September 21, 2017, 05:57:27 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: NEW CHILD BOARD CREATED IN THE POLITICAL SECTION FOR THE 2016 ELECTION
 
   Home   Help Login Register  
Pages: 1   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: "Missing in Maine" 100 reported missing over 30 years - never found...  (Read 13635 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Nut44x4
Maine - USA
Global Moderator
Monkey Mega Star
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 18679


...and Injustice for most


« on: June 27, 2009, 03:58:42 PM »

Missing in Maine

BANGOR, Maine — On the evening of April 24, five members of Charles Springer’s family gathered at a southern Maine restaurant to mark his 70th birthday. Like many such celebrations, family members shared a meal that ended with a cupcake topped with a birthday candle.
Absent, however, was the guest of honor.Charles Milton Springer, a truck driver from Belmont who liked to be called “Chuck,” walked out of his home on May 2, 2008, with only the clothes on his back. He has not been seen since.

Springer is among an estimated 100 people in Maine who have been reported missing during the past three decades and have never been found.

The missing person reports include the names of individuals as young as 3 and as old as 70, some in good health and others with medical or mental health problems. The files date back to 1971, about the time that federal and state authorities began indexing such cases.

Many of the missing are believed to be dead, the victims of foul play or the elements. Some are teenage runaways and adults whom authorities believe have fled to escape problems, while others seem to have simply vanished into thin air, leaving no trace behind.

Sometimes, new leads blow the dust off old cases. That was the case this week, when state police and Sanford police converged on a Lebanon residence and recovered from a well human remains believed to be those of Frances Moulton, who disappeared at the age of 27 in the summer of 2006.

The remains were taken to the Office of the State Medical Examiner for examination, but an identification is not expected until next week.

Though Springer has been missing for more than a year, family members he left behind still think of him daily. “Oh, it’s not good at all. I get through the day, you know,” Ellie Springer, the missing man’s mother, said this week in a telephone interview from her daughter’s home in Lebanon, where she recently moved because of health problems.

“I try not to think about it too much. When I think about it too much, I get a hollow feeling in the pit of my stomach and I feel like I just want to cry,” she said. “I don’t want to make myself sick. I’m 89 years old.”

Haunting cases

Lt. J. Darrell Ouellette, commander of the state police barracks in Houlton, has seen the effect that a missing loved one can have on families.

Until three years ago, Ouellette headed the state’s Missing Children Clearinghouse. His experience with missing adults is a product of his regular duties with the state police, who investigate all missing persons cases in which foul play is suspected except those in Bangor and Portland, where the city police departments handle their own. The FBI gets involved in missing children cases and those in which the missing person is believed to have crossed, or been taken across, state lines.

Though Ouellette has investigated dozens of missing person cases over the decades, there are some that continue to haunt him. One such case involves the 1977 disappearance of a 19-year-old Fort Kent man.

The son of a Fort Kent schoolteacher now living in Portland, Bernard “Bunny” Ross Jr. initially was the subject of a warrant in a truck theft case. The truck was found and the charges dropped, but Ross remained missing.

Despite a thorough search, Ross was never found. Though 32 years have passed, Ross’ parents maintain regular contact with Ouellette to see if there have been any new developments.

“We’ve done some work trying to locate him,” Ouellette said. He periodically checks for activity with Ross’ Social Security number, but so far has found nothing. “Once in a while [Ross’ father] will see a vanity plate that has the word bunny, and he’ll ask me to run the plate and find out who it is, and I’ll run the plate and I’d find out that it belongs to a female or somebody else,” he said.

“So there’s always that glimmer of hope that he’s alive, that he just ran away or he had some sort of accident where he doesn’t know where he belongs or whatever. But he’s accepted the fact that his son may be dead,” Ouellette said.

The numbers

Getting a handle on the actual number of missing people in Maine is no simple matter.

The missing person page on the Department of Public Safety’s Web site, which has only 16 listings, is still under construction. Two more missing people police believe were murdered are listed on the site’s unsolved homicides page. The site does not include cases being investigated by county and municipal police departments.

As of June 1, 92 people who disappeared in Maine were listed in the FBI’s National Crime Information Center’s database, the national repository for criminal justice information, according to Todd Matthews, a regional systems administrator for the missing people Web site www.NamUs.gov.

Police believe the actual total is higher because of inconsistent reporting over the years.Although police are legally bound to register children with the NCIC within three hours of receiving a report that they’re missing, there is more interpretation involved before listing adults.

People 21 and older can be entered into the NCIC database, but only if they have a physical or mental disability, may be in physical danger, are missing after a catastrophe, went missing under circumstances suggesting their disappearance may be involuntary, or who otherwise are believed to be in danger, according to the U.S. Department of Justice’s guidelines.

“Law enforcement has a lot of discretion with adults,” Ouellette said. “Police departments have to make a call on that, whether a person is in danger.” They might not submit a report of a missing adult in good physical and mental condition and not considered at risk.

Public Safety Department spokesman Steve McCausland agrees.

“It’s usually not a crime, obviously, for someone to go missing as an adult. Sometimes adults for their own reason want to go missing,” he said, adding, “Your most famous missing person probably in the Bangor area is [Roderick] Hotham. He’s not on that list but he certainly is missing.”

Arguably one of Bangor’s highest-profile missing people, Hotham made headlines when he vanished in September 1992 from the Stucco Lodge in Veazie. At the time of his disappearance, the certified public accountant was accused of defrauding five federally insured financial institutions of about $4 million through false representation and promises.

The vast majority of missing person cases are solved quickly, according to Ouellette and Penobscot County Sheriff Glenn Ross.

Ouellette said of the 160 runaway teenagers reported missing every month in Maine, “99.9 percent” return home within 24 hours or let their parents know where they are and that they don’t plan to come home.

“Luckily, most of them are teenagers who have pretty good parents. They just want to get away for a while,” he said, adding that most return when it gets cold and they’ve run out of food and money.

Ross said 300 to 400 missing person and “attempt to locate” reports are filed with the county’s deputies and municipal police departments in a typical year and that all but a handful are resolved quickly, often in less than 24 hours.

These cases involve people who weren’t home when expected or who didn’t show up for a scheduled event, he notes. People who commit suicide and whose bodies are found quickly come off the list.

“With the ones that are truly missing, there’s usually a lot of interaction between the family and the police that keeps it on the radar screen,” he said. Among the most troubling cases are those involving missing kids.

The profiles of three people who were reported missing as children in the 1970s and 1980s appear on the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children’s Web site, located at missingkids.com, National Center spokeswoman Nancy McBride said.

They are 3-year-old Douglas Charles Chapman, who vanished in 1971 while playing outside in Alfred; Cathy Moulton, 16, of Portland, who also went missing in 1971; and Kimberly Moreau, who was 17 when she disappeared from Jay in 1986.

Not among the National Center’s listings, however, is a fourth missing child from Maine, Kurt Ronald Newton, who has not been seen since 1975, when he wandered away from his family’s campsite at Chain of Ponds Public Reserve Land near Coburn Gore on the Quebec border.

The state police serve as the National Center’s designated statewide missing children’s clearinghouse, Ouellette said.

“They keep very good track of missing children,” he said of the center. The National Center “actually has a better database than we do, simply because they enter everything in there and they periodically check to see if the children have been recovered,” Ouellette said. The center’s Web site includes profiles with photos, includ-ing age-progressed photos showing what missing children would look like at their chronological ages, he said.

“When you only have three [missing children], it’s three too many, but it’s not a lot compared to more populated states, where it’s really a much bigger problem,” Ouellette said.

“We have a one-person missing children unit,” said Ouellette, who staffed it for five years. For the last three years, it has been staffed by Lt. Brian McDonough, commander of the criminal investigation division based in Gray.

“We don’t have the resources. We don’t have the staffing [like in more populated states]. Connecticut and New York both have full-time investigators assigned to their [NCMEC missing children] clearinghouses,” Ouellette said. Given their other duties, he and McDonough could devote only about 5 percent of a typical work-week to it, he estimated.

Cold cases

Ouellette said cold-case investigations on missing people sometimes remain stagnant for long periods. Though state police maintain ongoing investigations when it comes to missing children and adults they believe have met with foul play, current staffing levels do not allow police to devote much time to those involving adults missing under circumstances lacking a criminal element.

“We do not have a special bureau or person who oversees that,” McCausland said.

“These cases remain open all the time, but they don’t get a lot of publicity or a lot of attention because the lead detectives are working other cases,” Ouellette said.

Sometimes, however, cold-case investigations pick up again because of new leads, the discovery of human remains or some other break, such as in the case of Moulton.

McCausland said Moulton last contacted her family in July 2006 and was reported missing that September. She lived in Lebanon at the time of her disappearance, but often stayed with friends and family in Sanford. Police aren’t saying what new leads or evidence led them this week to the human remains they found at the bottom of a well in Lebanon.

But police, who suspected foul play in her disappearance, believe the remains are those of Moulton. McCausland said Thursday that a positive identification of the remains and cause of death would not be available for several days.

New technologies

The advent of new technologies is helping to offset the shortage of police staffing.

On the Internet, there are a growing number of sites devoted to finding missing people and solving cold cases. Some sites allow the public to report — and help solve — missing people cases.

Also relatively new are the AMBER Alert and Code Adam systems.

The AMBER Alert, which Ouellette noted has yet to be used in Maine, is an early warning system issued by law enforcement to notify broadcasters and state transportation officials when children are abducted. The AMBER Alerts interrupt regular programming and are broadcast on radio and television and highway signs and the Internet. They also can be issued on lottery tickets, wireless devices such as mobile phones, and over the Internet.

Code Adam, which Ouellette says has been used in Maine, requires no police authorization. When a child goes missing in a public building, such as a store, an announcement is made over the public address system. The building is locked down and employees immediately canvas the store to look for the child and monitor all ex-its to ensure the child does not leave the building. If the child isn’t found within 10 minutes or is seen with someone other than a parent or guardian, police are notified.

Social networking sites and cell phones also can provide clues about the circumstances leading up to a disappearance, adds retired Massachusetts Police Chief Thomas Shamshak, who now runs a private investigation company based in Boston and Providence, R.I. The families of two missing Mainers, Jeremy Theodore Alex and Miguel Oliveras, hired Shamshak to help with their searches.

Shamshak says the more exposure a missing person case gets, the better the chances are of solving it. “Otherwise, they go cold.”

Springer’s case

Chuck Springer, whose career as a long-distance truck driver spanned more than three decades, is a perplexing case. After leaving his Halls Corner Road home, family and friends speculate that he may have been headed toward the town hall in an attempt to have his driver’s license reinstated.

Chuck’s sister, Joanne Grigoreas, who last year left her job and home in Massachusetts to be with her mother in Maine and since has been joined by her husband, said that during the weeks and months after Chuck’s disappearance, the family theorized about his whereabouts. They speculated that he might have walked to Route 3 and gotten a ride, possibly with another trucker, and that he might even have gotten a job.

But extensive ground and air searches, as well as his family’s efforts to contact homeless shelters, hospitals and his trucker friends throughout the country, have failed to turn up any trace of Springer, a single man whose loves include music and classic cars.

Ellie Springer said she remains heartsick that she and her oldest son had argued the day before he vanished. Chuck was angry and frustrated about having lost his driver’s license because he was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease, while his then 88-year-old mother still had hers. Later that day, she avoided him over fear of an-other confrontation.

“He knew he had a memory problem, but he didn’t really acknowledge that it was getting to be what it was,” she said.

Grigoreas said at this point the family seeks closure. “That’s an important part of it, really. We’ve pretty much come to the realization that there’s a 90 percent chance he’s no longer alive, but not knowing really is the very worst part,” Grigoreas said. “We just want to get it finalized.”

That doesn’t mean the family is just sitting waiting for news.

“Some days we get up and we’re full of ambition,” Grigoreas said. “We’ll do something to try to find him, contact Internet sites or send out mailings or something, and other days we tend to lose hope sometimes. You know, what good is it doing?”

http://www.bangordailynews.com/detail/109470.html
« Last Edit: June 27, 2009, 04:00:35 PM by Nut44x4 » Logged

Brothers and Sisters, I bid you beware/Of giving your heart to a dog to tear  -- Rudyard Kipling

One who doesn't trust is never deceived...

'I remained too much inside my head and ended up losing my mind' -Edgar Allen Poe
Nut44x4
Maine - USA
Global Moderator
Monkey Mega Star
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 18679


...and Injustice for most


« Reply #1 on: December 12, 2009, 04:35:53 PM »

Frances Moulton's body was found in June of this year.

Police Chief Thomas Connolly Relieved
Friday, July 3, 2009

LEBANON, Maine — With the case of Frances Moulton's homicide now in the hands of Maine State Police, Sanford Police Chief Thomas Connolly expressed relief that a woman gone missing for three years can finally be put to rest.

"We are continuing to work cooperatively" with state police, Connolly said Thursday, adding the case falls under state police jurisdiction since it was deemed a homicide. Sanford and state police collaborated on the investigation for the past 18 months.

They found a break in the case on June 23 when they discovered human remains at the bottom of a well on Creamery Hill Road, later confirmed through testing to be remains of Frances Moulton, 26, who went missing in July 2006.

Homicides are not common in Maine. Connolly said there were only about 20 last year, many of them domestic-related. State police typically pick up homicide investigations, he said, because local police are often not trained, nor do they have the equipment to handle such an investigation. Last week, divers from Connecticut came to Lebanon to aid in the investigation because they had equipment unavailable to local investigators.

"This is a big deal, to have a homicide in your jurisdiction," Connolly said.

While he said he could not speak for state police as to the status of the investigation, Connolly knows from two years on the case how much information there is to investigate.

"There's two years of information to sort through. Finding her was the first big thing. We never were sure if she was dead," he said.

Moulton was a transient with family in Sanford. She was known to disappear for months at a time, only to turn up later without notice. She was also known to spend time at more than one home on Creamery Hill Road. Family members said she got on the back of a motorcycle in 2006 and was never heard from again.

"No matter what her lifestyle was, she is no longer at the bottom of the well... She was a troubled woman. There's no doubt about it... Solving the case is important, but I don't think anybody deserves that," Connolly said. "People who commit heinous crimes against the state are treated better than this."

Connolly said "a lot of people were interviewed" over the course of the 18-month investigation. Some of them gave statements near the beginning of the investigation. He said those can be looked at again now that police are sure they have found her remains.

"There's some good information out there," he said, adding, "I'm confident they'll be able to take that and close the case."
http://www.fosters.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20090703/GJNEWS_01/707039967
Logged

Brothers and Sisters, I bid you beware/Of giving your heart to a dog to tear  -- Rudyard Kipling

One who doesn't trust is never deceived...

'I remained too much inside my head and ended up losing my mind' -Edgar Allen Poe
Nut44x4
Maine - USA
Global Moderator
Monkey Mega Star
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 18679


...and Injustice for most


« Reply #2 on: December 12, 2009, 04:36:57 PM »

ARREST MADE

Arrest made in the murder of Frances Mouton
1 hr ago

HIRAM, Maine (NEWS CENTER) --A Grand Jury in York County has returned a murder indictment in connection with the 2006 homicide of a woman in Lebanon.

State Police arrested 22 year old Robert Copley of Hiram Friday night and charged him with murder. Copley is accused of killing 25 year Frances Moulton. Moulton's body was found in a well in Lebanon this past June.

Detectives say she way actually killed in July of 2006. Coble and Moulton knew each other.

State Police are not releasing any more information at this time.
http://www.wcsh6.com/news/local/story.aspx?storyid=112169&catid=2
Logged

Brothers and Sisters, I bid you beware/Of giving your heart to a dog to tear  -- Rudyard Kipling

One who doesn't trust is never deceived...

'I remained too much inside my head and ended up losing my mind' -Edgar Allen Poe
Nut44x4
Maine - USA
Global Moderator
Monkey Mega Star
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 18679


...and Injustice for most


« Reply #3 on: November 22, 2010, 06:52:42 PM »

Chuck Springer's remains may have been found................

Hunters discover human remains in Belmont
11.22.10

Belmont — Deer hunters found skeletal human remains in the woods of Belmont Saturday, Nov. 20, and State Police say they are looking at the possibility that the remains may be those of a Belmont man who has been missing for more than two years.

According to a press release from Steve McCausland, spokesman for the Maine Department of Public Safety, the remains were found about a mile into the woods off Back Belmont Road.

A hunter discovered the remains in thick woods about 11 a.m. Saturday, according to the press release. The remains were recovered Saturday and Sunday by a team of Maine Game Wardens and State Police personnel, and then transported to the State Medical Examiner's Office in Augusta for positive identification.

McCausland reported that police are looking at the possibility that the remains may be those of 68-year-old Charles "Chuck" Springer, a Belmont man who has been missing since May of 2008. Springer wandered away from his home on Halls Corner Road and was the subject of several searches in the area after he was reported missing.

The body discovered over the weekend, according to the press release, was found about 1.7 miles from Springer's house.

McCausland said the discovery of the remains in Belmont marks the third time this month that hunters have found human remains in the woods of Maine while hunting.

The two other bodies discovered this month by hunters were an unidentified man found in woods in Stacyville Nov. 4, and the body of a Vassalboro man, missing since June, who was found in woods near his home Nov. 15.

http://waldo.villagesoup.com/news/story/hunters-discover-human-remains-in-belmont/365392
Logged

Brothers and Sisters, I bid you beware/Of giving your heart to a dog to tear  -- Rudyard Kipling

One who doesn't trust is never deceived...

'I remained too much inside my head and ended up losing my mind' -Edgar Allen Poe
Nut44x4
Maine - USA
Global Moderator
Monkey Mega Star
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 18679


...and Injustice for most


« Reply #4 on: November 23, 2010, 05:16:11 PM »

Body Found in Belmont That of 68-Year-Old Missing Man
by Catherine Pegram - November 23rd 2010 04:13pm

Belmont - The medical examiner's office has confirmed the remains of a body found in Belmont over the weekend are that of a man who's been missing for two-and-a-half years.

Deer hunters discovered the remains of 68-year-old Charles Springer of Belmont Saturday.

State police say he was positively identified last night through dental records.

Springer's been missing since May of 2008 after he wandered away from his home on the Halls Corner Road.

He was the subject of several searches after that.

His body was found just a few miles from his house. Police say there's no indication of foul play.

This was the third time in a month deer hunters have discovered a body.

http://www.wabi.tv/news/15879/body-found-in-belmont-that-of-68-year-old-missing-man


RIP Chuck.......you can go home now.
Logged

Brothers and Sisters, I bid you beware/Of giving your heart to a dog to tear  -- Rudyard Kipling

One who doesn't trust is never deceived...

'I remained too much inside my head and ended up losing my mind' -Edgar Allen Poe
Nut44x4
Maine - USA
Global Moderator
Monkey Mega Star
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 18679


...and Injustice for most


« Reply #5 on: February 07, 2011, 03:52:22 PM »

Bangor Daily News (Maine) 
February 7, 2011 Monday
 
Missing Mainer focus of TV show;
Jeremy Alex vanished in 2004 in Northport
 
Editor's Note: This article is part of a feature called Follow-up in which BDN staff update stories from the past to inform readers of the status of subjects covered in initial reports and any new developments.

NORTHPORT - Almost seven years ago, Jeremy Alex disappeared in the woods of Northport under mysterious circumstances.

Despite a $20,000 reward for information on his whereabouts, his family is still left with many questions, no answers - and no Jeremy.

They hope that a television program about him that airs Monday night on the Investigation Discovery channel's series "Disappeared" will change that.

"There's not too many things left to do that will spark an interest again," his father, Ted Alex, said Friday from Portsmouth, N.H., where he lives. "We're optimistic ... Hopefully, somebody will call and give us some information."

Jeremy, a landscaper who was in the process of moving to Northport from Islesboro, was 28 when he last was seen running into the woods off Pound Hill Road the evening of April 24, 2004. Although the disappearance was treated initially as a missing-person case, his family believes that the man they describe as kind and a free spirit may have been murdered.

Over the course of the investigation, authorities found that Jeremy had used cocaine and heroin on the day he disappeared.

"My personal opinion is that Jeremy was the victim of foul play," Alex said. "He got himself in over his head. I think that was the result."
SNIPPED........
Anyone with information about Jeremy Alex should call Trundy at the Waldo County Sheriff's Office at 338-2040.

For more information, visit www.jeremyalex.com.


The Jeremy Alex episode of "Disappeared" will air at 9 p.m. Monday, Feb. 7, on the Investigation Discovery channel, 104 for Time Warner Cable subscribers, 285 for those with DirectTV, 192 for those with the DISH Network.
http://www6.lexisnexis.com/publisher/EndUser?Action=UserDisplayFullDocument&orgId=574&topicId=100020825&docId=l:1354629021&start=1
Logged

Brothers and Sisters, I bid you beware/Of giving your heart to a dog to tear  -- Rudyard Kipling

One who doesn't trust is never deceived...

'I remained too much inside my head and ended up losing my mind' -Edgar Allen Poe
Nut44x4
Maine - USA
Global Moderator
Monkey Mega Star
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 18679


...and Injustice for most


« Reply #6 on: February 05, 2012, 07:22:38 AM »

MISSING CHILDREN
Posted: February 5, 2012

Still 6 missing cases unresolved in Maine
275 of 283 children reported in Maine have been recovered


There are six unsolved missing children cases in Maine dating back to the early 1970s, according to the national organization charged with tracking the cases.


• Douglas Charles Chapman of Alfred was 3 when he was reported missing June 2, 1971. Today he would be 43.

• Cathy Marie Moulton of Portland was 16 when she was reported missing Sept. 24, 1971. Today she would be 56.

• Kurt Ronald Newton of Manchester was 4 when he was reported missing Sept. 1, 1975. Today he would be 40.

• Bernard Ross of Ashland was 18 when he was reported missing May 12, 1977. Today he would be 53. (According to the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children, a federal provision allows the center to classify missing persons between 18 and 21 as missing children, if requested by the parents or police.)

• Kimberly Ann Moreau of Jay was 17 when she was reported missing May 11, 1986. Today, she would be 43.

SNIP  (and now Ayla )


Of the eight reported cases that remain, six children are still missing and the other cases were closed because they were unfounded.

 ::snipping2::
In a 2002 study, the U.S. Department of Justice estimated that about 800,000 children were reported missing during a one-year period — an average of about 2,000 children per day.

The report estimates that 340,500 of those children were reported missing for “benign” reasons, and 357,600 children either ran away or were kicked out of their homes. Almost 62,000 of the cases involved children who were lost or injured and unable to come home when they were expected.

 ::snipping2::
The remaining cases involved abductions, which are broken into two categories: family and nonfamily ones. The study estimates that 56,500 children were abducted by family members and 12,100 were abducted by non-family members.

According to the study, a small minority of missing-child cases are because of so-called stereotypical kidnappings. Those kidnappings involve “someone the child does not know or a slight acquaintance who holds the child overnight, transports the child 50 miles or more, kills the child, demands ransom or intends to keep the child permanently,” according to the study.

Abducted children in those cases were 115 out of nearly 800,000, or about 0.01 percent.

The same study offers a breakdown of ages for the 800,000 children who were reported missing:

• 12 percent were younger than 5 years old

• 14 percent were 6-11

• 30 percent were 12-14

• 44 percent were 15-17

 ::snipping2::

 ::snipping2::
“The policy of the National Center is we will not close a case until the child has been physically found, regardless of the circumstances,” he said.

Department of Public Safety Spokesman Steve McCausland said the Maine cases remain open. “As new information comes in, detectives are assigned to follow that information up,” he said.
 ::snipping2::
http://www.onlinesentinel.com/news/Still-6-missing-cases-unresolved-in-Maine.html
Logged

Brothers and Sisters, I bid you beware/Of giving your heart to a dog to tear  -- Rudyard Kipling

One who doesn't trust is never deceived...

'I remained too much inside my head and ended up losing my mind' -Edgar Allen Poe
Sister
Monkey All Star Jr.
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8645



« Reply #7 on: February 06, 2012, 10:54:49 AM »

More than 2,000 children a day go missing . . . 
Logged


Nut44x4
Maine - USA
Global Moderator
Monkey Mega Star
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 18679


...and Injustice for most


« Reply #8 on: March 25, 2012, 12:47:31 PM »

1 found today, possibly

Posted:Today
Updated: 12:41 AM

Man's body found during search for Ayla
WATERVILLE – The body of man missing since 2004 was found Saturday during a search for Ayla Reynolds, but searchers did not find any clues that would lead them to the toddler.

Volunteer searchers found the skeletal remains of a man whom investigators believe to be Steven C. Brandon, a Waterville resident who has been missing since February 2004. Police do not believe foul play was involved in his death, according to Department of Public Safety spokesman Steve McCausland.

The remains, found by volunteer searchers on the banks of Messalonskee Stream, will be sent to the state Medical Examiner's Office to confirm the identity and cause of death.

 ::snipping2::

http://www.pressherald.com/news/mans-remains-found-during-search-for-ayla_2012-03-25.html
Logged

Brothers and Sisters, I bid you beware/Of giving your heart to a dog to tear  -- Rudyard Kipling

One who doesn't trust is never deceived...

'I remained too much inside my head and ended up losing my mind' -Edgar Allen Poe
Nut44x4
Maine - USA
Global Moderator
Monkey Mega Star
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 18679


...and Injustice for most


« Reply #9 on: May 18, 2013, 11:31:05 AM »

Since 1971, seven Maine children reported missing have not been found

Posted May 17, 2013, at 7:53 p.m.
 

“Missing children [who aren’t soon located], and there are only a handful, go back 40 years,” McCausland said.
 
Six children in addition to Cable have been reported missing in Maine since 1971 and have not yet been found, according to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children and media reports.
 
Aside from Cable, the most recent case of a child missing for a significant length of time is Ayla Reynolds, who was last seen 18 months ago.
 
Reynolds was 20 months old when she was reported missing from her father’s Waterville home on Dec. 17, 2011. McCausland said on Friday there have been no new developments in the case. Police continue to investigate her disappearance, although they have stated they do not think she will be found alive.

Ayla Reynolds’ disappearance is not the only open missing child case in Maine.
 
Douglas Charles Chapman, then 3, of Alfred was reported missing June 2, 1971; Cathy Marie Moulton, 16, of Portland was reported missing Sept. 24, 1971; Kurt Ronald Newton, 4, of Manchester was reported missing Sept. 1, 1975; Bernard Ross, 18, of Ashland was reported missing May 12, 1977; and Kimberly Ann Moreau, 17, of Jay was reported missing May 11, 1986.
 
Chapman was last seen playing by a sandpile about 25 yards from his home in Alfred while his mother was inside on the phone and his father was at work, according to a Maine State Police website dedicated to missing Mainers.
 
Moulton was last seen in downtown Portland, according to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children’s website.
 
Newton wandered away from his family’s campsite at the Chain of Ponds Public Reserve Land near Coburn Gore on the Quebec border, according to media reports. He was last seen riding his tricycle at the campsite while his mother was out of sight washing muddy shoes.
 
Moreau was last seen in the company of an individual she met earlier in the day and foul play is suspected, the state police website states.
 
Two older Maine teenagers who disappeared years ago also remain unaccounted for.
 
http://bangordailynews.com/2013/05/17/news/state/cases-of-children-missing-for-more-than-a-few-days-are-rare-in-maine/?ref=relatedSidebar
Logged

Brothers and Sisters, I bid you beware/Of giving your heart to a dog to tear  -- Rudyard Kipling

One who doesn't trust is never deceived...

'I remained too much inside my head and ended up losing my mind' -Edgar Allen Poe
Nut44x4
Maine - USA
Global Moderator
Monkey Mega Star
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 18679


...and Injustice for most


« Reply #10 on: June 23, 2016, 11:14:14 AM »

Crews are searching in Hermon regarding a missing person from 1980.
 Jun 23, 20169:12 AM EDT
Bangor Police Officers along with Maine State Troopers and Penobscot Sheriff’s Deputies are using a backhoe and a shovels to search for evidence related to the disappearance and/or death of Sharon Smith.
 
She was last seen in September of 1980.
 
Crews are digging up the lawn of a home on New Boston Road in Hermon.
 
Bangor police are not offering many details at this point other than it is related to Smith and is a search for a body.
 
We’ll have more information as it becomes available.
http://wabi.tv/2016/06/23/police-digging-up-lawn-in-hermon-searching-for-a-body/
Logged

Brothers and Sisters, I bid you beware/Of giving your heart to a dog to tear  -- Rudyard Kipling

One who doesn't trust is never deceived...

'I remained too much inside my head and ended up losing my mind' -Edgar Allen Poe
Nut44x4
Maine - USA
Global Moderator
Monkey Mega Star
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 18679


...and Injustice for most


« Reply #11 on: September 12, 2017, 05:00:10 PM »

New list (includes unsolved) https://www.mainecoldcasealliance.org/copy-of-memorial-list-of-names
Logged

Brothers and Sisters, I bid you beware/Of giving your heart to a dog to tear  -- Rudyard Kipling

One who doesn't trust is never deceived...

'I remained too much inside my head and ended up losing my mind' -Edgar Allen Poe
Pages: 1   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Use of this web site in any manner signifies unconditional acceptance, without exception, of our terms of use.
Powered by SMF 1.1.13 | SMF © 2006-2011, Simple Machines LLC
 
Page created in 0.144 seconds with 20 queries.