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Author Topic: H1N1 - Swine Flu - Novel Flu - Information  (Read 100989 times)
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« Reply #120 on: May 05, 2009, 02:11:38 PM »

http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/qa.htm

CDC UPDATE - H1N1 FLU - MAY 5, 2009

 H1N1 Flu (Swine Flu) and You*


On this Page
Novel H1N1 Flu
Novel H1N1 Flu in Humans
Exposures Not Thought to Spread New H1N1 Flu
Prevention & Treatment
Response & Investigation
May 5, 2009 12:30 PM ET

Novel H1N1 Flu


What is H1N1 (swine flu)?
H1N1 (referred to as “swine flu” early on) is a new influenza virus causing illness in people. This new virus was first detected in people in the United States in April 2009. Other countries, including Mexico and Canada, have reported people sick with this new virus. This virus is spreading from person-to-person, probably in much the same way that regular seasonal influenza viruses spread.

Why is this new H1N1 virus sometimes called “swine flu”?
This virus was originally referred to as “swine flu” because laboratory testing showed that many of the genes in this new virus were very similar to influenza viruses that normally occur in pigs in North America. But further study has shown that this new virus is very different from what normally circulates in North American pigs. It has two genes from flu viruses that normally circulate in pigs in Europe and Asia and avian genes and human genes. Scientists call this a “quadruple reassortant” virus.



Novel H1N1 Flu in Humans


Are there human infections with this H1N1 virus in the U.S.?
Yes. Cases of human infection with this H1N1 influenza virus were first confirmed in the U.S. in Southern California and near Guadalupe County, Texas. The outbreak intensified rapidly from that time and more and more states have been reporting cases of illness from this virus. An updated case count of confirmed novel H1N1 flu infections in the United States is kept at http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/investigation.htm. CDC and local and state health agencies are working together to investigate this situation.

Is this new H1N1 virus contagious?
CDC has determined that this new H1N1 virus is contagious and is spreading from human to human. However, at this time, it is not known how easily the virus spreads between people.

What are the signs and symptoms of this virus in people?
The symptoms of this new H1N1 flu virus in people are similar to the symptoms of seasonal flu and include fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue. A significant number of people who have been infected with this virus also have reported diarrhea and vomiting.  Also, like seasonal flu, severe illnesses and death has occurred as a result of illness associated with this virus.

How severe is illness associated with this new H1N1 virus?
It’s not known at this time how severe this virus will be in the general population. CDC is studying the medical histories of people who have been infected with this virus to determine whether some people may be at greater risk from infection, serious illness or hospitalization from the virus. In seasonal flu, there are certain people that are at higher risk of serious flu-related complications. This includes people 65 years and older, children younger than five years old, pregnant women, and people of any age with chronic medical conditions. It’s unknown at this time whether certain groups of people are at greater risk of serious flu-related complications from infection with this new virus. CDC also is conducting laboratory studies to see if certain people might have natural immunity to this virus, depending on their age.

How does this new H1N1 virus spread?
Spread of this H1N1 virus is thought to be happening in the same way that seasonal flu spreads. Flu viruses are spread mainly from person to person through coughing or sneezing by people with influenza. Sometimes people may become infected by touching something with flu viruses on it and then touching their mouth or nose.

How long can an infected person spread this virus to others?
At the current time, CDC believes that this virus has the same properties in terms of spread as seasonal flu viruses. With seasonal flu, studies have shown that people may be contagious from one day before they develop symptoms to up to 7 days after they get sick.  Children, especially younger children, might potentially be contagious for longer periods. CDC is studying the virus and its capabilities to try to learn more and will provide more information as it becomes available.

Exposures Not Thought to Spread New H1N1 Flu


Can I get infected with this new H1N1 virus from eating or preparing pork?
No. H1N1 viruses are not spread by food. You cannot get this new HIN1 virus from eating pork or pork products. Eating properly handled and cooked pork products is safe.

Is there a risk from drinking water?
Tap water that has been treated by conventional disinfection processes does not likely pose a risk for transmission of influenza viruses. Current drinking water treatment regulations provide a high degree of protection from viruses. No research has been completed on the susceptibility of the novel H1N1 flu virus to conventional drinking water treatment processes. However, recent studies have demonstrated that free chlorine levels typically used in drinking water treatment are adequate to inactivate highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza. It is likely that other influenza viruses such as novel H1N1 would also be similarly inactivated by chlorination. To date, there have been no documented human cases of influenza caused by exposure to influenza-contaminated drinking water.

Can the new H1N1 flu virus be spread through water in swimming pools, spas, water parks, interactive fountains, and other treated recreational water venues?
Influenza viruses infect the human upper respiratory tract. There has never been a documented case of influenza virus infection associated with water exposure. Recreational water that has been treated at CDC recommended disinfectant levels does not likely pose a risk for transmission of influenza viruses. No research has been completed on the susceptibility of the H1N1 influenza virus to chlorine and other disinfectants used in swimming pools, spas, water parks, interactive fountains, and other treated recreational venues. However, recent studies have demonstrated that free chlorine levels recommended by CDC (1–3 parts per million [ppm or mg/L] for pools and 2–5 ppm for spas) are adequate to disinfect avian influenza A (H5N1) virus. It is likely that other influenza viruses such as novel H1N1 virus would also be similarly disinfected by chlorine.

Can H1N1 influenza virus be spread at recreational water venues outside of the water?
Yes, recreational water venues are no different than any other group setting. The spread of this novel H1N1 flu is thought to be happening in the same way that seasonal flu spreads. Flu viruses are spread mainly from person to person through coughing or sneezing of people with influenza. Sometimes people may become infected by touching something with flu viruses on it and then touching their mouth or nose.

Prevention & Treatment


What can I do to protect myself from getting sick?
There is no vaccine available right now to protect against this new H1N1 virus. There are everyday actions that can help prevent the spread of germs that cause respiratory illnesses like influenza.

Take these everyday steps to protect your health:

Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.
Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially after you cough or sneeze. Alcohol-based hand cleaners are also effective.
Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth. Germs spread this way.
Try to avoid close contact with sick people.
Stay home if you are sick for 7 days after your symptoms begin or until you have been symptom-free for 24 hours, whichever is longer. This is to keep from infecting others and spreading the virus further.

Other important actions that you can take are:

Follow public health advice regarding school closures, avoiding crowds and other social distancing measures.
Be prepared in case you get sick and need to stay home for a week or so; a supply of over-the-counter medicines, alcohol-based hand rubs, tissues and other related items might could be useful and help avoid the need to make trips out in public while you are sick and contagious.
What is the best way to keep from spreading the virus through coughing or sneezing?
If you are sick, limit your contact with other people as much as possible. If you are sick, stay home for 7 days after your symptoms begin or until you have been symptom-free for 24 hours, whichever is longer. Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when coughing or sneezing. Put your used tissue in the waste basket. Then, clean your hands, and do so every time you cough or sneeze.



What is the best technique for washing my hands to avoid getting the flu?

Washing your hands often will help protect you from germs. Wash with soap and water or clean with alcohol-based hand cleaner. CDC recommends that when you wash your hands -- with soap and warm water -- that you wash for 15 to 20 seconds. When soap and water are not available, alcohol-based disposable hand wipes or gel sanitizers may be used. You can find them in most supermarkets and drugstores. If using gel, rub your hands until the gel is dry. The gel doesn't need water to work; the alcohol in it kills the germs on your hands.

What should I do if I get sick?
If you live in areas where people have been identified with new H1N1 flu and become ill with influenza-like symptoms, including fever, body aches, runny or stuffy nose, sore throat, nausea, or vomiting or diarrhea, you should stay home and avoid contact with other people, except to seek medical care.

If you have severe illness or you are at high risk for flu complications, contact your health care provider or seek medical care. Your health care provider will determine whether flu testing or treatment is needed

If you become ill and experience any of the following warning signs, seek emergency medical care.

In children emergency warning signs that need urgent medical attention include:

Fast breathing or trouble breathing
Bluish or gray skin color
Not drinking enough fluids
Severe or persistent vomiting
Not waking up or not interacting
Being so irritable that the child does not want to be held
Flu-like symptoms improve but then return with fever and worse cough
In adults, emergency warning signs that need urgent medical attention include:

Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
Pain or pressure in the chest or abdomen
Sudden dizziness
Confusion
Severe or persistent vomiting
Flu-like symptoms improve but then return with fever and worse cough

Are there medicines to treat infection with this new virus?
Yes. CDC recommends the use of oseltamivir or zanamivir for the treatment and/or prevention of infection with the new H1N1 flu virus. Antiviral drugs are prescription medicines (pills, liquid or an inhaler) that fight against the flu by keeping flu viruses from reproducing in your body. If you get sick, antiviral drugs can make your illness milder and make you feel better faster. They may also prevent serious flu complications. During the current outbreak, the priority use for influenza antiviral drugs during is to treat severe influenza illness.

Contamination & Cleaning


How long can influenza virus remain viable on objects (such as books and doorknobs)?
Studies have shown that influenza virus can survive on environmental surfaces and can infect a person for up to 2-8 hours after being deposited on the surface.

What kills influenza virus?
Influenza virus is destroyed by heat (167-212°F [75-100°C]). In addition, several chemical germicides, including chlorine, hydrogen peroxide, detergents (soap), iodophors (iodine-based antiseptics), and alcohols are effective against human influenza viruses if used in proper concentration for a sufficient length of time. For example, wipes or gels with alcohol in them can be used to clean hands. The gels should be rubbed into hands until they are dry.

What surfaces are most likely to be sources of contamination?
Germs can be spread when a person touches something that is contaminated with germs and then touches his or her eyes, nose, or mouth. Droplets from a cough or sneeze of an infected person move through the air. Germs can be spread when a person touches respiratory droplets from another person on a surface like a desk, for example, and then touches their own eyes, mouth or nose before washing their hands.

How should waste disposal be handled to prevent the spread of influenza virus?


To prevent the spread of influenza virus, it is recommended that tissues and other disposable items used by an infected person be thrown in the trash. Additionally, persons should wash their hands with soap and water after touching used tissues and similar waste.

How long can influenza virus remain viable on objects (such as books and doorknobs)?

Studies have shown that influenza virus can survive on environmental surfaces and can infect a person for up to 2-8 hours after being deposited on the surface.

What kills influenza virus?
Influenza virus is destroyed by heat (167-212°F [75-100°C]). In addition, several chemical germicides, including chlorine, hydrogen peroxide, detergents (soap), iodophors (iodine-based antiseptics), and alcohols are effective against human influenza viruses if used in proper concentration for a sufficient length of time. For example, wipes or gels with alcohol in them can be used to clean hands. The gels should be rubbed into hands until they are dry.

How should waste disposal be handled to prevent the spread of influenza virus?
To prevent the spread of influenza virus, it is recommended that tissues and other disposable items used by an infected person be thrown in the trash. Additionally, persons should wash their hands with soap and water after touching used tissues and similar waste.

What household cleaning should be done to prevent the spread of influenza virus?
To prevent the spread of influenza virus it is important to keep surfaces (especially bedside tables, surfaces in the bathroom, kitchen counters and toys for children) clean by wiping them down with a household disinfectant according to directions on the product label.

How should linens, eating utensils and dishes of persons infected with influenza virus be handled?
Linens, eating utensils, and dishes belonging to those who are sick do not need to be cleaned separately, but importantly these items should not be shared without washing thoroughly first.
Linens (such as bed sheets and towels) should be washed by using household laundry soap and tumbled dry on a hot setting. Individuals should avoid “hugging” laundry prior to washing it to prevent contaminating themselves. Individuals should wash their hands with soap and water or alcohol-based hand rub immediately after handling dirty laundry.

Eating utensils should be washed either in a dishwasher or by hand with water and soap.

Response & Investigation


What is CDC doing in response to the outbreak?
CDC has implemented its emergency response. The agency’s goals are to reduce transmission and illness severity, and provide information to help health care providers, public health officials and the public address the challenges posed by the new virus. CDC continues to issue new interim guidance for clinicians and public health professionals. In addition, CDC’s Division of the Strategic National Stockpile (SNS) continues to send antiviral drugs, personal protective equipment, and respiratory protection devices to all 50 states and U.S. territories to help them respond to the outbreak.

What epidemiological investigations are taking place in response to the recent outbreak?
CDC works very closely with state and local officials in areas where human cases of new H1N1 flu infections have been identified. In California and Texas, where EpiAid teams have been deployed, many epidemiological activities are taking place or planned including:

Active surveillance in the counties where infections in humans have been identified;
Studies of health care workers who were exposed to patients infected with the virus to see if they became infected;
Studies of households and other contacts of people who were confirmed to have been infected to see if they became infected;
Study of a public high school where three confirmed human cases of H1N1 flu occurred to see if anyone became infected and how much contact they had with a confirmed case; and
Study to see how long a person with the virus infection sheds the virus.
Who is in charge of medicine in the Strategic National Stockpile (SNS) once it is deployed?
Local health officials have full control of SNS medicine once supplies are deployed to a city, state, or territory. Federal, state, and local community planners are working together to ensure that SNS medicines will be delivered to the affected area as soon as possible. Many cities, states, and territories have already received SNS supplies. After CDC sends medicine to a state or city, control and distribution of the supply is at the discretion of that state or local health department. Most states and cities also have their own medicines that they can access to treat infected persons.

*Note: Much of the information in this document is based on studies and past experience with seasonal (human) influenza.  CDC believes the information applies to the new H1N1 (swine) viruses as well, but studies on this virus are ongoing to learn more about its characteristics. This document will be updated as new information becomes available.

For general information about swine influenza (not new H1N1 flu) see Background Information about Swine Influenza.

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« Reply #121 on: May 05, 2009, 03:47:44 PM »

http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/K12_dismissal.htm  Please click on link for full article.....

Update on School (K – 12) and Childcare Facilities: Interim CDC Guidance in Response to Human Infections with the Novel Influenza A (H1N1) Virus
May 5, 2009, 2:00 PM EDT


Background

This document provides updated interim guidance for schools and childcare facilities regarding the prevention of the spread of novel influenza A (H1N1) virus.

Initial cases of novel influenza A (H1N1) in the United States included school-aged students and were associated with travel to Mexico and school-based outbreaks. Early information from Mexico indicated that many previously healthy young adults were hospitalized with rapidly progressive pneumonia, frequently resulting in respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation and death.

Based on this initial information, CDC recommended consideration of school closure as an option to lessen the risk of infection with this novel influenza virus in order to protect students, staff, parents and other caregivers from a potentially severe disease as well as limit spread into the community.

New information on disease severity warrant revision of the school closure guidance. Most U.S. cases have not been severe and are comparable in severity to seasonal influenza.  CDC and local and state health officials will continue to closely monitor the severity and spread of this novel H1N1 influenza outbreak.

At this time, CDC recommends the primary means to reduce spread of influenza in schools focus on early identification of ill students and staff, staying home when ill, and good cough and hand hygiene etiquette.  Decisions about school closure should be at the discretion of local authorities based on local considerations, including public concern and the impact of school absenteeism and staffing shortages.
 
Please click on link for all recommendations.....
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« Reply #122 on: May 05, 2009, 04:51:02 PM »


http://cnnwire.blogs.cnn.com/2009/05/05/navy-cancels-deployment-of-ship-cites-flu-concerns/

May 5th, 2009

Navy cancels deployment of ship, cites flu concerns
Posted: 04:37 PM ET
From Barbara Starr and Mike Mount
CNN


WASHINGTON (CNN) - The U.S. Navy has canceled the deployment of one of its ships because of a number of possible cases of swine flu, Navy officials said Tuesday.

The USS Dubuque, an amphibious transport dock ship, was due to deploy on June 1 to the South Pacific on a humanitarian mission, according to Cmdr. Joseph Surette, a Navy spokesman.

He said there was one confirmed case of H1N1 virus and 49 possible other cases among crew members over the past several days. The 50 crew members are off the ship recovering and being given Tamiflu medication, Surette said. The ship is being scrubbed and disinfected, and the remaining 370 crew members are being given Tamiflu as a precaution, according to Surette.

Officials said there are no other cases of the H1N1 virus on any other Navy ships, though at total of five total sailors throughout the Navy have been confirmed as contracting the virus.
 
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« Reply #123 on: May 05, 2009, 08:43:25 PM »

http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5hNkUqwzLRY-8nSc_6e5AM0Vf2FIgD980D3380

Texas confirms first flu death of US resident
By CHRISTOPHER SHERMAN – 46 minutes ago


McALLEN, Texas (AP) — Texas health officials on Tuesday announced the first death of a U.S. resident with swine flu, and said she was a 33-year-old schoolteacher who had recently given birth to a healthy baby.

The woman died early Tuesday and had been hospitalized since April 19, said Leonel Lopez, Cameron County epidemiologist.

Health officials stopped short of saying that swine flu caused the woman's death. State health department spokeswoman Carrie Williams said the woman had "chronic underlying health conditions" but wouldn't give any more details.

Lopez said the flu exacerbated the woman's condition. "The swine flu is very benign by itself," Lopez said. But "by the time she came to see us it was already too late."

The only other swine flu death in the U.S. was of a Mexico City boy who also had underlying health problems and had been visiting relatives in Brownsville, near Harlingen. He died last week at a Houston children's hospital.

There have been 26 other confirmed swine flu deaths, all in Mexico. Hundreds of cases of the disease have been confirmed in several countries, but mostly in Mexico and the U.S.

The teacher was from Harlingen, a city of about 63,000 near the U.S.-Mexico border. The school district where she worked announced it would close its schools for the rest of the week, though officials said anyone who might have contracted the disease from her would have shown symptoms by now.

The teacher was first seen by a physician April 14 and was hospitalized on the 19th. The woman delivered a healthy baby while hospitalized and stayed in the hospital until her death, said Lopez, who declined to give further details about the baby.

Doctors knew she had a flu when she came in, but did not know what kind, Lopez said. The area is undergoing a Type A influenza epidemic right now, of which the swine flu is one variety, he said. She was confirmed to have swine flu shortly before she died, he said.

Dr. Joseph McCormick, regional dean of the University of Texas School of Public Health's Brownsville campus, said the woman was extremely ill when she was hospitalized.

Mercedes Independent School District, where the woman taught, announced it would close its schools starting Wednesday and reopen May 11.

Based on the time the patient was admitted to the hospital and began to show symptoms of swine flu, anyone who had contracted the disease from her would have shown symptoms by now, McCormick said. Lopez also said students and employees of the school district where she worked shouldn't worry if they are currently healthy.

U.S. health officials changed course on their advice to schools Tuesday, saying they are no longer recommending that schools close for the swine flu. Last week, the government had advised schools to shut down for about two weeks if there were suspected cases of swine flu.

Associated Press writers Alicia A. Caldwell in El Paso and Jamie Stengle in Dallas contributed to this report.
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« Reply #124 on: May 06, 2009, 11:12:37 AM »

NEWS LINKS FOR SWINE FLU - H1N1 FLU ARTICLES

http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/
 
http://www.who.int/en/
 
http://www.usatoday.com
 
http://news.yahoo.com
 
http://news.google.com/
 
http://cnn.com
 
http://foxnews.com
 
http://msnbc.com
 
http://www.pandemicflu.gov/index.html
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« Reply #125 on: May 06, 2009, 11:21:54 AM »

http://new.paho.org/hq/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=1316&Itemid=1

Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) Situation Report on H1N1

 

Summary

Today, the first case of Influenza A (H1NI) in Guatemala was confirmed. To date, the total number of confirmed cases of Influenza A (H1N1) in the Americas Region is 1,370 in 7 countries of the Americas (Mexico, United States, Canada, Costa Rica, Colombia, El Salvador and Guatemala).
From the WHO briefing today, it the Influenza (H1N1) virus seems to be similar across the different geographical regions, and that is responding to antiviral treatment.
The following countries outside the Americas have reported laboratory confirmed cases with no deaths - Austria (1), China, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (1), Denmark (1), France (4), Germany (9), Ireland (1), Israel (4), Italy (5), Netherlands (1), New Zealand (6), Portugal (1), Republic of Korea (2), Spain (57), Switzerland (1) and the United Kingdom (27).
Today the WHO Director General, Dr. Margaret Chan, briefed international partners that form part of the UN Health Cluster, should this mechanism need to be activated in the future. She stressed that countries in the Southern hemisphere will be entering winter soon and are therefore at increased risk for influenza. She also highlighted the importance of ongoing surveillance, reporting and monitoring of Influenza A/H1N1.
Investigative work in Mexico and USA is providing a clearer picture of the outbreak. In his press briefing on 4 May 2009, Dr. Jon Andrus stated “You are now seeing that work is paying off, with a clearer picture of the epidemic curve and how the outbreak is evolving within the country.”
Read full article>>

For more information on H1N1 situation, please visit www.PandemicFlu.gov
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« Reply #126 on: May 06, 2009, 11:29:54 AM »

http://new.paho.org/hq/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=1314&Itemid=1

Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) Urges Southern Hemisphere to Remain Alert for Influenza A(H1N1)

  Washington, D.C., May 5, 2009 (PAHO/WHO) – While the vast majority of confirmed cases of influenza A(H1N1) have been in the Northern Hemisphere, a top Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) expert today cautioned that Southern Hemisphere countries should remain on high alert, as their winter season is just now beginning. 


Read full article>>  Please click link above to read full article
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« Reply #127 on: May 06, 2009, 11:35:04 AM »

http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/

CDC DAILY REPORT - UPDATE, MAY 6, 2009

 
More images
H1N1 Flu (Swine Flu)
Site last updated May 6, 2009, 11:00 AM ET

U.S. Human Cases of H1N1 Flu Infection
(As of May 6, 2009, 11:00 AM ET)  States # of
laboratory
confirmed
cases Deaths
 
Alabama 4   
Arizona 48   
California 67   
Colorado 17   
Connecticut 4   
Delaware 33   
Florida 5   
Georgia 3   
Hawaii 3   
Idaho 1   
Illinois 122   
Indiana 15   
Iowa 1   
Kansas 2   
Kentucky* 2   
Louisiana 7   
Maine 1   
Maryland 4   
Massachusetts 45   
Michigan 8   
Minnesota 1   
Missouri 2   
Nebraska 4   
Nevada 5   
New Hampshire 2   
New Jersey 7   
New Mexico 3   
New York 97   
North Carolina 7   
Ohio 5   
Oklahoma 1   
Oregon 15   
Pennsylvania 1   
Rhode Island 2   
South Carolina 16   
Tennessee 2   
Texas 61 2
Utah 1   
Virginia 3   
Washington 9   
Wisconsin 6   
TOTAL (41) 642 cases 2 deaths

International Human Cases of Swine Flu Infection
See: World Health Organization

*Case is resident of KY but currently hospitalized in GA.
 
The ongoing outbreak of novel influenza A (H1N1) continues to expand in the United States. CDC expects that more cases, more hospitalizations and more deaths from this outbreak will occur over the coming days and weeks.

CDC continues to take aggressive action to respond to the expanding outbreak. CDC’s response goals are to reduce spread and illness severity, and provide information to help health care providers, public health officials and the public address the challenges posed by this emergency.

CDC is issuing updated interim guidance daily in response to the rapidly evolving situation.

School Guidance

This includes updated interim guidance for schools and childcare facilities on preventing the spread of novel influenza A (H1N1) virus. At this time, CDC recommends the primary means to reduce spread of influenza in schools focus on early identification of ill students and staff, staying home when sick, and good cough etiquette and frequent hand washing. Decisions about school closure should be at the discretion of local authorities based on local considerations.

Increased Testing

CDC has developed a PCR diagnostic test kit to detect this novel H1N1 virus and has now distributed test kits to all states in the U.S. and Puerto Rico. The test kits are being shipped internationally as well. This will allow states and other countries to test for this new virus. This increase in testing capacity is likely to result in an increase in the number of reported confirmed cases in this country, which should provide a more accurate picture of the burden of disease in the United States.

More on the Situation  - Use main link above

Guidance
Reports & Publications
Press Briefings
Past Updates on the Situation
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« Reply #128 on: May 06, 2009, 11:54:25 AM »

WHO Updates International H1N1 Situation Including Global Number of Laboratory Confirmed Cases
Edit to add link: http://www.who.int/csr/don/2009_05_06/en/index.html
WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION - UPDATE - CONFIRMED CASES - MAY 6, 2009  

6 May 2009 -- As of 06:00 GMT, 6 May 2009, 22 countries have officially reported 1516 cases of influenza A (H1N1) infection.

Mexico has reported 822 laboratory confirmed human cases of infection, including 29 deaths. The United States has reported 403 laboratory confirmed human cases, including one death.

The following countries have reported laboratory confirmed cases with no deaths - Austria (1), Canada (165), China, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (1), Colombia (1), Costa Rica (1), Denmark (1), El Salvador (2), France (4), Germany (9), Guatemala (1), Ireland (1), Israel (4), Italy (5), Netherlands (1), New Zealand (6), Portugal (1), Republic of Korea (2), Spain (57), Switzerland (1) and the United Kingdom (27).

 
 

It is considered prudent for people who are ill to delay international travel and for people developing symptoms following international travel to seek medical attention, in line with guidance from national authorities. Individuals are advised to wash hands thoroughly with soap and water on a regular basis and should seek medical attention if they develop any symptoms of influenza-like illness.

WHO advises no restriction of regular travel or closure of borders.

There is no risk of infection from this virus from consumption of well-cooked pork and pork products.

Further information on the situation will be available on the WHO website on a regular basis.

Read full article>>

For more information on H1N1 situation, please visit www.PandemicFlu.gov



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« Reply #129 on: May 06, 2009, 01:25:28 PM »

http://www.chicagobreakingnews.com/2009/05/confirmed-illinois-swine-flu-cases-soar.html

Confirmed Illinois swine flu cases soar
May 6, 2009 10:59 AM | 1 Comment
There are now 225 confirmed case of swine flu in Illinois, the state Department of Public Health reported this morning.

The dramatic climb into triple digits over a few days was attributed to state labs tackling test backlogs because they are able for the first time to conduct confirmation tests without sending them away, officials say.

Chicago remains the apparent epicenter of the swine flu outbreak in Illinois, with 93 confirmed cases. Suburban Cook County has another 57 confirmed cases, the IDPH reported this morning.

Other counties reporting confirmed cases included DuPage County with 26 cases, Will County with 15, Kane County with 12, Lake County with four cases, two cases each in Boone, McHenry, Winnebago Counties, and single cases reported in Kendall and Knox Counties.

Two other confirmed cases could not be assigned to a specific county.

An additional 20 probable but unconfirmed cases were reported in at least eight counties - DeKalb, Sangamon, Cook, DuPage, Kane, Lake, Winnebago and Kendall Counties. One probable case had not been assigned to a county.
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« Reply #130 on: May 06, 2009, 02:13:22 PM »

Hi Mere!  The lady is an adult and she had been to Mexico.  She is expected to recover.  No other cases reported.
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« Reply #131 on: May 06, 2009, 06:16:48 PM »

http://www.fda.gov/bbs/topics/NEWS/2009/NEW02008.html


     

FDA Home Page | Search FDA Site | FDA A-Z Index | Contact FDA



FDA News
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 6, 2009
 Media Inquiries:
Peper Long, 301-796-4540
Consumer Inquiries:
888-INFO-FDA
 


FDA Approves New Influenza Vaccine Production Facility

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) today announced that it has approved a new manufacturing facility used to produce influenza virus vaccines.  The facility is approved for seasonal influenza vaccine production and could be used for the production of vaccine against the new 2009 H1N1 influenza strain.

As part of its overall pandemic influenza preparedness efforts, the FDA meets with vaccine manufacturers to guide the efficient establishment of influenza vaccine facilities that comply with agency requirements.  The agency promptly reviews applications and manufacturing supplements that could increase both the number of manufacturers and the overall supply of vaccine.

The facility, located in the United States, is owned and operated by sanofi pasteur, which manufactures Fluzone Influenza Virus Vaccine. This new facility will greatly increase sanofi pasteur’s production capability.

“This approval represents an important step towards increasing the availability of influenza vaccines,” said Karen Midthun, M.D., the FDA’s acting director of the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research.

“Increased manufacturing capacity for influenza vaccine is critical to our preparedness for an influenza pandemic,” said Jesse Goodman, M.D., M.P.H., the FDA’s acting chief scientist and deputy commissioner for scientific and medical programs. “This action also enhances the ability to produce and provide vaccines to protect the public from seasonal influenza, still estimated to cause more than 30,000 deaths per year. Thanks to strategic investments by the federal government and proactive efforts and engagement by the FDA and the vaccine industry, our nation’s preparedness has come a long way over the last five years.”

The FDA has interacted with the company throughout the regulatory process to help ensure compliance with applicable requirements.

The bulk manufacturing facility will be used for the production of Fluzone, sanofi pasteur’s egg-based influenza vaccine. 

Sanofi Pasteur is located in Swiftwater, Pa.

Information on the FDA’s response to the new 2009 H1N1 influenza virus may be found on the FDA’s Web site at http://www.fda.gov/h1n1flu/default.htm.

Information on seasonal influenza vaccine may be found on the FDA’s Web site at http://www.fda.gov/cber/flu/flu.htm.

The FDA’s Pandemic Influenza Preparedness Strategic Plan may be found on the FDA’s Web site at http://www.fda.gov/oc/op/pandemic/strategicplanupdate03_08.html.

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« Reply #132 on: May 06, 2009, 06:19:21 PM »

Hi Mere!  The lady is an adult and she had been to Mexico.  She is expected to recover.  No other cases reported.

Good news...! 
Thank you Always......
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« Reply #133 on: May 07, 2009, 12:09:32 AM »

http://www.who.int/en/

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION - UPDATE 18 - MAY 6, 2009

Influenza A(H1N1) - update 18
6 May 2009 -- As of 16:00 GMT, 6 May 2009, 23 countries have officially reported 1893 cases of influenza A (H1N1) infection.

Mexico has reported 942 laboratory confirmed human cases of infection, including 29 deaths. The United States has reported 642 laboratory confirmed human cases, including two deaths.

Related links -


The following countries have reported laboratory confirmed cases with no deaths - Austria (1), Canada (165), China, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (1), Colombia (1), Costa Rica (1), Denmark (1), El Salvador (2), France (5), Germany (9), Guatemala (1), Ireland (1), Israel (4), Italy (5), Netherlands (1), New Zealand (5), Portugal (1), Republic of Korea (2), Spain (73), Sweden (1), Switzerland (1) and the United Kingdom (28).
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« Reply #134 on: May 07, 2009, 12:36:25 AM »

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/chi-swine_flu_wedmay07,0,5423657.story

chicagotribune.com

Swine flu: Confirmed cases jump to 225 in Illinois

Only Chicago public school to close during outbreak reopens
By Dahleen Glanton and Azam Ahmed

Tribune reporters

May 7, 2009

The number of confirmed cases of swine flu in Illinois soared to 225 on Wednesday -- including a first at Cook County Jail -- but state health officials assured that the increase was due to new testing capabilities that continue to reduce a backlog of suspected flu samples.

As a result of the surge in cases, Illinois rose to the top of the list of states with the flu, recording more confirmed cases than any other state, health officials said. The state had 20 probable cases not yet confirmed.

"We want to make sure that people are reassured and understand that this is not an increase in community spread," said Kelly Jakubek, spokeswoman for the Illinois Department of Public Health. "We have had hundreds upon hundreds of specimens come into our lab, and now ... we have been able to move through those much more quickly."

New testing guidelines from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, along with the reduction of the backlog, are expected to stabilize numbers in Illinois in the coming days, Jakubek said.

Previously, the state Health Department tested specimens from anyone with flulike symptoms that were determined not to be common influenza strains. Since Friday, the state has tested samples only from people who are hospitalized, have severe symptoms or have a high-risk condition, such as pregnancy, Jakubek said.

At the reopening of Kilmer Elementary School on Chicago's Far North Side -- the only city public school closed because of swine flu -- Chicago Public Schools chief Ron Huberman said the school system has sent home 132 children who exhibited flu symptoms, a number he called "reasonable" in light of the system's 400,000 students.

The 12-year-old girl whose illness prompted Kilmer's shutdown a week ago won't return to school until next week, Huberman said.

Most of the parents walking their children back to school said they were happy the school was reopening. At least one parent thought the school system had overreacted and caused panic.

"They shouldn't have closed the school in the first place," said Cynthia McDonald, who accompanied her 11-year-old son, Sidney, to school.

The ill County Jail inmate was a 35-year-old Chicago man who was detained Saturday on a drug charge. The next day he began showing flulike symptoms and was immediately moved to an isolation unit at Cermak Hospital.

The medium-security jail tier where his cell was located was quarantined, and workers and inmates were allowed to move around it only with surgical masks. But, in a statement, jail officials said no one else on that tier has experienced flulike symptoms.

dglanton@tribune.com

aahmed@tribune.com



Copyright © 2009, Chicago Tribune
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« Reply #135 on: May 07, 2009, 11:21:29 AM »

http://www.who.int/csr/don/2009_05_07/en/index.html

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION - UPDATE 19 - MAY 7, 2009

Influenza A(H1N1) - update 19

7 May 2009 -- As of 06:00 GMT, 7 May 2009, 23 countries have officially reported 2099 cases of influenza A(H1N1) infection.

Mexico has reported 1112 laboratory confirmed human cases of infection, including 42 deaths. The United States has reported 642 laboratory confirmed human cases, including two deaths.

Related links


Map of the spread of Infuenza A(H1N1): number of laboratory confirmed cases and deaths [jpg 1.15Mb]
As of 7 May 2009, 09:00 GMT

Influenza A(H1N1) web site
Daily updates will be posted on this site.

 

The following countries have reported laboratory confirmed cases with no deaths - Austria (1), Canada (201), China, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (1), Colombia (1), Costa Rica (1), Denmark (1), El Salvador (2), France (5), Germany (9), Guatemala (1), Ireland (1), Israel (4), Italy (5), Netherlands (1), New Zealand (5), Portugal (1), Republic of Korea (2), Spain (73), Sweden (1), Switzerland (1) and the United Kingdom (28).

Please use link above to access entire article.

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« Reply #136 on: May 07, 2009, 11:41:35 AM »

http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/update.htm

Use the above link to show Novel Influenza A (H1N1) Cases by HHS Joint Field Office Coordination Groups - by REGION
May 7, 2009, 11:00 AM ET

 
CDC H1N1 Flu Update: U.S. Human Cases of H1N1 Flu Infection

Novel Influenza A (H1N1) Cases by HHS Joint Field Office Coordination Groups
May 7, 2009, 11:00 AM ET

896 Confirmed Cases in 41 States


U.S. Human Cases of H1N1 Flu Infection
(As of May 7, 2009, 11:00 AM ET)  States Laboratory
confirmed
cases Deaths
Alabama 4   
Arizona 48   
California 106   
Colorado 17   
Connecticut 4   
Delaware 38   
Florida 5   
Georgia 3   
Hawaii 3   
Idaho 1   
Illinois 204   
Indiana 15   
Iowa 5   
Kansas 7   
Kentucky* 2   
Louisiana 7   
Maine 4   
Maryland 4   
Massachusetts 71   
Michigan 9   
Minnesota 1   
Missouri 4   
Nebraska 4   
Nevada 5   
New Hampshire 2   
New Jersey 7   
New Mexico 8   
New York 98   
North Carolina 7   
Ohio 5   
Oklahoma 1   
Oregon 15   
Pennsylvania 2   
Rhode Island 2   
South Carolina 17   
Tennessee 2   
Texas 91 2
Utah 8   
Virginia 11   
Washington 23   
Wisconsin 26   
TOTAL (41) 896 cases 2 deaths
International Human Cases of Swine Flu Infection
See: World Health Organization

*Case is resident of KY but currently hospitalized in GA.
 
The ongoing outbreak of novel influenza A (H1N1) continues to expand in the United States. CDC expects that more cases, more hospitalizations and more deaths from this outbreak will occur over the coming days and weeks.

CDC continues to take aggressive action to respond to the expanding outbreak. CDC’s response goals are to reduce spread and illness severity, and provide information to help health care providers, public health officials and the public address the challenges posed by this emergency.

CDC is issuing updated interim guidance daily in response to the rapidly evolving situation.

Antiviral Guidance
CDC has issued guidance for health care providers on the use of antiviral medications during the current outbreak. The priority use for influenza antiviral drugs is to treat severe influenza illness and people who are at high risk of serious influenza-related conditions.

School Guidance
At this time, CDC recommends the primary means to reduce spread of influenza in schools focus on early identification of ill students and staff, staying home when sick, and good cough etiquette and frequent hand washing. Decisions about school closure should be at the discretion of local authorities based on local considerations.

Increased Testing
CDC has developed a PCR diagnostic test kit to detect this novel H1N1 virus and has now distributed test kits to all states in the U.S. and Puerto Rico. The test kits are being shipped internationally as well. This will allow states and other countries to test for this new virus. This increase in testing capacity is likely to result in an increase in the number of reported confirmed cases in this country, which should provide a more accurate picture of the burden of disease in the United States.

More on the Situation
Guidance
Reports & Publications
Press Briefings
Past Updates on the Situation


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« Reply #137 on: May 07, 2009, 12:02:15 PM »

 http://www.dhs.gov/ynews/releases/pr_1241646562350.shtm

Please use above link to access entire article.  This Media Briefing occurred on May 6, 2009 and includes confirmed and probable cases.

DHS: Remarks by Secretary Napolitano at Media Briefing on the H1N1 Flu Outbreak

Secretary Napolitano:  Good afternoon. Let me begin by saying this is the last day we plan to hold a daily briefing on the H1N1 flu situation. We will have briefings on an as-needed basis as new details warrant. So today I want to talk about where we are and then where we are going.

The CDC [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention] has confirmed 642 cases of H1N1 flu in 41 states. Additionally, CDC has begun reporting probable cases as well, which now stand at 845 in 42 states. Sadly, we also learned of the second death in the United States from H1N1 flu. This death was reported in Texas. We are respecting the privacy of that individual and that individual's family, and our thoughts and our prayers are with them.

Read full article>>

For more information on H1N1 situation, please visit www.PandemicFlu.gov



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« Reply #138 on: May 07, 2009, 12:23:57 PM »

http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/sick.htm

What to Do If You Get Flu-Like Symptoms
May 6, 2009 10:49 PM ET


Background
The novel H1N1 flu virus is causing illness in infected persons in the United States and countries around the world. CDC expects that illnesses may continue for some time. As a result, you or people around you may become ill. If so, you need to recognize the symptoms and know what to do.

Symptoms

The symptoms of this new H1N1 flu virus in people are similar to the symptoms of seasonal flu and include fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue. A significant number of people who have been infected with this new H1N1 virus also have reported diarrhea and vomiting.   

The high risk groups for novel H1N1 flu are not known at this time but it’s possible that they may be the same as for seasonal influenza. People at higher risk of serious complications from seasonal flu include people age 65 years and older, children younger than 5 years old, pregnant women, people of any age with chronic medical conditions (such as asthma, diabetes, or heart disease), and people who are immunosuppressed (e.g., taking immunosuppressive medications, infected with HIV).

Avoid Contact With Others

If you are sick, you may be ill for a week or longer. You should stay home and avoid contact with other persons, except to seek medical care. If you leave the house to seek medical care, wear a mask or cover your coughs and sneezes with a tissue. In general you should avoid contact with other people as much as possible to keep from spreading your illness.

At the current time, CDC believes that this virus has the same properties in terms of spread as seasonal flu viruses. With seasonal flu, studies have shown that people may be contagious from one day before they develop symptoms to up to 7 days after they get sick. Children, especially younger children, might potentially be contagious for longer periods.

Treatment is Available for Those Who Are Seriously III

It is expected that most people will recover without needing medical care.

If you have severe illness or you are at high risk for flu complications, contact your health care provider or seek medical care. Your health care provider will determine whether flu testing or treatment is needed. Be aware that if the flu becomes wide spread, there will be little need to continue testing people, so your health care provider may decide not to test for the flu virus.


Antiviral drugs can be given to treat those who become severely ill with influenza. These antiviral drugs are prescription medicines (pills, liquid or an inhaler) with activity against influenza viruses, including H1N1 flu virus. These medications must be prescribed by a health care professional.


There are two influenza antiviral medications that are recommended for use against H1N1 flu. The drugs that are used for treating H1N1 flu are called oseltamivir (trade name Tamiflu ®) and zanamivir (Relenza ®). As the H1N1 flu spreads, these antiviral drugs may become in short supply. Therefore, the drugs will be given first to those people who have been hospitalized or are at high risk of complications. The drugs work best if given within 2 days of becoming ill, but may be given later if illness is severe or for those at a high risk for complications.

Aspirin or aspirin-containing products (e.g. bismuth subsalicylate – Pepto Bismol) should not be administered to any confirmed or suspected ill case of novel influenza A (H1N1) virus infection aged 18 years old and younger due to the risk of Reye syndrome. For relief of fever, other anti-pyretic medications are recommended such as acetaminophen or non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. For more information about Reye’s syndrome, visit the National Institute of Health website.

Check ingredient labels on over-the-counter cold and flu medications to see if they contain aspirin.
Teenagers with the flu can take medicines without aspirin, such as acetaminophen (Tylenol®) and ibuprofen (Advil®, Motrin®, Nuprin®), to relieve symptoms.
Children younger than 4 years of age should not be given over-the-counter cold medications without first speaking with a healthcare provider. 


Emergency Warning Signs

If you become ill and experience any of the following warning signs, seek emergency medical care.

In children emergency warning signs that need urgent medical attention include:

Fast breathing or trouble breathing
Bluish or gray skin color
Not drinking enough fluids
Severe or persistent vomiting
Not waking up or not interacting
Being so irritable that the child does not want to be held
Flu-like symptoms improve but then return with fever and worse cough

In adults, emergency warning signs that need urgent medical attention include:

Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
Pain or pressure in the chest or abdomen
Sudden dizziness
Confusion
Severe or persistent vomiting
Flu-like symptoms improve but then return with fever and worse cough

Protect Yourself, Your Family, and Community
Stay informed. Health officials will provide additional information as it becomes available. Visit the CDC H1N1 Flu website.

Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.

Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially after you cough or sneeze. Alcohol-based hand cleaners are also effective.

Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth. Germs spread this way.

Try to avoid close contact with sick people.

If you are sick with a flu-like illness, stay home for 7 days after your symptoms begin or until you have been symptom-free for 24 hours, whichever is longer. Keep away from other household members as much as possible. This is to keep you from infecting others and spreading the virus further.
Learn more about how to take care of someone who is ill in "Taking Care of a Sick Person in Your Home"
Follow public health advice regarding school closures, avoiding crowds, and other social distancing measures.

If you don’t have one yet, consider developing a family emergency plan as a precaution. This should include storing a supply of extra food, medicines, and other essential supplies. Further information can be found in the "Flu Planning Checklist"
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« Reply #139 on: May 07, 2009, 01:53:25 PM »

7 cases in Maine now.

http://www.bangordailynews.com/detail/105220.html
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