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Author Topic: SHANGO/SIMIAN - who are they and what did they know? #4  (Read 634709 times)
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Rob
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« Reply #780 on: July 08, 2008, 12:03:17 PM »

Poochy - JACKPOT

http://www.jamestown.org/terrorism/news/article.php?articleid=2369844

Radical Islam in Latin America

By Chris Zambelis


(December 2, 2005)

In the wake of the September 11 attacks, the possibility of al-Qaeda infiltrating Latin America became a priority for U.S. intelligence and law enforcement officials. However, the most publicized incidents of radical Islamist activity in Latin America have not been linked to al-Qaeda but instead to the Lebanese Shi’ite Hezbollah, which is ideologically and politically close to Iran. These include the March 1992 bombing of the Israeli Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina and the July 1994 attack against the Argentine-Israeli Mutual Association (AIMA), also in the Argentine capital, allegedly in retaliation for Israel’s assassination of former Hezbollah leader Sheikh Abbas al-Musawi and his family in February 1992.

Hezbollah officially denies responsibility for these attacks and remains emphatic that it only operates in the Israel-Lebanon theatre, in what it declares to be the defense of Lebanese soil and sovereignty against Israeli threats and occupation. Many questions still surround the attacks in Argentina. Some observers suggest that the attacks were in fact out of character for Hezbollah, and instead point to al-Qaeda’s possible involvement. This controversial theory throws into question the date of al-Qaeda’s earliest attack, which is generally believed to be the failed December 1992 attack against U.S. servicemen en route to Somalia in a hotel in Aden, Yemen that killed two Austrian tourists instead. It also raises the possibility of a link between the attacks in Latin America and the first World Trade Center bombing in February 1993.

Many observers believe the evidence implicating Iran and Hezbollah in these incidents is scant and, at best, circumstantial. Yet this did not prevent opponents of Argentine President Carlos Menem from exploiting the attacks in an effort to discredit him. Menem’s tenure in office was mired by corruption charges, which included allegations that he accepted a USD10 million bribe from Iranian intelligence to cover up Tehran’s alleged role in directing the attacks through Hezbollah. Some even pointed to Menem’s Syrian Christian origins as evidence of his alleged pro-Hezbollah leanings. These reports stem from the testimony of a former Iranian intelligence agent known by his alias, Abolghasem Mesbahi, who defected in 1996 and whose credibility has been the subject of intense speculation [1].

Subsequent legal action against Iran for its alleged role in the attacks led to the brief detainment of Iranian officials, including former Iranian Ambassador to Argentina, Hadi Soleimanpour, who was apprehended in the United Kingdom in 2003. However, a London court rejected the evidence provided by Argentine officials against the Ambassador and his colleagues.

The Nexus between Terrorism and Organized Crime

In June 2005, Ecuadorian security officials uncovered a drug smuggling ring led by a Quito-based restaurateur of Lebanese descent identified as Rady Zaiter. Under the auspices of “Operacion Damasco,” local security forces disrupted his syndicate, which stretched to the U.S., Europe, and the Middle East. Although little evidence has emerged confirming that Zaiter was anything other than a prolific drug dealer, Ecuadorian sources are emphatic that Zaiter had ties to Hezbollah and was in fact laundering money for the group [2]. This seems to fit a pattern in Latin America, as more countries attempt to curry favor with Washington by claiming solidarity in the war on terrorism by linking narcotics traffickers to terrorism.

Zaiter was also known by his aliases David Assi Alvarez and Almawla Fares. He is accused of cocaine trafficking and money laundering through a network of local drug smugglers and contacts in the sizable Arab and Muslim immigrant communities of Maicao, a free-trade zone in northeastern Colombia, as well as the capital Bogota. Like Zaiter, the majority of Maicao’s Arab Muslim population is of Lebanese descent. Others trace their origins to Syria and, to a lesser extent, Palestine [3].

Margarita Island, Venezuela, another free-trade zone that is home to a sizeable Arab Muslim (and Arab Christian) community, is also cited as a potential terrorist base. The alleged threat emanating from Margarita Island is receiving far more attention in Washington, but is as much a product of the simmering tensions between the Bush Administration and Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez.

Both Maicao and Margarita Island, along with the banking centers on the island of Curacao and elsewhere in the Netherlands Antilles, Colon, Panama, the Cayman Islands, and the rest of the Caribbean Basin, are part of a multifaceted network that facilitates the transfer of illicit funds from drug and weapons sales, as well as counterfeiting, piracy, and human smuggling. The warring factions in Colombia’s civil war also have a lucrative stake in this system.

The Tri-Border Area (TBA) that binds Puerto Iguazu, Argentina; Ciudad del Este, Paraguay; and Foz do Iguacu, Brazil, is another center of lawlessness and lucrative criminal activity in South America that includes Russian and Asian gangs, in addition to South American criminal syndicates. Hezbollah is reported to operate extensive operations involving fundraising and money laundering amidst the region’s sizeable Arab community in the TBA.

The Black Market Peso Exchange (BMPE), the largest and most sophisticated system of laundering money in the Western Hemisphere, along with other Alternative Remittance Systems (ARS), including hawala, an Islamic form of money transfer traditionally used by Muslims that facilitates the movement of funds through informal and anonymous channels, are endemic to Latin America and a central feature of organized crime and the drug trade in the region [4].

Despite a lack of hard evidence demonstrating collaboration between Hezbollah and al-Qaeda in Latin America and elsewhere for that matter, many observers worry that al-Qaeda may be using the same networks exploited by Hezbollah and other organizations to generate funds. Members of the Egyptian Gammat al-Islamiyya, including Al-Sayid Hassan Mukhlis, who is tied to the 1997 attack against tourists in Luxor, Egypt, have been linked to the TBA, allegedly as a local fundraiser for the group. Mukhlis was arrested in El Chui, Uruguay in January 1999 and eventually extradited to Egypt in 2003 [5]. Gammat al-Islamiyya is known to have links to al-Qaeda.

Islam in Latin America

Latin America is home to a sizeable and diverse Muslim population with deep roots throughout the region. Most Muslims are of Arab descent, typically of Lebanese, Syrian, and Palestinian origin, although Christian Arabs from the Levant far outnumber their Muslim kin. There are also sizeable South and Southeast Asian Muslim communities with roots in India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Indonesia in Suriname, Guyana, Trinidad and Tobago and elsewhere in the Caribbean Basin. The region is also experiencing a steady stream of migration from the Middle East and South Asia in recent years, especially in vibrant free-trade zones such as Iquique, Chile and Colon, Panama.

As a result of intermarriage and conversion, Islam is becoming one of the fastest growing religions in Latin America. There is evidence to suggest that Muslim missionaries based in Spain and their regional affiliates are making inroads into disenfranchised and underserved indigenous communities that were once the target of evangelical Christian sects for conversion [6]. The competition between Muslim and Christian missionaries for prospective converts has even led to confrontation and violent clashes in the Mexican state of Chiapas.

Spain’s al-Murabitun (The Almoravids, after the African Muslim dynasty that ruled North Africa and Spain in 11th and 12th century) is believed to be the most prolific missionary movement operating in Latin America [7]. The group is an international Sufi order founded in the 1970s by Sheikh Abdel Qader as-Sufi al-Murabit, a controversial Scottish Muslim convert born Ian Dallas. Although no hard evidence has surfaced tying the group to international terrorism, let alone al-Qaeda, Dallas has been accused of harboring extremist leanings. Aurelino Perez heads the Murabitun’s campaign in Chiapas, where he competes with Omar Weston, a British-born Muslim convert who resides in Mexico City and heads the Centro Cultural Islamico de Mexico (CCIM), for adherents in Chiapas and the rest of Mexico. Known locally as Muhammed Nafia, Perez is a Spanish convert to Islam who hails from the southern Spanish city of Granada in Andalusia.

The Murabitun’s ambitious efforts to gain adherents in Mexico include an unsuccessful attempt to forge an alliance with Subcommandante Marcos and his Zapatista Army of National Liberation (EZLN), following the group’s armed rebellion in Chiapas in 1994 [8]. The Murabitun are comprised predominantly of Spanish and European converts to Islam. There are also reports that Muslim missionaries are finding adherents among indigenous peoples in Bolivia and elsewhere in Latin America [9].

In an effort to win over converts in Latin America, the Murabtiun emphasize the cultural links between the Arab world and Latin America through Spain’s Moorish heritage. In doing so, the Murabitun and like-minded movements advocate a collective reversion to Islam, which in their view signifies a return to the region’s true heritage, as opposed to what many see as conversion to the Muslim faith. In this sense, Islam not only represents an alternative to the colonial traditions imposed on the indigenous and mestizo peoples of Latin America, namely the Roman Catholic Church, but is also a nativist tradition that has been suppressed. The Murabitun also claim that Islam is not tainted by European and Western colonialism and imperialism, but instead serves as a remedy for the oppression and destruction brought about by the Spanish conquest.

Given al-Qaeda’s documented successes in recruiting Muslim converts in Europe and the U.S. to its cause, many observers worry that Muslim converts in Latin America provide fertile ground for new recruits due to their perceived ability to circumvent travel restrictions and blend into Western cities more effectively.

There is no evidence to suggest that the recent trend toward conversion to Islam in Latin America stems from a turn to political and religious radicalism. On the contrary, most Muslim converts see Islam as a vehicle for reasserting their identity. They also see conversion as a form of social and political protest in societies where they are marginalized and experience discrimination [10]. In this context, it is no surprise that groups such as the Murabitun, with their message of social, political, and cultural empowerment, are making inroads into disenfranchised and impoverished indigenous communities. The group also supports local education, social welfare, and other projects that include Arabic language instruction and the publication of the Qur’an in Spanish and other local languages. I call bullshit!

Conclusion

Although the evidence pointing to an alleged al-Qaeda presence in the region is often overshadowed and/or confused with the reported activities of Hezbollah and other groups, it is important for policymakers to consider each of these organizations separately and not fall into the trap of linking them as part of a unified network with a common agenda. At the same time, the diverse array of criminal organizations active in the region—from local drug gangs to radical Islamists—demonstrates that weak institutions, political instability, corruption, and poverty provide ample opportunities for groups such as al-Qaeda and others to share the spoils.

++++++++++

my first bold at the very top in reference to Argentina is this -

http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1058/is_n22_v111/ai_15699986
Jewish center bombed in Argentina
Christian Century,  July 27, 1994 


What has been described as the heart of the Argentine Jewish community was destroyed July 18 when a massive bomb blast ripped through a building in Buenos Aires. The religious center housed the Delegation of Argentine Israeli Associations, Argentina's primary Jewish communal leadership group, and the Argentine Israelite Mutual Association, the community's social service arm. The bombing left at least 37 confirmed dead and 157 injured. Three days after the incident some 60 others were still unaccounted for. Historic archives were also destroyed.

 Israel blamed the attack on Islamic extremists aligned with Iran and seeking revenge for a June Israeli attack on a pro-Iranian Hezbollah militia camp in Lebanon that left 50 guerrillas dead. Iran has denied any involvement. Argentine President Carlos Menem said the attack was planned "from abroad and helped by people [in Argentina]." The blast followed by little more than two years a car bomb attack on the Israeli Embassy in Buenos Aires that killed 28 and injured more than 200. No arrests have been made in that case, which Israel also blamed on Muslim extremists. While not discounting a possible Middle East link, Argentine Jews and others interviewed suggested an alternative motive for the latest bomb attack.

Among the projects housed at the building was a review of previously secret government files that reportedly reveal how scores of Nazis entered Argentina. following World War II with the help of Argentine officials. Review of the files has gone on for two years but was believed to be far from complete. Speculation centered on the possibility that former Argentine govemment and military officials, fearful of exposure, were responsible for the bomb attack, most likely in tandem with Middle East extremists.

"Blaming Muslims fits Israel's worldview, and blaming outsiders is convenient for Argentine officials who would prefer not to deal with an explosive domestic problem," said Carlos Waisman, an Argentine Jew who teaches political sociology at the University of California - San Diego. Moreover, said Waisman, Argentine Jews generally maintain a cordial if distant relationship with the country's estimated 500,000 Muslims of Arab descent. Menem himself was a Muslim but converted to Roman Catholicism in order to satisfy Argentine constitutional requirements for becoming president.

Rabbi Abraham Cooper, associate director of the Nazi-hunting Simon Wiesenthal Center in Los Angeles, suggested that these same cashiered govemment and military figures may also have sought to embarrass the Menem govemment because of its decision to release the files and its ties with Israel and the Argentine Jewish community. "Anti-Semitism is endemic in Argentina," added Jacobo Kovadloff, consultant on Latin American affairs for the New York-based American Jewish Committee. Earlier this year, Kovadloff noted, Argentina's chief rabbi was assaulted while walking to synagogue by youths who pushed him to the ground and shouted anti-Semitic curses. That attack followed by one day the painting of Nazi slogans on the chief rabbi's synagogue. Argentina hosts the largest Jewish community - estimates put the figure at upwards of 250,000 - in Latin America.

++++++

Iran found guilty of bombing synagogue years later.
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« Reply #781 on: July 08, 2008, 12:05:42 PM »

Poochy, In my above post I highlighted the word Russian, I did that on purpose. Years ago, on the forum I was posting and someone asked me if I had ever seen any Russians on the island. I replied no. This person seem to imply that they were indeed there. That was about the extent of the exchange.
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« Reply #782 on: July 08, 2008, 12:21:07 PM »

Poochy, In my above post I highlighted the word Russian, I did that on purpose. Years ago, on the forum I was posting and someone asked me if I had ever seen any Russians on the island. I replied no. This person seem to imply that they were indeed there. That was about the extent of the exchange.

Poochy I could literally go on and on here -

from above - It also raises the possibility of a link between the attacks in Latin America and the first World Trade Center bombing in February 1993.

We have now discovered that Ramzi Yousef (who was also the uncle of Khalid Shiek Mohammed) was the relation of Mohammed Atta.

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« Reply #783 on: July 08, 2008, 01:29:15 PM »

Poochy, In my above post I highlighted the word Russian, I did that on purpose. Years ago, on the forum I was posting and someone asked me if I had ever seen any Russians on the island. I replied no. This person seem to imply that they were indeed there. That was about the extent of the exchange.


Darn Rob...a name would have been nice...Need to check the Chamber lists....Though these guys probably aren't on it....wonder if they have listed phone numbers?
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« Reply #784 on: July 08, 2008, 01:29:49 PM »

Poochy - JACKPOT

http://www.jamestown.org/terrorism/news/article.php?articleid=2369844

Radical Islam in Latin America

By Chris Zambelis


(December 2, 2005)
<SNIPPET FROM YOUR POST>

The Nexus between Terrorism and Organized Crime

In June 2005, Ecuadorian security officials uncovered a drug smuggling ring led by a Quito-based restaurateur of Lebanese descent identified as Rady Zaiter. Under the auspices of “Operacion Damasco,” local security forces disrupted his syndicate, which stretched to the U.S., Europe, and the Middle East. Although little evidence has emerged confirming that Zaiter was anything other than a prolific drug dealer, Ecuadorian sources are emphatic that Zaiter had ties to Hezbollah and was in fact laundering money for the group [2]. This seems to fit a pattern in Latin America, as more countries attempt to curry favor with Washington by claiming solidarity in the war on terrorism by linking narcotics traffickers to terrorism.

Zaiter was also known by his aliases David Assi Alvarez and Almawla Fares. He is accused of cocaine trafficking and money laundering through a network of local drug smugglers and contacts in the sizable Arab and Muslim immigrant communities of Maicao, a free-trade zone in northeastern Colombia, as well as the capital Bogota. Like Zaiter, the majority of Maicao’s Arab Muslim population is of Lebanese descent. Others trace their origins to Syria and, to a lesser extent, Palestine [3].

Margarita Island, Venezuela, another free-trade zone that is home to a sizeable Arab Muslim (and Arab Christian) community, is also cited as a potential terrorist base. The alleged threat emanating from Margarita Island is receiving far more attention in Washington, but is as much a product of the simmering tensions between the Bush Administration and Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez.

Both Maicao and Margarita Island, along with the banking centers on the island of Curacao and elsewhere in the Netherlands Antilles, Colon, Panama, the Cayman Islands, and the rest of the Caribbean Basin, are part of a multifaceted network that facilitates the transfer of illicit funds from drug and weapons sales, as well as counterfeiting, piracy, and human smuggling. The warring factions in Colombia’s civil war also have a lucrative stake in this system.
...
Conclusion

Although the evidence pointing to an alleged al-Qaeda presence in the region is often overshadowed and/or confused with the reported activities of Hezbollah and other groups, it is important for policymakers to consider each of these organizations separately and not fall into the trap of linking them as part of a unified network with a common agenda. At the same time, the diverse array of criminal organizations active in the region—from local drug gangs to radical Islamists—demonstrates that weak institutions, political instability, corruption, and poverty provide ample opportunities for groups such as al-Qaeda and others to share the spoils.
+++++++++

ROB - YUP. JACKPOT IS RIGHT!  Now you're talkin'.

THAT would scare the beezeebers out of the Gottenbos family. THAT would give out those neckties. THAT would have rattled the coffins in the cemetary. THAT would cause Joran to chew on his bloody tongue and say 'one day I will tell my story' (well, er he sorta did), THAT would cause the Kalpoes to continue to STFU, and THAT is why Beth said the world would be shocked. If we only knew what was on those islands we'd never vacation on them. They are ALL TERRIFIED. Aruba knows what happened, but they are terrified. Choose-a-name bouncer was a sign to Aruba as his chopped up body burned outside a tourist cave.

So Sumerians don't like the Casino intrusion. No wonder the RitzC changed it's mind. Untamed lions...

Shango Says: June 26th, 2005 at 3:14 pm
Simian, The Sumerians do not like the Babylonian intrusion.
The Babylonian card may be tossed from the table and crushed under Sumerian feet


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

POTTERY = JUG/JAR TWITTY (never forget AmSouth-)  Was Natalee was stalked before or during her trip like Max deVries and all the others? The pack did panic. They left Beth all alone.

Simian Says: June 24th, 2005 at 6:16 pm
The pottery need not break and yet the pack still may panic. I am leaving. I am done.
 
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« Reply #785 on: July 08, 2008, 02:00:48 PM »

Poochy, In my above post I highlighted the word Russian, I did that on purpose. Years ago, on the forum I was posting and someone asked me if I had ever seen any Russians on the island. I replied no. This person seem to imply that they were indeed there. That was about the extent of the exchange.


Darn Rob...a name would have been nice...Need to check the Chamber lists....Though these guys probably aren't on it....wonder if they have listed phone numbers?


Rob, Mum,

Is this the Russian to whom you refer?
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=abramovich+aruba

The richest man on the planet?
http://www.silobreaker.com/DocumentReader.aspx?Item=5_877142538


I also read the boat was in Aruba at the time it was to be 'christened'. Not sure if rumor or not.  http://community.webshots.com/album/137248985MPhMGO/0

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« Reply #786 on: July 08, 2008, 02:34:13 PM »

Poochy, Mr. Abramovich is a cause for concern, but probably not DIRECTLY linked to Aruba. I say DIRECTLY. He could be linked in a roundabout way, but why use Aruba when he had Putin and Russia. Not much reason I can see. Yes, the Ecstasea was on sea trials during the time Natalee disappeared. However, no one has ever even put him close to Aruba. The closest I ever got personally was when I discovered that the manager of the Chelsea Football Club used the boat then. He used it as a gift from Roman.

I just don't see how Roman fits into all of this. I don't think these are the Russians that the anon poster was referring to. There could have been other Russians on board and likely were, and they could work for Roman, but again, I'm not at all sure how Roman fits in. Maybe just googling Roman Abramovich and 5-30-2005 might shed some light of his schedule. He seems pretty easy to find due to his high profile. He is not hiding as far as I have seen and his very public divorce is all over the net.

As for the Sumerians - I almost for got about that. Boy, that fits right in and could be a reason everyone is scared to death.
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« Reply #787 on: July 08, 2008, 02:52:59 PM »

Poochy, In my above post I highlighted the word Russian, I did that on purpose. Years ago, on the forum I was posting and someone asked me if I had ever seen any Russians on the island. I replied no. This person seem to imply that they were indeed there. That was about the extent of the exchange.


Darn Rob...a name would have been nice...Need to check the Chamber lists....Though these guys probably aren't on it....wonder if they have listed phone numbers?


Rob, Mum,

Is this the Russian to whom you refer?
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=abramovich+aruba

The richest man on the planet?
http://www.silobreaker.com/DocumentReader.aspx?Item=5_877142538


I also read the boat was in Aruba at the time it was to be 'christened'. Not sure if rumor or not.  http://community.webshots.com/album/137248985MPhMGO/0




No...ran across one a few weeks back that owns a certain property in Florida that we have been looking at...saved the records, as I didn't find anything, but my interest peeked when Rob mentioned Russians in Aruba.

Probably nothing more than them being a landlord.
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« Reply #788 on: July 08, 2008, 05:49:56 PM »

Mum,

Sasha added some friends today, I see. I think we have a connection to the two at last...

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« Reply #789 on: July 08, 2008, 05:59:44 PM »

Mum,

Sasha added some friends today, I see. I think we have a connection to the two at last...



Also another Arambatzis added and Mayra Smalley...
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« Reply #790 on: July 08, 2008, 07:16:52 PM »

Poochy, something just hit me - I remember a while back, during the very height of the Al-Qaida disclosures, the CIA / NSA / FBI said explicitly that Al-Qaida was in 60 countries. I believe there were only 191 countries total at that time. I think a few more have been added since then. That is 1/3 of the total countries on the planet and makes the possibility that they are in Latin America a very very very real possibility. (We have seen enough cached docs to prove that).

I also remember something from my own personal investigations of countries that I was thinking of traveling - Granada (Not Grenada) was a Muslim country and even possessing a single joint could land your tush in the hottest water you could imagine. I asked my friend, who used to guard Al Gore during the Clinton years, if that was true - his words - stay the F outta there! This same guy used to guard the Treasury Sec (in the Bush Admin) who was from my area and he has now been reassigned to the counterfeiting division. Secret Service, as you are well aware, is a division of the Treasury.

I asked him if this was truly a Muslim country and he also indicated - not on top - but below. This could be a hot bed of activity and maybe we should look into this a little bit.

Every terrorism group I have ever seen needs a base of operation away from the areas where the deeds are carried out.
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« Reply #791 on: July 08, 2008, 10:34:43 PM »

Poochy, something just hit me - I remember a while back, during the very height of the Al-Qaida disclosures, the CIA / NSA / FBI said explicitly that Al-Qaida was in 60 countries. I believe there were only 191 countries total at that time. I think a few more have been added since then. That is 1/3 of the total countries on the planet and makes the possibility that they are in Latin America a very very very real possibility. (We have seen enough cached docs to prove that).

I also remember something from my own personal investigations of countries that I was thinking of traveling - Granada (Not Grenada) was a Muslim country and even possessing a single joint could land your tush in the hottest water you could imagine. I asked my friend, who used to guard Al Gore during the Clinton years, if that was true - his words - stay the F outta there! This same guy used to guard the Treasury Sec (in the Bush Admin) who was from my area and he has now been reassigned to the counterfeiting division. Secret Service, as you are well aware, is a division of the Treasury.

I asked him if this was truly a Muslim country and he also indicated - not on top - but below. This could be a hot bed of activity and maybe we should look into this a little bit.

Every terrorism group I have ever seen needs a base of operation away from the areas where the deeds are carried out.

Rob, scarey statistics! And yeah, know all about Granada. Your buddy is spot on

The 'gods' of each country know all about the infiltration of the lions, sitting back as they get stronger. Not sure what that's about. Why would Aruba put up with the Sloots after what their son did to all of them? How could they continue to teach and practice law and have art shows, and act as if nothing happened while their son literally destroyed a country single handed? It's because ALL OF THEM know what's going - the Arawaks, Babylonians, Elders, Dutch, Syrians, poison siren cops, dirty hands, gamblers, all of 'em.
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« Reply #792 on: July 08, 2008, 10:50:45 PM »

poochy -

zoltanzion@hotmail.com

I would like to share something with you.

Everyone else - it's nothing important. Really it's not. It's just gibber jabber.
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« Reply #793 on: July 08, 2008, 11:38:46 PM »

Rob, I just have to say, I really admire you.  You know a lot about a lot of things...
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« Reply #794 on: July 08, 2008, 11:41:36 PM »

http://profile.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=user.viewprofile&friendid=76034452

John Chemaly, Damalice
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« Reply #795 on: July 09, 2008, 12:05:05 AM »

Check your inbox Rob. Meanwhile, I thought this was interesting.

http://www.brazzilmag.com/content/view/9539/1/

Written by Newsroom     
Saturday, 05 July 2008 
 The Brazilian government launched the process to buy at least 36 fighter jets as part of a broader plan to modernize its Air Force and in keeping with neighbors like Venezuela, Chile and Peru, which are also in the process of overhauling their fleets.

According to Brasília sources, Brazil wants to buy and build equipment to defend offshore oil assets and the porous Amazon border threatened by armed drug-traffickers, smugglers and foreign guerrillas.

In February, Colombia ordered 24 Kfir bomber jets from Israel, while Venezuela acquired Russian Sukhoi jets and last month revealed it is considering buying more. Chile bought new Boeing F-16s and Peru decided to upgrade its jets. Argentina has also announced plans to upgrade its air force.

Upon taking office in January 2003, President Lula da Silva scrapped plans to replace aging Mirage jets, saying he would use the money to feed the poor.

Now, the Air Force wants a multi-role fighter to replace its entire fleet of fighter jets over the next 15 years. That could increase the size of the order to more than 100 aircraft.

Six manufacturers figure in the possible list of procurement from which he Brazilian Air Force requested information according to the service press department. They are Boeing's F-18 Super Hornet; Lockheed Martin's F-35 Lightning II; Dassault's Rafale; Sukhoi's SU-35, Saab's Gripen and Eurofighter's Typhoon.

Brazil is seeking a generous technology transfer package, possibly including local assembly, to help develop its own aviation industry and perform maintenance of the aircraft.

Brazil has been leading an effort to create a South American Defense Council to help coordinate arms purchases. Though many of its neighbors have recently renewed their fleets, some manufactures still see Brazil as a possible regional defense hub.
 
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« Reply #796 on: July 09, 2008, 08:07:24 AM »

Mum,

Sasha added some friends today, I see. I think we have a connection to the two at last...



Also another Arambatzis added and Mayra Smalley...



vms...Thanks!...I am so glad that Sasha has a friend...and that they all seem to have reconnected.

I am still a little worried that none of sasha's schoolmates's have signed her guestbook, this poor girl must not be very popular with her peers. But she does have her family!
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MumInOhio
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« Reply #797 on: July 09, 2008, 08:11:32 AM »

And I thought it was only where I come from that needed a rabbit proof fence...

Good Morning Aruba, Venezuela and Southern Florida!

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MumInOhio
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« Reply #798 on: July 09, 2008, 08:18:53 AM »

Rob......IIRC one of the SGs was from Granada!
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SS
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« Reply #799 on: July 09, 2008, 08:39:39 AM »

Mum,

Sasha added some friends today, I see. I think we have a connection to the two at last...



Also another Arambatzis added and Mayra Smalley...



vms...Thanks!...I am so glad that Sasha has a friend...and that they all seem to have reconnected.

I am still a little worried that none of sasha's schoolmates's have signed her guestbook, this poor girl must not be very popular with her peers. But she does have her family!




I think they just want to be included in the genealogy tree. 
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