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Author Topic: Victims & Possible Victims of Dean Corll, Elmer Wayne Henly & David Brooks  (Read 12978 times)
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« on: November 23, 2008, 02:20:32 PM »

Even though not in previous SM files, I thought this belonged with the Missing Found Deceased.  

Heights teen slain by notorious serial killer remembered
By ERICKA MELLON
Copyright 2008 Houston Chronicle
Nov. 22, 2008, 10:03PM
Thirty-seven years after their brother disappeared, Donna Lovrek and Lenore McNiel said goodbye Saturday.

"We have closure now, and that's good," McNiel said after the memorial service for Randell Lee Harvey, or Randy, as the family called him.

The tall, long-haired "hippie" was 15 in 1971 when he hopped on his bicycle, rode to work at a nearby gas station and never returned to his home in the Heights.

It wasn't until last month that the Harris County Medical Examiner's Office confirmed through 21st-century technology what the sisters had suspected: Harvey was a victim of Houston's notorious serial killer Dean Corll and his teenage accomplices, David Owen Brooks and Elmer Wayne Henley.

Harvey's skeletal remains, which turned up in a Houston boat shed two years after his disappearance, had been in the county morgue, unidentified, for 35 years.

Sharon Derrick, the forensic anthropologist who helped identify Harvey, spoke at the memorial service to the boy she never met.

"I know that you are looking down here and saying, 'Man, you guys got old,'" Derrick said.

Harvey would have been 53.

As a child, he liked everything, his family said.

"He was all boy," said his cousin 54-year-old Sherri DeAngelo, who recalled the two getting into trouble as kids. "We used to jump off my grandma's porch. We'd have to jump over the tomatoes."

And if they missed, "We'd get swatted on the back of the legs — just enough to make us squeal," she said.

The family has been able to find only one photo of Harvey after a fire destroyed others in his childhood home.

The black-and-white picture, propped against an urn at the memorial service, showed a smiling Harvey at about age 10, on his knees and holding a wooden airplane.

By age 15, when he died, Harvey was at least 6 feet tall.

"And he still had some growing to do," said Derrick, who studied his skeletal remains and DNA samples from his sisters to help confirm the identification. "He was going to be a tall man, and he probably would have filled out some. ... He would have been really something to see."

McNiel, Harvey's younger sister, who at 51 is tall and slender, recalled her brother's free spirit. "All I can say is, he was a hippie. But he was our hippie," she said.

The sisters plan to scatter Harvey's ashes in Lake Livingston, as they did his mother's. Harvey's father also is deceased.

Lasting influence
Derrick brought Harvey's sisters a memento, a peace sign that had been patched onto the T-shirt he was wearing the night he was murdered.

DeAngelo said she wanted to get the symbol, with Harvey's case number, tattooed on her leg.

Crime victims advocate Andy Kahan, who works for the Houston mayor's office, said he plans to lobby for a change in state law based on Harvey's case.

Harvey's sisters needed help paying for his memorial service, but the state's compensation fund for crime victims, which helps defray such costs, does not apply to crimes committed before 1980.

Kahan wants a new law — named after Harvey — to allow discretion.

"Randy's going to be thought of in a positive way for eternity," he said.

Earthman Funeral Directors donated services for the memorial at their Hunters Creek chapel after hearing about the problem.

As the service concluded on a chilly but sunny Saturday afternoon, a 1968 song from the Zombies played in Harvey's honor.

"It's the time of the season

When the love runs high

In this time, give it to me easy

And let me try."
http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/front/6127116.html
« Last Edit: August 10, 2013, 07:06:41 PM by klaasend » Logged

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« Reply #1 on: August 10, 2013, 07:08:00 PM »

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« Reply #2 on: August 11, 2013, 04:33:26 AM »

I am lost, as usual ... 
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« Reply #3 on: August 11, 2013, 07:28:47 AM »

Nut- Randall Lee Harvey or "Randy" was a victim of serial killers Dean Corll, Elmer Wayne Henly & David Brooks.  His remains were found 2 years after he was reported missing, but he remained unidentified for 35 years, until 2008, and it became known he was a victim of the serial killers.  I found another victim of this group of serial killers from Houston, and I will post it next.  I had asked Klaas to move the above article here, so we can put the possible victims or victims from these three in one place.


Heights teen slain by notorious serial killer remembered
By ERICKA MELLON
Copyright 2008 Houston Chronicle
Nov. 22, 2008, 10:03PM


Thirty-seven years after their brother disappeared, Donna Lovrek and Lenore McNiel said goodbye Saturday.

"We have closure now, and that's good," McNiel said after the memorial service for Randell Lee Harvey, or Randy, as the family called him.

 
It wasn't until last month that the Harris County Medical Examiner's Office confirmed through 21st-century technology what the sisters had suspected: Harvey was a victim of Houston's notorious serial killer Dean Corll and his teenage accomplices, David Owen Brooks and Elmer Wayne Henley.

Harvey's skeletal remains, which turned up in a Houston boat shed two years after his disappearance, had been in the county morgue, unidentified, for 35 years.
 
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« Reply #4 on: August 11, 2013, 07:32:00 AM »

http://www.khou.com/news/local/Can-a-high-school-reunion-solve-a-gruesome-Houston-mystery-219060061.html
Authorities hope a high school reunion can solve Houston mystery
August 9, 2013

HOUSTON -- The headlines from old newspapers have faded and many Houstonians are too young to remember, but what may have been the most shocking crime case in the city’s history came to light forty years ago this week.
Cindy Yates hasn’t forgotten. She’s 60 years old now, but she was just a teenager when her 14-year-old brother vanished.
"Never, never did we think that he was dead,” Yates said. “We never thought that."
But two years after he disappeared, his family learned the horrible truth. Danny Yates had been sexually tortured and murdered one of dozens of victims of a serial killing spree that stunned the nation.
At least the Yates family eventually learned what happened to Danny. Somewhere, though, the family of another victim has no idea.
The unidentified victim probably would’ve been in his 50s now, maybe with children in college or even grandchildren in preschool.
We’ll never know what his future might have been if he had survived. Right now, we don’t even know his name.
His corpse was found four decades ago inside a boat shed that became a burial ground for dozens of boys and young men killed in what became known as the “Houston mass murders.”
Dean Corll, a sadistic pedophile living in the Heights, lured dozens of victims into a home equipped with sexual torture devices. Two young men, Elmer Wayne Henley and David Brooks, helped him attract teenagers and young men with promises of beer and drugs.
The horror continued for three years, with boys disappearing from the streets of Houston. Before they were killed, some of them were forced to write post cards telling their mothers they had taken jobs out of town.
They slaughtered at least 30 victims. The exact number is still debatable, because Corll may have committed even more murders without anyone’s knowledge.
Henley eventually shot Corll to death and led police to the mass graves in August 1973. Both Henley and Brooks are serving life sentences in Texas prisons.
One final victim from the Houston mass murders remains unidentified, defying decades of mystery. But forensic pathologists now have a new piece of evidence they hope will lead to his identity: A remarkably life-like facial reconstruction that resembles a photograph of a teenage boy.
The Harris County Institute of Forensic Sciences has circulated the photograph, making a special point of publishing it in community newspapers on the northwest side of Houston where many of the victims lived.

Dr. Sharon Derrick, a forensic anthropologist who’s used DNA to identify other long-dead victims of the crimes, has pored through school yearbooks from the era without any luck. Now she’s trying a different tactic.
Derrick plans to attend this weekend’s reunion of the 1973 class from Waltrip High School, showing the picture around and hoping to jog someone’s memory.
“I’m hoping that someone there might be able to provide me with the name of someone who lost a teenage boy during that time period or someone who knew of a missing boy,” Derrick said.
She also plans to show photographs of clothing and other artifacts found in the gravesite.
Many of the victims were high school dropouts, so it’s possible the unidentified boy didn’t even attend school. Nonetheless, it’s possible someone at the reunion will remember seeing the boy somewhere off campus.
More...

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« Reply #5 on: August 11, 2013, 07:40:15 AM »

http://www.chron.com/news/houston-texas/houston/article/40-years-after-Houston-serial-killings-one-4686772.php
40 years after Houston serial killings, one victim still unidentified
By Carol Christian | July 25, 2013 | Updated: July 26, 2013 8:40am


Photo By Anonymous/ASSOCIATED PRESS1 of 38
This cabin near Lake Sam Rayburn in Broaddus, Texas, is owned by the family of Dean Corll, 33, the alleged central figure in 1973 a mass slaying case. Sheriff's deputies searched the cabin and found torture items inside the cabin and under it. (AP Photo)



As the 40th anniversary of serial killer Dean Corll's death approaches, a forensic anthropologist is again asking for the public's help in naming the last of 29 young men discovered in mass graves.

Sharon Derrick, of the Harris County Institute of Forensic Sciences, is seeking the identity of a boy, possibly as young as 16, who was found buried in a stall Corll had rented in a southwest Houston boat shed.

The murder spree ended Aug. 8, 1973, when Corll was killed in his Pasadena house by teenaged accomplice Elmer Wayne Henley Jr. Henley remains in prison, as does David Brooks, who also helped lure victims.

That day and the next, investigators found the remains of 16 boys and young men at the boat shed in the 4500 block of Silver Bell Street. It was the largest of three mass graves where Corll and his helpers buried their victims.

Next month, Derrick will make a brief presentation at the 40th high school reunion of Waltrip High School's class of 1973.

The class members would likely be about the same age as the unidentified victim, whom Derrick believes probably disappeared in 1971 or 1972.

"I really want to get this information out to them," she said. "What we need is people to step up and say, 'I had a friend who went missing. Here's his name.' "

Something that bothers Derrick is the relatively little news coverage the case has received over the years outside the Houston area.

"In Houston, there's a core of people who are still very angry and very sad about what happened here," said Derrick, who has helped identify five of the victims since 2006.

"I'm concerned that family members of this boy have completely moved out of the area, and we're not getting national coverage on the Internet," she said.

The unidentified teen was buried with striped swim trunks, a tan shirt with a peace symbol on the back and cowboy boots.

The shirt has several tiny letters that might be LB4 MF or possibly LBHMF.

"We still wonder if he had a military person in his family," Derrick said. "There's just something about his clothing that makes you think he's either protesting the military or has a conection to the military. A lot of boys his age had older brothers or fathers who were in Vietnam."

Derrick believes the teen stood 5-5 or 5-6 and had dark brown hair that hung over the tops of his ears. His teeth were in good condition and had no fillings.

The boy's DNA profile has been entered into a national database and, locally, has been compared against six or seven family samples with no match, Derrick said.

Because almost all of the known victims were from the Houston area, Derrick said she believes the unidentified young man was, also.
 


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« Reply #6 on: August 11, 2013, 07:55:23 AM »

http://www.theleadernews.com/?p=11107
THE LAST LOST BOY: Can you ID the final known victim of the 1970s Heights mass murders?
July 25, 2013


Based on forensic evidence, this may be how the young man appeared in the early 1970s. (From Harris Co. Institute of Forensic Sciences)

Certainly someone remembers the teenage boy, recognizes his distinctive clothing, recalls him vanishing –– likely during a sticky summer of 1971 or 1972 when he might have thought he was joining other young men for a swim –– never to return.

That’s the hope of Dr. Sharron Derrick. Attaching a name to the scraps of evidence from the last known yet unidentified victim of the “Candyman” mass murders in the Heights has become her passion, her mission.

 

“He’s very likely to be from the area, unlikely to be from someplace else,” she said.
 

Here’s the information that Derrick thinks could jog someone’s memory:

•The victim was probably between 16-18 years old.
•He had dark brown hair. “It wasn’t real long, but it was probably over his ears,” according to Derrick.
•He was 5-feet-5 or -6 inches tall.
•He had “beautiful teeth, no fillings, well cared for.”
•He appears to have had some kind of developmental problems with his lower spine that would not have been visible to the casual ******* but may have resulted in him complaining about pain at times

And there is clothing: distinctive striped Catalina swim trunks, size 10 1/2-11 pointed-toed cowboy boots, a rawhide wrist or ankle bracelet, and a “beige-y” T-shirt-material shirt with blue buttons at the neck and a unique peace symbol on the back, with hand lettering below that may read L84MF (or some close combination). Military personnel have suggested to Derrick that could stand for “late for my funeral.” She’s hoping it will jog someone’s memory. [Closeup views of these items are at the bottom of this story in large format.]

The 29 victims (Derrick’s figure) of the mass murder were seized, raped, tortured and killed at Corll’s homes – first in the Heights, later in Pasadena — and buried in mass graves in a boathouse in southwest Houston and on High Island on the Gulf Coast.

Derrick believes this victim likely died in the summer of ’71 or ’72 because of the presence of the swim trunks – the killers liked to take their prey to the beach – and because of the position of his remains in the boathouse, between two identified victims whose approximate dates of death are known.


“Some of the victims were dropouts, such of them were very mainstream,” said Derrick. “It was a crime of opportunity.”

For those who find it hard to understand how a young man could disappear without public attention, Derrick reminds them that the early 1970s were a very different time.

“It was a time when there was a lot more freedom for teenagers, and many times it was thought a boy was a runaway or out doing drugs,” Derrick explained. “If there were reports, they were not followed through to the extent that there would be today.”

There was no DNA, poor keeping of dental records in that era, and the Houston Police Department did not have a missing persons unit. Local television news was coming into its own, but there was no social media, no Amber Alerts.

She’s ready to use all the most modern methods – and her own savvy – to close this last case. Anyone believing they may have information on the identity of the young man can call Derrick’s office at 713-796-9292. If a relative gets in touch, a simple non-invasive DNA test would be performed – a swab inside the cheek. “They can even do it themselves,” Derrick said.

The DNA would be used only for identification in this case and would not going into any criminal identification database, she promised.

Derrick was only slightly younger than the victims when she began reading about the murders, especially attentive because of her family’s deep roots in the Heights. The poignancy of the cases haunts her.

“These parents never saw their child again,” she said. “They may feel like he ran away and ‘didn’t love me and didn’t want to come back and talk to me.’ And I would much prefer that they knew that he just couldn’t come home.”

The families whose young men she’s identified “have been so grateful,” she said. “They look for these boys, they still look at people on the street and think, ‘could that be him grown up?’ It haunts them forever.
 


The collection of evidence that Derrick believes could help identify the last known victim of the Heights mass murders. (Photo from Harris Co. Institute of Forensic Sciences)

More photos at link.
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« Reply #7 on: August 11, 2013, 07:58:28 AM »

http://blog.chron.com/bayoucityhistory/2013/08/40-years-ago-the-houston-mass-murders-come-to-light/
40 years ago: The Houston mass murders come to light
Thursday, August 8, 2013

Forty years.

It was on this date in 1973 — at about 8:30 in the morning — that 17-year-old Elmer Wayne Henley Jr. placed a call to Pasadena police. The teenager had shot and killed 33-year-old Dean Corll following a struggle.

Over the next few hours a macabre story would unfold in Houston. A story involving the gruesome deaths of nearly 30 youths, many with ties to the Heights. A story about burial sites at a southwest Houston boat stall Corll had rented, an area near Sam Rayburn Reservoir and a lonely stretch of beach near High Island.

Over a three-year period beginning in about 1970, Corll, with help from his young accomplices Henley and David Brooks, kidnapped, sexually tortured and killed the youths. When the Houston mass murders came to light, it was the largest of its kind at that point in American history.

Both Henley and Brooks continue to serve prison sentences that could keep them incarcerated for the rest of their lives.

If you’re looking to go beyond the numerous articles on the case that are available online there are a couple of books out there that go into the murders. First is Jack Olsen’s “The Man With the Candy,” published a few months before Henley went on trial in 1974. More recently, former Harris County District Attorney Carol Vance devoted the final chapter of his book, “Boomtown DA,” to the prosecution of Henley.

Last month, another call for help was put out to identify the remains of a boy whose body was found all those many years ago.

 

Photo gallery with 27 images.


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« Reply #8 on: December 05, 2014, 08:46:47 PM »

http://www.kvue.com/story/news/state/2014/12/05/notorious-houston-serial-killer-up-for-parole/19943707/
Notorious Houston serial killer up for parole
December 5, 2014

A mother and father from Pasadena drove to an office building in Angleton Thursday for a closed door parole hearing on one of Houston's most notorious killers.

Their son, a 13 year-old boy named Stanton Dreymala, may not be remembered by many people in the Houston area, but what happened to him is seared in the collective memory of a generation of Houstonians. He was one of at least 28 boys and young men lured to a horrifying death in what became known as the Houston mass murders.

"He was just a normal 13 year-old," said his mother, Elaine Dreymala. "He went to school, he rode his bike, he mowed lawns for his spending money."

Between 1971 and 1973, a man named Dean Corrl recruited two teenaged accomplices – David Brooks and Elmer Wayne Henley – to entice other youngsters to his homes, where they were drugged, raped and sexually tortured – sometimes for days – before they were murdered. Some of the terrified victims were forced to write notes telling their mothers they were leaving town shortly before they were killed.

The boys' disappearances were mostly dismissed as cases of runaways until one day in August 1973, when Corrl tried to kill Henley and Henley somehow managed to shoot Corrl dead. Henley and Brooks then led law enforcement authorities on a gruesome search for the buried corpses of their victims. Both of the surviving killers were sentenced to life in prison.

Since then, both of them have occasionally come up for parole. And although there seems little chance either of the notorious serial killers would be freed by a Texas parole board, the hearings tear at the psychological wounds imposed on the victims' families and friends.

"We can't hardly bear to go through this, since there's two of them," said Eliane Dreymala. "That's about every year and a half for us."

Henley has attracted more media attention than Brooks since their incarceration. An art gallery in Houston's Montrose area once hosted an exhibit of his paintings, which he has offered for sale. And a few years ago, he allowed himself to be interviewed and photographed by an author.

But some of the victim's families believe Brooks is more culpable in the killings than Henley.

"Brooks, of course, recruited Henley," said Andy Kahan, the City of Houston's crime victim advocate. "And essentially, he marched 28 young boys to their deaths knowing full well the sadistic type of torture they would receive before they were brutally killed."

The headlines in newspapers saved by the victims' families have faded, but their determination to keep the killers behind bars has not. Every couple of years, one of the two murderers comes up for parole. And loved ones of the victims mount campaigns to keep them in prison.

The Dreymala's appearance before a parole board in Angleton Thursday was especially poignant. They are now the last surviving parents to have lost a child in the Houston mass murders.

"And when we have to go through it, it brings back all the memories, all the horror," said Elaine Dreymala, Stanton's mother. "And it's just not right. We feel victimized every time we have to do it."

Of course, nobody's forcing them to appear before the parole board. But even though a parole for such notorious killers seems unlikely, the Dreymala's think their appearances are important.

"Every time we come up here, we think it's possible," James Dreymala said. "Not probable. But we would feel really, really stupid if he was paroled and we weren't here to fight it."

That's why they plan to join other victim rights advocates lobbying Texas legislators for a change in state law that would allow officials to wait five years between parole hearings for killers like Henley and Brooks. Right now, Kahan said, there's a disparity in the law decreeing that convicts guilty of lesser crimes can wait five years between hearings, but some of the state's most heinous murderers are eligible every three years.

However often the parole board holds its hearings, the Dreymalas plan to return every time.

"There is no earthly reason why they should ever be paroled," Elaine Dreymala said. "And we'll fight it as long as we are alive."
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« Reply #9 on: August 08, 2018, 07:03:23 PM »

https://www.khou.com/article/news/investigations/missing-pieces/houstons-candy-man-killer-died-45-years-ago-today-one-of-his-victims-remains-unidentified/285-581706868
MISSING-PIECES
Houston's 'Candy Man' killer died 45 years ago today. One of his victims remains unidentified.

Dean Corll and two teenage accomplices tortured, raped and murdered young boys for years in the Heights during the 1970s.
August 8, 2018

Forty-five years ago this August, Houston’s most notorious serial killer met his end.

But through all these years, one of his victims remains unidentified.

Dean Corll, known as the Candy Man, was shot and killed Aug. 8, 1973 by one of his teenage accomplices, Elmer Wayne Henley, revealing the horror of their crimes.

Corll, Henley and another accomplice—David Brooks—spent three years torturing, raping and murdering 30 young boys and burying their bodies across the Houston area.

Most of their victims lived in or had connections to the Heights, one of Houston’s most coveted neighborhoods. Henley and Brooks would lure the boys for Corll, who earned his nickname because of his family’s candy shop that sat across from a school, with the promise of parties and rides.

Andy Kahan, a crime victim’s advocate who works for Crime Stoppers of Houston, said the boys’ deaths were especially troubling.

“These were not quick and easy deaths,” Kahan said. “These were long and excruciating.”

Kahan noted that police identified most of the missing boys as runaways and didn’t allocate the time and effort to search for them. All the while, Corll and his accomplices continued their horrific crimes.

“You didn’t have groups like Texas EquuSearch,” Kahan said, citing the local search-and-rescue organization that attempts to locate missing people.

Donna and Lenore Lovrek’s brother, Randall Harvey, was one of Corll’s victims.

“It’s a terrible thing and it should have never taken place,” Donna said.

In the four decades since Corll’s death, one boy remains unidentified; his family left without any closure of their missing loved one.

Dr. Sharon Derrick, a forensic anthropologist for the Harris County Institute of Forensic Sciences, has uncovered seven of Corll’s victims, including Harvey. Derrick hopes on the 45th anniversary of Corll’s death, she can identify the last boy.

“I just want people not to forget about this,” she said.

The boy is believed to be about 15 years old. He was found wearing a Catalina-branded striped swimsuit and a shirt with a mysterious combination of letters and numbers handwritten below a design that Derrick believes might be a military symbol.

“That led us down a road of wondering whether he had an older brother or a father in the Vietnam conflict,” she said.

Investigators have received numerous tips over the years, including a picture of a boy named Bobby French who matches the unidentified boy’s description.

A clay re-creation and a computer-generated sketch show what the boy might have looked like. He has brown hair cut above his ears, with brown eyes, a large nose and a pointed chin.

Anyone with information about the boy can call the Harris County Institute of Forensic Sciences at 832-927-5001.

The Lovrek sisters know what it’s like to lose a family member and hope the family of the unidentified boy finds its peace.

“This boy has got parents, siblings or somebody,” Donna Lovrek said. “God, I hope they are found and that they can get some closure.”

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« Reply #10 on: August 14, 2018, 08:53:33 AM »




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