusting bahaviour.  Ugh.  Thank god the management at Jack FM heard about this disgusting contest and pulled the plug.  What next disgusting thing are they gonna pull?  JMO

Yes, Peterson and his attorney are both discusting.
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