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Author Topic: Immigration Reform - What does it mean to you?  (Read 1668 times)
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WhiskeyGirl
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« on: June 02, 2009, 05:44:56 PM »

I look at the immigration system, and I see an orderly system where people may apply, and wait patiently for permission to enter.  The system doesn't need reforming - it already works.

Quote
"America voted for change and voted for political leaders who will take on tough problems, forge broad coalitions, and solve American problems with American solutions. Immigration reform that restores stability, structure, and responsibility to our system is within our grasp if we all work for it. This week, that work begins in earnest," Noorani continued.

http://www.americanchronicle.com/articles/view/104567

There are people who are here illegally.  These are not immigrants.  They are breaking the law.  Why aren't they returned to their country of origin?  Why aren't they taken to task for using phoney or fraudulent Social Security numbers?  Drivers licenses?

Why do they take jobs from Americans?

Did those voting for change, vote for another 30-40 million citizens?  30-40 million more to burden healthcare?  Welfare?  Social Security?  Take jobs?

It seems like Martha Stewart went to jail for some advance knowledge she used to save a little money.  SHE went to jail.

How many illegal aliens had advance knowledge of any amnesty?  How many ran and are waiting patiently?  How many receive welfare benefits?

I also think the citizenship rules should be changed to prevent the children of illegal aliens from gaining citizenship by being born in the U.S.

When do Americans come first?   When will the few remaining jobs be for Americans?  Welfare for Americans?

Can the US afford another 40-50 million instant citizens?  In the past, immigrants came here and didn't get any benefits.  There were few if any benefits for citizens.

Somehow, I think it's more than the 12-20 million being promoted in some arenas.

The U.S. has become a welfare magnet for the global population - that's the change that needs changing.  Stop the human and drug tsunami crossing our borders illegally.

jmho
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It doesn't do any good to hate anyone,
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WhiskeyGirl
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« Reply #1 on: June 02, 2009, 05:48:06 PM »

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State Representative Kim Thatcher, a Republican from Keizer has sponsored several bills that would tighten rules for undocumented immigrants: requiring employers to check status, limiting state benefits.

Thatcher says if the federal government wants to help, it could start by speeding up the entry process for good, qualified candidates who want to work.

Kim Thatcher  “They need to give realistic numbers of -- allow realistic numbers to apply for citizenship. There’s such a glut right now.”

http://news.opb.org/article/5111-immigration-reform-whats-it-mean-you/

Why don't people apply to come here legally? 
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All my posts are just my humble opinions.  Please take with a grain of salt.  Smile

It doesn't do any good to hate anyone,
they'll end up in your family anyway...
WhiskeyGirl
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« Reply #2 on: June 02, 2009, 05:56:43 PM »

E-Verify

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Immigration experts have long argued that a consistent system for checking worker status is essential to prevent illegal immigration. Congress has appropriated $274 million and U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services has spent $183 million developing e-verify, which lets employers type in a name and Social Security number to find out whether a new hire is eligible for work.

...

The acting head of USCIS, which manages e-verify, touts the system as nearly capable of handling checks by all 7 million employers nationwide to verify the status of 60 million new hires a year.

The system "is ready to go" and 96 percent of queries lead to quick confirmation that a worker can be hired, said Michael Aytes, acting deputy director of USCIS, in a recent interview before the opening of a district headquarters in Denver.

"This is going to mean it's easier to enforce the laws this country has with respect to immigration . . . limiting immigration to what the law allows," Aytes said. "Immigration comes down to economics, job opportunities. . . . This is certainly going to be a critical piece of any immigration solution."


Quote
Evergreen-based Mitch's Green Thumb Landscaping — which relies primarily on workers from Mexico — began using the system two years ago, said Ivette Esquivel, office manager for the 40-employee firm. Its workers did the tree-planting, mulching and other landscaping work around Denver's new USCIS headquarters in a suburban office park.

The system screened out at least five workers this year as the company hired 10, she said.

Many landscapers do not use the system to verify worker status, Esquivel said.

"It takes maybe a couple minutes," she said.

Some men enter her office looking for work, see the sign that indicates immigration status will be checked and quickly leave, she said.

"A lot of time they go: 'Oh! OK. I'll come back.' That often means they may not be verifiable. They say: 'Oh! I left my ID at home.' And then they don't come back."

http://**/news/ci_12491903

Somehow, I don't imagine I'd have much success as an illegal alien in another country.  Will they give me welfare?  A job?  Food Stamps?  Housing?

Would it be easier to go elsewhere and return to this country and take over my own ID illegally?  Maybe start a new life?
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All my posts are just my humble opinions.  Please take with a grain of salt.  Smile

It doesn't do any good to hate anyone,
they'll end up in your family anyway...
WhiskeyGirl
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« Reply #3 on: June 02, 2009, 06:04:55 PM »

DISPATCHES: Undocumented caught in tuition trap
Tuesday, June 2, 2009 4:18 PM EDT
By Hank Kalet, Online Editor

Quote
”The only documents I have are a birth certificate and a passport that can prove I am from Mexico,” she said during a telephone interview. “My vaccination records, my associates degree, my high school diploma — all of them have New Jersey stamps on them. But I still pay out-of-state tuition regardless of all the documents that can prove my New Jersey residency since 1988.”

   The question, of course, is why someone who spent all 12 years of grade school in New Jersey schools, who graduated with top marks and has the drive to succeed at the college level should be treated differently than any other New Jersey student.

   Immigration hardliners, as The New York Times reported recently, say granting in-state tuition to people like Ms. Conde-Hernandez “could result in illegal immigrants taking college slots from legal residents and would cost the state money that could otherwise be used to benefit citizens.”

   The chances of that happening are pretty slim, given the number of undocumented students is relatively small and is likely to remain small. Plus, as Princeton immigration attorney Ryan Stark Lilienthal points out, the approach is unnecessarily harsh, punishing students who had little choice but to join their parents in their trek north, treating students differently who may have identical school backgrounds.

   ”You have kids growing up in the state of New Jersey who are really smart,” he said. “But instead of growing up to be doctors or lawyers or engineers, they can’t afford college, and they do something that doesn’t reflect their abilities.”

   That’s why the state panel on immigration convened by Gov. Jon Corzine recommended undocumented immigrant students who live in New Jersey be treated as state residents for tuition purposes. Under most of the proposals that have been made over the years, none of which have made it very far in the state Legislature, undocumented students with a high school diploma would be eligible if they attended a high school in the state for three years.

   ”If I was granted the right to pay in-state tuition, I could afford to do six classes in a semester and finish next year,” Ms. Conde-Hernandez says.

   She works between 20 and 40 hours a week, pays $500 a month to share an apartment and pays more than $20 a week in bus fare.

...

   ”I can afford it because I have a good job,” she says. “I live independently. Not every student can get a good job because they don’t know how to and because of their status. I know kids who have to work 60 to 70 hours a week and have just enough to cover their rent.”

http://centraljersey.com/articles/2009/06/02/opinions/doc4a258790aae4d364839436.txt

These are things that just don't make sense.  Why didn't the parents apply to come legally?  Why not wait patiently? 

There is an orderly system, whey didn't these people use it?  Why didn't the government do something for the past 2-3 decades to prevent all these illegal people from coming?

If you legalize 12-50 million more people this year, what's to prevent another 12-50 million people from coming and staying here illegally next year?  Year after that?
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All my posts are just my humble opinions.  Please take with a grain of salt.  Smile

It doesn't do any good to hate anyone,
they'll end up in your family anyway...
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