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Author Topic: H1N1 - Swine Flu - Novel Flu - Information  (Read 66635 times)
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« Reply #200 on: June 19, 2009, 12:23:47 PM »

CDC WEEKLY UPDATE - H1N1 - JUNE 19, 2009 - STATES & TERRITORIES
SUMMARY OF SITUATION
[/b]

http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/update.htm
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« Reply #201 on: June 19, 2009, 12:34:18 PM »

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION - Update 51 - Laboratory-confirmed cases of H1N1 as officially reported to WHO by States Parties to the International Health Regulations

19June2009  07:00 GMT

http://www.who.int/csr/don/2009_06_19/en/index.html
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« Reply #202 on: June 22, 2009, 11:58:51 AM »

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION - Update 52 - Laboratory-confirmed cases of H1N1 as officially reported to WHO by States Parties to the International Health Regulations

22June2009

Note:  Check increase in numbers of cases and numbers of deaths for USA.  Check numbers now being reported for China.

http://www.who.int/csr/don/2009_06_22/en/index.html











 
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« Reply #203 on: June 26, 2009, 04:14:55 PM »

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION - UPDATE 54 - 26June2009 
Use link for number of cases by reporting country and for access to entire article.


Influenza A(H1N1) - update 54
Laboratory-confirmed cases of new influenza A(H1N1) as officially reported to WHO by States Parties to the International Health Regulations (2005)

26 June 2009 07:00 GMT

http://www.who.int/csr/don/2009_06_26/en/index.html
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« Reply #204 on: June 26, 2009, 04:21:36 PM »

CENTER FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION - H1N1 UPDATE - June 25, 2009 7:00 P.M.
Please use link to access number of cases and deaths per State.


Novel H1N1 Flu Situation Update
June 25, 2009, 7:00 PM ET
Map: Weekly Influenza Activity Estimates Reported by State and Territorial Epidemiologists

http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/update.htm
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« Reply #205 on: July 02, 2009, 08:30:25 AM »

Another view -

"Solutions for Forced Vaccinations and Flu Pandemics "

Quote
(NaturalNews) In response to several readers concern over the issues presented by the article Watch Out for Flying Syringes, GMO Food Vaccines, and Forced Vaccinations, here are some solutions. Most of the solutions suggested are for vaccination induced disease syndrome (VIDS) or post vaccination syndrome (PVS). Some are for the flu itself.

Especially among the very young whose immune systems are not fully developed, there have been many almost immediate, terrible consequences of VIDS or PVS. Understand that though you may have had vaccinations and walked away on your own two feet, there are residual, latent dangers that can cause auto immune problems later in life. There are several thousand Gulf War I veterans who can attest to that!

Vaccination by inoculation is not immunization. Immunization occurs when you are stricken with a disease and survive, or if you`re exposed to pathogens and your immune system beats them. Even without the hazardous materials usually present in vaccines, bypassing the normal path of the immune system by injection into the bloodstream with pathogens from unusual sources causes more long term chronic stress on the immune system. This chronic immune system stress manifests in illness or disease later in life.

read more here -
http://www.naturalnews.com/026538_vaccination_vaccinations_homeopathy.html

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« Reply #206 on: July 04, 2009, 02:03:37 PM »

Use link to read entire article.....

http://www.hhs.gov/news/press/2009pres/07/20090702a.html

News Release
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday, July 2, 2009
 Contact: HHS Press Office
(202) 690-6343
 

U.S. to Provide Antiviral Medication to Latin America and the Caribbean for Novel H1N1 Influenza

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« Reply #207 on: July 04, 2009, 02:34:35 PM »

Keynote speech at a high-level meeting on influenza A(H1N1):
lessons learned and preparedness


Cancun, Quintana Roo, Mexico
2 July 2009

Influenza A(H1N1): lessons learned and preparedness
Dr Margaret Chan
Director-General of the World Health Organization


President Calderon, Minister Cordova, Governor Canto, Secretary Sebelius, Minister Aglukkaq, honourable ministers, distinguished participants, ladies and gentleman,

Let me thank the ministries of health of Mexico, the United States of America, and Canada for organizing this high-level meeting. Our special thanks to the government of Mexico for hosting this meeting. President Calderon, your leadership in managing the H1N1 outbreak in Mexico is commendable.

The fact that we are gathered here in Cancun, Mexico, reaffirms a statement consistently made by WHO since the new H1N1 virus was first detected. Recommendations to avoid travel to Mexico, or to any other country or area with confirmed cases, serve no purpose.

They do not protect the public. They do not contain the outbreak. And they do not prevent further international spread.

We are in phase 6 – that is, we are in the early days of the 2009 influenza pandemic. As we see today, with well over 100 countries reporting cases, once a fully fit pandemic virus emerges, its further international spread is unstoppable.

Influenza pandemics are remarkable events because they spread throughout a world population that is either largely or entirely susceptible to infection. They tend to hit a given area in the epidemiological equivalent of a tidal wave.

In densely populated areas, we see a steep increase in the number of cases, with a sharp peak, followed by a steep decline. Once the virus has swept through a susceptible population, transmission may continue, but at a much lower intensity.

In more sparsely populated areas, the peak may be flatter. Aggressive control measures can also flatten the epidemiological peak somewhat, but only for a while.

Mexico, and especially Mexico City, experienced this tidal wave of cases, and its peak, back in April. Other countries, where the virus was introduced later, are experiencing it now. More countries will see this pattern in the months to come.

But the worst for Mexico should be over now, at least during this first wave of spread. Our presence here is an expression of confidence. Mexico is a safe, as well as a beautiful and warmly gracious, place to visit.

Ladies and gentlemen,

When a new infectious agent causes an outbreak, it is nearly always the first country affected that suffers the most. New diseases are, by definition, poorly understood as they emerge.

The first country affected will, quite literally, not know what hit it in the early days of an outbreak. Decisions, from the doctor at the hospital bed to the head of state, have to be made quickly and decisively in an emergency situation characterized by considerable scientific uncertainty.

Mexico was the first country to experience a widespread outbreak. Mexico bore the brunt of these consequences at a time when the new virus had not yet been identified and nothing was known about the disease it causes.

Mexico gave the world an early warning, and it also gave the world a model of rapid and transparent reporting, aggressive control measures, and generous sharing of data and samples.

Canada and the United States supported the early control measures in Mexico, and then followed this model of transparent reporting and generous collaboration as their own outbreaks began to spread.

WHO and the international community have much to thank these three countries for setting a precedent that, up to now, nearly every country has followed.

Thanks to this collaboration, we have some answers that can help us greatly right now, as countries do everything possible to protect their populations, mitigate the health effects, and prepare for whatever might lie ahead.

What do we know? As I have said before, we have good reason to believe that this pandemic will be of moderate severity, at least in its early days.

We have seen some social disruption, especially when schools or camps have had to close, bringing added demands on parents and their employers. Most health systems have coped well, though some have reported some strains on staff, hospitals beds, laboratories and resources.

But we need to watch very carefully what happens during the current winter season in the Southern Hemisphere.

We are still seeing a largely reassuring clinical picture. The overwhelming majority of patients experience mild symptoms and make a full recovery within a week, often in the absence of any form of medical treatment. Research published last week confirms that this pattern, in which most patients experience mild influenza-like illness, has also been seen in Mexico.


Most cases of severe and fatal infection continue to occur in people with underlying medical conditions. We are getting, day-by-day, better data on the specific conditions that place patients at heightened risk.

Without question, pregnant women are at increased risk of complications. This heightened risk takes on added importance for a virus, like this one, that preferentially infects younger age groups.

But there are some exceptions that must be the focus of particular concern. For reasons that are poorly understood, some deaths are occurring in perfectly healthy young people. Moreover, some patients experience a very rapid clinical deterioration, leading to severe, life-threatening viral pneumonia that requires mechanical ventilation.

In keeping our populations informed, we face a difficult challenge. We cannot be alarmist, as this risks flooding emergency wards with the worried well, creating disruptively high demands for staff, hospitals, and laboratories. I am sure you will agree: health services need to stay fit for genuinely severe cases.

At the same time, if we are overly reassuring, patients in genuine need of treatment, where rapid emergency care can make a life-and-death difference, may be lulled into waiting too long.

Last week, Mexican researchers published clinical profiles of early H1N1 cases in the New England Journal of Medicine. As noted, the full clinical spectrum of this disease is not yet fully understood. We do not fully understand the predictive factors for severe or fatal infections.

However, as more and more data become available, we are getting a better grip on warning signs that can signal the need for urgent medical care. Symptoms of concern include difficulty in breathing, shortness of breath, chest pain and severe or persistent vomiting.

In adults, a high fever that lasts for more than three days is a warning sign, particularly when accompanied by a general worsening of the patient’s condition. Lethargy in a child, that is, a child that has difficulty waking up or is no longer alert, or is not playing, is a warning sign.

For a pandemic of moderate severity, this is one of our greatest challenges: helping people to understand when they do not need to worry, and when they do need to seek urgent care. This is one key way to help save lives.

Ladies and gentlemen,

Between the extremes of panic and complacency lies the solid ground of vigilance. This meeting is all about vigilance: taking stock of what we have learned, and preparing for whatever surprises this capricious new virus delivers next.

Constant, random mutation is the survival mechanism of the microbial world. Like all influenza viruses, H1N1 has the advantage of surprise on its side.

We have the advantages of science, and of rational and rigorous investigation, on our side, supported today by tools for data collection, analysis, and communication that are unprecedented in their power.

We have another advantage on our side, as exemplified by this meeting: collaboration and solidarity. It is my sincere wish that this meeting will take us some big steps forward in building our collective defences against a threat shared by all.

Thank you.

http://www.who.int/dg/speeches/2009/influenza_h1n1_lessons_20090702/en/index.html
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« Reply #208 on: July 04, 2009, 02:59:33 PM »

http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/update.htm  ....click on link to read entire article

Novel H1N1 Flu Situation Update
July 2, 2009, 2:30 PM ET


U.S. Human Cases of H1N1 Flu Infection in the United States and Territories -  (this includes numbers of cases by State and deaths by State).

Map: Weekly Influenza Activity Estimates Reported by State and Territorial Epidemiologists
(Posted July 2, 2009, 6:00 PM ET, for Week Ending June 27, 2009)
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« Reply #209 on: July 04, 2009, 03:12:34 PM »


http://www.who.int/csr/don/2009_07_03/en/index.html ...click link to see list of countries with number of cases and deaths for each country

Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 - update 57 - World Health Organization

Laboratory-confirmed cases of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 as officially reported to WHO by States Parties to the International Health Regulations (2005)

3 July 2009 09:00 GMT

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« Reply #210 on: July 05, 2009, 07:36:31 PM »

I'll say it again... All governments have chemical and biological weaponry. This was an accidental (on purpose) leak by the Mexican government.
October should be interesting. Quds Day should be a time of alert.
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« Reply #211 on: July 05, 2009, 09:18:33 PM »

updated at 03:00 GMT, Friday, 3 July 2009 04:00 UK
 
 
WHO warns swine flu 'unstoppable' 

WHO calls for vigilance over swine flu
The UN's top health official has opened a forum in Mexico on combating swine flu by saying that the spread of the virus worldwide is now unstoppable.

World Health Organization head Margaret Chan added that the holding of the meeting in Cancun showed confidence in Mexico, which has been hard hit.

The WHO says most H1N1 cases are mild, with many people recovering unaided.

As the summit opened, the UK alone was projecting more than 100,000 new cases of H1N1 a day by the end of the summer.

As the peak of the flu season approaches in South America, some areas have declared a public health emergency.

El Salvador reported its first death from swine flu, a day after Paraguay reported its first fatality.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/8130196.stm

more at link...
 
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« Reply #212 on: July 10, 2009, 03:52:47 PM »

Email received 7/8/09 from hhs.gov

 Novel H1N1 Flu (Swine Flu) and Feeding your Baby: What Parents Should Know (CDC)

This document updates previously posted information for parents about infant feeding and novel H1N1 flu (swine flu).  It now more clearly addresses parents who are formula feeding as well as breastfeeding, suggests that parents sick with novel H1N1 flu (swine flu) find someone who is not sick to feed the baby, and provides more detailed strategies for breastfeeding mothers to maintain breastfeeding throughout the course of infection. This document is based on current knowledge of the novel H1N1 flu outbreak in the United States, and may be revised as more information becomes available.

 

Read full article>>
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« Reply #213 on: July 10, 2009, 03:55:22 PM »

Email received 7/8/09 from hhs.gov

 Novel H1N1 Flu (Swine Flu) and Feeding your Baby: What Parents Should Know (CDC)

This document updates previously posted information for parents about infant feeding and novel H1N1 flu (swine flu).  It now more clearly addresses parents who are formula feeding as well as breastfeeding, suggests that parents sick with novel H1N1 flu (swine flu) find someone who is not sick to feed the baby, and provides more detailed strategies for breastfeeding mothers to maintain breastfeeding throughout the course of infection. This document is based on current knowledge of the novel H1N1 flu outbreak in the United States, and may be revised as more information becomes available.

 

Read full article>>  http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/infantfeeding.htm

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« Reply #214 on: July 10, 2009, 03:58:16 PM »

Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 news brief: no. 1

Viruses resistant to oseltamivir (Tamiflu) identified
8 JULY 2009 | GENEVA -- WHO has been informed by health authorities in Denmark, Japan and the Special Administrative Region of Hong Kong, China of the appearance of H1N1 viruses which are resistant to the antiviral drug oseltamivir (known as Tamiflu) based on laboratory testing.

These viruses were found in three patients who did not have severe disease and all have recovered. Investigations have not found the resistant virus in the close contacts of these three people. The viruses, while resistant to oseltamivir, remain sensitive to zanamivir.

Close to 1000 pandemic H1N1 viruses have been evaluated by the laboratories in the Global Influenza Surveillance Network for antiviral drug resistance. All other viruses have been shown sensitive to both oseltamivir and zanamivir. WHO and its partners will continue to conduct ongoing monitoring of influenza viruses for antiviral drug resistance.

Therefore, based on current information, these instances of drug resistance appear to represent sporadic cases of resistance. At this time, there is no evidence to indicate the development of widespread antiviral resistance among pandemic H1N1 viruses. Based on this risk assessment, there are no changes in WHO's clinical treatment guidance. Antiviral drugs remain a key component of the public health response when used as recommended.

Read full article>> http://www.who.int/csr/disease/swineflu/newsbriefs/h1n1_antiviral_resistance_20090708/en/index.html


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« Reply #215 on: July 10, 2009, 04:01:09 PM »

CDC Recommendations for State and Local Planning for a 2009 Novel H1N1 Influenza Program

July 8, 2009, 1:30 PM ET

The purpose of this document is to describe planning scenarios for state and local governments to target high-priority populations for vaccination in order to reduce the health and societal impact of the novel H1N1 influenza virus.

Background
Data from U.S. and international sources suggests that it is appropriate to plan for a vaccination program to reduce the health and societal impacts of the novel H1N1 influenza virus.  In order to increase the probability of success of such a program, planning scenarios should be provided to state and local health authorities promptly.  Planning scenarios can facilitate readiness to implement specific plans within states and large cities, improving the chances that vaccine will reach target populations when recommendations are made, and that distribution, delivery, and communication efforts regarding vaccination will overcome local challenges and maximize capacities. 


Read full article>> http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/vaccination/statelocal/planning.htm


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« Reply #216 on: July 10, 2009, 04:04:52 PM »

Obama Administration Calls on Nation to Begin Planning and Preparing for Fall Flu Season & the New H1N1 Virus

Administration Leaders Say that Flu Preparedness is a “Shared Responsibility” Announce New Funding for States and New Nation-Wide Flu Prevention Campaign at flu.gov

The Obama Administration sent a strong message to the nation today that it is time to start planning and preparing for the fall flu season and the ongoing H1N1 flu outbreak and that the federal government is prepared to commit resources, training, and new tools to help state and local governments and America’s families get ready.

White House Homeland Security Advisor John Brennan, Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius, Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano, Secretary of Education Arne Duncan  joined with delegations from 54 states, tribes and territories today at the H1N1 Influenza Preparedness Summit at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md., to kick-off the government’s nation-wide fall flu preparedness efforts.

“The President and the administration are actively engaged in mitigating the effects of the H1N1 flu virus and developing a national response framework and action plan that builds on the efforts and lessons learned from this spring’s initial onset to prepare for the possibility of a more serious fall outbreak of the virus,” said White House Homeland Security Advisor Brennan in his address to summit participants.

“Over the course of coming weeks and months, we will move aggressively to prepare the nation for the possibility of a more severe outbreak of the H1N1 virus,” said HHS Secretary Sebelius.  “We ask the American people to become actively engaged with their own preparation and prevention.  It’s a responsibility we all share.”

“The federal government is working together with its federal, state, local and tribal partners to develop a nation-wide plan to combat the H1N1 flu that incorporates the lessons we learned this spring,” said Homeland Security Secretary Napolitano.  “The H1N1 Summit will allow us to continue this aggressive preparation for all possible H1N1 virus outbreak scenarios to ensure that we are doing everything possible to keep our country safe and healthy.”

“Effectively dealing with a potential H1N1 outbreak requires all of us -- parents, educators, health providers, and local, state and federal governments -- working together on our emergency management plan,” said Education Secretary Duncan. “Today’s Flu Summit is an important step in that direction. Our primary goals at the Department of Education are the health and well being of students, faculty and staff, and ensuring that, in the event of any school closures, the learning process will continue. ”

Maryland Governor Martin O’Malley moderated a Governors panel with participation via videolink from Governor Jim Douglas of Vermont, Governor Jim Doyle of Wisconsin, Governor Mark Parkinson of Kansas, Governor John Baldacci of Maine and Governor Jodi Rell of Connecticut.

“When responding to a national pandemic or a national recession, the basic principles of smart government remain the same -- to increase efficiency, openness, and transparency in everything we do.  Today’s summit illustrates our collective commitment to that goal,” said Maryland Governor Martin O’Malley.  “The experience in the spring taught us that while earlier pandemic flu planning efforts were effective, there are also areas for improvement.  Effective response requires accurate and timely information that is as close to real time as possible.  We share the commitment of the Obama Administration to constantly monitor, evaluate and improve these processes as we continue to lead the world in emergency preparedness.”

Throughout the one-day summit, Administration officials laid out specific ways that states and local governments could start their planning and preparation efforts and announced new programs and resources to help state and local governments, the medical community and every day America prepare for H1N1 and the fall flu season.

First, HHS will make available preparedness grants worth a total of $350 million. These grants were funded by Congress in the latest supplemental appropriations bill and they will give state and local public health offices and health care systems valuable resources to step up their preparedness efforts.

Second, the federal government will centralize communications about H1N1 and seasonal flu on the federal government’s new Web site www.flu.gov. This one-stop comprehensive site brings together flu-related information from across HHS and other federal agencies.  The expanded site builds on the pandemic planning information long presented on www.pandemicflu.gov, and incorporates information about the novel H1N1 flu as well as the seasonal flu. 

Finally, HHS is launching a new PSA campaign contest to encourage more Americans to get involved in the nation’s flu preparedness efforts by making a 15-second or 30-second PSA. Officials at the summit stressed the idea of “shared responsibility” when it comes to combating the flu and the goal of the new HHS PSA campaign contest is to tap into the nation’s creativity to help educate Americans about how to plan for and prevent the spread of H1NI influenza. HHS will evaluate submissions and will present the best PSAs back to the public so everyone can vote on their favorite submission. The winning PSA will receive $2,500 in cash and will appear on national television. Contest details as well more information about the larger effort to plan and prepare for the flu season are available at www.flu.gov.

http://www.hhs.gov/news/press/2009pres/07/20090709a.html
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« Reply #217 on: July 10, 2009, 04:08:28 PM »

CDC Updates U.S. H1N1 Flu Situation: 54* states | 37,246 cases


Table. U.S. Human Cases of H1N1 Flu Infection
Web page updated July 10, 2009,
11:00 AM ET

Data reported to CDC by July 10, 2009, 11:00 AM ET.  States and Territories*  Confirmed and Probable Cases  Deaths 
States 
Alabama  400 cases  0 deaths 
Alaska  122 cases  0 deaths 
Arizona  762 cases  11 deaths 
Arkansas  42 cases  0 deaths 
California  2461  31 deaths 
Colorado  146 cases  0 deaths 
Connecticut  1364 cases  6 deaths 
Delaware  347 cases  0 deaths 
Florida  1781 cases  7 death 
Georgia  138 cases  0 deaths 
Hawaii  722 cases  1 death 
Idaho  115 cases  0 deaths 
Illinois  3259 cases  14 deaths 
Indiana  273 cases  0 deaths 
Iowa  156 cases  0 deaths 
Kansas  136 cases  0 deaths 
Kentucky  130 cases  0 deaths 
Louisiana  183 cases  0 deaths 
Maine  107 cases  0 deaths 
Maryland  686 cases  2 death 
Massachusetts  1328 cases  4 deaths 
Michigan  489 cases  8 deaths 
Minnesota  634  3 death 
Mississippi  188 cases  0 deaths 
Missouri  68 cases  1 death 
Montana  67 cases  0 deaths 
Nebraska  215 cases  0 deaths 
Nevada  327 cases  0 deaths 
New Hampshire  237 cases  0 deaths 
New Jersey  1289 cases  10 deaths 
New Mexico  232 cases  0 deaths 
New York  2582 cases  52 deaths 
North Carolina  312 cases  2 deaths 
North Dakota  58 cases  0 deaths 
Ohio  147 cases  1 death 
Oklahoma  150 cases  1 death 
Oregon  403 cases  4 
Pennsylvania  1794 cases  6 deaths 
Rhode Island  177 cases  2 death 
South Carolina  176 cases  0 deaths 
South Dakota  34 cases  0 deaths 
Tennessee  213 cases  0 deaths 
Texas  4463 cases  21 deaths 
Utah  953 cases  14 deaths 
Vermont  50 cases  0 deaths 
Virginia  306 cases  2 death 
Washington  636 cases  4 deaths 
Washington, D.C.  45 cases  0 deaths 
West Virginia  179 cases  0 deaths 
Wisconsin  6031 cases  4 death 
Wyoming  99 cases  0 deaths 
Territories 
Guam  1 case  0 deaths 
Puerto Rico  18 cases  0 deaths 
Virgin Islands  15 case  0 deaths 
TOTAL (54)*  37,246 cases  211 deaths 
*Includes the District of Columbia, Guam, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

This table will be updated each Friday at 11 AM ET.

International Human Cases of H1N1 Flu Infection
See: World Health Organization.

NOTE: Because of daily reporting deadlines, the state totals reported by CDC may not always be consistent with those reported by state health departments. If there is a discrepancy between these two counts, data from the state health departments should be used as the most accurate number.

For more information about how these case counts are updated, see Questions & Answers About CDC's Online Reporting.
 

 

Read full article>> http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/update.htm

 
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« Reply #218 on: July 11, 2009, 11:49:13 AM »

States Eligible to Receive $350 Million for H1N1, Seasonal Flu Preparedness Efforts

Grants Will Support Work to Protect Public Health, Prepare for Novel H1N1and Seasonal Flu

One day after hosting a summit on the 2009 novel H1N1 flu with representatives from state, tribal, territorial and local governments from across the country, HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius today announced the availability of $350 million in grants to help states and territories prepare for the 2009 novel H1N1 flu virus and the fall flu season. The grants were funded by the recent supplemental appropriations bill that was passed by Congress and signed into law by President Barack Obama on June 24, 2009.

“With flu season around the corner, we must remain vigilant and do all we can to prepare our nation and protect public health,” said Secretary Sebelius. “These grants will give states valuable resources to step up their flu preparedness efforts.”

A total of $260 million in Public Health Emergency Response Grants and $90 million in Hospital Preparedness grants will be distributed nationwide.

Public Health Emergency Response grants help state public health departments perform a variety of functions, including preparing for potential vaccination campaigns, implementing strategies to reduce people’s exposure to the 2009 novel H1N1 flu and improving influenza surveillance and investigations.   

http://www.hhs.gov/news/press/2009pres/07/20090710a.html
 
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« Reply #219 on: July 14, 2009, 01:34:20 PM »

 
WHO recommendations on pandemic (H1N1) 2009 vaccines
Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 briefing note 2
 

13 JULY 2009 | GENEVA -- On 7 July 2009, the Strategic Advisory Group of Experts (SAGE) on Immunization held an extraordinary meeting in Geneva to discuss issues and make recommendations related to vaccine for the pandemic (H1N1) 2009.

SAGE reviewed the current pandemic situation, the current status of seasonal vaccine production and potential A(H1N1) vaccine production capacity, and considered potential options for vaccine use.

The experts identified three different objectives that countries could adopt as part of their pandemic vaccination strategy:

protect the integrity of the health-care system and the country's critical infrastructure;
reduce morbidity and mortality; and
reduce transmission of the pandemic virus within communities.
Countries could use a variety of vaccine deployment strategies to reach these objectives but any strategy should reflect the country’s epidemiological situation, resources and ability to access vaccine, to implement vaccination campaigns in the targeted groups, and to use other non-vaccine mitigation measures.

Although the severity of the pandemic is currently considered to be moderate with most patients experiencing uncomplicated, self-limited illness, some groups such as pregnant women and persons with asthma and other chronic conditions such as morbid obesity appear to be at increased risk for severe disease and death from infection.

Since the spread of the pandemic virus is considered unstoppable, vaccine will be needed in all countries. SAGE emphasized the importance of striving to achieve equity among countries to access vaccines developed in response to the pandemic (H1N1) 2009.

 

Read full article>>   http://www.who.int/csr/disease/swineflu/notes/h1n1_vaccine_20090713/en/index.html


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