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Author Topic: H1N1 - Swine Flu - Novel Flu - Information  (Read 66901 times)
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« Reply #20 on: April 28, 2009, 02:56:00 PM »

CNN checking now....possible swine flu death.....2 men in California

CA governor - State of Emergency

NY health chief - many hundreds of children ill with swine flu
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« Reply #21 on: April 28, 2009, 02:57:23 PM »

CNN checking now....possible swine flu death.....2 men in California

CA governor - State of Emergency

NY health chief - many hundreds of children ill with swine flu

2nd school closed in NY - school of sibling who has swine flu
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« Reply #22 on: April 28, 2009, 03:27:16 PM »

 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
http://www.cdc.gov/swineflu/
 
World Health Organization
http://www.who.int/en/
 
USA Today
http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/2009-04-28-swine-flu_N.htm
 
Yahoo News
http://news.yahoo.com
 
Google News
http://news.google.com/
 
CNN
http://cnn.com
 
FOX
http://foxnews.com
 
MSNBC
http://msnbc.com
 
 
 
 


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« Reply #23 on: April 28, 2009, 09:09:46 PM »

NO deaths have been confirmed in California.

The statistics are very fluid.  The counts will be reported again tomorrow morning.

There is a great deal of information on the 8 sites above.

Good night fellow monkeys..... Smile

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« Reply #24 on: April 29, 2009, 08:07:03 AM »

Texas Toddler - 1st Death from Flu
3 new cases in Germany
11 added New Zealand
1 Costa Rica
1 Austria



Check News Links:
 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
http://www.cdc.gov/swineflu/
 
World Health Organization
http://www.who.int/en/
 
USA Today
http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/2009-04-28-swine-flu_N.htm
 
Yahoo News
http://news.yahoo.com
 
Google News
http://news.google.com/
 
CNN
http://cnn.com
 
FOX
http://foxnews.com
 
MSNBC
http://msnbc.com
 
 
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« Reply #25 on: April 29, 2009, 08:15:52 AM »

From CDC.....please note that numbers are as of yesterday.

U.S. Human Cases of Swine Flu Infection
(As of April 28, 2009, 11:00 AM ET)
 

State # of laboratory
confirmed cases
California 10 cases
Kansas 2 cases
New York City 45 cases
Ohio 1 case
Texas 6 cases
TOTAL COUNT 64 cases

International Human Cases of Swine Flu Infection
See: World Health Organization

Swine Influenza (Flu)
Swine Flu website last updated April 29, 03:30 AM ET


 
The human swine flu outbreak continues to grow in the United States and internationally. Today, CDC reports additional cases of confirmed swine influenza and a number of hospitalizations of swine flu patients. Internationally, the situation is more serious too, with additional countries reporting confirmed cases of swine flu. In response to the intensifying outbreak, the World Health Organization raised the worldwide pandemic alert level to Phase 4. A Phase 4 alert is characterized by confirmed person-to-person spread of a new influenza virus able to cause “community-level” outbreaks.” The increase in the pandemic alert phase indicates that the likelihood of a pandemic has increased.

CDC has activated its emergency operations center to coordinate the agency’s emergency response. CDC ’s goals are to reduce transmission and illness severity, and provide information to help health care providers, public health officials and the public address the challenges posed by this swine influenza virus. Yesterday, CDC issued a travel warning recommending that people avoid non-essential travel to Mexico. CDC continues to issue interim guidance daily on the website and through health alert network notices. CDC’s Division of the Strategic National Stockpile (SNS) is releasing one-quarter of its antiviral drugs, personal protective equipment, and respiratory protection devices to help states respond to the outbreak. The swine influenza A (H1N1) virus is susceptible to the prescription antiviral drugs oseltamivir and zanamivir. This is a rapidly evolving situation and CDC will provide updated guidance and new information as it becomes available.
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« Reply #26 on: April 29, 2009, 08:45:35 AM »

 http://www.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1894534,00.html
 

TIME ARTICLE

Health & Science
 
Mexico's Mystery: Why Is Swine Flu Deadlier There?
By Bryan Walsh Wednesday, Apr. 29, 2009


The swine-flu virus continued its gradual global march on Tuesday, prompting countries to strengthen efforts to stem its spread, while President Barack Obama asked Congress for $1.5 billion in supplementary spending to prepare for a possible swine-flu pandemic and installed the newly confirmed Secretary of Health and Human Services, Kathleen Sebelius, to help lead the fight against the disease. In the U.S., the caseload rose to 67 across five states — 45 of them in New York City, where health officials are investigating two new possible outbreaks at city schools — with more virus samples awaiting laboratory confirmation. New Zealand and Israel confirmed their first cases, while Canada, the U.K. and Spain saw small upticks in their swine-flu caseloads.


Swine Flu Hits Mexico
Several countries tightened border controls and discouraged travel to affected areas — Cuba suspended all flights to and from Mexico — but the World Health Organization kept the pandemic alert level at Phase 4, still two phases below a full pandemic. Outside Mexico, the apparent epicenter of the A/H1N1 virus, there have been no deaths confirmed from the flu and relatively few hospitalizations, and health officials continued to preach the need for a calm response. "What we see in the United States, or have been seeing so far, has been milder," said Richard Besser, the acting director for the Centers for Disease Control. (See pictures of the swine flu in Mexico.)

But health officials also cautioned that the U.S. caseload, including fatalities, would rise, with ongoing surveillance. "We expect to see more cases and we expect to report on them," says Besser. "As this moves forward, I fully expect that we will see deaths from this infection." [Update: On Wednesday morning, Besser confirmed the death of a 23-month-old child in Texas from swine flu, the first virus-related death outside Mexico.]

Still, Mexico seems to be experiencing a very different — and much scarier — outbreak than the rest of the world. More than 2,000 suspected swine-flu cases have been reported in several Mexican states, with more than 150 deaths. Those numbers are still preliminary and are expected to rise as blood samples from Mexican patients continue to be tested for the A/H1N1 swine-flu virus. Lack of laboratory capacity to run the time-consuming blood tests has so far held up the confirmation of cases there.

On Tuesday the government of Mexico City ordered gyms, discos, theaters and all sit-down restaurants (excluding those that serve only take-out) closed until at least May 6, in an effort to limit public gatherings and the spread of the virus. As epidemiologists swarm the country in an effort to trace the virus's spread, the big question remains: Why is the disease seemingly so much more deadly in Mexico than anywhere else? "This will be the object of a great deal of research and attention," said Keiji Fukuda, the interim director-general for health, safety and environment for the World Health Organization (WHO). "But we can't say why there seems to be a difference." (See the five things you need to know about swine flu.)

The WHO will convene an expert panel on April 29 to attempt to answer that question, but one way to begin is to look at where the virus originated. Epidemiologists appear to be homing in on a possible ground zero in the Mexican Gulf Coast state of Veracruz, in a town called Perote, which is home to a large pig farm owned by the U.S. company Smithfield Foods. Flu-like cases began popping up there in early April, before the first confirmed case in Mexico on April 13.

But the truth is that even though the virus is referred to as swine flu, researchers do not yet know for sure that the A/H1N1 virus actually originated in pigs. There's been no evidence yet of pigs getting sick in either Mexico or the U.S. (Despite several countries' bans on pork imports, it's important to remember that the disease cannot be contracted by eating pork.) The original reservoir for flu viruses is actually wild birds, which can spread infection to domestic birds and people — as we saw with the H5N1 avian flu in Asia — and to pigs. Pigs make particularly good biological mixing bowls since they can be infected by bird-, swine- and human-flu viruses and provide a hospitable environment for the viruses to swap genes and create entirely new strains in a process called reassortment. That is what may have happened with the A/H1N1 swine-flu virus, which contains genes from bird-, pig- and human-flu viruses. "When you get a large concentration of pig farms, people, wild birds and poultry, these things do happen," says Peter Daszak, the president of the Wildlife Trust and an expert on emerging diseases.

In recent years, since the ongoing H5N1 bird-flu virus first surfaced, health officials have focused mostly on Asia as the breeding ground for the world's next pandemic flu virus. But Daszak points out that Mexico, where people, pigs and poultry can exist in close proximity, is an overlooked hot spot for new viruses. Given the booming global livestock trade — more than 1.5 billion live animals have been shipped to the U.S. from all over the world in the past decade — it's possible that the A/H1N1 virus originated in an Asian bird that was exported to Mexico, where it may have reassorted in a pig before infecting people. Far more investigation is still needed, but it's clear that while U.S. officials were looking for flu exports from Asia, they should have also improved surveillance of their southern neighbor. "I think it might have been possible to prevent it," says Daszak. "We should be paying more attention to our own backyard."

Now that the swine-flu virus seems well established in human beings, containment is no longer an option. The public health response must be to slow the spread, which means getting a better handle on the virus. While the difference in severity between Mexico and U.S. cases would suggest that there are different viruses affecting the two countries, researchers have genetically sequenced swine-flu viruses from both Mexican and American victims, and "we see no difference in the viruses infecting sick people and less-sick people," said Fukuda. And even if there were genetic differences, it wouldn't necessarily mean much — scientists still don't know exactly which genes do what on flu viruses.

The Mexican deaths may also be attributable to some underlying coinfection or health problem that is simply not present in the U.S. cases — but that will require more investigation to uncover.

It's also possible that A/H1N1 began life in Mexico especially virulent — that country has apparently been grappling with the virus for weeks longer than the U.S. has — and evolved to become less dangerous by the time it crossed the border. That would not be an unusual evolutionary device, since viruses that are too deadly cannot survive if they kill off their host before being given a chance to spread. "It's fairly common in epidemics to see a trade-off between the ability to cause severe death and transmissibility," says Steven Kleiboeker, a virologist and the chief scientific officer for ViraCor Laboratories. The A/H1N1 virus may be attenuating itself as it spreads from person to person, becoming easier to catch but less dangerous. (Read "CDC Readies Swine-Flu Vaccine.")

The WHO, however, says that so far the virus appears to have stayed relatively stable during the chains of transmission, so it may not be mutating much. Still, the virus's current relatively weak state does not guarantee that it won't return later, much more virulent — which is exactly what happened in the 1918 flu pandemic that killed at least 50 million people worldwide. As the flu season comes to an end in the northern hemisphere, it may lead to a natural petering out of new swine-flu cases in the U.S. But the strain may continue to circulate aggressively in the southern hemisphere, which is just now entering its flu season, and then return to the north next winter.

Any conclusions now will be premature, because we still don't know what we're looking at. Experts predict we'll eventually begin to see fewer new cases in Mexico, as lab results separate real swine-flu infections from normal respiratory disease. Meanwhile, the anticipation of more cases and deaths in the U.S. has already been begun to be borne out. As the CDC's Besser himself has pointed out, swine flu is going to be a marathon, not a sprint — and we've only just gotten started.


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« Reply #27 on: April 29, 2009, 09:03:35 AM »

The following article is from the Associated Press

Officials confront first US death from swine flu
 
 By LAURAN NEERGAARD, AP Medical Writer Lauran Neergaard, Ap Medical Writer – 8 mins ago

WASHINGTON – A 23-month-old Texas toddler became the first confirmed swine flu death outside of Mexico as authorities around the world struggled to contain a growing global health menace that has also swept Germany onto the roster of afflicted nations.

"Even though we've been expecting this, it is very, very sad," Dr. Richard Besser, acting chief of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said Wednesday of the infant's death. "As a pediatrician and a parent, my heart goes out to the family."

President Barack Obama said this morning that Americans should know the government is doing all it can to control virus. Obama also says schools should consider closing if the spread of the swine flu virus worsens.

Canada, Austria, New Zealand, Israel, Spain, Britain and Germany also have reported cases of swine flu sickness. Deaths reported so far have been limited to Mexico, and now the U.S.

As the United States grappled with this widening health crisis, Besser went from network to network Wednesday morning to give an update on what the Obama administration is doing. He said authorities essentially are still "trying to learn more about this strain of the flu." His appearances as Germany reported its first cases of swine flu infection, with three victims.

"It's very important that people take their concern and channel it into action," Besser said, adding that "it is crucial that people understand what they need to do if symptoms appear.

"I don't think it (the reported death in Texas) indicates any change in the strain," he said. "We see with any flu virus a spectrum of disease symptoms."

Asked why the problem seems so much more severe in Mexico, Besser said U.S. officials "have teams on the ground, a tri-national team in Mexico, working with Canada and Mexico, to try and understand those differences, because they can be helpful as we plan and implement our control strategies."

Sixty-six infections had been reported in the United States before the report of the toddler's death in Texas.

The world has no vaccine to prevent infection but U.S. health officials aim to have a key ingredient for one ready in early May, the big step that vaccine manufacturers are awaiting. But even if the World Health Organization ordered up emergency vaccine supplies — and that decision hasn't been made yet — it would take at least two more months to produce the initial shots needed for human safety testing.

"We're working together at 100 miles an hour to get material that will be useful," Dr. Jesse Goodman, who oversees the Food and Drug Administration's swine flu work, told The Associated Press.

The U.S. is shipping to states not only enough anti-flu medication for 11 million people, but also masks, hospital supplies and flu test kits. President Barack Obama asked Congress for $1.5 billion in emergency funds to help build more drug stockpiles and monitor future cases, as well as help international efforts to avoid a full-fledged pandemic.

"It's a very serious possibility, but it is still too early to say that this is inevitable," the WHO's flu chief, Dr. Keiji Fukuda, told a telephone news conference.

Cuba and Argentina banned flights to Mexico, where swine flu is suspected of killing more than 150 people and sickening well over 2,000. In a bit of good news, Mexico's health secretary, Jose Cordova, late Tuesday called the death toll there "more or less stable."

Mexico City, one of the world's largest cities, has taken drastic steps to curb the virus' spread, starting with shutting down schools and on Tuesday expanding closures to gyms and swimming pools and even telling restaurants to limit service to takeout. People who venture out tend to wear masks in hopes of protection.

The number of confirmed swine flu cases in the United States rose to 66 in six states, with 45 in New York, 11 in California, six in Texas, two in Kansas and one each in Indiana and Ohio, but cities and states suspected more. In New York, the city's health commissioner said "many hundreds" of schoolchildren were ill at a school where some students had confirmed cases.

The WHO argues against closing borders to stem the spread, and the U.S. — although checking arriving travelers for the ill who may need care — agrees it's too late for that tactic.

"Sealing a border as an approach to containment is something that has been discussed and it was our planning assumption should an outbreak of a new strain of influenza occur overseas. We had plans for trying to swoop in and knockout or quench an outbreak if it were occurring far from our borders. That's not the case here," Besser told a telephone briefing of Nevada-based health providers and reporters. "The idea of trying to limit the spread to Mexico is not realistic or at all possible."

"Border controls do not work. Travel restrictions do not work," WHO spokesman Gregory Hartl said in Geneva, recalling the SARS epidemic earlier in the decade that killed 774 people, mostly in Asia, and slowed the global economy.

Authorities sought to keep the crisis in context: Flu deaths are common around the world. In the U.S. alone, the CDC says about 36,000 people a year die of flu-related causes. Still, the CDC calls the new strain a combination of pig, bird and human viruses for which people may have limited natural immunity.

Hence the need for a vaccine. Using samples of the flu taken from people who fell ill in Mexico and the U.S., scientists are engineering a strain that could trigger the immune system without causing illness. The hope is to get that ingredient — called a "reference strain" in vaccine jargon — to manufacturers around the second week of May, so they can begin their own laborious production work, said CDC's Dr. Ruben Donis, who is leading that effort.

Vaccine manufacturers are just beginning production for next winter's regular influenza vaccine, which protects against three human flu strains. The WHO wants them to stay with that course for now — it won't call for mass production of a swine flu vaccine unless the outbreak worsens globally. But sometimes new flu strains pop up briefly at the end of one flu season and go away only to re-emerge the next fall, and at the very least there should be a vaccine in time for next winter's flu season, Dr. Anthony Fauci, the National Institutes of Health's infectious diseases chief, said Tuesday.

"Right now it's moving very rapidly," he said of the vaccine development.

Besser appeared on NBC's "Meet the Press," CNN and CBS's "The Early Show."

Please Note:  HLN just reported that the toddler who died today was from Mexico and was being treated in the United States....Mere
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« Reply #28 on: April 29, 2009, 09:14:24 AM »

Please Note:  HLN just reported that the toddler who died today was from Mexico and was being treated in the United States....Mere

HLN further reports that child was treated in Houston and died on Monday.  This information was first known today.
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« Reply #29 on: April 29, 2009, 09:44:11 AM »

http://www.pandemicflu.gov/index.html

This is a very good site which has multiple helpful links.  As always, you may need to refresh these links to get the most up-to-date information.

CDC Afternoon Briefing (2:30 p.m. ET) Listen live


News
CDC Guidance to Assist Airline Flight Deck and Cabin Crew in Identifying Passengers Who May Have Swine Influenza (April 28)
 
CDC Provides Swine Flu Public Service Announcements (April 28)
 
WHO Issues Instructions for Shipments of Swine Influenza A (H!N!) Specimens and Virus Isolates to WHO Collaborating Centres for Influenza (April 28)
 
WHO Updates International Swine Flu Situation  (April 28)
 
Gov. Schwarzenegger Issues Proclamation to Confront Swine Flu Outbreak in California  (April 28)
 
CDC Guidance for Clinicians: Pregnant Women and Swine Influenza   
 

Links:

Workplace Questions
Planning Checklists
Community Strategy for Pandemic Influenza Mitigation (PDF - 10.3MB)
Pandemic Influenza Preparedness, Response, and Recovery Guide for Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources (PDF - 4.97 MB)
Hotlines
Risk Communication
HHS Pandemic Plan
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« Reply #30 on: April 29, 2009, 10:11:59 AM »

Thank you for keeping up on this Mere.  It is such a scarey time, I am amazed more people are not concerned.

The case that was stated to occur in Orlando, FL but that has not yet been confirmed is frightening.  Disney World is the host this week for the Tennis and Track & Field finals and tournaments state wide for all schools. 
 
My 9 y/o sister asked last night, "If it comes from people in Mexico, why do we let them come here and give it to us?" 
 
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« Reply #31 on: April 29, 2009, 11:18:42 AM »

http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/2009-04-28-swine-flu_N.htm

First U.S. swine flu fatality came from Mexico

By Martha T. Moore, USA TODAY

Officials say the first confirmed death in the United States from swine flu was a 23-month-old Mexican child who died in Houston. The Marine Corps commandant, meantime, says a troop at the Twenty-Nine Palms Base in California may have the illness.

In Texas, Kathy Barton, a spokeswoman for the Houston Health and Human Services Department, said Wednesday that the child who died had traveled with family from Mexico to Brownsville in south Texas. She says the child became ill in Brownsville and was taken to a Houston hospital and died Monday night.

Dr. Richard Besser, acting director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, told NBC's Today show that it's too soon to say if the death in Texas suggests the virus is spreading to more states.


MORE: USA TODAY coverage of the swine flu outbreak

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« Reply #32 on: April 29, 2009, 11:22:43 AM »

CDC Reporting on CNN

91 confirmed cases in 10 States

New York 51
Texas 16
California 14
Massachusetts 2
Michigan 2
Arizona 1
Nevada 1
Kansas 2
Ohio 1
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« Reply #33 on: April 29, 2009, 11:26:47 AM »

http://www.cdc.gov/swineflu/

Swine Influenza (Flu)
Swine Flu website last updated April 29, 11:00 AM ET

U.S. Human Cases of Swine Flu Infection
(As of April 29, 2009, 11:00 AM ET)  States # of laboratory confirmed cases Deaths
Arizona 1 
California 14 
Indiana 1 
Kansas 2 
Massachusetts 2   
Michigan 2 
Nevada 1 
New York City 51 
Ohio 1   
Texas 16 1
TOTAL COUNTS 91 cases 1 death
International Human Cases of Swine Flu Infection
See: World Health Organization 

The outbreak of disease in people caused by a new influenza virus of swine origin continues to grow in the United States and internationally. Today, CDC reports additional confirmed human infections, hospitalizations and the nation’s first fatality from this outbreak. The more recent illnesses and the reported death suggest that a pattern of more severe illness associated with this virus may be emerging in the U.S. Most people will not have immunity to this new virus and, as it continues to spread, more cases, more hospitalizations and more deaths are expected in the coming days and weeks.

CDC has implemented its emergency response. The agency’s goals are to reduce transmission and illness severity, and provide information to help health care providers, public health officials and the public address the challenges posed by the new virus. Yesterday, CDC issued new interim guidance for clinicians on how to care for children and pregnant women who may be infected with this virus. Young children and pregnant women are two groups of people who are at high risk of serious complications from seasonal influenza. In addition, CDC’s Division of the Strategic National Stockpile (SNS) continues to send antiviral drugs, personal protective equipment, and respiratory protection devices to all 50 states and U.S. territories to help them respond to the outbreak. The swine influenza A (H1N1) virus is susceptible to the prescription antiviral drugs oseltamivir and zanamivir. This is a rapidly evolving situation and CDC will provide updated guidance and new information as it becomes available
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« Reply #34 on: April 29, 2009, 12:33:16 PM »

http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5hG6zmXnY6v5La-llZ8qbQIrdE-WAD97S79R80

Swine flu cases rise to 91 in U.S. with one death
A toddler from Mexico has died in a Houston hospital. A health official says the disease is spreading and shows no signs of slowing down.
By Thomas H. Maugh II
April 30, 2009
As the swine flu outbreak spread to four more states overnight, bringing the total to at least 91 cases, the United States reported its first death from the new virus, a 23-month old child who died in a Houston hospital.

The boy was a Mexican national from Matamoros, just across the border from Texas, who was brought to this country by his parents to seek medical treatment.


Arizona, Massachusetts, Michigan and Nevada joined the list of states with new cases. Texas said its total has now climbed to 16 cases, New York has 51, and California has 14.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said there have been more hospitalizations as well and reported on its website that "a pattern of more severe illness associated with the virus may be emerging in the United States."

As with all flu strains, experts said, the more people who are infected, the greater the likelihood that some will develop more severe illnesses. At this time, however, there is little to suggest this strain will be more virulent than other strains currently already in the population.


Worldwide, new cases have been reported in Canada, the United Kingdom, Austria and New Zealand among other countries.

"It's clear that the virus is spreading and we don't see any evidence of it slowing down at this point," Dr. Keiji Fukuda, assistant director-general of the World Health Organization, said at a morning news conference in Geneva.

"The illness we are seeing is generally consistent with seasonal influenza infection," he added, but there is "a suggestion that cases are developing diarrhea more often."

He also added that "the epidemiologic information to date more strongly suggests that we are dealing with a virus that is being transmitted form person to person. It is this transmission and travel that are accounting for the cases."

President Obama issued a statement today, saying, "We are closely and continuously monitoring the emerging cases of the virus throughout the United States" and noting that his "thoughts and prayers go out" to the family of the child who died in Houston.

Public health officials recommended that schools where a case of the virus has been confirmed "should strongly consider temporarily closing." Several school systems in Texas and New York have done so.

Fukuda said that genetic analysis of the new virus indicated that it was originally a swine influenza virus "but is now behaving more or less like a human influenza virus." Reflecting that change -- as well as pressure from the pork industry -- many officials have begun referring to the virus as the H1N1 virus. European officials prefer to call it "novel flu."

"There is no evidence that people are getting infected from pigs or that it is dangerous to eat pork," Fukuda said.

Nonetheless, the Egyptian government today ordered the slaughter of 300,000 pigs in the country as a protective measure. Muslims in the country do not eat pork, but the animals are raised for the Christian minority.

thomas.maugh@latimes.com

Mark Silva in Washington contributed to this story.
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« Reply #35 on: April 29, 2009, 01:12:31 PM »

Dolce...I want to give you a heads up so that you do not hear or read and not know about this....CNN-TV is reporting that there are two very sick patients in Texas....one a baby and another is a young woman who came in pregnant, had an emergency C-section, the baby is fine but the mom is very ill.

I am going to find any articles on this recent statement and I will post here.  Do you have any thoughts about this?  I do not want to stress you and would be happy not to post these.  Please let me know.....
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« Reply #36 on: April 29, 2009, 04:18:22 PM »

WHO BREAKING NEWS

NOW GOING TO PHASE 5.....There will be following information.  Dr. Chan is now speaking.
I am watching this on CNN.
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« Reply #37 on: April 29, 2009, 04:20:30 PM »

Governor Bobby Jindal says that an elementary school in Lafayette (Louisiana) is being closed after five children in the school have tested positive for flu-strain A. One of those students was recently in Mexico.
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« Reply #38 on: April 29, 2009, 04:23:54 PM »

Governor Bobby Jindal says that an elementary school in Lafayette (Louisiana) is being closed after five children in the school have tested positive for flu-strain A. One of those students was recently in Mexico.

Neglected to say....this information became available from WWL_TV, Channel 4, New Orleans
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« Reply #39 on: April 29, 2009, 04:44:57 PM »

Dolce...I want to give you a heads up so that you do not hear or read and not know about this....CNN-TV is reporting that there are two very sick patients in Texas....one a baby and another is a young woman who came in pregnant, had an emergency C-section, the baby is fine but the mom is very ill.

I am going to find any articles on this recent statement and I will post here.  Do you have any thoughts about this?  I do not want to stress you and would be happy not to post these.  Please let me know.....
Please post, it is fine, if it bothers me I will not read it.  Smile  People need to be aware of what is happening.  Thank you for your concern though!! 
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