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Author Topic: H1N1 - Swine Flu - Novel Flu - Information  (Read 109895 times)
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« Reply #140 on: May 08, 2009, 12:49:43 AM »

http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/   Please use link to access entire article.

CDC Update - MAY 7, 2009 7:15 PM

Site last updated May 7, 2009, 7:15 PM ET

U.S. Human Cases of H1N1 Flu Infection

(As of May 7, 2009, 11:00 AM ET)  States Laboratory
confirmed
cases Deaths
TOTAL (41) 896 cases 2 deaths  

International Human Cases of Swine Flu Infection,
see World Health Organization

View state-by-state table >>  Use link above

View complete map >>  Use link above

The ongoing outbreak of novel influenza A (H1N1) continues to expand in the United States. CDC expects that more cases, more hospitalizations and more deaths from this outbreak will occur over the coming days and weeks.

CDC continues to take aggressive action to respond to the expanding outbreak. CDCís response goals are to reduce spread and illness severity, and provide information to help health care providers, public health officials and the public address the challenges posed by this emergency.

CDC is issuing updated interim guidance daily in response to the rapidly evolving situation.

Antiviral Guidance
CDC has issued guidance for health care providers on the use of antiviral medications during the current outbreak. The priority use for influenza antiviral drugs is to treat severe influenza illness and people who are at high risk of serious influenza-related conditions.

School Guidance
At this time, CDC recommends the primary means to reduce spread of influenza in schools focus on early identification of ill students and staff, staying home when sick, and good cough etiquette and frequent hand washing. Decisions about school closure should be at the discretion of local authorities based on local considerations. (See the School Guidance.)

Increased Testing
CDC has developed a PCR diagnostic test kit to detect this novel H1N1 virus and has now distributed test kits to all states in the U.S. and Puerto Rico. The test kits are being shipped internationally as well. This will allow states and other countries to test for this new virus. This increase in testing capacity is likely to result in an increase in the number of reported confirmed cases in this country, which should provide a more accurate picture of the burden of disease in the United States.
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« Reply #141 on: May 08, 2009, 12:55:56 AM »

http://www.who.int/csr/don/2009_05_07a/en/index.html  Please use link to read all...

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION - UPDATE 20 - 5/7/09

Influenza A(H1N1) - update 20

7 May 2009 -- As of 18:00 GMT, 7 May 2009, 24 countries have officially reported 2371 cases of influenza A (H1N1) infection.

Mexico has reported 1112 laboratory confirmed human cases of infection, including 42 deaths. The United States has reported 896 laboratory confirmed human cases, including two deaths.

Related links


Map of the spread of Infuenza A(H1N1): number of laboratory confirmed cases and deaths [png 201kb]
As of 7 May 2009, 18:00 GMT

Influenza A(H1N1) web site
Daily updates will be posted on this site.

 

The following countries have reported laboratory confirmed cases with no deaths - Austria (1), Canada (201), China, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (1), Colombia (1), Costa Rica (1), Denmark (1), El Salvador (2), France (5), Germany (10), Guatemala (1), Ireland (1), Israel (6), Italy (5), Netherlands (2), New Zealand (5), Poland (1), Portugal (1), Republic of Korea (3), Spain (81), Sweden (1), Switzerland (1) and the United Kingdom (32).

WHO is not recommending travel restrictions related to the outbreak of the influenza A(H1N1) virus.

Individuals who are ill should delay travel plans and returning travelers who fall ill should seek appropriate medical care. These recommendations are prudent measures which can limit the spread of many communicable diseases, including influenza.

Further information on the situation will be available on the WHO website on a regular basis
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« Reply #142 on: May 08, 2009, 11:36:10 AM »

http://www.who.int/csr/don/2009_05_08/en/index.html

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION UPDATE - UPDATE 21 - MAY 8, 2009

24 countries have officially reported 2384 cases of influenza A (H1N1) infection.

Please use link above to read entire article
.


http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/

CDC UPDATE - MAY 8, 2009 - 9:15 A.M. -  H1N1 Flu - includes yesterday's Confirmed Number of Cases

Please use link above to read entire article
.

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« Reply #143 on: May 08, 2009, 11:55:39 AM »

http://www.reuters.com/article/domesticNews/idUSTRE5473S520090508

United States has 1,639 cases of new flu, CDC says
Fri May 8, 2009 11:25am EDT


CHICAGO (Reuters) - The United States has 1,639 cases of the new H1N1 flu in 43 states, with two deaths, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported on Friday.

U.S. officials have said they expect the swine influenza virus to spread to all 50 states and to cause many infections ranging from mild to severe. The case count on Thursday was 896 but there has been a backlog of likely cases that need extra testing to confirm.

(Reporting by Julie Steenhuysen, editing by Jackie Frank)

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« Reply #144 on: May 08, 2009, 12:19:10 PM »

http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/update.htm#statetable
Please use this link to see Regional Map of Confirmed Cases

CDC H1N1 Flu Update: U.S. Human Cases of H1N1 Flu Infection

Novel Influenza A (H1N1) Cases by HHS Joint Field Office Coordination Groups
May 8, 2009, 11:00 AM ET

1639 Confirmed Cases in 43 States
(includes the District of Columbia)


U.S. Human Cases of H1N1 Flu Infection
(As of May 8, 2009, 11:00 AM ET) 
States* Laboratory
confirmed
cases Deaths

 
Alabama 4   
Arizona 131   
California 107   
Colorado 25   
Connecticut 4   
Delaware 39   
Florida 6   
Georgia 3   
Hawaii 5   
Idaho 1   
Illinois 392   
Indiana 29   
Iowa 5   
Kansas 12   
Kentucky** 3   
Louisiana 7   
Maine 4   
Maryland 4   
Massachusetts 83   
Michigan 49   
Minnesota 1   
Missouri 9   
Nebraska 4   
Nevada 8   
New Hampshire 3   
New Jersey 7   
New Mexico 8   
New York 174   
North Carolina 7   
Ohio 6   
Oklahoma 4   
Oregon 15   
Pennsylvania 2   
Rhode Island 7   
South Carolina 29   
South Dakota 1   
Tennessee 36   
Texas 93 2
Utah 24   
Virginia 14   
Washington 33   
Washington, D.C. 1   
Wisconsin 240   
TOTAL*(43) 1639 cases 2 deaths

International Human Cases of Swine Flu Infection
See: World Health Organization

*includes the District of Columbia

**case is resident of KY but currently hospitalized in GA.

NOTE: Because of daily reporting deadlines, the state totals reported by CDC may not always be consistent with those reported by state health departments. If there is a discrepancy between these two counts, data from the state health departments should be used as the most accurate number.
 

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« Reply #145 on: May 11, 2009, 12:36:42 PM »

http://www.who.int/csr/don/2009_05_11/en/index.html

Please use link to access entire article.

Influenza A(H1N1) - update 25
11 May 2009 -- As of 06:00 GMT, 11 May 2009, 30 countries have officially reported 4694 cases of influenza A(H1N1) infection.


Mexico has reported 1626 laboratory confirmed human cases of infection, including 48 deaths. The United States has reported 2532 laboratory confirmed human cases, including three deaths. Canada has reported 284 laboratory confirmed human cases, including one death. Costa Rica has reported eight laboratory confirmed human cases, including one death.

Related links


Map of the spread of Infuenza A(H1N1): number of laboratory confirmed cases and deaths [jpg 435kb]
As of 06:00 GMT, 11 May 2009

Influenza A(H1N1) web site
Daily updates will be posted on this site.

 

The following countries have reported laboratory confirmed cases with no deaths - Argentina (1), Australia (1), Austria (1), Brazil (Cool, China (2, comprising 1 in China, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, and 1 in mainland China), Colombia (3), Denmark (1), El Salvador (4), France (13), Germany (11), Guatemala (1), Ireland (1), Israel (7), Italy (9), Japan (4), Netherlands (3), New Zealand (7), Norway (2), Panama (15), Poland (1), Portugal (1), Republic of Korea (3), Spain (95), Sweden (2), Switzerland (1) and the United Kingdom (47).
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« Reply #146 on: May 11, 2009, 12:42:34 PM »

http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/

PLEASE USE LINK TO ACCESS TOTAL ARTICLE....INCLUDING STATES AND NUMBER OF CONFIRMED CASES PER STATE.....


H1N1 Flu (Swine Flu)
Site last updated May 11, 2009, 11:00 AM ET


U.S. Human Cases of H1N1 Flu Infection

(As of May 11, 2009, 11:00 AM ET)  States* Laboratory confirmed cases Deaths

TOTAL (44) 2618 cases 3 deaths
 
*includes the District of Columbia

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« Reply #147 on: May 11, 2009, 03:55:40 PM »

CDC INFORMATION FROM THE LINK AT THE ABOVE POST

U.S. Human Cases of H1N1 Flu Infection

(As of May 11, 2009, 12:41 PM ET)  States* Laboratory
confirmed
cases Deaths

Alabama 4   
Arizona 182   
California 191   
Colorado 39   
Connecticut 24   
Delaware 44   
Florida 54   
Georgia 3   
Hawaii 6   
Idaho 1   
Illinois 487   
Indiana 39   
Iowa 43   
Kansas 18   
Kentucky** 10   
Louisiana 9   
Maine 4   
Maryland 23   
Massachusetts 88   
Michigan 130   
Minnesota 7   
Missouri 14   
Nebraska 13   
Nevada 9   
New Hampshire 4   
New Jersey 7   
New Mexico 30   
New York 190   
North Carolina 11   
Ohio 6   
Oklahoma 14   
Oregon 17   
Pennsylvania 10   
Rhode Island 7   
South Carolina 32   
South Dakota 1   
Tennessee 54   
Texas 179 2
Utah 63   
Vermont 1   
Virginia 16   
Washington 128 1
Washington, D.C. 4   
Wisconsin 384   

TOTAL*(44) 2600 cases 3 deaths

International Human Cases of Swine Flu Infection
See: World Health Organization

*includes the District of Columbia

**one case is resident of KY but currently hospitalized in GA.

NOTE: Because of daily reporting deadlines, the state totals reported by CDC may not always be consistent with those reported by state health departments. If there is a discrepancy between these two counts, data from the state health departments should be used as the most accurate number.
 
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« Reply #148 on: May 14, 2009, 08:47:06 AM »

 http://tinyurl.com/o9hl63
 
H1N1 flu cases, death toll rise: WHO
1 hr 31 mins ago

 
GENEVA (Reuters) Ė The number of confirmed cases of the new Influenza A (H1N1) flu has climbed to 6,497, including 65 deaths, the World Health Organization said on Thursday.

The number of countries reporting confirmed cases remains at 33, with the vast majority of cases in Mexico and the United States, the WHO said in a twice-daily update.

The latest update appeared before a meeting of experts later on Thursday by the WHO to decide whether drugmakers should switch production of flu vaccine to deal with the new outbreak, widely known as swine flu, from seasonal flu.

Seasonal flu kills 500,000 people a year, mainly the elderly or those with respiratory problems like asthma.

So the WHO will want to be sure that the H1N1 outbreak poses a severe threat before recommending the switch.

Drugmakers do not have the capacity to make both. One question the experts will examine is whether a course against swine flu would require two shots rather than one, taking up twice as much manufacturing capacity.

Recommendations by the experts will be put to the WHO's World Health Assembly next week. In the meantime manufacturers have already started producing the H1N1 vaccine.

The spread of the disease has led the WHO to declare a pandemic is imminent. On April 29 it raised its pandemic alert to 5 on a 6-level scale.

Evidence the new flu was spreading in a sustained manner in countries outside North America would trigger a move to phase 6 for a full-blown pandemic.

Conversely, signs the infection is not spreading in new countries and is slowing in North America could allow the WHO to lower the alert level.

Mexico's Health Minister Jose Angel Cordova told Reuters the flu was infecting fewer people and was likely to cause no more than 100 deaths in the country.

WHO experts say it is not possible to create a scale giving a scientific assessment of the severity of the outbreak, on the lines of hurricane warnings or the Richter scale for earthquakes.

That is because the new flu affects people differently in various countries, depending on their stage of development, healthcare systems and experience in dealing with epidemics.

The WHO's tally lags national reports but is considered more secure. Rising numbers can indicate that a backlog of cases is being processed, as well as the spread of the disease.

The WHO said Mexico has reported 2,446 confirmed cases including 60 deaths. The United States has reported 3,352 confirmed cases including 3 deaths. Canada has 389 confirmed cases and Costa Rica 8 cases, both with one death.

Other countries with confirmed cases but no deaths are Argentina (1), Australia (1), Austria (1), Brazil (Cool, Britain (71), China (4), Colombia (7), Cuba (1), Denmark (1), El Salvador (4), Finland (2), France (14), Germany (12), Guatemala (3), Ireland (1), Israel (7), Italy (9), Japan (4), Netherlands (3) New Zealand (7), Norway (2), Panama (29), Poland (1), Portugal (1), South Korea (3), Spain (100), Sweden (2), Switzerland (1) and Thailand (2).

(Reporting by Jonathan Lynn, editing by Mark Trevelyan)


Copyright © 2009 Reuters Limited. All rights reserved. Republication or redistribution of Reuters content is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of Reuters. Reuters shall not be liable for any errors or delays in the content, or for any actions taken in reliance thereon.


Copyright © 2009 Yahoo! Inc. All rights reserved.Questions or CommentsPrivacy PolicyTerms of ServiceCopyright/IP Policy
 
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« Reply #149 on: May 14, 2009, 01:22:19 PM »

http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/update.htm

PLEASE USE ABOVE LINK TO READ ENTIRE ARTICLE AND SEE MAP OF STATES INVOLVED

CDC H1N1 Flu Update: U.S. Human Cases of H1N1 Flu Infection

Novel Influenza A (H1N1) Cases by HHS Joint Field Office Coordination Groups
May 14, 2009, 11:00 AM ET

4,298 Confirmed and Probable Cases in 47 States
(includes the District of Columbia)


U.S. Human Cases of H1N1 Flu Infection
(As of May 14, 2009, 11:00 AM ET) 


Alabama 41   
Arkansas 1   
Arizona 431   
California 473   
Colorado 47   
Connecticut 38   
Delaware 58   
Florida 65   
Georgia 36   
Hawaii 10   
Idaho 5   
Illinois 620   
Indiana 70   
Iowa 58   
Kansas 28   
Kentucky** 13   
Louisiana 45   
Maine 13   
Maryland 28   
Massachusetts 109   
Michigan 141   
Minnesota 34   
Missouri 20   
Montana 5   
Nebraska 23   
Nevada 25   
New Hampshire 18   
New Jersey 12   
New Mexico 51   
New York 224   
North Carolina 12   
North Dakota 1   
Ohio 12   
Oklahoma 22   
Oregon 94   
Pennsylvania 50   
Rhode Island 8   
South Carolina 34   
South Dakota 5   
Tennessee 63   
Texas 439 2
Utah 80   
Vermont 1   
Virginia 20   
Washington 195 1
Washington, D.C. 10   
Wisconsin 510   
TOTAL*(47) 4,298 cases 3 deaths
*includes the District of Columbia

**one case is resident of KY but currently hospitalized in GA.

This table will be updated daily Monday-Friday at around 11 AM ET.

International Human Cases of Swine Flu Infection
See: World Health Organization.

NOTE: Because of daily reporting deadlines, the state totals reported by CDC may not always be consistent with those reported by state health departments. If there is a discrepancy between these two counts, data from the state health departments should be used as the most accurate number.
 
A New Influenza Virus
Novel influenza A (H1N1) is a new flu virus of swine origin that was first detected in April, 2009. The virus is infecting people and is spreading from person-to-person, sparking a growing outbreak of illness in the United States. An increasing number of cases are being reported internationally as well.

Itís thought that novel influenza A (H1N1) flu spreads in the same way that regular seasonal influenza viruses spread; mainly through the coughs and sneezes of people who are sick with the virus.

Itís uncertain at this time how severe this novel H1N1 outbreak will be in terms of illness and death compared with other influenza viruses. Because this is a new virus, most people will not have immunity to it, and illness may be more severe and widespread as a result. In addition, currently there is no vaccine to protect against this novel H1N1 virus. CDC anticipates that there will be more cases, more hospitalizations and more deaths associated with this new virus in the coming days and weeks.

Novel influenza A (H1N1) activity is now being detected through CDCís routine influenza surveillance systems and reported weekly in FluView. CDC tracks U.S. influenza activity through multiple systems across five categories. The fact that novel H1N1 activity can now be monitored through seasonal surveillance systems is an indication that there are higher levels of influenza-like illness in the United States than is normal for this time of year. About half of all influenza viruses being detected are novel H1N1 viruses.

CDC Response
CDC continues to take aggressive action to respond to the outbreak. CDCís response goals are to reduce the spread and severity of illness, and to provide information to help health care providers, public health officials and the public address the challenges posed by this new public health threat.
CDC is issuing updated interim guidance daily in response to the rapidly evolving situation.

Clinician Guidance
CDC has issued interim guidance for clinicians on identifying and caring for patients with novel H1N1, in addition to providing interim guidance on the use of antiviral drugs. Influenza antiviral drugs are prescription medicines (pills, liquid or an inhaler) with activity against influenza viruses, including novel influenza H1N1 viruses. The priority use for influenza antiviral drugs during this outbreak is to treat severe influenza illness, including people who are hospitalized or sick people who are considered at high risk of serious influenza-related complications.

Public Guidance
In addition, CDC has provided guidance for the public on what to do if they become sick with flu-like symptoms, including infection with novel H1N1. CDC also has issued instructions on taking care of a sick person at home. Novel H1N1 infection has been reported to cause a wide range of symptoms, including fever, cough, sore throat, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue. In addition, a significant number of people also have reported nausea, vomiting or diarrhea. Everyone should take everyday preventive actions to stop the spread of germs, including frequent hand washing and people who are sick should stay home and avoid contact with others in order to limit further spread of the disease.

Testing
CDC has developed a PCR diagnostic test kit to detect this novel H1N1 virus and has now distributed test kits to all states in the U.S. and the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. The test kits are being shipped internationally as well. This will allow states and other countries to test for this new virus. This increase in testing will likely result in an increase in the number of confirmed cases of illness reported. This, combined with ongoing monitoring through Flu View should provide a fuller picture of the burden of disease in the United States over time.

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« Reply #150 on: May 15, 2009, 02:30:06 PM »

http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/update.htm

PLEASE CLICK ON LINK TO ACCESS ENTIRE ARTICLE

 
CDC H1N1 Flu Update: U.S. Human Cases of H1N1 Flu Infection

Novel Influenza A (H1N1) Cases by HHS Joint Field Office Coordination Groups
May 15, 2009, 11:00 AM ET

4,714 Confirmed and Probable Cases in 47 States
(includes the District of Columbia)


U.S. Human Cases of H1N1 Flu Infection
(As of May 15, 2009, 11:00 AM ET) 

States* Confirmed and Probable Cases Deaths
Alabama 55 
Arkansas 2 
Arizona 435 1
California 504 
Colorado 55 
Connecticut 47 
Delaware 60 
Florida 68 
Georgia 18 
Hawaii 10 
Idaho 5 
Illinois 638 
Indiana 71 
Iowa 66 
Kansas 30 
Kentucky** 13 
Louisiana 57 
Maine 14 
Maryland 28 
Massachusetts 135 
Michigan 142 
Minnesota 36 
Missouri 19 
Montana 4 
Nebraska 27 
Nevada 26 
New Hampshire 18 
New Jersey 14 
New Mexico 68 
New York 242 
North Carolina 12 
North Dakota 2 
Ohio 14 
Oklahoma 26 
Oregon 94 
Pennsylvania 47 
Rhode Island 8 
South Carolina 36 
South Dakota 4 
Tennessee 74 
Texas 506 2
Utah 91 
Vermont 1 
Virginia 21 
Washington 246 1
Washington, D.C. 12 
Wisconsin 613 
TOTAL*(47) 4,714 cases 4 deaths
*includes the District of Columbia

**one case is resident of KY but currently hospitalized in GA.

This table will be updated daily Monday-Friday at around 11 AM ET.

International Human Cases of Swine Flu Infection
See: World Health Organization.

NOTE: Because of daily reporting deadlines, the state totals reported by CDC may not always be consistent with those reported by state health departments. If there is a discrepancy between these two counts, data from the state health departments should be used as the most accurate number.
 
A New Influenza Virus
Novel influenza A (H1N1) is a new flu virus of swine origin that was first detected in April, 2009. The virus is infecting people and is spreading from person-to-person, sparking a growing outbreak of illness in the United States. An increasing number of cases are being reported internationally as well.

Itís thought that novel influenza A (H1N1) flu spreads in the same way that regular seasonal influenza viruses spread; mainly through the coughs and sneezes of people who are sick with the virus.

Itís uncertain at this time how severe this novel H1N1 outbreak will be in terms of illness and death compared with other influenza viruses. Because this is a new virus, most people will not have immunity to it, and illness may be more severe and widespread as a result. In addition, currently there is no vaccine to protect against this novel H1N1 virus. CDC anticipates that there will be more cases, more hospitalizations and more deaths associated with this new virus in the coming days and weeks.

Novel influenza A (H1N1) activity is now being detected through CDCís routine influenza surveillance systems and reported weekly in FluView. CDC tracks U.S. influenza activity through multiple systems across five categories. The fact that novel H1N1 activity can now be monitored through seasonal surveillance systems is an indication that there are higher levels of influenza-like illness in the United States than is normal for this time of year. About half of all influenza viruses being detected are novel H1N1 viruses.

CDC Response
CDC continues to take aggressive action to respond to the outbreak. CDCís response goals are to reduce the spread and severity of illness, and to provide information to help health care providers, public health officials and the public address the challenges posed by this new public health threat.
CDC is issuing updated interim guidance daily in response to the rapidly evolving situation.

Clinician Guidance
CDC has issued interim guidance for clinicians on identifying and caring for patients with novel H1N1, in addition to providing interim guidance on the use of antiviral drugs. Influenza antiviral drugs are prescription medicines (pills, liquid or an inhaler) with activity against influenza viruses, including novel influenza H1N1 viruses. The priority use for influenza antiviral drugs during this outbreak is to treat severe influenza illness, including people who are hospitalized or sick people who are considered at high risk of serious influenza-related complications.

Public Guidance
In addition, CDC has provided guidance for the public on what to do if they become sick with flu-like symptoms, including infection with novel H1N1. CDC also has issued instructions on taking care of a sick person at home. Novel H1N1 infection has been reported to cause a wide range of symptoms, including fever, cough, sore throat, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue. In addition, a significant number of people also have reported nausea, vomiting or diarrhea. Everyone should take everyday preventive actions to stop the spread of germs, including frequent hand washing and people who are sick should stay home and avoid contact with others in order to limit further spread of the disease.

Testing
CDC has developed a PCR diagnostic test kit to detect this novel H1N1 virus and has now distributed test kits to all states in the U.S. and the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. The test kits are being shipped internationally as well. This will allow states and other countries to test for this new virus. This increase in testing will likely result in an increase in the number of confirmed cases of illness reported. This, combined with ongoing monitoring through Flu View should provide a fuller picture of the burden of disease in the United States over time.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention   1600 Clifton Rd. Atlanta, GA 30333, USA
800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636) TTY: (888) 232-6348, 24 Hours/Every Day - cdcinfo@cdc.gov

 
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« Reply #151 on: May 15, 2009, 02:45:24 PM »

Thanks, Mere, checking daily.  Alabama took a big jump in the last 24 hours.  There are several more suspected cases that I am aware of. 

Thankfully the death toll remains very low on all levels of this new virus.
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« Reply #152 on: May 17, 2009, 08:56:51 PM »

QUEENS AST PRINCIPAL MITCHELL WEINER DEAD FROM SWINE FLU

http://www.nypost.com/seven/05162009/news/regionalnews/queens/queens_ast_principa_mitchell_weiner_dead_169754.htm

By ALEX GINSBERG

The Queens assistant principal stricken with swine flu succumbed to the deadly virus today, the first person to die in the city from the disease, hospital officials said.

"We were treating him very aggressively," said Flushing Hospital spokesman Ole Pedersen. "Unfortunately, he did expire at 6:17 p.m. this evening."

The sick man, Mitchell Wiener, 55, an assistant principal at IS 238 in Jamaica Estates, first fell ill more than a week ago, but didn't seek help at the hospital until his symptoms became severe early Wednesday morning.

Since that time, he's been in a medically induced coma, on a ventilator.

Just hours before his death, his wife, Bonnie, said there were hopeful signs.

"There's no change," she told The Post earlier today. "He's stabilized. They're just giving him supporting care and hoping the treatment will kick in."
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« Reply #153 on: May 20, 2009, 12:08:24 PM »

Hello Monkeys....I have been out of town....so will be back today with the "numbers".  San....thank you for the information on the Assistant Principal, Mr. Weiner.

These numbers came in e-mail this morning and do not format as well as they did in the past....
making the list a bit more difficult to read.

CDC Updates U.S. H1N1 Flu Situation: 48 states | 5710 cases

  Table. U.S. Human Cases of H1N1 Flu Infection
(As of May 20, 2009, 11:00 AM ET) 

States*  Confirmed and Probable Cases  Deaths  
Alabama  64 cases  0 deaths 
Arkansas  3 cases  0 deaths 
Arizona  488 cases  2 deaths 
California  553 cases  0 deaths 
Colorado  55 cases  0 deaths 
Connecticut  59 cases  0 deaths 
Delaware  88 cases  0 deaths 
Florida  122 cases  0 deaths 
Georgia  25 cases  0 deaths 
Hawaii  26 cases  0 deaths 
Idaho  8 cases  0 deaths 
Illinois  794 cases  0 deaths 
Indiana  105 cases  0 deaths 
Iowa  71 cases  0 deaths 
Kansas  34 cases  0 deaths 
Kentucky**  20 cases  0 deaths 
Louisiana  73 cases  0 deaths 
Maine  9 cases  0 deaths 
Maryland  39 cases  0 deaths 
Massachusetts  175 cases  0 deaths 
Michigan  171 cases  0 deaths 
Minnesota  39 cases  0 deaths 
Mississippi  5 cases  0 deaths 
Missouri  20 cases  1 deaths 
Montana  9 cases  0 deaths 
Nebraska  28 cases  0 deaths 
Nevada  33 cases  0 deaths 
New Hampshire  22 cases  0 deaths 
New Jersey  22 cases  0 deaths 
New Mexico  68 cases  0 deaths 
New York  284 cases  1 deaths 
North Carolina  12 cases  0 deaths 
North Dakota  5 cases  0 deaths 
Ohio  13 cases  0 deaths 
Oklahoma  43 cases  0 deaths 
Oregon  94 cases  0 deaths 
Pennsylvania  55 cases  0 deaths 
Rhode Island  8 cases  0 deaths 
South Carolina  36 cases  0 deaths 
South Dakota  4 cases  0 deaths 
Tennessee  86 cases  0 deaths 
Texas  556 cases  3 deaths 
Utah  72 cases  0 deaths 
Vermont  1 cases  0 deaths 
Virginia  23 cases  0 deaths 
Washington  411 cases  1 death 
Washington, D.C.  13 cases  0 deaths 
Wisconsin  766 cases  0 deaths 
TOTAL*(48)  5,710 cases  8 deaths 
*includes the District of Columbia

**one case is resident of KY but currently hospitalized in GA.

This table will be updated daily Monday-Friday at around 11 AM ET.

International Human Cases of Swine Flu Infection
See: World Health Organization .

NOTE: Because of daily reporting deadlines, the state totals reported by CDC may not always be consistent with those reported by state health departments. If there is a discrepancy between these two counts, data from the state health departments should be used as the most accurate number.
 


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« Reply #154 on: May 20, 2009, 12:27:21 PM »

Monkeys....this report came in email this morning and also does not format well in transferring.
There are four columns of numbers following each country....and heading should read:
Country.....1.  Cumulative Total of Cases....2.  Deaths....3.  Newly Confirmed Cases....4.  Deaths


WHO Updates International H1N1 Situation: 41 Countries Reported 10243 Cases

Influenza A(H1N1) - update 34
20 May 2009 -- As of 06:00 GMT, 20 May 2009, 41 countries have officially reported 10 243 cases of influenza A(H1N1) infection, including 80 deaths.

The breakdown of the number of laboratory-confirmed cases by country is given in the following table and map.

Map of the spread of Influenza A(H1N1): number of laboratory confirmed cases and deaths [jpg 1.29Mb]
As of 06:00 GMT, 20 May 2009


Laboratory-confirmed cases of new influenza A(H1N1) as officially reported to WHO by States Parties to the International Health Regulations (2005)

Country 
Cumulative total of Cases....Deaths
Newly confirmed since the last reporting period....Deaths     
   Cases  Deaths  Cases  Deaths 
Argentina   1  0    0    0   
Australia    1  0    0    0   
Austria      1  0    0    0   
Belgium      5  0    0    0   
Brazil         8  0    0    0   
Canada   496  1    0    0   
Chile          5  0    1    0   
China         7  0    0    0   
Colombia   12  0    1    0   
Costa Rica  9  1    0    0   
Cuba          3  0    0    0   
Denmark     1  0    0    0   
Ecuador      1  0    0    0   
El Salvador  6  0    0    0   
Finland       2  0    0    0   
France      15  0    1    0   
Germany    14  0    0    0   
Greece        1  0    1    0   
Guatemala   3  0    0    0   
India          1  0    0    0   
Ireland        1  0    0    0   
Israel          7  0    0    0   
Italy           9  0    0    0   
Japan      210  0    51  0   
Korea,
Republic of   3  0    0    0   
Malaysia      2  0    0    0   
Mexico   3648  72   0    0   
Netherlands  3  0    0    0   
New Zealand  9  0    0    0   
Norway        2  0    0    0   
Panama       65  0    6   0   
Peru             3  0    1   0   
Poland          2  0    1   0   
Portugal        1  0    0    0   
Spain         107  0    4   0   
Sweden         3  0    0    0   
Switzerland    1  0    0    0   
Thailand        2  0    0    0   
Turkey          2  0    0    0   
United Kingdom  102  0    0    0   
United States of America  5469  6  346  1 
Grand Total  10243  80  413  1 

Cumulative and new figures are subject to revision
 

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« Reply #155 on: May 25, 2009, 07:22:58 PM »

http://www.ajc.com/health/content/shared-auto/healthnews/cdc-/627396.html
Viable Swine Flu Shot Closer to Reality
MONDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Progress has been made toward developing a viable H1N1 swine flu vaccine, with experts at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention saying they have two promising candidate viruses for use in such a shot.

Meanwhile, a 50-year-old woman died of swine flu in New York City over the weekend, becoming the second swine flu fatality in that city and the 11th in the United States, according to the Associated Press.

As with most of the other reported swine flu deaths, the woman had other health conditions, Department of Health and Mental Hygiene spokeswoman Jessica Scaperotti said. No other information on her case was disclosed Sunday.

But good news came Friday from CDC officials, who reported that they are closer to a viable vaccine for this new strain of flu.

"Today CDC received, from one institution, a candidate vaccine virus," Dr. Anne Schuchat, the CDC's interim deputy director for science and public health program, said during a news conference on Friday.

The strain was created by "combining the genes of the novel H1N1 virus with other parts from other viruses," Schuchat explained. This type of hybrid virus will grow more easily in eggs -- an essential part of the vaccine production process.

The CDC, along with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, has also created a second candidate virus using reverse genetics, Schuchat added.

The CDC is testing both viruses to make sure they can stimulate an optimal immune response, Schuchat said. "After that work is done, suitable viruses will be sent out to manufacturers. We expect by the end of May that will happen," she added.

Also Friday, Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius announced that the federal government was allocating $1 billion to the search for a swine flu vaccine, the AP reported. The funding is aimed at pilot testing of a vaccine and the setting up of a "pre-pandemic" stockpile that HHS said would cover at least 20 million people, including health-care workers and people at high risk for complications from the illness.

In related news, a study released on Friday suggests that many of the genes that make up the new H1N1 swine flu virus have been circulating undetected in pigs for more than a decade.

Scientists at the CDC and elsewhere sequenced the genomes of dozens of samples of the swine flu strain and found it is distantly connected to its closest viral relatives.

The researchers also found that the new H1N1 strain lacks genes that -- in other influenza A strains -- confer ease of transmission and virulence.

CDC officials discussed the findings at a teleconference Friday. The findings were released early in the journal Science because of the broad interest in this new strain of swine flu.

"From our analysis, we have confirmed that the novel H1N1 virus likely originated from pigs, based on data that each of the genetic components of this virus are most closely related to corresponding influenza virus genes identified from swine influenza viruses," said Dr. Nancy Cox, chief of CDC's Influenza Division.

However, this new virus is not similar to seasonal H1N1 viruses, she said. In their analysis of 70 samples of the new H1N1 virus from the United States and Mexico, the researchers found minor genetic differences, but consider the virus to be basically homogeneous, Cox noted.

Knowing the genetic makeup of the virus makes it easier to come up with a candidate vaccine, Cox said. "We see much less variation among these new H1N1 viruses than we do for typical seasonal influenza viruses," she said.

Sequencing the virus' genetic code is also important for planning the public health response, including knowing which antiviral medications will be effective and which won't, Cox said.

And, Cox added, "We can take measures to be sure that the virus doesn't reemerge in a slightly different form."

In the future, scientists will need to keep a closer eye on pig populations to spot similar emerging flu viruses, the researchers said in the Science paper.

In the United States, most cases of the swine flu continue to be no worse than seasonal flu. Testing has found that the swine flu virus remains susceptible to two common antiviral drugs, Tamiflu and Relenza, according to the CDC.

While the new swine flu only seems to cause relatively mild infection, experts worry that, if the virus mutates, people would have limited immunity to it. The CDC is concerned that, as the H1N1 virus moves into the Southern Hemisphere, where the flu season is just getting under way, it could mutate and return in a more virulent form in the Northern Hemisphere next fall.

On Thursday, U.S. health officials said that, while many states are still reporting new cases of infection, there seems to be an overall decline in visits to doctors and hospitals by people with the disease, indicating that the outbreak might be subsiding.

The CDC reported on Wednesday that some older people may have partial immunity to the new H1N1 swine flu virus because of possible exposure to another H1N1 flu strain circulating prior to 1957. So far, 64 percent of cases of swine flu infection in the United States have been among people aged 5 to 24, while only 1 percent involves people over 65, officials said.

On Friday, the CDC was reporting 6,552 U.S. cases of swine flu in 48 states, including nine deaths, although health officials said the death toll could be as high as 10.

The World Health Organization on Saturday was reporting 12,022 diagnosed cases in 43 countries, including 86 deaths, mostly in Mexico, believed to be the source of the outbreak.

Mexico City on Thursday lowered its swine flu alert level from yellow to green after no new infections had been reported for a week, the Associated Press reported.
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« Reply #156 on: May 25, 2009, 10:12:00 PM »

Hello Monkeys....hope you had a good holiday.  I had to leave for a funeral, so I am back with the "numbers".  Muffy thank you for that article.  The following is the CDC May 25th update. Mere

http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/update.htm      Link includes entire article with map...

Novel H1N1 Flu Situation Update
May 25, 2009, 11:00 AM ET
Map: Weekly Influenza Activity Estimates, Including Novel H1N1 Flu


Summary of Situation

A New Influenza Virus

Novel influenza A (H1N1) is a new flu virus of swine origin that was first detected in April, 2009. The virus is infecting people and is spreading from person-to-person, sparking a growing outbreak of illness in the United States. An increasing number of cases are being reported internationally as well.
Itís thought that novel influenza A (H1N1) flu spreads in the same way that regular seasonal influenza viruses spread; mainly through the coughs and sneezes of people who are sick with the virus.
Itís uncertain at this time how severe this novel H1N1 outbreak will be in terms of illness and death compared with other influenza viruses. Because this is a new virus, most people will not have immunity to it, and illness may be more severe and widespread as a result. In addition, currently there is no vaccine to protect against this novel H1N1 virus. CDC anticipates that there will be more cases, more hospitalizations and more deaths associated with this new virus in the coming days and weeks.

Novel influenza A (H1N1) activity is now being detected through CDCís routine influenza surveillance systemsand reported weekly in FluView. CDC tracks U.S. influenza activity through multiple systems across five categories. The fact that novel H1N1 activity can now be monitored through seasonal surveillance systems is an indication that there are higher levels of influenza-like illness in the United States than is normal for this time of year. Most of the influenza viruses being detected now are novel H1N1 viruses.

CDC Response

CDC continues to take aggressive action to respond to the outbreak. CDCís response goals are to reduce the spread and severity of illness, and to provide information to help health care providers, public health officials and the public address the challenges posed by this new public health threat.
CDC is issuing updated interim guidance daily in response to the rapidly evolving situation.

Clinician Guidance

CDC has issued interim guidance for clinicians on identifying and caring for patientswith novel H1N1, in addition to providing interim guidance on the use of antiviral drugs. Influenza antiviral drugs are prescription medicines (pills, liquid or an inhaler) with activity against influenza viruses, including novel influenza H1N1 viruses. The priority use for influenza antiviral drugs during this outbreak is to treat severe influenza illness, including people who are hospitalized or sick people who are considered at high risk of serious influenza-related complications.

Public Guidance

In addition, CDC has provided guidance for the public on what to do if they become sick with flu-like symptoms, including infection with novel H1N1.

CDC also has issued instructions on taking care of a sick person at home. Novel H1N1 infection has been reported to cause a wide range of symptoms, including fever, cough, sore throat, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue.

In addition, a significant number of people also have reported nausea, vomiting or diarrhea. Everyone should take everyday preventive actions to stop the spread of germs, including frequent hand washing and people who are sick should stay home and avoid contact with others in order to limit further spread of the disease.

Testing

CDC has developed a PCR diagnostic test kit to detect this novel H1N1 virus and has now distributed test kits to all states in the U.S. and the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. The test kits are being shipped internationally as well. This will allow states and other countries to test for this new virus. This increase in testing will likely result in an increase in the number of confirmed cases of illness reported. This, combined with ongoing monitoring through Flu View should provide a fuller picture of the burden of disease in the United States over time.

Table. U.S. Human Cases of H1N1 Flu Infection
(As of May 25, 2009, 11:00 AM ET)
 

States* Confirmed and Probable Cases Deaths

Alabama 66 cases 0 deaths
Arkansas 4 cases 0 deaths
Arizona 531 cases 3 deaths
California 553 cases 0 deaths
Colorado 60 cases 0 deaths
Connecticut 102 cases 0 deaths
Delaware 102 cases 0 deaths
Florida 139 cases 0 deaths
Georgia 28 cases 0 deaths
Hawaii 40 cases 0 deaths
Idaho 9 cases 0 deaths
Illinois 896 cases 0 deaths
Indiana 120 cases 0 deaths
Iowa 71 cases 0 deaths
Kansas 34 cases 0 deaths
Kentucky** 27 cases 0 deaths
Louisiana 86 cases 0 deaths
Maine 9 cases 0 deaths
Maryland 41 cases 0 deaths
Massachusetts 238 cases 0 deaths
Michigan 176 cases 0 deaths
Minnesota 44 cases 0 deaths
Mississippi 7 cases 0 deaths
Missouri 24 cases 1 deaths
Montana 12 cases 0 deaths
Nebraska 29 cases 0 deaths
Nevada 49 cases 0 deaths
New Hampshire 23 cases 0 deaths
New Jersey 29 cases 0 deaths
New Mexico 97 cases 0 deaths
New York 343 cases 1 deaths
North Carolina 12 cases 0 deaths
North Dakota 6 cases 0 deaths
Ohio 14 cases 0 deaths
Oklahoma 51 cases 0 deaths
Oregon 116 cases 0 deaths
Pennsylvania 88 cases 0 deaths
Rhode Island 10 cases 0 deaths
South Carolina 36 cases 0 deaths
South Dakota 3 cases 0 deaths
Tennessee 94 cases 0 deaths
Texas 900 cases 3 deaths
Utah 122 cases 1 deaths
Vermont 2 cases 0 deaths
Virginia 25 cases 0 deaths
Washington 517 cases 1 death
Washington, D.C. 13 cases 0 deaths
Wisconsin 766 cases 0 deaths

TOTAL*(48) 6,764 cases 10 deaths
*includes the District of Columbia

**one case is resident of KY but currently hospitalized in GA.

This table will be updated daily Monday-Friday at around 11 AM ET.

International Human Cases of Swine
 

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« Reply #157 on: May 26, 2009, 11:38:51 AM »

http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/masks.htm

The above link will take you to an article on Recommendations for Face Mask and Respirator Use.
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« Reply #158 on: May 26, 2009, 11:45:45 AM »

WHO Updates International H1N1 Situation: 46 Countries Reported 12954 Cases

Influenza A(H1N1) - update 39
26 May 2009 -- As of 06:00 GMT, 26 May 2009,


http://www.who.int/csr/don/2009_05_26/en/index.html

The link will take you to the entire article and show map and countries reporting.
 



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« Reply #159 on: May 27, 2009, 10:39:30 AM »

http://www.who.int/csr/don/2009_05_27a/en/index.html

The above link will take you to the entire article with map and numbers of cases by country.

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION DAILY REPORT - NUMBER 40

Influenza A(H1N1) - update 40
27 May 2009 -- As of 06:00 GMT, 27 May 2009, 48 countries have officially reported 13,398 cases of influenza A(H1N1) infection, including 95 deaths
.

The breakdown of the number of laboratory-confirmed cases by country is given in the following table and map.

Map of the spread of Influenza A(H1N1): number of laboratory confirmed cases and deaths [jpg 1.37Mb]
As of 08:00 GMT, 27 May 2009
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