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Author Topic: Lindsey Baum #3 7/28/09 - 8/26/09  (Read 205514 times)
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JessStar
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« Reply #720 on: August 03, 2009, 04:16:59 PM »

Here's a little information that gives us some idea of the demographics of McCleary:

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.8 square miles (4.7 km˛), of which, 1.8 square miles (4.7 km˛) of it is land and 0.55% is water.

As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 1,454 people, 555 households, and 376 families residing in the city.
The population density was 800.2 people per square mile (308.5/km˛).
There were 583 housing units at an average density of 320.9/sq mi (123.7/km˛).
The racial makeup of the city was 94.36% White, 0.21% African American, 0.89% Native American, 0.28% Asian, 0.76% from other races, and 3.51% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.20% of the population.

There were 555 households out of which 32.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.3% were married couples living together, 13.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.1% were non-families.

27.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older.
The average household size was 2.48 and the average family size was 3.00.

In the city the population was spread out with 25.0% under the age of 18, 7.7% from 18 to 24, 27.0% from 25 to 44, 21.5% from 45 to 64, and 18.8% who were 65 years of age or older.

The median age was 38 years.

For every 100 females there were 91.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.0 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $30,769, and the median income for a family was $36,534. Males had a median income of $33,421 versus $25,417 for females. The per capita income for the city was $14,249. About 12.2% of families and 17.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 22.9% of those under age 18 and 24.5% of those age 65 or over.
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JessStar
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« Reply #721 on: August 03, 2009, 04:21:58 PM »

A little additional information comparing McCleary to Washington generally:

Estimated median household income in 2007:
McCleary:   $38,193
Washington:   $55,591


Estimated per capita income in 2007:
McCleary:   $17,580
Washington:   $29,027


Estimated median house or condo value in 2007:
McCleary:   $138,604
Washington:   $300,800
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« Reply #722 on: August 03, 2009, 04:25:46 PM »

Strange - today when I signed on there is only 1 guest.  A couple of weeks ago, there were 18 or 19 all the time.  What does this mean? 
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JessStar
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« Reply #723 on: August 03, 2009, 04:26:18 PM »

This answers some of our questions and helps us get a feel for this seemingly quaint little town:

http://ftp.techline.com/infocus/mccleary.htm
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Fanny Mae
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« Reply #724 on: August 03, 2009, 04:26:26 PM »

The storm drain system, sewer system, and water system would be one thing. The knowledge about abandoned water wells, septic tanks, and cisterns would probably only be documented in the memory of a long time WILLING McCleary resident. IMO
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« Reply #725 on: August 03, 2009, 04:27:57 PM »

Strange - today when I signed on there is only 1 guest.  A couple of weeks ago, there were 18 or 19 all the time.  What does this mean? 
Guests are non-members who are here to read, or in some cases (like me sometimes) members who have not logged in (I forget Monkey Devil! )
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« Reply #726 on: August 03, 2009, 04:28:50 PM »

This answers some of our questions and helps us get a feel for this seemingly quaint little town:

http://ftp.techline.com/infocus/mccleary.htm
Thanks JessStar
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Lovinlife
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« Reply #727 on: August 03, 2009, 04:31:55 PM »

The storm drain system, sewer system, and water system would be one thing. The knowledge about abandoned water wells, septic tanks, and cisterns would probably only be documented in the memory of a long time WILLING McCleary resident. IMO
Good idea Fanny.  Some interesting reading here:


http://mcclearychamber.org/history.html
Although Simpson Logging Company improved the utilities prior to selling them to the Town, the need for adequate fire protection and a new sewer system soon became apparent. In 1952, a complete two-stage sewage treatment plant together with new water mains and a storage tank were constructed at a cost of $500,000.

So any home constructed before 1952 would have a well & a septic?  I'm a city girl, I'm not sure how that works.
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« Reply #728 on: August 03, 2009, 04:36:46 PM »

Strange - today when I signed on there is only 1 guest.  A couple of weeks ago, there were 18 or 19 all the time.  What does this mean? 

Maybe they don't like the company here posting.  Monkey Devil!
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Jesus loves the little children, all the children in the world.
Red and yellow, black and white, they are precious in his sight. Jesus loves the little children of the world.

 Words: C. Her­bert Wool­ston (1856-1927)  Music: George F. Root (1820-1895)
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« Reply #729 on: August 03, 2009, 04:41:03 PM »

The storm drain system, sewer system, and water system would be one thing. The knowledge about abandoned water wells, septic tanks, and cisterns would probably only be documented in the memory of a long time WILLING McCleary resident. IMO
Good idea Fanny.  Some interesting reading here:


http://mcclearychamber.org/history.html
Although Simpson Logging Company improved the utilities prior to selling them to the Town, the need for adequate fire protection and a new sewer system soon became apparent. In 1952, a complete two-stage sewage treatment plant together with new water mains and a storage tank were constructed at a cost of $500,000.

So any home constructed before 1952 would have a well & a septic?  I'm a city girl, I'm not sure how that works.

Unfortunately, I know all about wells and sewer systems.  We have both.  3 months after we bought our house we started noticing a strange wet spot in the front yard.  We asked the previous owners if they knew anything about it.  He said it was a natural spring.  We later found out it was the septic lines that he "the previous owner" had pumped out every 3 months before they sold the house.  It cost us $10,000 to replace (it never passed county code either and we had to completely replace)
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« Reply #730 on: August 03, 2009, 04:43:20 PM »

I meant septic system Sooooorry......
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JessStar
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« Reply #731 on: August 03, 2009, 04:44:24 PM »

The storm drain system, sewer system, and water system would be one thing. The knowledge about abandoned water wells, septic tanks, and cisterns would probably only be documented in the memory of a long time WILLING McCleary resident. IMO
Good idea Fanny.  Some interesting reading here:


http://mcclearychamber.org/history.html
Although Simpson Logging Company improved the utilities prior to selling them to the Town, the need for adequate fire protection and a new sewer system soon became apparent. In 1952, a complete two-stage sewage treatment plant together with new water mains and a storage tank were constructed at a cost of $500,000.

So any home constructed before 1952 would have a well & a septic?  I'm a city girl, I'm not sure how that works.

If McCleary is like other places, updating to city water/sewage would have been required.  I'll leave that up to the locals to answer for sure, but this comes from the site I referenced above:

The water and sewer departments are up to date, and again very reasonable. Although the utilities are town owned, some of the outlying areas are serviced for electricity by Grays Harbor PUD and have privately-owned water wells and septic tanks.

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Fanny Mae
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« Reply #732 on: August 03, 2009, 04:44:49 PM »

The storm drain system, sewer system, and water system would be one thing. The knowledge about abandoned water wells, septic tanks, and cisterns would probably only be documented in the memory of a long time WILLING McCleary resident. IMO
Good idea Fanny.  Some interesting reading here:


http://mcclearychamber.org/history.html
Although Simpson Logging Company improved the utilities prior to selling them to the Town, the need for adequate fire protection and a new sewer system soon became apparent. In 1952, a complete two-stage sewage treatment plant together with new water mains and a storage tank were constructed at a cost of $500,000.

So any home constructed before 1952 would have a well & a septic?  I'm a city girl, I'm not sure how that works.

I was a city girl too. But I do know that when my mama and daddy bought a house in the early '60 that was further out, it had a well and a septic tank. A few years later, the city came through and laid water and sewer pipes and offered the residents a cheaper rate if they hooked on at the time of construction. Most did, although my daddy kept the well going for irrigation of his garden, as long as the water pipes to the city service were seperate from the well water. The septic tanks were still there in every yard, and were sometimes filled with cement or fill. Some were not. Over the years, the grass grew over the opening, and unless you knew beforehand it was there, you would have never know it. It was that way in most yards in the neighborhood.

It would be that kind of information from someone living in the area at the time to be able to tell if this was so in McCleary. I doubt seriously if it would be in any public records.
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Jesus loves the little children, all the children in the world.
Red and yellow, black and white, they are precious in his sight. Jesus loves the little children of the world.

 Words: C. Her­bert Wool­ston (1856-1927)  Music: George F. Root (1820-1895)
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« Reply #733 on: August 03, 2009, 04:52:36 PM »

Most people don't take out the septic tanks because of the expense to do so.  I wanted our septic tank moved because it was so close to the front door.  Needless to say, I couldn't afford it so it is still there.  Also, the county codes keep most people from making decisions for themselves.  You have to have the county approve every step.
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« Reply #734 on: August 03, 2009, 04:56:43 PM »

Unfortunately, I have heard of a couple of cases where children have been found in a septic tank.  Most tanks are hard to get into though, so It always seem suspicious to me.
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« Reply #735 on: August 03, 2009, 04:58:53 PM »

I think we scared everyone away with our sewer talk.  Fanny, I think you maybe on to something here.  If I understand correctly, just because you have city sewer & water does not necessarily mean you don't have an abandoned well & septic tank on your property.  Hmmmm. 
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« Reply #736 on: August 03, 2009, 05:10:16 PM »

I'd surmise that very few people removed their septic systems. However, if the conversion took place over 50 years ago, the chances that they would still be accessible are probably slim. I'd be more concerned about abandoned wells. They're probably all over the place. JMO
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« Reply #737 on: August 03, 2009, 05:11:49 PM »

Do you think Lindsey may have fallen into an abandoned well or septic tank?  Abandoned wells have always scared me.  We had a property beside ours when I was a child that had a couple of abandoned wells.  The property had, at one time, been a little park that had performances and parties.  It had long ago been abandoned and the only evidence of the wells were metal sheets that covered it.  I was always afraid that one of our dogs would fall in.  They often went over there to play in the creek.  Alot of abandoned wells are not even covered adequately.
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« Reply #738 on: August 03, 2009, 05:17:56 PM »

Most people don't take out the septic tanks because of the expense to do so.  I wanted our septic tank moved because it was so close to the front door.  Needless to say, I couldn't afford it so it is still there.  Also, the county codes keep most people from making decisions for themselves.  You have to have the county approve every step.

I had a house where everything was on septic and when we got public utilities it was the homeowners responsibility and was strictly enforced that the tanks had to be filled with pea gravel and sealed.  Wonder if the regulations are that strict there? 

BTW - ChiMonkey - interesting post - you have been busy on this. 

Atlanta mom - I have noticed that on big news days the amount of guest goes up in a linear fashion to logged in monkeys.  When news is slow, few guests and often they are us - just not logged in yet!

Lets hope news comes soon about Lindsay.



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Fanny Mae
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« Reply #739 on: August 03, 2009, 05:26:27 PM »

Do you think Lindsey may have fallen into an abandoned well or septic tank?  Abandoned wells have always scared me.  We had a property beside ours when I was a child that had a couple of abandoned wells.  The property had, at one time, been a little park that had performances and parties.  It had long ago been abandoned and the only evidence of the wells were metal sheets that covered it.  I was always afraid that one of our dogs would fall in.  They often went over there to play in the creek.  Alot of abandoned wells are not even covered adequately.

I don't really think Lindsay "fell" into an abandoned well or septic tank because of the time she came up missing. It was getting dark and she was on her way home on the sidewalks and streets. But I certainly do think she could have been place there by someone in the area that knows of such things. JMO
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Jesus loves the little children, all the children in the world.
Red and yellow, black and white, they are precious in his sight. Jesus loves the little children of the world.

 Words: C. Her­bert Wool­ston (1856-1927)  Music: George F. Root (1820-1895)
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