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Author Topic: H1N1 - Swine Flu - Novel Flu - Information  (Read 61652 times)
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« Reply #400 on: November 04, 2009, 02:04:32 PM »

CDC - Update - Activity in the U.S.

2009-2010 Influenza Season Week 42 ending October 24, 2009
All data are preliminary and may change as more reports are received.

Synopsis:
During week 42 (October 18-24, 2009), influenza activity increased in the U.S.

8,268 (42.1%) specimens tested by U.S. World Health Organization (WHO) and National Respiratory and Enteric Virus Surveillance System (NREVSS) collaborating laboratories and reported to CDC/Influenza Division were positive for influenza.
All subtyped influenza A viruses being reported to CDC were 2009 influenza A (H1N1) viruses.
The proportion of deaths attributed to pneumonia and influenza (P&I) was above the epidemic threshold.
Twenty-two influenza-associated pediatric deaths were reported. Nineteen of these deaths were associated with 2009 influenza A (H1N1) virus infection and three were associated with an influenza A virus for which the subtype was undetermined.
The proportion of outpatient visits for influenza-like illness (ILI) was above the national baseline. All 10 regions reported ILI above region-specific baseline levels.
Forty-eight states reported geographically widespread influenza activity, Guam and two states reported regional influenza activity, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico reported local influenza activity, and the U.S. Virgin Islands did not report

Continue reading here....
http://www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/
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« Reply #401 on: November 04, 2009, 07:15:46 PM »

Veterinary Medicine - Cat Catches Swine Flu

Pet cat in U.S. catches swine flu

Wed Nov 4, 2009 4:10pm EST 
 
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A cat in Iowa has tested positive for H1N1 swine flu, the first time a cat has been diagnosed with the new pandemic strain, the American Veterinary Medical Association said on Wednesday.

The 13-year-old cat apparently caught the virus from one of the people living in the house, the group said in a statement. It has recovered and does not appear to have infected anyone or anything else.

Pigs are the original source of the H1N1 virus and it has been found in several herds, as well as in a pet ferret. Ferrets are especially susceptible to human influenza viruses.

"Two of the three members of the family that owns the pet had suffered from influenza-like illness before the cat became ill," Iowa Department of Public Health Veterinarian Dr. Ann Garvey said in a statement.

"This is not completely unexpected, as other strains of influenza have been found in cats in the past." Both the cat and its owners have recovered from their illnesses.

The AVMA has a website on H1N1 illnesses in U.S. animals at www.avma.org/public_health/influenza/new_virus. Dogs and horses also can catch various influenza strains, although none have so far been diagnosed with H1N1.

"Indoor pets that live in close proximity to someone who has been sick are at risk and it is wise to monitor their health to ensure they aren't showing signs of illness," said Dr. David Schmitt, state veterinarian for Iowa.

The new H1N1 passes easily from person to person and has infected millions globally since March, killing at least 5,000 people whose infections have been documented.

(Editing by Jackie Frank)

http://www.reuters.com/article/domes...5A33ZG20091104
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« Reply #402 on: November 04, 2009, 07:17:32 PM »

I wonder now....can the cat infect a human...?

If any information is available out there, please bring it to our thread......Thank you.
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« Reply #403 on: November 05, 2009, 10:50:42 AM »

Good Morning.....someone asked me yesterday if you can get the swine flu twice.  I have been reading FluTrackers like the morning paper, and there is a thread regarding this issue.
Today, however, is information from a physician who feels this has happened in her family.  This discussion is taking place in the United States forum.

W. Va. doctor says she's caught H1N1 twice now

CROSS LANES, W.Va.--A Cross Lanes pediatrician says she came down with swine flu twice in two months, and she's among the medical professionals who are puzzled by the occurrence.


Keep on reading......

http://**/News/200911041062


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« Reply #404 on: November 05, 2009, 11:16:35 AM »

Iowa - H1N1 - Indoor Cat with Flu
 
Posted: Wed, 04 Nov 2009 10:00 CST
Category: H1N1

Protecting Pets from Illness

The Iowa Department of Public Health (IDPH) and the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship (IDALS) remind Iowans that in addition to protecting their families, friends and neighbors from the spread of the 2009 H1N1 influenza virus, it’s important to remember to protect family pets from the illness, as well. People who are sick with H1N1 can spread the virus not only to humans, but to some animals.


The Departments are sharing this message following the confirmation of a case of H1N1 in an Iowa cat.


The 13-year-old indoor cat in Iowa was brought to the Lloyd Veterinary Medical Center at Iowa State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine, where it tested positive for the H1N1 virus. The diagnosis is the culmination of collaborative efforts between IDPH, Iowa State University College of Veterinary Medicine, Center for Advanced Host Defenses, Immunobiotics and Translational Comparative Medicine, USDA, and IDALS Animal Industry Bureau.


“Two of the three members of the family that owns the pet had suffered from influenza-like illness before the cat became ill,” said IDPH Public Health Veterinarian, Dr. Ann Garvey. “This is not completely unexpected, as other strains of influenza have been found in cats in the past.” Both the cat and its owners have recovered from their illnesses.


People can keep their pets healthy by washing hands, covering coughs and sneezes, and minimizing contact with their pets while ill with influenza-like symptoms. If your pet exhibits signs of a respiratory illness, contact your veterinarian.


“Indoor pets that live in close proximity to someone who has been sick are at risk and it is wise to monitor their health to ensure they aren’t showing signs of illness,” said Dr. David Schmitt, State Veterinarian for Iowa.


For more information about H1N1, visit www.idph.state.ia.us/h1n1/ or call the Iowa Influenza Hotline at 1-800-447-1985.


Contact Information: Polly Carver-Kimm at (515) 281-6693



http://www.idph.state.ia.us/IdphNews/Reader.aspx?id=8FBE90B3-4667-4960-9AF5-1B9B477A3805
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« Reply #405 on: November 11, 2009, 11:20:02 AM »

Interesting Reading at FluTrackers.com - Pets with H1N1

Roehl_JC 
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Location: New Brighton, Christchurch, New Zealand
Posts: 268 
 
 More ferrets with H1N1 caught from owners in Oregon


More ferrets in Oregon get swine flu from owners
By Lynne Terry, The Oregonian
November 10, 2009, 12:48PM

More ferrets in Oregon have developed swine flu from their owners, fueling worries that the virus could jump from the pets to people.

“We are advising vets to take care because of the possibility of animal to human transmission,” said Emilio DeBess, the state public health veterinarian.

So far, the virus has only gone one way — from owners to their ferrets.

In early October, the first case of human to ferret transmission of the H1N1 virus was documented by DeBess in the Portland area. Then at the end of last month, nine ferrets owned by a family in Roseburg came down with flulike symptoms, he said.

That was a week after two kids in the Roseburg family — a teenager and a child younger than 10 — got sick with the swine flu.

Like the kids, the ferrets developed high fevers, red eyes, runny noses and they were coughing and sneezing.

“If the ferrets could talk, they’d say ‘Oh my God, my body aches,’” DeBess said.

Tests on three of the ferrets confirmed that they had the H1N1 virus. DeBess suspects that the others had the virus as well.

Ferrets, which mimic human flu symptoms, are used in labs researching the flu. DeBess said ferrets are especially susceptible to catching pneumonia.

A pet ferret in Nebraska that caught the H1N1 virus from its family died, and a cat in Iowa has come down with the virus, said Michael San Filippo, spokesman for the American Veterinary Medical Association.

Pigs in Indiana have also contracted the virus along with swine in Canada and other countries. Two health inspectors were infected with the H1N1 virus when they visited the sick swine herd in Canada, San Filippo said.

“These are the only two cases that we know of of animals passing the virus to people,” San Filippo said. “All the other cases involve are people passing it to animals.”


Still, DeBess has warned veterinarians in the state to protect themselves from sneezing and coughing ferrets and other pets. Owners need to take precautions as well, he said.

The virus passes from humans to ferrets — or cats — the same way it is transmitted among humans. Coughing and sneezing can spread the virus which can remain infectious for about a week outside the body. That means that owners — and vets — need to thoroughly wash their hands when handling sick pets or when they are sick.

The ferrets and their owners in both the Portland area and Roseburg are fine, DeBess said.

The flu season is far from over. So far, 942 people have been hospitalized with the H1N1 virus in Oregon and 30 people statewide have died. The state has sent up a Web page here with the latest information about influenza in Oregon.

-- Lynne Terry

http://www.oregonlive.com/news/index...n_get_swi.html 
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« Reply #406 on: November 11, 2009, 11:39:20 AM »

CDC - Week 43 Update

2009-2010 Influenza Season Week 43 ending October 31, 2009
All data are preliminary and may change as more reports are received.

Synopsis:
During week 43 (October 25-31, 2009), influenza activity remained elevated in the U.S.

5,258 (37.2%) specimens tested by U.S. World Health Organization (WHO) and National Respiratory and Enteric Virus Surveillance System (NREVSS) collaborating laboratories and reported to CDC/Influenza Division were positive for influenza.

Over 99% of all subtyped influenza A viruses being reported to CDC were 2009 influenza A (H1N1) viruses.

The proportion of deaths attributed to pneumonia and influenza (P&I) was above the epidemic threshold.
 
Eighteen influenza-associated pediatric deaths were reported. Fifteen of these deaths were associated with 2009 influenza A (H1N1) virus infection and three were associated with an influenza A virus for which the subtype was undetermined.
 
The proportion of outpatient visits for influenza-like illness (ILI) was above the national baseline. All 10 regions reported ILI above region-specific baseline levels

Forty-eight states reported geographically widespread influenza activity, two states reported regional influenza activity, the District of Columbia reported local influenza activity; Puerto Rico and Guam reported sporadic influenza activity, and the U.S. Virgin Islands did not report.

Continue reading here.....
http://www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/
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« Reply #407 on: November 11, 2009, 11:57:07 AM »

WHO - Update 73

Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 - update 73
Weekly update

As of 1 November 2009, worldwide more than 199 countries and overseas territories/communities have reported laboratory confirmed cases of pandemic influenza H1N1 2009, including over 6000 deaths.

As many countries have stopped counting individual cases, particularly of milder illness, the case count is likely to be significantly lower than the actual number of cases that have occurred. WHO is actively monitoring the progress of the pandemic through frequent consultations with the WHO Regional Offices and member states and through monitoring of multiple sources of data.

Situation update:

Please continue reading here....
http://www.who.int/csr/don/2009_11_06/en/index.html
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« Reply #408 on: November 11, 2009, 12:19:58 PM »

WHO - Animals and H1N1

Infection of farmed animals with the pandemic virus
Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 briefing note 15

5 NOVEMBER 2009 | GENEVA --

To date, extensive testing by laboratories in the WHO influenza surveillance network has detected no signs that the H1N1 pandemic virus has mutated to a more virulent form.

 Currently licensed pandemic vaccines closely match circulating viruses and are expected to confer good protection.

Vigilance for changes in the H1N1 virus includes monitoring to detect possible influenza infections in susceptible animals, both mammals and birds, as well as humans. While most influenza A viruses circulating in mammals preferentially infect a single species, cross-species transmission is known to occur.

Infections in swine
Concern has traditionally focused on swine, which are susceptible to infections from human and avian influenza viruses as well as swine influenza viruses. As influenza viruses have eight neatly segmented genes, swine could theoretically operate as a viral “mixing vessel” for the exchange of genetic material when an animal is co-infected with different viruses. Such an event could lead to changes in the genetic makeup of the H1N1 virus or result in a novel influenza virus of unknown public health significance.

Since the new H1N1 pandemic virus emerged, a small number of infections in swine herds have been reported. Limited evidence suggests that these infections occurred following direct transmission of the virus from infected humans to swine. These isolated events have had no impact on the dynamics of the pandemic, which is spreading readily via human-to-human transmission. As human infections become increasingly widespread, transmission of the virus from humans to swine is likely to occur with greater frequency.

Influenza in other species
In addition, pandemic H1N1 infections have been reported in turkeys in Chile and Canada and in a few pet animals in the USA. Again, these infections were isolated events and pose no special risks to human health.

The virus is killed at normal cooking temperatures. No human infections have been linked to the consumption of properly prepared meat or animal products, or any other food items.

Another concern is the continuing presence of the highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus in poultry in several countries, where the virus is endemic. While no one can predict how the H5N1 virus might behave under the pressures of a pandemic, all data to date have been reassuring.

Most recently, authorities in Denmark reported a novel H3N2 influenza virus in mink on several mink farms. Sequencing of the virus demonstrated a combination of human and swine genes that has not been identified previously in circulating influenza viruses. Testing of farm workers detected no spread of the virus to humans. However, the incident demonstrates the constantly evolving ecology of influenza viruses, the potential for surprising changes, and the need for constant vigilance, also in animals.

Close monitoring needed
These recent findings further suggest that influenza A viruses in animals and humans increasingly behave like a pool of genes circulating among multiple hosts, and that the potential exists for novel influenza viruses to be generated in animals other than swine. This situation reinforces the need for close monitoring and close collaboration between public health and veterinary authorities.

When influenza infections are detected in farmed animals, WHO recommends monitoring of farm workers for signs of respiratory illness, and testing for H1N1 infection should such signs appear. FAO and OIE recommend that animals that are showing signs of illness be examined and properly managed, and allowed to fully recover before being transported or marketed.

In addition, samples from infected animals and humans should be taken for full genome sequencing of the influenza viruses to determine if mutations have occurred that could lead to changes in virulence, host range or antiviral resistance. Such sequencing is also important to assess the possible origin of the case or outbreak.

Official notification
Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus infections in birds must be reported to the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), as must any "emerging disease" in animals. This would include infections with the pandemic H1N1 virus or other novel influenza viruses, when consistent with the “emerging disease” criteria for official notification.

These animal health events should be reported, together with the results of epidemiological and virological investigations, in keeping with OIE requirements for notification.


RELATED LINKS
Evolution of pandemic H1N1 2009 in animals
Press release from the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE)

Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO): Pandemic (H1N1) 2009


© WHO 2009 
 
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« Reply #409 on: November 11, 2009, 12:25:40 PM »


Link for above post on H1N1 in Farmed Animals.....

http://www.who.int/csr/disease/swineflu/notes/briefing_20091105/en/index.html
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« Reply #410 on: November 11, 2009, 06:24:10 PM »

Minneapolis 28 mins ago
ATLANTA – Federal health officials now say that 4,000 or more Americans likely have died from swine flu — about four times the estimate they've been using.

The new, higher figure was first reported by The New York Times. It includes deaths caused by complications related to swine flu, including pneumonia and bacterial infections. Until now, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention had conservatively put the U.S. swine flu death count at more than 1,000. Officials said this week they're working on an even more accurate calculation.

The CDC says "many millions" of Americans have caught the pandemic flu virus since it first appeared in April.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20091111/ap_on_he_me/us_med_swine_flu

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« Reply #411 on: November 12, 2009, 07:14:14 PM »

CDC - Estimates of Flu Cases, Hospitalizations and Deaths - United States


CDC Estimates of 2009 H1N1 Influenza Cases, Hospitalizations and Deaths in the United States, April – October 17, 2009
November 12, 2009, 1:00 PM ET


 
Background

Estimating the number of individual flu cases in the United States is very challenging because many people with flu don’t seek medical care and only a small number of those that do seek care are tested.

More people who are hospitalized or die of flu-related causes are tested and reported, but under-reporting of hospitalizations and deaths occurs as well.

For this reason CDC monitors influenza activity levels and trends and virus characteristics through a nationwide surveillance system and uses statistical modeling to estimate the burden of flu illness (including hospitalizations and deaths) in the United States.

When the 2009 H1N1 flu outbreak began in April 2009, CDC began reporting the number of laboratory-confirmed cases, hospitalizations and deaths associated with 2009 H1N1 flu in the United States that were reported by states to CDC.

These initial case counts, and subsequent ongoing laboratory-confirmed reports of hospitalizations and deaths, are thought to represent a significant undercount of the actual number of 2009 H1N1 flu cases in the United States.
 
A paper in Emerging Infectious Diseases authored by CDC staff entitled “Estimates of the Prevalence of Pandemic (H1N1) 2009, United States, April–July 2009”  reported on a study to estimate the prevalence of 2009 H1N1 based on the number of laboratory-confirmed cases reported to CDC.

Correcting for under-ascertainment, the study found that every case of 2009 H1N1 reported from April – July represented an estimated 79 total cases, and every hospitalized case reported may have represented an average of 2.7 total hospitalized people.

Since that time, CDC has been working to develop a way to estimate, in an ongoing way, the impact of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic on the U.S. in terms of 2009 H1N1 cases, hospitalizations and deaths.

Continue to read this article.....
http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/estimates_2009_h1n1.htm
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Happy Easter. T.Y., Brandi! :)


« Reply #412 on: November 12, 2009, 08:43:55 PM »

Hi Monkeys,

I found tidbits of information on these sites.  I

http://facesofinfluenza.com/


http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/


The link below was posted earlier this thread. I found the information on food strange and helpful.


http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/33654164/ns/health-cold_and_flu/
 
Flu-proof your family this winter
Shield yourself from germs with these immunity boosters

Snip...

Yogurt: Shift workers who consumed a drink containing Lactobacillus reuteri, a probiotic that appears to stimulate infection-fighting white blood cells, were 33 percent less likely to take sick days than those who took a placebo, according to an 80-day Swedish study published in Environmental Health. But beware, says Elizabeth Somer, RD, author of 10 books on nutrition: "Some companies make up probiotic names to put on their label." She suggests looking for yogurt that contains Lactobacillus acidophilus as well as Bifidus and L. rhamnosus. "They're even more effective when combined," she says.

Garlic: According to a study published in Advances in Therapy, subjects who swallowed a garlic capsule for 12 winter weeks were two-thirds less likely to catch a cold; those who did suffered for 3 1/2 days less. Garlic contains allicin, a potent bacteria fighter, and other infection-fighting compounds, and Somer believes it's even more effective in food form. She suggests adding one to three cooked cloves to your food each day.

Black tea: Drinking 5 cups a day for 2 weeks can turn your immune system's T cells into "Hulk cells" that produce 10 times more interferon, a protein that battles cold and flu infections, according to a Harvard study. Don't like black tea? The green variety will also do the trick. If you can't stomach drinking that much, you can still get added protection with fewer cups.

Snip...
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« Reply #413 on: November 13, 2009, 09:35:37 AM »

Toler and seahorse....thank you for your articles...!

The article "faces of influenza" is from the American Lung Association and has an area where you can enter your ZIP code to find the locations of seasonal and H1N1 shots.  In checking my ZIP code, I found the information in my area is correct....showing name, address, phone contact and whether the shot is available at this time.   Good stuff...!

seahorse your third link is from Prevention Magazine and is full of information for those who would like to stay healthy this winter.

Again thanks.....Mere
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Happy Easter. T.Y., Brandi! :)


« Reply #414 on: November 13, 2009, 11:53:56 AM »

Toler and seahorse....thank you for your articles...!

The article "faces of influenza" is from the American Lung Association and has an area where you can enter your ZIP code to find the locations of seasonal and H1N1 shots.  In checking my ZIP code, I found the information in my area is correct....showing name, address, phone contact and whether the shot is available at this time.   Good stuff...!

seahorse your third link is from Prevention Magazine and is full of information for those who would like to stay healthy this winter.

Again thanks.....Mere

Your welcome Mere,


I found the yogurt that was suggested a very handy tip, I wonder if it is Dannon or Columbo that has the needed nutrients?

I spent a lousy 2.75 for "wet ones" the hand wipes I should have bought carrot's, garlic and yogurt instead of investing in
debugging stuff. 

I wonder if a Swine Flu germ can live in water?  I was thinking instead of constantly washing the hands, I may just
keep a little bowl of water with a few drops of clorox in it.  I read this method a TV chef uses to dip her hands in instead of
washing them constantly.  I guess a few drop of vinegar in a water bowl may work too.


http://www.ksbw.com/health/21589599/detail.html

I don't recommend vaccinations for H1N1," said Beatrice Levinson, owner of Monterey Bay's Naturopathy. "My recommendation: the very basics are exercise, diet, water and sleep. I call them the four pillars of health.

I don't agree with Ms. Levinson, I believe if you can do both: the swine flu shot and "four pillars of health" will be ideal, if not
the exercie, diet, water and sleep will have to do.
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« Reply #415 on: November 13, 2009, 09:00:29 PM »

President's address to the Ukrainian people on the occasion of flu epidemic in Ukraine
President.gov.ua ^ | 11/4/09

Posted on Friday, November 13, 2009 6:52:07 PM by FromLori

Dear fellow citizens!

I address you in performance of my constitutional duty under the Article 106 of the Basic Law of the state.

The reason is the emergency epidemic situation in the country.

Infections of viral origin, including the A/H1N1 flu, are rapidly spreading across Ukraine.

The emergency is evident in the scale of the epidemic: the speed and the geography of its spreading, rapid progress of the illness and the exceptional number of deaths.

People are dying. The epidemic is killing doctors. This is absolutely unprecedented and inconceivable in the XXI century.

All the limits have been exceeded - even those under the Constitution that determine my actions as the President.

Therefore I am motivated by the most important: the security of your life and your health.

Therefore I give clear and frank assessment of the situation. And you should know that.

We have special risk factors that aggravate the epidemic in Ukraine.

The conclusions of the National Security and Defense Council of Ukraine, my numerous consultations with national and international experts show that.

First. Unlike similar epidemics in other countries, three pathogens of viral infections came to Ukraine at the same time: two of them are seasonal flu and the third is the A/H1N1.

According to virologists, such a combination of infections due to mutation may produce a new, even more aggressive virus.

That's why I have addressed the United Nations with the request to conduct a virologic examination in Ukraine and to establish the appropriate laboratory in order to take timely preventive measures.

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/2386058/posts
------------------------------------------------------------------------

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« Reply #416 on: November 17, 2009, 08:56:11 AM »

The Moral of the Story.....Handling Money?....Wash Your Hands...!

Read at FluTrackers.com this morning:


   FluTrackers > Genetic Tracking & Scientfic Analysis of Pandemic Influenza & Other Diseases > Virology Blog - About Viruses and Viral Disease
 
 VB - Influenza virus is infectious for days on banknotes 

Virology Blog - About Viruses and Viral Disease Vincent Racaniello's Blog
 

  #1    Today, 06:05 AM 
 Florida1 
Editor-in-Chief & President   Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 14,260 
 
 

Influenza virus is infectious for days on banknotes

by Vincent Racaniello on 10 November 2009

Influenza virus may be transmitted among humans in three ways: by direct contact with infected individuals; by contact with contaminated objects (called fomites, such as toys, doorknobs); and by inhalation of virus-laden aerosols.

The contribution of each mode to overall transmission of influenza is not known. But something that most of us touch on a daily basis – paper currency – appears to be able to hold infectious virus for a surprisingly long period of time.

The idea that currency can serve as a vector for transmission of influenza virus is attractive since billions of banknotes change hands daily throughout the globe.

To determine if virus can remain infectious on banknotes, a small volume (50 microliters) of a viral suspension was added to a 50 franc Swiss note. The note was kept at room temperature, and at different times the inoculated area was cut out, immersed in buffer, and viral infectivity was determined in cell culture.

Infectivity of influenza A (H1N1) and influenza B viruses was detected for only 1 and 2 hours, respectively. In contrast, two different influenza A (H3N2) viruses were detected up to 1 and 3 days.

As expected, the more virus placed on the banknote, the longer infectivity could be detected. Addition of respiratory secretions to the viral inoculum also increased the ’survival’ time.

 For example, influenza A/Moscow/10/99 (H3N2) remained infectious on banknotes up to 8 days in the presence of mucus, compared with 2 days without mucus. When higher amounts of virus with mucus were added to banknotes, infectivity could be detected for 17 days.

 Mucus might provide a protective matrix which slows the loss of viral infectivity.

To determine if similar results would be observed using human specimens, nasopharyngeal secretions from children with influenza-like illness were inoculated onto banknotes. Virus from half of the samples could be detected on the currency for 24 hours, and from 36% of specimens for 48 hours.

These observations demonstrate that influenza virus infectivity remains on banknotes for days.

In theory virus could be transferred from currency to the nasal tract by contaminated fingers, initiating an infection. Whether humans acquire influenza by this route is unknown.

However, good hand hygiene, which is known to remove influenza virus, is an excellent preventative measure – especially after handling currency.

This study was carried out – where else? – in Switzerland, where 7 million individuals exchange 20 – 100 million banknotes each day.

Thomas Y, Vogel G, Wunderli W, Suter P, Witschi M, Koch D, Tapparel C, & Kaiser L (2008). Survival of influenza virus on banknotes. Applied and environmental microbiology, 74 (10), 3002-7 PMID: 18359825 
 
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« Reply #417 on: November 17, 2009, 01:42:47 PM »

Alabama - Vaccine Information and Availability

Read at FluTrackers today.....

Death toll of Alabama H1N1 victims now at 31
Updated: Nov 17, 2009 11:48 AM EST

The Alabama Department of Health will get about 40,000 doses of swine flu vaccine this week after originally be told to expect about 120,000 doses.

Despite the vaccine shortage, enough vaccine is arriving to enable state health officials to begin school-based vaccination clinics in two weeks.


The first students in Alabama to be vaccinated at schools will be students in grades K-3 if their parents sign permission forms.

State Health Officials will be joined by the State School Superintendent Wednesday for a news conference to outline procedures for the school-based clinics and the importance of parents in getting permission slips in on time.

Swine flu is now blamed for a 31st fatality in Alabama.

The latest victim is a Jefferson County man in his 50's according to Dr. Jim McVay of the State Health Department.

http://www.waff.com/Global/story.asp?S=11521452

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« Reply #418 on: November 17, 2009, 01:48:01 PM »


 National Institute of Allergy and
Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
http://www.niaid.nih.gov
 
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday, Nov. 16, 2009 


NIAID MEDIA AVAILABILITY
Immune System of Healthy Adults May Be Better Prepared Than Expected to Fight 2009 H1N1 Influenza Virus

WHAT:  A new study shows that molecular similarities exist between the 2009 H1N1 influenza virus and other strains of seasonal H1N1 virus that have been circulating in the population since 1988. These results suggest that healthy adults may have a level of protective immune memory that can blunt the severity of infection caused by the 2009 H1N1 influenza virus.
 
Continue article here.....

http://www3.niaid.nih.gov/news/newsreleases/2009/H1N1protection.htm
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« Reply #419 on: November 17, 2009, 01:58:51 PM »

FDA - Approval of New Vaccine

FDA NOTE TO CORRESPONDENTS
For Immediate Release:  Nov. 16, 2009

Media Inquires: Pat El-Hinnawy, 301-796-4763; patricia.el-hinnawy@fda.hhs.gov
Consumer Inquiries: 888- INFO-FDA

FDA Approves Additional Vaccine for 2009 H1N1 Influenza Virus

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced that it has approved a fifth vaccine for protection against the 2009 H1N1 influenza virus. The vaccine is manufactured by ID Biomedical Corp. of Quebec, Canada, owned by GlaxoSmithKline PLC.

As with the four previous H1N1 influenza vaccines licensed by the FDA on Sept.15, 2009, ID Biomedical Corporation will manufacture its H1N1 vaccine using the established, licensed egg-based manufacturing process used for producing seasonal flu vaccine.

Potential side effects of this H1N1 vaccine are expected to be similar to those of the seasonal and H1N1 flu vaccines. The most common side effect is soreness at the injection site. Others may include mild fever, body aches and fatigue for a few days after the inoculation.

As with any medical product, unexpected or rare serious adverse events may occur. The FDA is collaborating with other government agencies to enhance adverse event safety monitoring during and after the H1N1 2009 vaccination program.

ID Biomedical’s H1N1 monovalent vaccine will be produced in multi-dose vials, in a formulation that contains thimerosal.

As with any medical product, unexpected or rare serious adverse events may occur. FDA is collaborating with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and other government agencies to enhance the capacity for adverse event safety monitoring during and after the 2009 H1N1 vaccination program.

For more information
FDA Page on Influenza A (H1N1) 2009 Monovalent Vaccine


http://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm190783.htm
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