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Author Topic: H1N1 - Swine Flu - Novel Flu - Information  (Read 101237 times)
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« Reply #500 on: January 15, 2010, 04:29:51 AM »

 
Yellow Book
CDC Health Information for International Travel 2008


Announcement
Enjoy a safe and healthy Lunar New Year!
This information is current as of today, January 15, 2010 at 04:16 EST
Released: January 07, 2010

Many travelers are expected to visit Asia in the upcoming weeks to celebrate the beginning of the Year of the Tiger. Lunar New Year falls on February 14, 2010. If you are traveling, the Centers for Disease Control and prevention (CDC) would like to share information and tips that will help you stay healthy and enjoy your trip.

Every destination, even in different areas of the same country, has unique health issues that travelers need to be aware of. To find specific information about the areas you plan to visit, see the East Asia, South Asia, and Southeast Asia regional pages on the CDC Travelers’ Health website, or click on the country or countries you will be visiting on the destinations page.

Important Health Information

Mosquito-borne illnesses, such as malaria, dengue fever, and Japanese encephalitis, are common throughout Asia, so it is very important to take steps to prevent insect bites. In addition, you may need to take prescription medicine to protect yourself from malaria or get a vaccine against Japanese encephalitis. Talk to your doctor about which prevention measures are right for you and your destination.
Food and Water. Eating contaminated food and drinking contaminated water can cause illnesses such as hepatitis A, typhoid fever, and travelers’ diarrhea. Read about how to prevent these diseases by visiting the Safe Food and Water page of the Travelers’ Health website
.
Seasonal flu, 2009 H1N1 flu and avian flu

Flu is a common illness in travelers. It is important to consider getting a seasonal flu shot before your trip. Learn more about seasonal flu.

This year a vaccine against 2009 H1N1 flu is also recommended, especially if you are at risk from health complications from flu. Learn more about 2009 H1N1 Flu  and read the Travelers’ Health H1N1 outbreak notice: 2009 H1N1 flu: Global Situation.

Due to the circulation of 2009 H1N1 flu, some countries may screen arriving travelers for symptoms of the flu. Read more about possible screening for international travelers.

Another type of flu called avian influenza  (“bird flu” or H5N1) has been found in poultry and wild birds in Asia, Europe, and Africa. While rare, human infection and death from H5N1 have been reported. To learn more about H5N1 virus visit, see Human Infection with Avian Influenza A (H5N1) Virus: Advice for Travelers.

Before Your Trip

It is important to prepare for your health before you leave. Learn how by visiting Your Survival Guide to Safe and Healthy Travel.
At least 4—6 weeks before your trip, make an appointment to see a doctor familiar with travel medicine. You can contact the Travel Medicine Clinic nearest you.
At the appointment, make sure to get all the vaccinations and medicines you need for your trip and discuss any allergies, current medications, or other health concerns with the doctor.

Be sure that you are up-to-date with all of your routine vaccinations, including the seasonal flu and H1N1 flu vaccines.
Pack health items that you may need on your trip.  See Travelers’ Health Kit or Pack Smart on the Travelers’ Health website for a complete list of health items CDC recommends.

Make a plan for what to do if you get sick during your trip, including where to go for medical care if you need it. Learn more by visiting Illness and Injury Abroad and Medical Information for Americans Abroad from the U.S. Department of State.
 
Stay Healthy During Your Trip

Wash your hands often with soap and clean water. Use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol if soap and clean water are not available and your hands do not look dirty.

Avoid close contact with people who are sick.

Remember to cover your cough:
Cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze.

Put your used tissue in a wastebasket.

Clean your hands after coughing or sneezing by washing them with soap and water (or by using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer containing at least 60% alcohol).

Go to the doctor if you have a fever with a cough or sore throat, are having difficulty breathing, or feel very sick. Tell the doctor if you may have been around a sick person or an animal that looked sick.

Avoid traveling when you are sick, unless it is to get local medical care.

Do not go to bird farms or live bird markets.

Avoid touching—
Live birds, including chickens, ducks, and wild birds, even if they do not seem sick.
Dead or sick chickens, ducks, or any other birds.

Surfaces that have bird droppings, blood, or other body fluids on them.

Make sure the meat and other foods from birds that you eat, like eggs and poultry blood, are fully cooked. Egg yolks should not be runny or liquid. Visit the Safe Food and Water page on the Travelers’ Health website for more information.

Keep raw meats away from other foods.

After touching raw poultry or eggs, wash your hands and all surfaces, dishes, and utensils thoroughly with soap and water.

Use insect repellent to prevent bites from insects and mosquitoes that can transmit malaria, dengue, and other infections. If you are visiting an area with malaria, take your malaria prevention medicine.

Use sunscreen (at least SPF 15).  Be sure to apply sunscreen before applying insect repellent.

Road traffic injuries are the leading cause of injury-related deaths worldwide, so it is important to take precautions. Don’t drink and drive. Always wear a seatbelt when traveling in a moving vehicle and a helmet when you ride bicycles and motorcycles.
 
Follow local laws and customs.

Be careful and stay alert in crowds.
 
After Your Trip

Pay very close attention to how you feel for at least 10 days after you get home.

 Go to the doctor right away if you—
have a fever with a cough or sore throat, or have trouble breathing.
have a fever, chills, headache, muscle aches, tiredness, or flu-like illness and visited an area with a risk for malaria.

When you go to the doctor, tell your doctor about your recent travel.
Avoid traveling if you are sick, unless it is to go to the doctor.

Malaria can develop up to 1 year after travel, so stay alert for fever or other signs of illness.  Make sure you continue to take your malaria pills until your prescription is finished.
 
Additional Information
To learn more about 2009 H1N1 flu, visit these websites:

www.flu.gov
CDC 2009 Flu and Travel
World Health Organization (WHO) Pandemic (H1N1) 2009
Avian Flu Travel Information
CDC Avian Influenza (Bird Flu)
World Health Organization (WHO) Avian Influenza
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« Reply #501 on: January 15, 2010, 01:56:15 PM »

http://www.amigoe.com/artman/publish/artikel_67514.php

Google translation:

ARUBA

Second round of vaccination

January 15, 2010, 12:30 (GMT -04:00)



This woman, Nora Pardo Artcaga, can be vaccinated for the first time.

ORANGE CITY - Today is the second day of the second round of vaccination against H1N1, better known as the Mexican flu. The Minister of Health and Sport Richard Visser (AVP) last week made an urgent appeal to the people to come. For very Aruba is during this second round a shot heading into the Centro diagnostico di Influenza in Orange City.

our reporter
Mirte de Rozario

The first day, just after noon. Around the building in Orange City Health Department with signs and arrows indicate where the vaccination post is located. The Avicennastraat the building itself is decorated with blue, orange and yellow smiley balloons. Upon entering the looks quiet. Softly music sounds from a room somewhere. Employees in recognizable vaccination T-shirts walking around.

Ronald Geerman, Department of Health, says that the puncture post good morning visited. "It's a constant in-run of people who come for the puncture. Some come for the first time, other people really come for the second round. "Puncture in the post is a room set up for registration and two rooms are designed to puncture post.

Register
When you register or make people express themselves for the first time be vaccinated or whether they are the second round. A woman who has just registered, sounds resolute. "I am here the first time once. My sister is being treated with chemotherapy. My whole family is in the medical world and me. I apothekersassistente. I am quite aware of the Mexican flu. Of course let me vaccinated. "After successfully completing the vaccination salute them all employees of insertion and post leave. She gets in between a piece of fruit offered, but turn them off.
Another woman reported what is uncertain at registration. She does not know how the piercing is done. The employee gets a vaccination form and fill it with her. The woman must certify that they are in good health and no allergies. Then she goes to one of the rooms where they receive the vaccination in her arm. She listens to the explanation of the employee on what to do when they are in the next few hours unwell. As quiet as they came, so she quietly goes out again.
A father and two sons now take place taken by the registration tables. The father was excited, but some pressure. "My wife is waiting outside in the car with our baby," he says. He asks his boys down to be registered and then rushes out to fetch his youngest child. The whole family is heading to the puncture came. The man recognizes the importance of the puncture against the Mexican flu. "We had wanted in the first round," says the father, "but then I had to work. Today I am free and that we use. "

Four Days
The second round of vaccination lasts four days. Yesterday and today, January 19 and 18 and more. Anyone who is at risk, are urged to get vaccination against H1N1 to come. Household of children under four years old, women more than thirteen weeks pregnant, household of women more than 26 weeks pregnant, people aged sixty years and people with a chronic illness such as heart disease, diabetes, HIV / AIDS or asthma. Their supervisors are advised to be vaccinated themselves. "Babies and small children also receive the puncture, but that happens in the offices of the White Yellow Cross," said Geerman. "Every day there is another item of the White Yellow Cross open."

The vaccine in the Centro diagnostico di Influenza held eight hours of the morning until five hours in the afternoon. During a press conference last week took place at this second round of vaccination to announce, we said that buses would be made available for people who come from far away and no transport. Buses were not there yesterday afternoon. Whether that is a sign that everyone can provide their own transportation or the turnout, as in the first round of vaccination, not size, that will appear after Tuesday.


Success in Netherlands
In the Netherlands the last round against the Mexican flu prick behind. The GGD is much higher than expected turnout. The highest peak flu in the Netherlands over and so was the health authorities fear that fewer people would come for the second vaccination. That is not the case. Minister of Health and Sport Richard Visser (AVP) has been in the Netherlands, when vaccination round to look at it and learn lessons for Aruba. He found that the first vaccination round in Aruba plainly has gone wrong and put the hand in his own bosom. "We can vaccinate to Aruba much nicer and attractive, so the turnout is higher." He said he hoped the second round will go better.
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I stand with the girl, Natalee Holloway.

"I can look back over the past 10 years and there were no steps wasted, and there are no regrets,'' she said. "I did all I knew to do and I think that gives me greater peace now." "I've lived every parent's worst nightmare and I'm the parent that nobody wants to be," she said.

Beth Holloway, 2015 interview with Greta van Susteren
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« Reply #502 on: January 21, 2010, 03:53:57 PM »

Council Of Europe Will Investigate “Faked” Swine Flu Pandemic

Much like all the evidence proves man-made global warming is a fraud, all the evidence clearly points to an orchestrated effort to instill panic on the swine flu. The CDC even inadvertently admitted that they were fudging numbers, and fear-mongering on swine flu.

Now, finally, an major international organization is going to investigate this fraud upon the world’s citizens. The Council of Europe will investigate the “faked pandemic” to get to the bottom of this farce. To learn more about the Council of Europe … go here. They are basically a local European United Nations, and they are legit.


http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-bloggers/2434205/posts

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« Reply #503 on: January 21, 2010, 04:13:14 PM »


Regarding the article above....the original and complete article is found at this link.  I would ask that you also look at the "about me" section so that you may see who is
putting this out to the public.


http://needsofthemany.wordpress.com/
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« Reply #504 on: January 22, 2010, 11:13:20 AM »

Teenage H1N1 Flu Survivor Sends Message to Young People
January 21, 2010

I'm Luke Duvall, H1N1 survivor, and here's my story.

On October 4th I began showing some of the symptoms of H1N1.  I didn't know then that I would soon be fighting for my life. 

On October 6th I was rushed to the ER due to shortness of breath.  I couldn't catch my breath enough to even speak clearly. 

I was air lifted to Arkansas Children's hospital the next day and spent the next 17 days of my life on a ventilator battling to stay alive and another 17 relearning how to walk, eat, and drink again. 

I finally won my battle and returned home on November 10th. I lost 36 pounds in my month long fight and half my sophomore football season.  I was unable to attend school again until January 5th. 

If I would have had the opportunity to get the vaccine I would have taken it and gained all those things that I lost.
 
Getting vaccinated can take only seconds and save you from all of these heartaches and troubles. 

My life, and the life of my family, has been changed forever. The vaccine would have prevented all of it.  If you don't want to do it for yourself do it for others because this doesn't just affect you, it affects whole towns and communities.  Do it for them, do it for yourself, but by all means, just do it.

Luke Duvall is a 15-year-old high school athlete from Little Rock, Arkansas.  Luke is also a spokesperson for Every Child by Two (ECBT) which seeks to raise awareness about the dangers of influenza and the importance for all parents to have their children vaccinated beginning at six months of age.

http://www.flu.gov/news/blogs/message_to_young_people.html
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« Reply #505 on: January 22, 2010, 11:23:32 AM »


Contact: Angela Harless (202) 720-4623
USDA STUDY CONFIRMS PORK FROM PIGS EXPOSED TO H1N1 VIRUS IS SAFE TO EAT

WASHINGTON, Dec. 17, 2009–A study conducted by U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists provides additional confirmation that meat and tissue from pigs exposed to two strains of the 2009 novel pandemic H1N1 virus did not contain virus.

The results were published today in the Public Library of Science’s online journal, PLoS ONE. The study was conducted by scientists with USDA’s Agricultural Research Service (ARS) at the agency’s National Animal Disease Center, part of the USDA National Centers for Animal Health in Ames, Iowa.

ARS is the chief intramural scientific research agency of USDA.

“This research provides additional reassurance for consumers about the safety of pork,” said Edward B. Knipling, ARS administrator. “The information contained in the study will also benefit customers of U.S. pork products, both here and abroad.”

ARS scientists received samples of the 2009 novel pandemic H1N1 (H1N1) virus in May from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The virus samples came from humans in California and Mexico who had become infected with this H1N1 virus.

Researchers inoculated a group of 30 five-week-old pigs with the virus to determine the pigs’ susceptibility to H1N1. Five pigs that were not inoculated with the virus served as a comparison or “control” group.

The pigs were observed daily for clinical signs of illness and then were euthanized at three, five or seven days after inoculation.

Researchers tested tissue samples of the pigs’ lungs, liver, muscle, spleen and other vital organs using the most sensitive tools available to detect the presence of live virus and nucleic acids from the virus.

The inoculated animals showed signs of upper respiratory disease consistent with influenza, however there was no evidence that the virus had spread to any other parts of the body.

These findings about the safety of pork from pigs previously infected with the 2009 novel pandemic H1N1 virus support recommendations of the World Health Organization that pork harvested from swine that had been infected previously and had recovered from the virus can be safely handled or eaten, following basic hygiene practices for handling of meat.

This research supports the USDA priority of ensuring food safety. Additional information about USDA’s H1N1 efforts is available at www.usda.gov/H1N1flu.


http://www.usda.gov/documents/ARS_STUDY_H1N1_Pork_12-16-09.pdf
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« Reply #506 on: January 22, 2010, 06:19:23 PM »

http://www.amigoe.com/artman/publish/artikel_67801.php

Google translation:

Aruba

Second round of vaccination against H1N1 is

January 22, 2010, 07:21 (GMT -04:00)

Email this article
Print this article

ORANGE CITY - The second round of vaccination against the flu is not a Mexican success. Health Department confirms that between 15 and January 19, 2771 people from risk groups have received a puncture. "Three quarters of them came for their second vaccination. One third of people did get their first vaccine, "said Maribel Tromp, head of the Epidemiology Department of Health.

For this latter group is about three weeks half round vaccination. Precise dates for this are not yet known. At the White Yellow Cross in 1352 were children between zero and four years of their vaccination.

Health Department is not really satisfied with the results of this vaccination, says Tromp. "We are dealing with a population of 20,000 people at risk. If only one fifth of these will respond to the summons to be vaccinated, that's not good. "Tromp completely understand why this number, as in the first round of vaccination, is so low. "Maybe people have not read the information. However, I feel that the information about the vaccination campaign is sufficiently dispersed. "

Local media have during the vaccination days articles devoted to the holistic doctor living in the Netherlands Roy Martina. He claimed that the vaccine Pandemrix malicious components, and that the major drug manufacturers for the declaration of a pandemic have lobbied. "I must admit that this time I own the media are not very well have kept an eye, but I have heard that this time a campaign was launched against" said Tromp. After the first round of vaccination, said the Minister of Health and Sport Richard Visser (AVP) that he suspected some groups deliberately spreading false information, with the aim to scare the population and the vaccination campaign to fail.

The first three days were, as in the first round of vaccination in December, very quiet. "We have deployed buses, but they were empty or with two or three people to prick the central post," said Tromp. On the last day was the storm, however, as was the case during the first round. Tromp do not know where it comes from.

Expiry date
There are now about 15,000 vaccines, 75 percent of the total that is given to Aruba. The expiry date is March 2011. Now the second vaccination round is over, GPs have their opportunity to chronically ill patients within three weeks for vaccines to vaccinate one months and so are healthy people aged over sixty. The family doctors earlier this week agreed that their vaccines if needed centrally ordered from Department of Health.
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I stand with the girl, Natalee Holloway.

"I can look back over the past 10 years and there were no steps wasted, and there are no regrets,'' she said. "I did all I knew to do and I think that gives me greater peace now." "I've lived every parent's worst nightmare and I'm the parent that nobody wants to be," she said.

Beth Holloway, 2015 interview with Greta van Susteren
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« Reply #507 on: January 22, 2010, 07:37:41 PM »

Seasonal Influenza (Flu)
2009-2010 Influenza Season Week 2 ending January 16, 2010
All data are preliminary and may change as more reports are received.

Synopsis:
During week 2 (January 10-16, 2010), influenza activity decreased slightly in the U.S.

120 (3.7%) specimens tested by U.S. World Health Organization (WHO) and National Respiratory and Enteric Virus Surveillance System (NREVSS) collaborating laboratories and reported to CDC/Influenza Division were positive for influenza.
Ninety-eight percent of subtyped influenza A viruses reported to CDC were 2009 influenza A (H1N1) viruses.
The proportion of deaths attributed to pneumonia and influenza (P&I) was above the epidemic threshold.
Nine influenza-associated pediatric deaths were reported. Three deaths were associated with 2009 influenza A (H1N1) virus infection, four were associated with an influenza A virus for which the subtype was undetermined, one was associated with an influenza A (H3) virus infection, and one was associated with an influenza B virus infection. The influenza A(H3) and B deaths occurred during the 2008-09 influenza season.
The proportion of outpatient visits for influenza-like illness (ILI) was 1.8% which is below the national baseline of 2.3%. One of the 10 regions (region 9) reported ILI above their region-specific baseline.
No states reported widespread influenza activity, seven states reported regional influenza activity, Puerto Rico, and 10 states reported local influenza activity, the District of Columbia, Guam, and 32 states reported sporadic influenza activity, and the U.S. Virgin Islands and one state reported no influenza activity.

Continue here....
http://www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/
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« Reply #508 on: January 22, 2010, 07:40:38 PM »


Update: Influenza Activity --- United States, August 30, 2009--January 9, 2010
Weekly
January 22, 2010 / 59(02);38-43


The emergence and spread of the 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus (2009 H1N1) resulted in extraordinary influenza activity in the United States throughout the summer and fall months of 2009 (1,2). During this period, influenza activity reached its highest level in the week ending October 24, 2009, with 49 of 50 states reporting geographically widespread disease. As of January 9, 2010, overall influenza activity had declined substantially. Since April 2009, the dominant circulating influenza virus in the United States has been 2009 H1N1. This report summarizes U.S. influenza activity* from August 30, 2009, through January 9, 2010.

Continue here.....
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5902a3.htm?s_cid=mm5902a3_e
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« Reply #509 on: January 22, 2010, 07:42:43 PM »


Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 - update 84

Weekly update
22 January 2010 -- As of 17 January 2010, worldwide more than 209 countries and overseas territories or communities have reported laboratory confirmed cases of pandemic influenza H1N1 2009, including at least 14142 deaths.

WHO is actively monitoring the progress of the pandemic through frequent consultations with the WHO Regional Offices and member states and through monitoring of multiple sources of information.

Situation update:
The overall situation in largely unchanged since last week. The most intense transmission of pandemic influenza virus continues to occur in North Africa, South Asia, and in limited areas of Eastern Europe. Overall pandemic influenza activity in the temperate northern hemisphere peaked between late October and late November 2009 and has continued to decline since.

In North Africa, limited data suggest that transmission of pandemic influenza virus remains geographically widespread and active throughout the region, but has likely recently peaked in most places. During early January 2010 only the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya reported an increasing trend in respiratory diseases activity. Egypt is now reporting a declining trend after increases in respiratory diseases activity throughout December 2009, suggesting a recent peak in activity during early January 2010. In West Asia, limited data suggests pandemic influenza virus transmission remains geographically widespread however overall activity has been declining in most places during December and January.

In South Asia, active transmission of pandemic influenza virus persists in the northern and western parts of the subcontinent, however overall activity has recently peaked. In India, influenza activity has been largely confined to the northern and western states; activity in the northern states peaked during mid December 2009 and in the western states during early January 2010. In Nepal, active transmission of virus persists, and the trend in respiratory diseases activity remains unchanged since the previous week after reporting continuous increases in activity since late October 2009.

In Europe, pandemic influenza virus transmission remains geographically widespread across parts of western, central, and southeastern Europe, however overall influenza activity continued to decline or remain low in most countries The areas of most intense transmission currently include Poland, Austria, Estonia, Romania, Hungary, and Moldova; however, in all but Romania, ILI activity has declined significantly since peaking in November. The overall rate of specimens testing positive for influenza fell to 20% in Europe after reaching a peak of 45% during early November 2009. Pandemic H1N1 2009 virus continues to be predominant circulating influenza virus in the European region with only sporadic detections of seasonal influenza viruses.

In East Asia, pandemic influenza activity remains widespread but continues to decline in most places. Mongolia reported a very high intensity of respiratory diseases during early January 2010; rates of ILI have been elevated above expected seasonal levels since late October 2009 but are well below a significant peak of activity observed during November 2009. In Japan, overall influenza activity continued to decline since peaking at the end of November 2009, however regional increases in activity were observed during late December on the southern island of Okinawa. In China, Hong Kong SAR, and Chinese Taipei pandemic influenza activity remains widespread but continues to decline or remain stable. Pandemic H1N1 continues to be the predominant circulating virus in the region but seasonal H3N2 viruses continue to circulate in very small numbers in northern China.

In the Americas, both in the tropical and northern temperate zones, overall pandemic influenza activity continued to decline or remain low in most places.

In temperate regions of the southern hemisphere, sporadic cases of pandemic influenza continued to be reported without evidence of sustained community transmission.

The Global Influenza Surveillance Network (GISN) continues monitoring the global circulation of influenza viruses, including pandemic, seasonal and other influenza viruses infecting, or with the potential to infect, humans including seasonal influenza. For more information on virological surveillance and antiviral resistance please see the weekly virology update (Virological surveillance data, below).

Continue here....
http://www.who.int/csr/don/2010_01_22/en/index.html
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« Reply #510 on: January 23, 2010, 03:10:17 AM »

Reading at www.flutrackers.com....

Bill Gates: A Better Response to the Next Pandemic

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

What’s been on my mind lately
A Better Response to the Next Pandemic
Posted 01/18/2010


The H1N1 flu wasn’t nearly as bad as predicted, but not because of the effectiveness of the steps taken to contain it. The inadequate global response shows that we are still unprepared for a major pandemic. New methods for manufacturing vaccines quickly and other investments are clearly required. The H1N1 flu strain got a lot of attention in 2009. Most of the headlines made it sound dangerous. Early in the epidemic we thought that a very high percentage of infected people were getting sick, and it was quite scary.

But the real story isn’t how bad H1N1 was. The real story is that we are lucky it wasn’t worse because we were almost completely unprepared for it.

When an epidemic breaks out, there are four steps to try to contain it.

The first is to gather data about the disease – where it is and how it is spreading.

Second is to limit the movement of people from place to place – with quarantine a last option. Once a disease is widespread this is very hard to do.

Third is to have drugs of some type that reduce how much someone infects others and that reduces the severity of the sickness.

Fourth is to make a vaccine that is effective against the disease and give it to anyone who is at risk.


We did a reasonable job of gathering data, partly due to the capacity that had been set up to track avian flu. But for all the other steps, we didn’t manage to do anything that would have stopped a serious epidemic. In other words, the modest death toll from this flu epidemic is entirely because we were lucky.

Hopefully this outbreak will serve as a wakeup call to get us to invest in better capabilities, because more epidemics will come in the decades ahead and there is no guarantee we will be lucky next time. The 1918 flu killed more than 50 million people.

Nothing other than bioterrorism could kill that many people again, and most of the things we need to do to reduce the impact of an epidemic will also reduce the impact of bioterrorism.

The ability to make a vaccine quickly and manufacture it in huge quantities is a critical part of a response to an epidemic.

You need to get production going in less than a month instead of more than five months, which is what it took in this case. You also need to be able to make vaccine at a rate ten times faster than what was achieved.

Most flu vaccines today are made by injecting parts of the virus into chicken eggs, which is a laborious process. Given the approved approaches, the vaccine industry did a great job getting the vaccine out as quickly as it did.

(Ironically, now that the disease is proving to be relatively mild, a lot of the vaccines they hurried to make will not be bought.) This is one place where innovation can make a big difference.

There are new manufacturing approaches that reduce the lead time and increase the production rate, but government rules don’t allow the vaccine companies to use them yet because of safety concerns.

Although governments are right to be conservative about vaccine safety, they have to find a way to help the vaccine industry incorporate these new approaches and expand its capacity in the next few years before the next epidemic comes along.

Source: The Gates Notes
http://www.thegatesnotes.com/Thinkin...le.aspx?ID=106
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« Reply #511 on: January 23, 2010, 09:29:40 PM »

A soup recipe to build your immunity.

Immune-Boosting Soup

Simmer these ingredients for 30 minutes: cabbage, carrots, fresh ginger, onion, oregano, shiitake mushrooms (if dried, they must be soaked first), the seaweed of your choice, and any type of squash in chicken or vegetable stock. Cabbage can increase your body’s ability to fight infection, ginger supports healthy digestion, and seaweed cleanses the body. Shiitake mushrooms contain coumarin, polysaccharides, and sterols, as well as vitamins and minerals that increase your immune function, and the remaining ingredients promote general health and well-being. Eat this soup every other day to build a strong and healthy immune system.

http://health.yahoo.com/experts/drmao/23125/soup-therapy-detoxify-lose-weight-and-boost-immunity/

ME:I don't have a favorite seaweed, I will substitute spinach:)
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« Reply #512 on: January 26, 2010, 04:47:45 PM »



read at Flutrackers.com..............


 H1N1: One family's terrifying ordeal
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Tuesday, Jan. 26, 2010

H1N1: One family's terrifying ordeal



By Mary Meehan -


Doctors applied the paddles to Maddy Kidwell's little body over and over and over and over.

Four times in 10 minutes.

Four times before her heart began to beat again.


Maddy Kidwell, now 3, went from healthy toddler to frighteningly sick child in just a few hours last fall. The illness was diagnosed as H1N1 flu, and it once caused her heart to stop. The Somerset girl recovered, but she spent 45 days in Lexington hospitals. Her mom, Edith, said H1N1 hadn't been on her radar.

The Kidwell family of Somerset, clockwise from top: Harold; Brooke, 15; Morgan, 8; Edith; Maddy, 3; and Jordan, 13. After recovering from a severe case of H1N1, Maddy required therapy to regain the ability to walk and talk. Her parents say she has made a full recovery.



HOW TO GET HELP
Contact your local health department for vaccination clinics near you. For information on H1N1 or clinics, go to http://healthalerts.ky.gov, or contact the Lexington health department at www.lexflucrew.com or (859) 288-7529.


Her parents, Harold and Edith Kidwell, knew something had gone badly wrong because the nurses wouldn't even let them near the room she was in.
It was just another unreal moment in a string of unreal moments that had led them from watching their almost 3-year-old daughter play happily on the floor to waiting while she fought for her life.

The H1N1 flu virus that hit Maddy so hard "wasn't even really on my radar," her mom said. She'd told her kids to keep their hands washed and had bought some hand sanitizer. But she didn't get them vaccinated. It didn't seem necessary, she said.

"You never realize how easy it could happen to you."

Maddy's case is extreme, but 229 children have died from H1N1 since August, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

State health officials reported that four of the 39 people in Kentucky who died of H1N1 have been children.

The number of cases overall has waned in recent weeks, but CDC officials expect another surge as the nation enters what is typically flu season.

Dr. Philip Bernard, who treated Maddy at Kentucky Children's Hospital, said H1N1 is "a completely preventable disease because there is vaccine available."

Parents, he said, should keep that in mind.

"The vast majority of children (who contract H1N1) are going to be very sick and miserable for a few days, then recover," said Bernard, an associate professor of pediatrics at the University of Kentucky School of Medicine.

But, he said, "there is a small majority of children who are going to be severely affected."

Children like Maddy.

The Kidwells' ordeal began after a family trip to Ohio on Oct. 18. Maddy had seemed fine on the trip and as they started for home. But mile after mile, as the family went home to Somerset, Maddy started to fade. Then, from the back seat, her 13-year-old brother, Jordan, screamed: "Maddy! Maddy!"

"She was in a full-blown seizure," Edith Kidwell said.

They called 911, and the paramedics examined her. She was a little anemic but should be OK, they said. They were told to call the family doctor. Maddy checked out fine with the family physician, although she had a bit of a fever. Shortly after the family got home from that doctor's visit, though, she had another seizure.

Bernard said children can sometimes have seizures as their temperatures change rapidly. It doesn't always mean something more serious is happening. This time, though, the Kidwells were told they should go to Kentucky Children's Hospital.

It was a long ride, Kidwell said.

At first, doctors thought Maddy might have meningitis, but they quickly determined she had the flu.

"I was just ballistic, just going crazy," said Edith, the more talkative of Maddy's parents. "I couldn't figure out why my baby was doing this with her being so healthy besides allergies.

"I was just numb."

Things kept getting worse. Maddy developed staph pneumonia. That's what affected her lungs and heart so severely that she had to be resuscitated. After that, she spent three weeks sedated and on a ventilator.

"We were really worried daily about whether she was going to make it," said Bernard, the physician. "It's very rare to have a child recover from having her heart stop."

"There were several little babies that passed away because of the flu" while Maddy was in the hospital, Kidwell said.

After about three weeks on the ventilator, Maddy improved. But those weeks had undone much of what she'd learned in her short life. She had trouble talking and eating and walking, and she had to have several weeks of physical therapy at Cardinal Hill Rehabilitation Hospital before she could go home.

Originally, the family was told she might be at Cardinal Hill as long as two months, but she was released after 10 days. From beginning to end, she was under care for 45 days.

She made it home in time for her birthday on Dec. 20, when she got an Elmo microwave, a Dora the Explorer backpack and a Big Wheel.

She is back on target, walking and talking as if nothing ever happened.

Her parents, however, are still recovering from the shock of the whole thing.

"You never dream about it and feel sorry for the other families and wish, 'God, I hope this never happens to me,' and then it happens," Edith Kidwell said.

Bernard said he hopes the Kidwells' story will remind people to take flu seriously, whether it's the seasonal variety or H1N1, and consider vaccination.

"The take-home message is, why would you want to subject your children from ever getting into this situation" when vaccine is available? he said.

http://www.allvoices.com/s/event-510...MTEzMzAuaHRtbA==
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« Reply #513 on: January 26, 2010, 05:12:05 PM »

 Today, 09:21 AM 
 sharon sanders 
Editor-in-Chief & President   Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Florida, Québec
Posts: 15,197 
 
 Re: The WHO uses the 'high infant mortality' to fend off criticism

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"Nine more pediatric deaths caused by Swine Flu have been reported to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and CDC director Thomas R. Frieden says the new virus has produced five time more fatalities among children than a regular flu season."


There are 2 issues here. One is whether some personnel have a conflict of interest in their work at the World Health Organization. This may, or may not, be true. The facts will be ascertained over time and we have no interest in this subject here.

The other issue is whether a real pandemic is taking place.

And the answer is yes.

We have been tracking influenza here since 2006, both seasonal and novel flu:


Seasonal Flu 2006 - 2007

Seasonal Flu 2007 - 2008

Seasonal Flu 2008 - 2009

Seasonal Flu 2009 - 2010

A/H1N1 Pandemic Flu News and Information

FluTrackers H5N1 Tracking Outbreaks

The Discovery of the 2009 A/H1N1 Pandemic - Mexico: April 17 New Respiratory Illnesses - Including Mexico City & Oaxaca


The global spread of novel A/H1N1 is indeed a pandemic. We have been lucky that this virus has not been more lethal. The future is uncertain.

The pursuit of WHO personnel that have championed the awareness and protection of the world's population against this threat is, in itself, a violation of the public trust.

Due to the rhetoric against the reality of this pandemic and the vaccine, many of the world's citizens have chosen not to partake of the full and/or partial protection that a vaccine offers:

Germany to sell H1N1 vaccine due to low demand

Greece cancels some flu vaccine orders

"..United States said it has halved the orders of H1N1 flu vaccine to the Australian company CSL........

France canceled 7 million doses of H1N1 vaccine order made to Novartis, which is equivalent to slightly less than half the amount requested, and another 9 million doses ordered from Sanofi-Aventis. The French government said it aimed to cancel 50 million of 94 million doses originally ordered to Sanofi, Novartis and Glaxo......

Britain says it is in talks with its main supplier of influenza vaccines against H1N1, GlaxoSmithKline, on a reduction in future supplies and could run a buyout clause in his contract this with Baxter International.


Spain - The country said last month it was negotiating with its largest suppliers, Novartis and Glaxo, to return excess reserves of vaccine against H1N1 pandemic influenza.


The Netherlands Government was first warned about the problem of excessive supply of pandemic vaccines, announcing plans in November to sell up to 19 million of 34 million doses ordered.


Belgium - Glaxo said it was negotiating with Belgium a reduction in the provision of immunizations H1N1.


Switzerland plans to donate or sell some 4.5 million surplus vaccines..."

http://www.flutrackers.com/forum/sho...d.php?t=138739


Shame on you. Pursuit of political advantage at the expense of millions of lives.

This is your legacy.



FluTrackers.com is not affiliated with WHO, Council of Europe, European Union, the U.S. government, any governments in the world, or any pharmaceutical entities.

http://www.flutrackers.com/forum/showthread.php?t=140014
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« Reply #514 on: January 27, 2010, 07:11:31 PM »

http://www.amigoe.com/artman/publish/artikel_67801.php

Google translation:

Aruba

Second round of vaccination against H1N1 is

January 22, 2010, 07:21 (GMT -04:00)

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ORANGE CITY - The second round of vaccination against the flu is not a Mexican success. Health Department confirms that between 15 and January 19, 2771 people from risk groups have received a puncture. "Three quarters of them came for their second vaccination. One third of people did get their first vaccine, "said Maribel Tromp, head of the Epidemiology Department of Health.

For this latter group is about three weeks half round vaccination. Precise dates for this are not yet known. At the White Yellow Cross in 1352 were children between zero and four years of their vaccination.

Health Department is not really satisfied with the results of this vaccination, says Tromp. "We are dealing with a population of 20,000 people at risk. If only one fifth of these will respond to the summons to be vaccinated, that's not good. "Tromp completely understand why this number, as in the first round of vaccination, is so low. "Maybe people have not read the information. However, I feel that the information about the vaccination campaign is sufficiently dispersed. "

Local media have during the vaccination days articles devoted to the holistic doctor living in the Netherlands Roy Martina. He claimed that the vaccine Pandemrix malicious components, and that the major drug manufacturers for the declaration of a pandemic have lobbied. "I must admit that this time I own the media are not very well have kept an eye, but I have heard that this time a campaign was launched against" said Tromp. After the first round of vaccination, said the Minister of Health and Sport Richard Visser (AVP) that he suspected some groups deliberately spreading false information, with the aim to scare the population and the vaccination campaign to fail.

The first three days were, as in the first round of vaccination in December, very quiet. "We have deployed buses, but they were empty or with two or three people to prick the central post," said Tromp. On the last day was the storm, however, as was the case during the first round. Tromp do not know where it comes from.

Expiry date
There are now about 15,000 vaccines, 75 percent of the total that is given to Aruba. The expiry date is March 2011. Now the second vaccination round is over, GPs have their opportunity to chronically ill patients within three weeks for vaccines to vaccinate one months and so are healthy people aged over sixty. The family doctors earlier this week agreed that their vaccines if needed centrally ordered from Department of Health.

English version of the same article:

http://www.amigoe.com/artman/publish/artikel_67845.php

Second round H1N1-vaccinations disappointing
22 Jan, 2010, 12:35 (GMT -04:00)

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ORANJESTAD — The second vaccination round against the Mexican flu was no success either. Directorate of Public Health confirms that between January 15th and 19th, 2771 people from high-risk groups had been vaccinated.

“Seventy-five percent had shown up for their second vaccination. One third of the people have come for their first vaccination” according to Maribel Tromp, head of the Epidemiology department of Directorate Public Health.

The second vaccination round for this latter group is due in three weeks. However, exact dates are not known yet. At the White Yellow Cross, 1352 children between 0 and 4 years of age received their vaccination.

Directorate of Public Health is actually not satisfied with the result of this vaccination, according to Tromp. “We are dealing with a population of 20.000 people in the high-risk group. It is not a good case when only one-fifth complies with the appeal for vaccination.” Tromp does not understand why this number is so low, just like the first vaccination round. “Perhaps people did not read the information. However, I have the feeling that the information on the vaccination campaign was adequately spread.”

During the vaccination days, local media had placed articles on the holistic doctor Roy Martina residing in the Netherlands. He had stated that the vaccine Pandemrix contained virulent substances and that the large medicine manufacturers had lobbied for the declaration of a pandemic. “I honestly admit that I had not kept a keen eye on the media this time, but I had heard that a counter-campaign had been started this time as well” according to Tromp. After the first vaccination round, the Minister of Public Health and Sport, Richard Visser (AVP) stated he suspected certain groups of willfully spreading incorrect information, with the purpose to frighten the population and to torpedo the vaccination campaign.

The first three days had been very peaceful, just like the first vaccination round last December. “We had deployed busses, but those had returned empty or transported two to three people to the central injection post” according to Tromp. However, there had been quite a rush on the last day, which had also been the case during the first round. Tromp does not have any explanation for this.

Storage life
There are now 15.000 vaccines left, which is 75 percent of the total given to Aruba. The ultimate storage life is March 2011. Now that the second vaccination round has finished, doctors have the opportunity to vaccinate their chronic ill patients within three weeks to one month and this also applies for healthy senior citizens. It was agreed with the family doctors at the beginning of this week that they could order their vaccinations centrally with the Directorate of Public Health whenever necessary.

 
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I stand with the girl, Natalee Holloway.

"I can look back over the past 10 years and there were no steps wasted, and there are no regrets,'' she said. "I did all I knew to do and I think that gives me greater peace now." "I've lived every parent's worst nightmare and I'm the parent that nobody wants to be," she said.

Beth Holloway, 2015 interview with Greta van Susteren
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« Reply #515 on: February 01, 2010, 10:42:57 AM »

Outbreaks of 2009 Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) Among Long-Term--Care Facility Residents --- Three States, 2009
Weekly
January 29, 2010 / 59(03);74-77


Hospitalization and death from seasonal influenza are more common among older adults and in long-term--care facilities (LTCFs) (1). Early data from the 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) outbreak indicated that attack rates among persons aged ≥65 years were lower than in other age groups, and anti-influenza A antibodies that cross-react with 2009 H1N1 could be detected in up to one third of healthy adults aged >60 years (2). Based on these early data and anticipation of limited initial supplies of 2009 H1N1 vaccine, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) identified priority groups for vaccination (3), which did not include persons aged ≥65 years who did not have higher risk for influenza or its complications (3). During October and November 2009, CDC received reports of 2009 H1N1 outbreaks in LTCFs in Colorado, Maine, and New York. This report summarizes the three outbreaks, which involved facilities primarily housing older patients. These outbreaks illustrate that, despite the lower risk for infection with 2009 H1N1 among persons aged ≥65 years compared with seasonal influenza, 2009 H1N1 outbreaks still can occur in LTCFs. These outbreaks also underscore the importance of respiratory illness surveillance and recommended infection-control procedures in LTCFs. All health-care personnel should be vaccinated against seasonal influenza and 2009 H1N1. LTCF residents should receive seasonal influenza vaccination, and should be vaccinated against 2009 H1N1 after assessment of vaccine availability at the local level indicates that demand for vaccine among younger age groups is being met (3).

Outbreak Reports

continue at link below.....state involved are Colorado, Maine and New York

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5903a3.htm?s_cid=mm5903a3_e%0d%0a
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« Reply #516 on: February 01, 2010, 10:45:45 AM »

2009-2010 Influenza Season Week 3 ending January 23, 2010
All data are preliminary and may change as more reports are received.

Synopsis:
During week 3 (January 17-23, 2010), influenza activity remained at approximately the same levels this week in the U.S.

164 (4.6%) specimens tested by U.S. World Health Organization (WHO) and National Respiratory and Enteric Virus Surveillance System (NREVSS) collaborating laboratories and reported to CDC/Influenza Division were positive for influenza.
All subtyped influenza A viruses reported to CDC were 2009 influenza A (H1N1) viruses.
The proportion of deaths attributed to pneumonia and influenza (P&I) was above the epidemic threshold.
Five influenza-associated pediatric deaths were reported. Four deaths were associated with 2009 influenza A (H1N1) virus infection and one was associated with an influenza A virus for which the subtype was undetermined.
The proportion of outpatient visits for influenza-like illness (ILI) was 1.7% which is below the national baseline of 2.3%. Two of the 10 regions (Regions 4 and 9) reported ILI equal to their region-specific baseline.
No states reported widespread influenza activity, five states reported regional influenza activity, Puerto Rico and nine states reported local influenza activity, the District of Columbia, Guam, and 33 states reported sporadic influenza activity, and the U.S. Virgin Islands and three states reported no influenza activity.

Article continues at link below...

http://www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/index.htm
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« Reply #517 on: February 01, 2010, 10:50:41 AM »

CDC - Seasonal Flu Report

2009-10 Influenza (Flu) Season
Questions & Answers about the 2009–2010 Flu Season

What has this flu season been like?

Flu seasons are unpredictable in a number of ways, including when they begin, how severe they are, how long they last and which viruses will spread. There were more uncertainties than usual going into this flu season (2009-2010), because of the emergence of the 2009 H1N1 influenza virus (previously called "novel H1N1" or "swine flu"). This virus caused the first influenza pandemic (global outbreak of disease) in more than 40 years.

Comprehensive article continues at link below....

http://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/season/current-season.htm
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« Reply #518 on: February 04, 2010, 12:13:36 AM »

http://www.amigoe.com/artman/publish/artikel_68324.php

Google translation:

ARUBA

Third round of vaccination

February 3, 2010, 12:25 (GMT -04:00)

ORANGE CITY - The state is third round of vaccination against the Mexican Flu organize. She has taken this decision because of the low turnout of the previous two rounds. This Health Department announced yesterday.

The third round of vaccination will take place in close collaboration with the GPs. More details will be announced shortly. A date is still unknown. So far, only 15 percent of the 20,000 people in the target will be vaccinated. In total, 2700 people received two injections and are therefore fully protected against the Mexican flu. People from the risk can be vaccinated by their GP. Health Department also asked the doctors to their patients to participate actively to the screen. Currently there are about 15,000 vaccines over that three-quarters of the amount of Aruba Netherlands has received. The expiry date of the vaccines in March 2011.
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I stand with the girl, Natalee Holloway.

"I can look back over the past 10 years and there were no steps wasted, and there are no regrets,'' she said. "I did all I knew to do and I think that gives me greater peace now." "I've lived every parent's worst nightmare and I'm the parent that nobody wants to be," she said.

Beth Holloway, 2015 interview with Greta van Susteren
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« Reply #519 on: February 08, 2010, 12:33:25 PM »

Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 - update 86
Weekly update
5 February 2010 -- As of 31 January 2010, worldwide more than 209 countries and overseas territories or communities have reported laboratory confirmed cases of pandemic influenza H1N1 2009, including at least 15174 deaths.

WHO is actively monitoring the progress of the pandemic through frequent consultations with the WHO Regional Offices and member states and through monitoring of multiple sources of information.

Situation update:
In the temperate zone of the northern hemisphere, overall pandemic influenza activity continues to decline or remain low in most regions since peaking during late October and November 2009. Several areas continue to have evidence of active but declining transmission, particularly in North Africa and in limited areas of Eastern Europe and East Asia.

In North Africa, pandemic influenza transmission remains active and geographically widespread but overall activity has been declining since peaking during late December 2009 and early January 2010. During January 2010, a substantial decline in the number of pandemic virus isolations and new cases was observed in Morocco and Egypt, respectively. In West Asia, pandemic influenza transmission remains geographically widespread to regional, but overall activity remained low.

In South and Southeast Asia, pandemic influenza transmission remains active but geographically localized to regional. The overall intensity of respiratory diseases activity was reported to be low to moderate in most places. In India, influenza activity continued to decline in all regions of the country, however, the most active areas of transmission currently are in the western states. An overall peak in the number of pandemic H1N1 cases was recorded in India during mid December 2009, and the majority of these cases were identified in the northern and western states of India. In Thailand, overall ILI activity remained low, however focal increase in activity were observed in several central and northern provinces.

In East Asia, pandemic influenza transmission remains active and geographically widespread across the region, however, overall activity continued to decline. In Japan, overall influenza activity continues to decline but transmission remains higher on the southern island of Okinawa than in other places. In the Republic of Korea (South Korea), rates of ILI continued to decline to near baseline after a substantial wave of activity which peaked during early to mid November 2009. In Mongolia, after a period of sustained elevated ILI activity since early November 2009, levels of ILI have recently fallen to the expected seasonal range. In northern and southern China, rates of ILI have returned to levels seen during recent seasons; however, approximately 30% of respiratory specimens tested were positive for influenza suggesting that active transmission of influenza viruses persists. Of note in China, in recent weeks the circulation of pandemic influenza H1N1 continued to decline with a concomitant increase in the circulation of seasonal influenza type B viruses (pandemic H1N1 and seasonal Type B viruses accounted for 34% and 66% of all influenza viruses detected, respectively). Active transmission of pandemic influenza virus also persists in Hong Kong SAR (China), although at significantly lower levels than an earlier peak of activity during September and October 2009.

In Europe, transmission of pandemic influenza virus remains active in a limited number of countries as overall activity remained low in most places. At least seven countries testing more than 20 sentinel respiratory samples reported that >20% of samples had tested positive for influenza (Albania, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Georgia, Greece, Luxembourg, and Romania); however, in all seven, rates of illness remained well below earlier peaks of activity. Small increases in ILI/ARI have been reported over the past two reporting weeks in Slovakia, Belarus, and the Russian Federation. The overall rate of sentinel respiratory samples testing positive for influenza fell to 14% after reaching a peak of 45% during early November 2009.

In the Americas, both in the tropical and northern temperate zones, overall pandemic influenza activity continued to decline or remain low in most places. In Central America and Caribbean, pandemic influenza virus transmission persists but overall activity remains low or unchanged in most places.

In temperate regions of the southern hemisphere, sporadic cases of pandemic influenza continued to be reported without evidence of sustained community transmission.

Pandemic influenza (H1N1) 2009 virus continues to be the predominant influenza virus circulating worldwide. In addition to the increasing proportion of seasonal influenza type B viruses recently detected in China, low levels of seasonal H3N2 and type B viruses are circulating in parts of Africa, East and Southeast Asia and are being detected only sporadically on other continents.

The Global Influenza Surveillance Network (GISN) continues monitoring the global circulation of influenza viruses, including pandemic, seasonal and other influenza viruses infecting, or with the potential to infect, humans including seasonal influenza. For more information on virological surveillance and antiviral resistance please see the weekly virology update (Virological surveillance data, below).

Weekly update (Virological surveillance data)
*Countries in temperate regions are defined as those north of the Tropic of Cancer or south of the Tropic of Capricorn, while countries in tropical regions are defined as those between these two latitudes.

**Abbreviations: influenza-like-illness (ILI), acute respiratory infection (ARI), and severe acute respiratory infection (SARI)

WHO Clinical Management Guidelines for Human infection with Pandemic (H1N1), 2009:
WHO Guidelines for Pharmacological Management of Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Influenza and other Influenza Viruses:
Qualitative indicators (Week 29 to Week 3: 13 July 2009 - 24 January 2010)
The qualitative indicators monitor: the global geographic spread of influenza, trends in acute respiratory diseases, the intensity of respiratory disease activity, and the impact of the pandemic on health-care services.

Human infection with pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus: updated interim WHO guidance on global surveillance


The maps below display information on the qualitative indicators reported. Information is available for approximately 60 countries each week. Implementation of this monitoring system is ongoing and completeness of reporting is expected to increase over time.

List of definitions of qualitative indicators
Geographic spread of influenza activity
Map timeline
Trend of respiratory diseases activity compared to the previous week
Map timeline
Intensity of acute respiratory diseases in the population
Map timeline
Impact on health care services
Map timeline
Laboratory-confirmed cases of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 as officially reported to WHO by States Parties to the IHR (2005) as of 31 January 2010
Map of affected countries and deaths
The countries and overseas territories/communities that have newly reported their first pandemic (H1N1) 2009 confirmed cases since the last web update (No. 85): Mauritania and Chad.

The countries and overseas territories/communities that have newly reported their first deaths among pandemic (H1N1) 2009 confirmed cases since the last web update (No. 85): none.

Region
 Deaths*
 
 
   
 
WHO Regional Office for Africa (AFRO)
 167
 
WHO Regional Office for the Americas (AMRO)
 At least 7261
 
WHO Regional Office for the Eastern Mediterranean (EMRO)
 1014
 
WHO Regional Office for Europe (EURO)
 At least 3605
 
WHO Regional Office for South-East Asia (SEARO)
 1474
 
WHO Regional Office for the Western Pacific (WPRO)
 1653
 
 
   
 
Total*
 At least 15174
 


* The reported number of fatal cases is an under representation of the actual numbers as many deaths are never tested or recognized as influenza related.

 
 




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