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Author Topic: WANT TO QUIT SMOKING? HAVE YOU ALREADY QUIT? Tell your story!  (Read 88312 times)
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jen3560
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« Reply #60 on: March 18, 2009, 11:29:19 AM »

5th day on Chantix.  2nd day on AM & PM doses.  Stil smoking but am aware of less of an urge to do so.  Never thought I'd be on a mind altering drug, sotospeak.  Giving it my best shot.   

    Yeah, the whole mind altering aspect of it is a bit surreal, huh?

Are you feeling pretty calm yet?  Or maybe apathetic is the word I'm looking for.  Apathetic about whether or not you smoke another?

That calm or apathy is only coming in waves, if that makes sense.  Not sure how quickly it happened to you.  I have to keep busy, because the idle time is more likely to have me lighting up.   Still working on breaking those old habits.



Yes - that definitely makes sense.  No worries - it will get to be a stronger feeling for you.

I don't remember exactly how quickly it happened for me.................but I do remember being amazed at how differently I thought and felt about smoking.  And that feeling has stayed.  My boss does sometimes get the urge to smoke, but I don't.  Not at all.

Habits......................I really tried to make a point of changing my daily routine to help with the habit part of the addiction.

I used to get up in the morning, and first thing I would do was smoke a cigarette.  Before anything else.

So I changed that - wake up, and make a mug of tea.

Umm..............in the car.  I used to smoke in the car.  I still sometimes will catch myself with the window cracked down - not even realizing when I did it, LOL.  I started keeping a tube of chap stick or lip gloss in the car............so when I got in - that's the first thing I would do - put it on.

Silly things like that..............but for me, they worked in helping to break the habit.

After meals................that was a tough one for me to break.  Used to always have to smoke after I ate.  For breakfast and lunch, instead of smoking - I stuck the end of a pen in my mouth and chewed on it (I still do that, LOL).

After dinner - it was another mug of tea.  I started excercising more - that was definitely a way to not only use up idle time, but to also feel better about myself all the way around.  Not only was I not smoking anymore, but I was getting myself into shape as well.

I guess the trick is to just find ways to vary your daily routine.  Break it up a bit.
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Sassycat
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« Reply #61 on: March 18, 2009, 12:54:37 PM »

5th day on Chantix.  2nd day on AM & PM doses.  Stil smoking but am aware of less of an urge to do so.  Never thought I'd be on a mind altering drug, sotospeak.  Giving it my best shot.   

Hey 2NJ!   We're behind you, all the way!    You can do it!     Hang in there!   One day at a time!



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Sassycat
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« Reply #62 on: March 18, 2009, 01:05:44 PM »

Well, here I am, still talking to myself here in this support thread....        

Doctor prescribed Chantix and I am nervous about taking it.  Hubby countered with argument that he & our sons want me to stop smoking and want to help me.  When I said I'm concerned about the side effects, he just got impatient and said, well, just keep smoking, then.  I'm not sure where this is all going.

I saw something online about Cig that was battery operated from China.  It gave one the satisfaction of a cig without the harmful chemicals. 

I'm going to have to look for this item for my hubby.   He hasn't had any luck in quitting.    I'm learning a lot about chantix here.  Thanks Monkeys.   I don't know if I can get him to try it.   He is using Commit - but still smoking a couple every day.    I wanted him to try the patch, but he knows if he puts one on, he can't smoke.   So, he needs to be "ready" before he takes that step.

He was sitting on the couch, holding my hand, the other night.  When he got up, I could smell stinky cigs on my hand.   I only quit Junuary 11 - and the smell is already getting to me.    I can say that I don't feel the urge to smoke anymore.    The only time I really think about it is when I'm upset about something - and so far, I've been able to shake off the urge when this happens.

I want to say    for the support that I found here!
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2NJSons_Mom
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« Reply #63 on: March 18, 2009, 06:00:41 PM »

Sassycat,

Hope your husband wins the battle, too.  Thanks for your support & congrats on quitting, yourself.

MuffyBee,

Thanks, to you, too.  I forgot to acknowledge your post earlier. 

Jen3560,

Your habit breaking tips are noted.  I have a lot of years worth to deal with.  TY
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R.I.P Dear 2NJ - say hi to Peaches for us!

I expect a miracle _Peaches ~ ~ May She Rest In Peace.

SOMEONE KNOWS THE TRUTH  

None of us here just fell off the turnip truck. - Magnolia
eyecanCOOK
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« Reply #64 on: March 18, 2009, 06:03:57 PM »

I would like to say(even though my siggy says differently) that I will  be smoke-free for one year on March 26th.  I had basal cell carcinoma removed from my face on May 6th and in order to have plastic surgery to repair the deformity I had to quit smoking for 6 weeks without any Nicotine Replacement Therapy...well I did it through Chantix while a super great medication for helping me quit a 23 year habit...I would not recommend anyone to use it...terrible side effects and PLEASE..........if you do go the Chantix route...PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE!!!!!!!! wean yourself off the medication by tapering it off before the 12 weeks run out, I did not and suffered some terrible side effects. It the medication is different for everyone and IT DID help me to quit, HOWEVER, my story and my opinion only was not the route that I should have took
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Kindness is a word the deaf and dumb can understand. No ciggies for one year....ok on to year two
Blue Moon
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« Reply #65 on: March 18, 2009, 06:07:16 PM »

Sassycat,

Hope your husband wins the battle, too.  Thanks for your support & congrats on quitting, yourself.

MuffyBee,

Thanks, to you, too.  I forgot to acknowledge your post earlier. 

Jen3560,

Your habit breaking tips are noted.  I have a lot of years worth to deal with.  TY

I am here to talk to you about it 2NJ.  You are using Chantex?  I haven't yet got up the nerve to try it.  Way to go.  Hang in there.  I am almost ready to follow you.  I did it once before but did not have the support I needed to continue with it.  In a weak moment I said what the hay and off I went like before.  This time I am going to do it at the right time, when I am serious, and when I have the support I need.  So I will give you support if you will do the same with me.   Hang in there. You are doing great. Be proud of yourself.  I am.
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If you ask the wrong question, of course, you get the wrong answer. We find in design itís much more important and difficult to ask the right question. Once you do that, the right answer becomes obvious.<br />Quote: Amory Lovins
KYcat
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« Reply #66 on: March 18, 2009, 09:42:38 PM »

2NJ, GOOD LUCK.  My husband and I both tried ***get this*** laser therapy!!  What a crock.  Didn't work.  Hubby tried Chantax.... didn't work.  BUT, I don't think he really wanted to quit at the time. 

We both have prescriptions for Chantax but I am afraid to try it.  When he tried it before, he had terrible (i hope this is not too much info, LOL) diarahea and horrible dreams/nightmares. 

Have you had any side affects?  Has anyone had any side affects?  I take blood pressure medicine and anti-panic medicine so I am leary of taking anything else.

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2NJSons_Mom
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« Reply #67 on: March 18, 2009, 10:28:25 PM »

Sassycat,

Hope your husband wins the battle, too.  Thanks for your support & congrats on quitting, yourself.

MuffyBee,

Thanks, to you, too.  I forgot to acknowledge your post earlier. 

Jen3560,

Your habit breaking tips are noted.  I have a lot of years worth to deal with.  TY

I am here to talk to you about it 2NJ.  You are using Chantex?  I haven't yet got up the nerve to try it.  Way to go.  Hang in there.  I am almost ready to follow you.  I did it once before but did not have the support I needed to continue with it.  In a weak moment I said what the hay and off I went like before.  This time I am going to do it at the right time, when I am serious, and when I have the support I need.  So I will give you support if you will do the same with me.   Hang in there. You are doing great. Be proud of yourself.  I am.

Blue Moon,

I'm here for you when you are ready.  I'm still not over the hurdle, but hope I'm getting there.   Thanks.
Logged

R.I.P Dear 2NJ - say hi to Peaches for us!

I expect a miracle _Peaches ~ ~ May She Rest In Peace.

SOMEONE KNOWS THE TRUTH  

None of us here just fell off the turnip truck. - Magnolia
2NJSons_Mom
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« Reply #68 on: March 18, 2009, 10:30:48 PM »

I would like to say(even though my siggy says differently) that I will  be smoke-free for one year on March 26th.  I had basal cell carcinoma removed from my face on May 6th and in order to have plastic surgery to repair the deformity I had to quit smoking for 6 weeks without any Nicotine Replacement Therapy...well I did it through Chantix while a super great medication for helping me quit a 23 year habit...I would not recommend anyone to use it...terrible side effects and PLEASE..........if you do go the Chantix route...PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE!!!!!!!! wean yourself off the medication by tapering it off before the 12 weeks run out, I did not and suffered some terrible side effects. It the medication is different for everyone and IT DID help me to quit, HOWEVER, my story and my opinion only was not the route that I should have took

Congratulations & thank you for sharing your experience, eyecanCOOK.  I understand your circumstances were unique.  It would be nice to know what side effects you had...it seems it does not effect all the same way.
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R.I.P Dear 2NJ - say hi to Peaches for us!

I expect a miracle _Peaches ~ ~ May She Rest In Peace.

SOMEONE KNOWS THE TRUTH  

None of us here just fell off the turnip truck. - Magnolia
2NJSons_Mom
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« Reply #69 on: March 18, 2009, 10:39:51 PM »

2NJ, GOOD LUCK.  My husband and I both tried ***get this*** laser therapy!!  What a crock.  Didn't work.  Hubby tried Chantax.... didn't work.  BUT, I don't think he really wanted to quit at the time. 

We both have prescriptions for Chantax but I am afraid to try it.  When he tried it before, he had terrible (i hope this is not too much info, LOL) diarahea and horrible dreams/nightmares. 

Have you had any side affects?  Has anyone had any side affects?  I take blood pressure medicine and anti-panic medicine so I am leary of taking anything else.



Well, to be honest, the last couple of days I have had some of those intestinal symptoms, but was not sure it was the Chantix.  My husband, who is on the patch, had had similar symptoms last week and is now okay, so I was thinking that it might be a virus (he thought immediately that it was the patch, which could be true).  Not sure, yet.  I have not had the horrible dreams.  I, too, take blood pressure med, so I understand your concerns.  My physician preferred the Chantix over the patch because the patch can raise blood pressure.  I'm giving it a chance, though I'd like it better if I took no meds at all. 

Thanks, KYcat. 
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R.I.P Dear 2NJ - say hi to Peaches for us!

I expect a miracle _Peaches ~ ~ May She Rest In Peace.

SOMEONE KNOWS THE TRUTH  

None of us here just fell off the turnip truck. - Magnolia
Port Valerie
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« Reply #70 on: March 19, 2009, 01:30:13 AM »

Good luck, 2NJ.

I smoked without any constraint from age 18 to 43. Two packs a day minimum. Three packs if the day was long and had a lot of business metings in it. I didn't want to stop and never considered it. Then my husband quit and he told me I smelled bad. Then we moved into a new house. When we took the pictures off the walls in the old one, I was amazed to see outlines on the wall caused by smoke stains. When we took down some draperies, the smoke and dust made them disintegrate, practically, in my hands. And they were new!

My husband quit by going to a six or eight week hospital program. When we moved into the new house, I didn't want to stink it up. I took the same same program that my husband had taken. No medication, no patch. Group support and information. The group had its first meeting on a Monday night. We had one week to think it over. I smoked one last cigarette a week later, at six-thirty on January 18, 2007. I put it out in the parking lot before going into the meeting room. Then I saw an ash tray even closer and regretted that I had not smoked all the way to the meeting room door. Insanity.

Quitting was hard. For a week, I went to bed work every day and came home and went to bed. Pretty soon, though, I began to notice that there were some positive aspects. I didn't smell bad. The stink washed out of my hair in the shower. Ismelled shampoo for the first time and it was beautiful. I could breathe. I wasn't coughing. I could buy white draperies and be sure I wouldn't ruin them. Coffee tasted good. They served us a non-caffeinated hot cider at the smoking-cessation group and I could taste it. The cider became a marker for me,  the taste of new sanity.

One trick they taught us was to hold a straw and breath through it. They gave us white straws the size of cigarettes and we carried them around. That helped with the physical, manipulation part of things.

I also used a lot of sugar free chewing gum, to the point where that too became an addiction -- but I didn't smoke.

I gained weight and hated it.

But I also gained freedom. There were so many places I couldn't go because of smoking, even back then. In college, I couldn't study in libraries. Later, I couldn't go to movies cuz I needed a ciggie-poo every 20 minutes. Now I can do those things.

In the first week of the smoking-cessation class, while we were still smoking, they had us make a note of every cigarette we smoked. We noted the time, place, and emotional state at the moment. I learned that I smoked to stop and start everything I did -- go to bed, get up, makke a phone call, end a phone call, stop to think what to do next, start the next thing, go to brush my teeth, finish brushing my teeth. For me it was not a matter of breaking one habit but a thousand habits. I took it as a small victory every time I did a "first" without a cigarette. The second time was always easier.

There were three people in my office who smoked as much as I did, or perhaps less. They all died later on, at the age of 63, from smoking related illnesses. When I quit smoking 63 was a long way away. Now it isn't. I'm glad I don't have the effects of smoking until that age. Other effects, sure, but not the wheezing and coughing and stinking and not being able to do things.

If I could quit, you could quit. I don't think anybody every smoked as much as I did and never had the slightest desire to quit.

When your time is up, it's up. The time for smoking is over with.

Keep up the good work.

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socialfriend2
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« Reply #71 on: March 19, 2009, 12:44:40 PM »

believe me chanix works no sideaffects for me ive been smokefree for 16teen months can anyone tell me why blogsfornatalee isnt working and where is everyone thank you
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2NJSons_Mom
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« Reply #72 on: March 19, 2009, 12:57:43 PM »

believe me chanix works no sideaffects for me ive been smokefree for 16teen months can anyone tell me why blogsfornatalee isnt working and where is everyone thank you

Thanks, socialfriend2.   I'm hanging in there & hope to be a success story. 

Not sure about bfn....Klaas might know.  My registration was canceled because I never posted and I never reregistered. 
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R.I.P Dear 2NJ - say hi to Peaches for us!

I expect a miracle _Peaches ~ ~ May She Rest In Peace.

SOMEONE KNOWS THE TRUTH  

None of us here just fell off the turnip truck. - Magnolia
2NJSons_Mom
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« Reply #73 on: March 19, 2009, 01:00:37 PM »

Good luck, 2NJ.

I smoked without any constraint from age 18 to 43. Two packs a day minimum. Three packs if the day was long and had a lot of business metings in it. I didn't want to stop and never considered it. Then my husband quit and he told me I smelled bad. Then we moved into a new house. When we took the pictures off the walls in the old one, I was amazed to see outlines on the wall caused by smoke stains. When we took down some draperies, the smoke and dust made them disintegrate, practically, in my hands. And they were new!

My husband quit by going to a six or eight week hospital program. When we moved into the new house, I didn't want to stink it up. I took the same same program that my husband had taken. No medication, no patch. Group support and information. The group had its first meeting on a Monday night. We had one week to think it over. I smoked one last cigarette a week later, at six-thirty on January 18, 2007. I put it out in the parking lot before going into the meeting room. Then I saw an ash tray even closer and regretted that I had not smoked all the way to the meeting room door. Insanity.

Quitting was hard. For a week, I went to bed work every day and came home and went to bed. Pretty soon, though, I began to notice that there were some positive aspects. I didn't smell bad. The stink washed out of my hair in the shower. Ismelled shampoo for the first time and it was beautiful. I could breathe. I wasn't coughing. I could buy white draperies and be sure I wouldn't ruin them. Coffee tasted good. They served us a non-caffeinated hot cider at the smoking-cessation group and I could taste it. The cider became a marker for me,  the taste of new sanity.

One trick they taught us was to hold a straw and breath through it. They gave us white straws the size of cigarettes and we carried them around. That helped with the physical, manipulation part of things.

I also used a lot of sugar free chewing gum, to the point where that too became an addiction -- but I didn't smoke.

I gained weight and hated it.

But I also gained freedom. There were so many places I couldn't go because of smoking, even back then. In college, I couldn't study in libraries. Later, I couldn't go to movies cuz I needed a ciggie-poo every 20 minutes. Now I can do those things.

In the first week of the smoking-cessation class, while we were still smoking, they had us make a note of every cigarette we smoked. We noted the time, place, and emotional state at the moment. I learned that I smoked to stop and start everything I did -- go to bed, get up, makke a phone call, end a phone call, stop to think what to do next, start the next thing, go to brush my teeth, finish brushing my teeth. For me it was not a matter of breaking one habit but a thousand habits. I took it as a small victory every time I did a "first" without a cigarette. The second time was always easier.

There were three people in my office who smoked as much as I did, or perhaps less. They all died later on, at the age of 63, from smoking related illnesses. When I quit smoking 63 was a long way away. Now it isn't. I'm glad I don't have the effects of smoking until that age. Other effects, sure, but not the wheezing and coughing and stinking and not being able to do things.

If I could quit, you could quit. I don't think anybody every smoked as much as I did and never had the slightest desire to quit.

When your time is up, it's up. The time for smoking is over with.

Keep up the good work.



Thank you very much, Port Valerie.  Your story is not unlike many others and I'm sure will be valuable to others besides myself.  I appreciate your sharing this for myself and anyone else who happens to find their way to this thread.   
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R.I.P Dear 2NJ - say hi to Peaches for us!

I expect a miracle _Peaches ~ ~ May She Rest In Peace.

SOMEONE KNOWS THE TRUTH  

None of us here just fell off the turnip truck. - Magnolia
katiekatie2u
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« Reply #74 on: March 19, 2009, 07:29:59 PM »

Good luck, 2NJ.

I smoked without any constraint from age 18 to 43. Two packs a day minimum. Three packs if the day was long and had a lot of business metings in it. I didn't want to stop and never considered it. Then my husband quit and he told me I smelled bad. Then we moved into a new house. When we took the pictures off the walls in the old one, I was amazed to see outlines on the wall caused by smoke stains. When we took down some draperies, the smoke and dust made them disintegrate, practically, in my hands. And they were new!

My husband quit by going to a six or eight week hospital program. When we moved into the new house, I didn't want to stink it up. I took the same same program that my husband had taken. No medication, no patch. Group support and information. The group had its first meeting on a Monday night. We had one week to think it over. I smoked one last cigarette a week later, at six-thirty on January 18, 2007. I put it out in the parking lot before going into the meeting room. Then I saw an ash tray even closer and regretted that I had not smoked all the way to the meeting room door. Insanity.

Quitting was hard. For a week, I went to bed work every day and came home and went to bed. Pretty soon, though, I began to notice that there were some positive aspects. I didn't smell bad. The stink washed out of my hair in the shower. Ismelled shampoo for the first time and it was beautiful. I could breathe. I wasn't coughing. I could buy white draperies and be sure I wouldn't ruin them. Coffee tasted good. They served us a non-caffeinated hot cider at the smoking-cessation group and I could taste it. The cider became a marker for me,  the taste of new sanity.

One trick they taught us was to hold a straw and breath through it. They gave us white straws the size of cigarettes and we carried them around. That helped with the physical, manipulation part of things.

I also used a lot of sugar free chewing gum, to the point where that too became an addiction -- but I didn't smoke.

I gained weight and hated it.

But I also gained freedom. There were so many places I couldn't go because of smoking, even back then. In college, I couldn't study in libraries. Later, I couldn't go to movies cuz I needed a ciggie-poo every 20 minutes. Now I can do those things.

In the first week of the smoking-cessation class, while we were still smoking, they had us make a note of every cigarette we smoked. We noted the time, place, and emotional state at the moment. I learned that I smoked to stop and start everything I did -- go to bed, get up, makke a phone call, end a phone call, stop to think what to do next, start the next thing, go to brush my teeth, finish brushing my teeth. For me it was not a matter of breaking one habit but a thousand habits. I took it as a small victory every time I did a "first" without a cigarette. The second time was always easier.

There were three people in my office who smoked as much as I did, or perhaps less. They all died later on, at the age of 63, from smoking related illnesses. When I quit smoking 63 was a long way away. Now it isn't. I'm glad I don't have the effects of smoking until that age. Other effects, sure, but not the wheezing and coughing and stinking and not being able to do things.

If I could quit, you could quit. I don't think anybody every smoked as much as I did and never had the slightest desire to quit.

When your time is up, it's up. The time for smoking is over with.

Keep up the good work.



Thank you very much, Port Valerie.  Your story is not unlike many others and I'm sure will be valuable to others besides myself.  I appreciate your sharing this for myself and anyone else who happens to find their way to this thread.   

I QUIT SMOKING COLD TURKEY!!   AFTER SMOKING FOR AT LEAST TEN YEAR'S!!  I ONCE IN A WHILE GET A CRAVING FOR A CIG.. ESPECIALY IF I AM UNDER STRESS OR SOMEONE PISSES ME OFF LOL.. BUT  I HAVENT GONE BACK TO SMOKING... MAINLY BECAUSE MY LUNGS ARE THAT GREAT AND I HAVE ASTHMA NOT CHRONIC BUT SMOKING ONLY INTENSIFIED  MY SHORTNESS OF BREATH...SO I  SAID TO MYSELF ONE DAY!! GIRLFRIEND ... IT'S TIME TO KICK THE HABIT OR THE BUCKET!!!  WITH LOTS OF PRAYER I CONTINUE MY DAILY ACTIVITIES WITHOUT CIGARETTES EVEN UNDER THE WORST OF STRESSERS... THATS MY STORY..
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katiekatie2u
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« Reply #75 on: March 19, 2009, 07:31:56 PM »

Good luck, 2NJ.

I smoked without any constraint from age 18 to 43. Two packs a day minimum. Three packs if the day was long and had a lot of business metings in it. I didn't want to stop and never considered it. Then my husband quit and he told me I smelled bad. Then we moved into a new house. When we took the pictures off the walls in the old one, I was amazed to see outlines on the wall caused by smoke stains. When we took down some draperies, the smoke and dust made them disintegrate, practically, in my hands. And they were new!

My husband quit by going to a six or eight week hospital program. When we moved into the new house, I didn't want to stink it up. I took the same same program that my husband had taken. No medication, no patch. Group support and information. The group had its first meeting on a Monday night. We had one week to think it over. I smoked one last cigarette a week later, at six-thirty on January 18, 2007. I put it out in the parking lot before going into the meeting room. Then I saw an ash tray even closer and regretted that I had not smoked all the way to the meeting room door. Insanity.

Quitting was hard. For a week, I went to bed work every day and came home and went to bed. Pretty soon, though, I began to notice that there were some positive aspects. I didn't smell bad. The stink washed out of my hair in the shower. Ismelled shampoo for the first time and it was beautiful. I could breathe. I wasn't coughing. I could buy white draperies and be sure I wouldn't ruin them. Coffee tasted good. They served us a non-caffeinated hot cider at the smoking-cessation group and I could taste it. The cider became a marker for me,  the taste of new sanity.

One trick they taught us was to hold a straw and breath through it. They gave us white straws the size of cigarettes and we carried them around. That helped with the physical, manipulation part of things.

I also used a lot of sugar free chewing gum, to the point where that too became an addiction -- but I didn't smoke.

I gained weight and hated it.

But I also gained freedom. There were so many places I couldn't go because of smoking, even back then. In college, I couldn't study in libraries. Later, I couldn't go to movies cuz I needed a ciggie-poo every 20 minutes. Now I can do those things.

In the first week of the smoking-cessation class, while we were still smoking, they had us make a note of every cigarette we smoked. We noted the time, place, and emotional state at the moment. I learned that I smoked to stop and start everything I did -- go to bed, get up, makke a phone call, end a phone call, stop to think what to do next, start the next thing, go to brush my teeth, finish brushing my teeth. For me it was not a matter of breaking one habit but a thousand habits. I took it as a small victory every time I did a "first" without a cigarette. The second time was always easier.

There were three people in my office who smoked as much as I did, or perhaps less. They all died later on, at the age of 63, from smoking related illnesses. When I quit smoking 63 was a long way away. Now it isn't. I'm glad I don't have the effects of smoking until that age. Other effects, sure, but not the wheezing and coughing and stinking and not being able to do things.

If I could quit, you could quit. I don't think anybody every smoked as much as I did and never had the slightest desire to quit.

When your time is up, it's up. The time for smoking is over with.

Keep up the good work.



Thank you very much, Port Valerie.  Your story is not unlike many others and I'm sure will be valuable to others besides myself.  I appreciate your sharing this for myself and anyone else who happens to find their way to this thread.   

I QUIT SMOKING COLD TURKEY!!   AFTER SMOKING FOR AT LEAST TEN YEAR'S!!  I ONCE IN A WHILE GET A CRAVING FOR A CIG.. ESPECIALY IF I AM UNDER STRESS OR SOMEONE PISSES ME OFF LOL.. BUT  I HAVENT GONE BACK TO SMOKING... MAINLY BECAUSE MY LUNGS ARE THAT GREAT AND I HAVE ASTHMA NOT CHRONIC BUT SMOKING ONLY INTENSIFIED  MY SHORTNESS OF BREATH...SO I  SAID TO MYSELF ONE DAY!! GIRLFRIEND ... IT'S TIME TO KICK THE HABIT OR THE BUCKET!!!  WITH LOTS OF PRAYER I CONTINUE MY DAILY ACTIVITIES WITHOUT CIGARETTES EVEN UNDER THE WORST OF STRESSERS... THATS MY STORY..
MEANT TO SAY MY LUNGS ARE NOT THAT GREATTTTTTTT
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klaasend
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« Reply #76 on: March 19, 2009, 07:44:25 PM »

believe me chanix works no sideaffects for me ive been smokefree for 16teen months can anyone tell me why blogsfornatalee isnt working and where is everyone thank you

BFN is going to be moving to a new server, they had server problems and that's why the site went down.  Currently some are occasionally posting at their backup forum:

http://bfnbackup.16.forumer.com/index.php
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« Reply #77 on: March 19, 2009, 07:57:24 PM »

believe me chanix works no sideaffects for me ive been smokefree for 16teen months can anyone tell me why blogsfornatalee isnt working and where is everyone thank you
I am happy that it worked for you with no side effects...I wish that I could say the same for myself.  I did not taper off and I did not take the full dosage because I got sick otherwise. There is something to be said for people who have taken anti-depressants years before the moment they are faced with having to quit. I did years ago when my oldest who turns 13 was born.  When I went off the meds I suffered or (rather my hubby) suffered my agitated wrath... I was aggressive, agitated and unreasonable.....Let's remember that this medication as wonderful as we all would like to believe,works on the neuro-receptors in your brain that release dopamine, BUT let's remember that the BRAIN is similar to Mars a vast undiscovered terraine capable of events and things that are beyond our comprehension(ex...very sad....but nonetheless Nastasha Richardson) Let's say perhaps, for arguements sake, that the same neuro-receptors that squash your desire to smoke are in fact the same receptors that regulate sugars in your body, or pain, or in my case give you canker sores, or in medical terms mouth ulcerations every month...I did take anti-depressants when my oldest was only a baby...so perhaps that was the cocktail that tipped me over the edge...but please, if there is anything that I can offer as advice...please watch your body and anything that might be off and please taper off the medication I did not maybe that is why I suffer all the time.
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Kindness is a word the deaf and dumb can understand. No ciggies for one year....ok on to year two
Port Valerie
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« Reply #78 on: March 19, 2009, 07:58:06 PM »

Meant to say I quit on January 18, 1988 -- not 2007.
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« Reply #79 on: March 19, 2009, 10:33:52 PM »

Meant to say I quit on January 18, 1988 -- not 2007.

My best friend died that year due to breast cancer.  She wanted me to quit back then.  That gives you an idea how long I've been smoking.  You went from a couple years non-smoker to a couple of decades non-smoker.  Guess you were a kid....

I think I'm getting there.  I hope so.
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R.I.P Dear 2NJ - say hi to Peaches for us!

I expect a miracle _Peaches ~ ~ May She Rest In Peace.

SOMEONE KNOWS THE TRUTH  

None of us here just fell off the turnip truck. - Magnolia
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