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Author Topic: H1N1 - Swine Flu - Novel Flu - Information  (Read 100991 times)
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Mere
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« Reply #520 on: February 08, 2010, 12:38:02 PM »


2009-2010 Influenza Season Week 4 ending January 30, 2010
All data are preliminary and may change as more reports are received.

Synopsis:
During week 4 (January 24-30, 2010), influenza activity remained at approximately the same levels as last week in the U.S.

119 (3.2%) specimens tested by U.S. World Health Organization (WHO) and National Respiratory and Enteric Virus Surveillance System (NREVSS) collaborating laboratories and reported to CDC/Influenza Division were positive for influenza.
 
All subtyped influenza A viruses reported to CDC were 2009 influenza A (H1N1) viruses.
The proportion of deaths attributed to pneumonia and influenza (P&I) was above the epidemic threshold.

Nine influenza-associated pediatric deaths were reported. Eight deaths were associated with 2009 influenza A (H1N1) virus infection and one was associated with an influenza A virus for which the subtype was undetermined.

The proportion of outpatient visits for influenza-like illness (ILI) was 1.9% which is below the national baseline of 2.3%. All regions reported ILI below their region-specific baseline.
 
No states reported widespread influenza activity, six states reported regional influenza activity, Puerto Rico and 10 states reported local influenza activity, the District of Columbia, Guam, and 31 states reported sporadic influenza activity, and the U.S. Virgin Islands and three states reported no influenza activity.

Entire article with charts....
http://www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/index.htm
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« Reply #521 on: February 22, 2010, 01:53:01 PM »


Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 - update 88
Weekly update
19 February 2010 -- As of 14 February 2010, worldwide more than 212 countries and overseas territories or communities have reported laboratory confirmed cases of pandemic influenza H1N1 2009, including at least 15921 deaths.

WHO is actively monitoring the progress of the pandemic through frequent consultations with the WHO Regional Offices and member states and through monitoring of multiple sources of information.


large article, continue at link:

http://www.who.int/csr/don/2010_02_19/en/index.html
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« Reply #522 on: February 22, 2010, 01:56:46 PM »


Recommended viruses for influenza vaccines for use in the 2010-2011 northern hemisphere influenza season

It is recommended that the following viruses be used for influenza vaccines in the 2010-2011 influenza season (northern hemisphere):

— an A/California/7/2009 (H1N1)-like virus;
— an A/Perth/16/2009 (H3N2)-like virus;*
— a B/Brisbane/60/2008-like virus.

* A/Wisconsin/15/2009 is an A/Perth/16/2009 (H3N2)-like virus and is a 2010 southern hemisphere vaccine virus.

For more information
- Recommended viruses for influenza vaccines for use in the 2010-2011 northern hemisphere influenza season - full report [pdf 63kb]

- Frequently asked questions [pdf 34kb]


http://www.who.int/csr/disease/influenza/recommendations2010_11north/en/index.html
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« Reply #523 on: February 22, 2010, 01:59:07 PM »


2009-2010 Influenza Season Week 6 ending February 13, 2010
All data are preliminary and may change as more reports are received.

Synopsis:
During week 6 (February 7-13, 2010), influenza activity remained at approximately the same levels as last week in the U.S.

129 (3.5%) specimens tested by U.S. World Health Organization (WHO) and National Respiratory and Enteric Virus Surveillance System (NREVSS) collaborating laboratories and reported to CDC/Influenza Division were positive for influenza.
All subtyped influenza A viruses reported to CDC were 2009 influenza A (H1N1) viruses.
The proportion of deaths attributed to pneumonia and influenza (P&I) was below the epidemic threshold.
Two influenza-associated pediatric deaths were reported. Both deaths were associated with 2009 influenza A (H1N1) virus infection.
The proportion of outpatient visits for influenza-like illness (ILI) was 2.1% which is below the national baseline of 2.3%. Three of 10 regions (Regions 4, 7, and 9) reported ILI above region-specific baseline levels.
No states reported widespread influenza activity, three states reported regional influenza activity, Puerto Rico and nine states reported local influenza activity, the District of Columbia and 35 states reported sporadic influenza activity, the U.S. Virgin Islands and three states reported no influenza activity, and Guam did not report.


Long article with charts and links...continue here:
http://www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/
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« Reply #524 on: February 23, 2010, 09:51:40 AM »


Protection Against 2009 H1N1 To Be Included in 2010-2011 Seasonal Flu Vaccine
February 22, 2010

A key U.S. Food and Drug Administration Advisory Committee recommended today that protection against the 2009 H1N1 virus, which was first identified last April, be included in the 2010-2011 seasonal influenza vaccine starting this fall.  That means that, barring some unforeseen circumstance, this fall, most Americans will be able to return to the traditional routine of having one flu vaccine to protect them against the major circulating flu viruses.  As is always the case with seasonal vaccine, younger children who have never had a seasonal vaccine will still need two doses.

Today’s recommendation to include protection against the 2009 H1N1 flu strain in next season’s flu vaccine was made by the FDA’s Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee.  The committee’s recommendations typically guide vaccine manufacturers in preparing each season’s flu vaccines.  The World Health Organization has made the same recommendation.

This recommendation will go into effect for next fall’s flu season.  In the meantime, you can still protect yourself against the H1N1 flu by getting your H1N1 vaccine now.  Supplies are still available and getting immunized now can protect you against H1N1 while it continues to circulate.  H1N1 has led to nearly 260,000 hospitalizations and approximately 12,000 deaths in the United States.  Use our handy vaccine locator to find a vaccination location near you.


http://flu.gov/news/blogs/blog20100222.html
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« Reply #525 on: February 25, 2010, 08:40:46 PM »

Thank you for continuing to keep us updated, Mere.   
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« Reply #526 on: February 26, 2010, 05:10:05 PM »

Thank you for continuing to keep us updated, Mere.   

Thanks Muffy...I wonder if you can add the word "Seasonal Flu" to the heading...so that it
would read - Re: H1N1 - Swine Flu - Novel Flu - Seasonal Flu Information

Many thanks if you can do it.  There is often seasonal flu information out there.   
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« Reply #527 on: February 26, 2010, 05:12:28 PM »


CDC Advisory Committee Recommends Flu Vaccination for All People Ages 6 Months and Older During 2010-2011 Flu Season
February 25, 2010

The Center's For Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) met in Atlanta, Georgia on Wednesday to report on the current state of the 2009-2010 H1N1 pandemic and to discuss steps to prevent and control the virus moving forward.

The CDC’s Influenza Division reported that the H1N1 flu was most widespread in the United States in late October and early November.  October 2009 saw the highest rate of flu illness of any flu season since surveillance began.  Children ages 5 – 17 were most likely to be hospitalized from the H1N1 flu virus. The majority of people who were hospitalized had an underlying condition, with asthma being the most common.

The CDC Influenza Division also reported that H1N1 viruses from over 100 countries have been characterized and virtually all of them are similar to the strain of H1N1 included in the 2009 H1N1 flu vaccine.  The H1N1 virus has not changed significantly since it was first recognized in spring 2009 and remains responsive to antiviral treatment.

The CDC’s Immunization Services Division reported that as of mid February, 126 million doses of vaccine had been ordered by states and that innovative school based vaccination programs were effective in reaching children who were in the target groups for vaccination.


http://www.flu.gov/news/blogs/blog20100225.html
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« Reply #528 on: February 26, 2010, 05:14:47 PM »

Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 - update 89
Weekly update
26 February 2010 -- As of 21 February 2010, worldwide more than 213 countries and overseas territories or communities have reported laboratory confirmed cases of pandemic influenza H1N1 2009, including at least 16226 deaths.

WHO is actively monitoring the progress of the pandemic through frequent consultations with the WHO Regional Offices and member states and through monitoring of multiple sources of information.

Situation update:
In the temperate zone of the northern hemisphere, pandemic influenza virus continues to be detected across many countries, however, overall influenza activity continues to wane in most places. The most active areas of transmission are currently in parts of south and southeast Asia and in limited areas of east and southeastern Europe.

continue at link.....

http://www.who.int/csr/don/2010_02_26/en/index.html
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« Reply #529 on: February 26, 2010, 05:17:27 PM »

Press Release
For Immediate Release: February 24, 2010
Contact: CDC Division of Media Relations
(404) 639-3286


CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) Recommends Universal Annual Influenza Vaccination


A panel of immunization experts voted today (February 24, 2010) to expand the recommendation for annual influenza vaccination to include all people aged 6 months and older. The expanded recommendation is to take effect in the 2010 – 2011 influenza season. The new recommendation seeks to remove barriers to influenza immunization and signals the importance of preventing influenza across the entire population

Continue article at link below:

http://www.cdc.gov/media/pressrel/2010/r100224.htm
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« Reply #530 on: February 26, 2010, 05:19:20 PM »

Protection Against 2009 H1N1 To Be Included in 2010-2011 Seasonal Flu Vaccine
February 22, 2010

A key U.S. Food and Drug Administration Advisory Committee recommended today that protection against the 2009 H1N1 virus, which was first identified last April, be included in the 2010-2011 seasonal influenza vaccine starting this fall.  That means that, barring some unforeseen circumstance, this fall, most Americans will be able to return to the traditional routine of having one flu vaccine to protect them against the major circulating flu viruses.  As is always the case with seasonal vaccine, younger children who have never had a seasonal vaccine will still need two doses.

Today’s recommendation to include protection against the 2009 H1N1 flu strain in next season’s flu vaccine was made by the FDA’s Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee.  The committee’s recommendations typically guide vaccine manufacturers in preparing each season’s flu vaccines.  The World Health Organization has made the same recommendation.

This recommendation will go into effect for next fall’s flu season.  In the meantime, you can still protect yourself against the H1N1 flu by getting your H1N1 vaccine now.  Supplies are still available and getting immunized now can protect you against H1N1 while it continues to circulate.  H1N1 has led to nearly 260,000 hospitalizations and approximately 12,000 deaths in the United States.  Use our handy vaccine locator to find a vaccination location near you.



http://www.flu.gov/news/blogs/blog20100222.html
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« Reply #531 on: February 26, 2010, 05:21:34 PM »


CDC Advisory Committee Recommends Flu Vaccination for All People Ages 6 Months and Older During 2010-2011 Flu Season
February 25, 2010

The Center's For Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) met in Atlanta, Georgia on Wednesday to report on the current state of the 2009-2010 H1N1 pandemic and to discuss steps to prevent and control the virus moving forward.

The CDC’s Influenza Division reported that the H1N1 flu was most widespread in the United States in late October and early November.  October 2009 saw the highest rate of flu illness of any flu season since surveillance began.  Children ages 5 – 17 were most likely to be hospitalized from the H1N1 flu virus. The majority of people who were hospitalized had an underlying condition, with asthma being the most common.

The CDC Influenza Division also reported that H1N1 viruses from over 100 countries have been characterized and virtually all of them are similar to the strain of H1N1 included in the 2009 H1N1 flu vaccine.  The H1N1 virus has not changed significantly since it was first recognized in spring 2009 and remains responsive to antiviral treatment.

The CDC’s Immunization Services Division reported that as of mid February, 126 million doses of vaccine had been ordered by states and that innovative school based vaccination programs were effective in reaching children who were in the target groups for vaccination.       

The ACIP also voted to expand the recommendation for annual influenza vaccination to include all people aged 6 months and older. The recommendation will take effect in the 2010 – 2011 influenza season.  The previous recommendation focused on vaccinating those who are at increased risk for complications from the flu.


http://www.flu.gov/news/blogs/blog20100225.html
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« Reply #532 on: February 26, 2010, 05:26:32 PM »

I am including Seasonal Flu information in this thread.

You may see some duplicate information as I receive emails from CDC, WHO
and Flu.gov.

Thanks for reading when you have a chance.
   
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ARUBA: It's all about Natalee...we won't give up!


« Reply #533 on: February 27, 2010, 01:18:36 PM »

Thanks for all your work here Mere 

This is the latest from Aruba:

http://www.amigoe.com/artman/publish/artikel_69266.php

Google translation:

ARUBA

'Donate H1N1 vaccines to other countries'

February 27, 2010, 12:40 (GMT -04:00)

ORANGE CITY-The ASF Group has filed a motion for the remaining vaccines against the H1N1 virus A to donate vaccines to countries that need it. Leader Rene Herde thinking of countries like Colombia and Venezuela.

The Minister of Health and Sport Richard Visser (AVP) but first wants to wait on advice from the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO). PAHO will Visser opinion whether it is for the remaining vaccines to other countries to donate. First clear whether the vaccines are no longer needed in this region.

More than one months ago, the second vaccination round place. This second round, just like the first vaccination round, not well. Vaccines are over 15,000, which is 75 percent of the total number of vaccines given to Aruba. The expiry date of these vaccines in March 2011. Health Department advises that during the second round of vaccination, which took place between 15 and January 19, 2771 people from the risk groups have received a puncture. "Three quarters of them came for their second vaccination. One third of people did get their first vaccine, "said Maribel Tromp, head of the Epidemiology Department of Health. GPs had after the last vaccination round opportunity for their chronically ill patients and healthy people over sixty in three weeks to one months be vaccinated.

Herde tells Amigoe sorry that he and the remaining vaccines must be discarded, while others can use them well. Herde does indicate that it is not easy. "The donation of the vaccines must be a verification system be implemented so that they are not sold to others in the respective countries."
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I stand with the girl, Natalee Holloway.

"I can look back over the past 10 years and there were no steps wasted, and there are no regrets,'' she said. "I did all I knew to do and I think that gives me greater peace now." "I've lived every parent's worst nightmare and I'm the parent that nobody wants to be," she said.

Beth Holloway, 2015 interview with Greta van Susteren
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ARUBA: It's all about Natalee...we won't give up!


« Reply #534 on: March 06, 2010, 12:28:09 PM »

http://www.rnw.nl/english/video/ah1n1-pandemic-not-yet-over

(Video at link also)

A(H1N1) pandemic not yet over

Published on : 5 March 2010 - 2:27pm | By Willemien Groot
More about: A(H1N1) Ab Osterhaus flu vaccinations global Mexican flu Mexican flu pandemic vaccination campaigns

Winter, the season when flu epidemics occur, is nearly over on the Northern Hemisphere. The number of people who died from the A(H1N1) pandemic is no more than the number who usually die from the common flu during the winter. However, virologist Ab Osterhaus from the Erasmus Medical centre says the virus was in some way different than the usual flues. And the epidemic is not yet over.

It has been nearly a year since the A(H1N1) virus made headlines across the globe, despite the relatively small number of victims: approximately 17,000. Mr Osterhaus says the most important difference is that the A(H1N1) virus usually affects younger people, whilst in most cases older people are the ones who die from a flu infection. He says the virus kills more people who would otherwise have a long life ahead of them. For instance, a 70-year-old might have another ten years to live, while one who is 35 might have 45 years remaining.

Vaccine reserves necessary
The virologist believes that the relatively low number of victims is a result of the worldwide distribution of vaccines and the massive inoculation campaigns. He thinks however that it may prove difficult to organise a similar effort in future. If there is a new outbreak we will have to convince people that the vaccine reserves are really necessary. During the current pandemic we learned how important it is to have good communications.

The virus is still active on the Southern Hemisphere. South Africa and Australia are working on a vaccination campaign for the winter season. There is also the possibility that people travelling to the Southern Hemisphere will take the virus with them when they return.
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I stand with the girl, Natalee Holloway.

"I can look back over the past 10 years and there were no steps wasted, and there are no regrets,'' she said. "I did all I knew to do and I think that gives me greater peace now." "I've lived every parent's worst nightmare and I'm the parent that nobody wants to be," she said.

Beth Holloway, 2015 interview with Greta van Susteren
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« Reply #535 on: March 11, 2010, 02:13:48 AM »

2009-2010 Influenza Season Week 8 ending February 27, 2010
All data are preliminary and may change as more reports are received.

Synopsis:
During week 8 (February 21-27, 2010), influenza activity remained at approximately the same levels as last week in the U.S.

263 (6.4%) specimens tested by U.S. World Health Organization (WHO) and National Respiratory and Enteric Virus Surveillance System (NREVSS) collaborating laboratories and reported to CDC/Influenza Division were positive for influenza.
Over 99% of all subtyped influenza A viruses reported to CDC were 2009 influenza A (H1N1) viruses.
The proportion of deaths attributed to pneumonia and influenza (P&I) was below the epidemic threshold.
One influenza-associated pediatric death was reported and was associated with an influenza B virus infection. This death occurred during the 2008-09 influenza season.
The proportion of outpatient visits for influenza-like illness (ILI) was 1.7% which is below the national baseline of 2.3%. Two of 10 regions (Regions 4 and 9) reported ILI above region-specific baseline levels.
No states reported widespread influenza activity, four states reported regional influenza activity, Puerto Rico and eight states reported local influenza activity, the District of Columbia, Guam, and 34 states reported sporadic influenza activity, four states reported no influenza activity, and the U.S. Virgin Islands did not report.

http://www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/
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« Reply #536 on: March 11, 2010, 02:15:28 AM »

CDC Estimates of 2009 H1N1 Influenza Cases,
Hospitalizations and Deaths in the United States,
April 2009 – January 16, 2010


Background
Estimating the number of individual flu cases in the United States is very challenging because many people with flu don’t seek medical care and only a small number of those that do seek care are tested. More people who are hospitalized or die of flu-related causes are tested and reported, but under-reporting of hospitalizations and deaths occurs as well.

Long article with links, continue here....
http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/estimates_2009_h1n1.htm
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« Reply #537 on: March 11, 2010, 02:17:49 AM »

Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 - update 90
Weekly update
5 March 2010 --


As of 28 February 2010, worldwide more than 213 countries and overseas territories or communities have reported laboratory confirmed cases of pandemic influenza H1N1 2009, including at least 16455 deaths.

WHO is actively monitoring the progress of the pandemic through frequent consultations with the WHO Regional Offices and member states and through monitoring of multiple sources of information.

Continue here....for coverage of all areas reporting to WHO...
http://www.who.int/csr/don/2010_03_05/en/index.html



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« Reply #538 on: March 11, 2010, 02:19:13 AM »

Don’t Let Influenza Spoil Your Plans for Spring Break
March 5, 2010


In anticipation of the Spring Break season starting, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the American College Health Association (ACHA) sent a letter to colleges and universities, encouraging students, faculty, and staff to get vaccinated against the H1N1 flu virus.

Excerpt from Letter:

Recently, several colleges and universities have reported increased influenza activity on their campuses. Flu activity is difficult to predict, but experts at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) expect that flu activity — caused by 2009 H1N1 or seasonal flu viruses — will continue for weeks, and parts of the world may even see big outbreaks.

Continue here......
http://flu.gov/news/blogs/springbreakplans.html
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« Reply #539 on: March 11, 2010, 02:25:15 AM »

American College Health Association Spring Break Vaccination Letter
March 5, 2010
Don't let influenza spoil your plans for Spring Break.


Although flu activity has declined in recent weeks, 2009 H1N1 Influenza viruses continue to spread in the United States and abroad, causing illness, hospitalizations and even deaths. Recently, several colleges and universities have reported increased influenza activity on their campuses.

Flu activity is difficult to predict, but experts at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) expect that flu activity - caused by 2009 H1N1 or seasonal flu viruses - will continue for weeks, and parts of the world may even see big outbreaks.

This season the 2009 H1N1 virus has hit young adults especially hard in terms of illness, as most young people do not have immunity to the virus.

For these reasons, the CDC and the American College Health Association (ACHA) continue to encourage all students, faculty and staff at universities and colleges to protect themselves against 2009 H1N1 by getting vaccinated.

In the spring of 2009, we saw the spread of 2009 H1N1 result in a lot of illness following travel associated with "Spring Break."

With the 2010 "Spring Break" coming up and large numbers of students expected to travel both domestically and internationally, getting vaccinated against 2009 H1N1 influenza is especially important.

The 2009 H1N1 influenza vaccine is readily available both on and off campus at school health clinics, doctor's offices, state and local health departments and many pharmacies. Vaccination is the best way to protect yourself against 2009 H1N1 flu.

And this protection is especially important if you have a health condition, such as asthma, diabetes, heart disease, pregnancy and other conditions that increase your risk of serious flu-related complications or hospitalization.

In addition to getting vaccinated, you can also take the following steps to help protect you from getting or spreading the flu and other illnesses while you're on break:

•Talk to your health care provider not only about 2009 H1N1, but also other recommended, routine vaccinations you may need if traveling, especially overseas.

Visit the CDC's Travelers' Health website (www.cdc.gov/travel) for more information and healthy travel recommendations to prevent influenza and other illnesses during travel. You can also find special information about spring break travel.

•Stay away from people who appear sick or are coughing or sneezing. The main way the flu spreads is through the droplets of coughs and sneezes.

•Practice good hygiene by washing your hands often with soap and water, especially after coughing and sneezing. If soap and water is not available, alcohol-based hand rubs are useful.

•Cover your coughs and sneezes with a tissue.

•Wash your hands often.

•Don't share drinking glasses or utensils - avoid drinking beverages mixed in a common container or eating after others.

•Stay home (or away from others) if you are sick for 24 hours after your fever is gone to prevent others from getting sick too.

Spring Break is a time for rest, relaxation and fun with friends and family.

Take the opportunity to get vaccinated before leaving for Spring Break and protect yourself, friends and family against 2009 H1N1 flu.

Don't let influenza spoil your plans - get vaccinated against 2009 H1N1.

http://www.flu.gov/professional/school/springbreakltr.html
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