March 25, 2019, 07:02:24 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: NEW CHILD BOARD CREATED IN THE POLITICAL SECTION FOR THE 2016 ELECTION
 
   Home   Help Login Register  
Pages: « 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 »   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Shooting at Ft. Hood Texas 11/05/09 13 dead, 43 wounded-(Murder Charges)  (Read 595417 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Txsflame
Scared Monkey
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 269


UnID Murder victim


WWW
« Reply #640 on: November 10, 2009, 11:21:00 PM »

I just again want to thank Heart. My computer is being a butt today.

 I also want to add. I have the names of 11 of the 13  confirmed dead, and will update that as soon as computer quits being stupid.. BUT I also want to add The pregnant officers baby also died.. so the TOTAL is 14. I can not and will not disreguard that babies life. Her family has stated she was there to get out of the army, that baby was real to her, and SHOULD be counted among the dead!




 TY very much. I just think it IS very important that babies life be counted!!

I've changed the subject line in the first post to reflect the additional death, to 14 dead,
38 wounded.  Please note:  I CAN"T change all of the subject headers of each post in the thread.  I'm sorry, but it won't allow me to do that.  I can change only the subject line in the first post. 

Note:  I misread a post or two.  I thought the count was 14.  In the future, please provide a link that includes any changes.  That's the best way to do it, to avoid confusion and for accuracy.  Muffy


Srry Muffy that was just my on personal thoughts on it, that the baby of fancheska should be also counted.. I said it wrong,
Logged

Perfectly Imperfect. Imperfection is the only thinig I ever perfected!!!!

Please visit http://walkercountyjanedoe1980.webs.com

http://scaredmonkeys.net/index.php?topic=6550.new#new
Heart
Monkey All Star Jr.
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 7717



« Reply #641 on: November 10, 2009, 11:25:32 PM »

Thank you Txsflame for your post. Very much appreciated.
Logged

Heart
Txsflame
Scared Monkey
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 269


UnID Murder victim


WWW
« Reply #642 on: November 10, 2009, 11:30:40 PM »

Can anyone tell me if there has been a coherent reason why there was gunfire in the two housing units and sirens going off hours after the initial shooting at the Readiness Center? 
Probably Chaos and Rumours Fanny.

I want a better explanation.....

 Fanny I have asked that several times..to other locals.. I HEARD with my own ears the lady on our local news claiming to be in the dorm NEXT to anotherdorm saying there was shooting, it was happening while she was on the phone with news channel 10 kcen..(outta Waco). It was 333 when she was saying this... I looked at the clock, when she started talking about it.  No one seems to know what was up, and maybe it wasnt gun fire she heard, but she was sure convincing, at the same time FT Hood loud speakers was saying ot close ALL vent??? Maybe a mystery never solved!?!?!?
Logged

Perfectly Imperfect. Imperfection is the only thinig I ever perfected!!!!

Please visit http://walkercountyjanedoe1980.webs.com

http://scaredmonkeys.net/index.php?topic=6550.new#new
Txsflame
Scared Monkey
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 269


UnID Murder victim


WWW
« Reply #643 on: November 10, 2009, 11:38:18 PM »

Thank you Txsflame for your post. Very much appreciated.

AND you are awsome.. and I do not use that word lightly!!!! TY TY TY   
Logged

Perfectly Imperfect. Imperfection is the only thinig I ever perfected!!!!

Please visit http://walkercountyjanedoe1980.webs.com

http://scaredmonkeys.net/index.php?topic=6550.new#new
Heart
Monkey All Star Jr.
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 7717



« Reply #644 on: November 10, 2009, 11:38:27 PM »

Cacoethes Scribendi: Thank You Veterans!

November 10, 2009 11:21 PM EST

I trust that you will forgive my posting my weekly article early this week, but because of the topic, I felt it was appropriate.

Last Thursday as the country watched in horror the extreme cowardice of Major Nidal Hassan at the Fort Hood Army Base, I was reminded of the sacrifice that the men and women of our armed forces make each and every day. Since our great country’s inception, men and women have put their lives on the line for the cause of freedom. More than 1,314,000 lives have been lost in the 233 years since our forefathers declared their independence from tyranny.

I have the honor of visiting Walter Reed Army Medical Center and the National Naval Medical Center on a weekly basis to perform the duties of my job. As I walk the corridors of these hospitals, I see the men and women who have lost limbs in combat and I am humbled and inspired by them.

Veterans Day grew out of Armistice Day that commemorated the end of World War 1. In 1954 it became Veterans Day to honor all veterans from all wars. 22 years ago, I was standing at attention in Navy Boot Camp listening to our Company Commander vent her anger and frustration at some local radio personalities who failed to show the proper respect for the meaning of the holiday. Sadly, not much has changed in the past 20 years.

Today we observe Veterans Day and for many people, this is a day that they will not even realize is a holiday. They will probably wonder why the bank is closed at lunch or why their mail didn’t get delivered. To many it is merely a nuisance vice a sobering reminder of the honor, integrity, courage, and patriotism those veterans from every generation of our nation’s history have displayed.

The members of our armed services, both past and present, are a rare breed; they truly are the bravest and finest that our country has to offer. They deserve our admiration and respect. The United States of America is a great country because of our freedoms and we are free because of the sacrifices of our veterans. At the funerals of veterans, a flag is presented to the family of the fallen with the words, “On behalf of a grateful nation.” Those should be our words every day of the year to our veterans. Today I stand and salute the veterans from every branch of service that have come before me, and those who have dutifully followed after me. I humbly say, “On behalf of a grateful nation, thank you!”

http://www.gather.com/viewArticle.action?articleId=281474977895195&grpId=3659174697244816&nav=Groupspace
Logged

Heart
MuffyBee
Former Moderator
Monkey Mega Star
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 44702



« Reply #645 on: November 10, 2009, 11:44:33 PM »

I just again want to thank Heart. My computer is being a butt today.

 I also want to add. I have the names of 11 of the 13  confirmed dead, and will update that as soon as computer quits being stupid.. BUT I also want to add The pregnant officers baby also died.. so the TOTAL is 14. I can not and will not disreguard that babies life. Her family has stated she was there to get out of the army, that baby was real to her, and SHOULD be counted among the dead!




 TY very much. I just think it IS very important that babies life be counted!!

I've changed the subject line in the first post to reflect the additional death, to 14 dead,
38 wounded.  Please note:  I CAN"T change all of the subject headers of each post in the thread.  I'm sorry, but it won't allow me to do that.  I can change only the subject line in the first post. 

Note:  I misread a post or two.  I thought the count was 14.  In the future, please provide a link that includes any changes.  That's the best way to do it, to avoid confusion and for accuracy.  Muffy


Srry Muffy that was just my on personal thoughts on it, that the baby of fancheska should be also counted.. I said it wrong,

I really do understand Txsflame.  I feel the same as you do.   an angelic monkey
Logged

  " Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not his own facts."  - Daniel Moynihan
Fanny Mae
Monkey Mega Star
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 16655



« Reply #646 on: November 11, 2009, 11:37:39 AM »

Good Morning.  an angelic monkey
Logged

Jesus loves the little children, all the children in the world.
Red and yellow, black and white, they are precious in his sight. Jesus loves the little children of the world.

 Words: C. Her­bert Wool­ston (1856-1927)  Music: George F. Root (1820-1895)
Fanny Mae
Monkey Mega Star
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 16655



« Reply #647 on: November 11, 2009, 11:53:51 AM »

Can anyone tell me if there has been a coherent reason why there was gunfire in the two housing units and sirens going off hours after the initial shooting at the Readiness Center? 
Probably Chaos and Rumours Fanny.

I want a better explanation.....

 Fanny I have asked that several times..to other locals.. I HEARD with my own ears the lady on our local news claiming to be in the dorm NEXT to anotherdorm saying there was shooting, it was happening while she was on the phone with news channel 10 kcen..(outta Waco). It was 333 when she was saying this... I looked at the clock, when she started talking about it.  No one seems to know what was up, and maybe it wasnt gun fire she heard, but she was sure convincing, at the same time FT Hood loud speakers was saying ot close ALL vent??? Maybe a mystery never solved!?!?!?


I know.
Logged

Jesus loves the little children, all the children in the world.
Red and yellow, black and white, they are precious in his sight. Jesus loves the little children of the world.

 Words: C. Her­bert Wool­ston (1856-1927)  Music: George F. Root (1820-1895)
MuffyBee
Former Moderator
Monkey Mega Star
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 44702



« Reply #648 on: November 11, 2009, 11:55:06 AM »

Good Morning.  an angelic monkey

Good morning Fanny Mae.   sunny
Logged

  " Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not his own facts."  - Daniel Moynihan
Fanny Mae
Monkey Mega Star
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 16655



« Reply #649 on: November 11, 2009, 12:09:35 PM »

Good Morning.  an angelic monkey

Good morning Fanny Mae.   sunny

Good morning MUFFY BEE. :: 
Logged

Jesus loves the little children, all the children in the world.
Red and yellow, black and white, they are precious in his sight. Jesus loves the little children of the world.

 Words: C. Her­bert Wool­ston (1856-1927)  Music: George F. Root (1820-1895)
Heart
Monkey All Star Jr.
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 7717



« Reply #650 on: November 11, 2009, 06:36:20 PM »

McCain calls Ft. Hood shootings “act of terror” in Louisville speech

by Joe Arnold

Posted on November 11, 2009 at 6:15 PM

In Louisville for the opening of the archives of Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY), Arizona Senator John
McCain (R-AZ) told the assembled crowd that the attack by Nidal Hasan on U.S. Soldiers at Fort Hood was "an act of terror."
 
McCain says he wants an investigation to answer many questions, adding it is "unacceptable" that warning signs
were ignored, leaving Hasan to carry out the barbaric shootings.
 
"I believe it was an act of terror," McCain said.
 
Described by U of L President James Ramsey on this Veterans Day as America's most recognized and renowned veteran,
John McCain shared his scorn for the military's lack of attention to "disturbing behavior" and islamic extremist views of
the shooting suspect.
 
"I think we ought to make sure that political correctness never impedes national security or impacts it,"  McCain said to
applause.
 
Speaking to reporters later, McCain expounded on his "terror" remarks, "the individual decided that he was not only against
the war, but that his religion somehow dictated that he would act in the most barbaric fashion.  So, I believe that what
he committed is an act of terror, and the depth of his ingratitude is really remarkable," McCain said, explaining that the
shooting suspect had received the benefits of military service but, when deployed overseas, instead attacked fellow soldiers.
 
"The fact is," McCain continued, "it was an act of terror when you are on a military base, and you are a trusted member of
the military, a commissioned officer, and you kill your fellow members of the military, motivated obviously by his
view of the extremist interpretation of an honorable religion."
 
McCain was in Louisville to honor Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell and his wife, former Labor Secretary Elaine Chao
as their joint archives opened today.
 
It was a remarkable political union considering how the two Senators have clashed over the years.  McCain once accused
McConnell of the "Most egregious incident" Of corruption he had seen in the Senate.
 
McCain was contrite as he addressed McConnell's constituents.
 
"Thanks also, Mitch for your patience and courtesy you've shown me over the years even when I've severely tested
your goodwill,"  McCain said.
 
"Mitch McConnell and I have differed from time to time on issues, but our differences have always been marked by
profound respect,"  McCain said.
 
McConnell called McCain a "colleague and friend" and spoke of his hopes that the archives and the McConnell
Scholars program teaches valuable lessons about governance.
 
"And the value of the two party system which forces us to make compromises that often lead to a better product
 for the American people,"  McConnell said.
 
The longest serving senator in Kentucky history made clear the archives do not signify the end of his career.
 
"God willing, I intend to spend many more years in the Senate.  I have more enthusiasm for my work than ever.
 And I feel very much at the top of my game," he said.
 
Mccain called on Democrats to at least give McConnell a seat at the table during health care negotiatons.
 
"I don't see why the leader of the Republican Party should not be called into at least to have our views ventilated,"
McCain complained.
 
McConnell promised that the Senate will be as deliberate in health care overhaul debate as any other consequential
legislation, and expressed dismay that Democrats were attempting to rush the process.
 
"We simply do not agree with the approach,"  McConnell said, "I think in the Senate as has been the case as long as I've
been there, any matters of controversy will require 60 votes."
 
As he honored fellow veterans on Veterans Day, McCain said the men and women in the military are getting very
nervous about President Obama's "lack of decision making" regarding strategy and troop levels in Afghanistan.
 
"It requires resources, a part of which is a sufficient number of troops.  And the worst thing that we can do,
the worst thing that we can do is have half-measures which send our men and women into harms way but are not
sufficient resources and numbers in order to get the job done."

http://www.whas11.com/news/local/McCain-honors-Sen-McConnell--69796707.html

Video:  http://www.whas11.com/news/local/McCain-honors-Sen-McConnell--69796707.html
Logged

Heart
Heart
Monkey All Star Jr.
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 7717



« Reply #651 on: November 11, 2009, 06:52:27 PM »

Unreliable advice from this Muslim group
http://dallasmorningviewsblog.dallasnews.com/archives/2009/11/unreliable-advi.html
Logged

Heart
Heart
Monkey All Star Jr.
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 7717



« Reply #652 on: November 11, 2009, 09:15:46 PM »

Wounded Fort Hood soldier describes 'swift, tactical' gunman

November 11, 2009 2:46 p.m. EST



Watch CNN's Dr. Sanjay Gupta's exclusive interview with Burnette, as the wounded soldier recalls the ordeal of the shooting and looks at the road to recovery. AC 360, 10 p.m. ET Wednesday.  http://www.cnn.com/2009/US/11/11/fort.hood.wounded.soldier/

Killeen, Texas (CNN) -- The gunman quickly reloaded his weapon, methodically moving away from Spc. Logan Burnette after shooting him several times during last week's deadly rampage at the Fort Hood Army Post.

"He was very swift, very tactical," Burnette told reporters Wednesday outside the Metroplex Adventist Hospital near Fort Hood.

Burnette recalled the events of Thursday's mass shooting that left 12 soldiers and one civilian dead, and more than 40 others wounded. It was the deadliest shooting ever on a U.S. military base.

Fifteen soldiers remained hospitalized on Wednesday, Fort Hood spokesman Col. James Rossi told reporters. Of those, four were in intensive care. All the soldiers were in stable condition, he said.

Burnette still has a bullet lodged in his right hip, he told reporters shortly before he transferred to the Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio, Texas. That is the same medical center where the suspected shooter, Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan, is being treated.

"I took one round to my hip, which tore through my hip on the left side, through my abdomen ... and is still lodged in right side of my hip," Burnette said.

"After the hit, I fell down, not even realizing I had been hit," he said. "As I tried to get back up, I was shot in elbow on the left arm and ... the knuckle on the left pinky finger."

Burnette said he then crawled to a nearby cubicle where he hid with two other soldiers.

A few minutes later, they decided "it was time for us to get out of that building," Burnette recalled.

"So we grabbed each other, they helped me up to my feet because I couldn't move," he said. "As I started to run, I fell again, not realizing I couldn't use my left leg."

After falling again, Burnette said he "threw all of my body weight ... towards that door as hard and as fast as possible."

"Once I hit that front door, I began to low crawl, about five meters up a hill just, you know, pushing my body forward with everything I had," he said.

Once outside those doors, a fellow soldier pulled him by the collar and dragged him to a nearby building and locked Burnette in the office.

He described lying there bleeding while the gunshots continued to ring out next door. He said he was safe at that point, but thinking of his fellow soldiers who were still there, defenseless with no weapons.

"There were a lot of heroes that day and by no means am I to take precedence over them," Burnette said. "There's a lot of heroes still in Iraq and Afghanistan and they do not need to be forgotten either."

He said he hopes to "recover and return to active duty as soon as possible."
There's a lot of heroes still in Iraq and Afghanistan and they do not need to be forgotten.

Rossi said authorities remain committed to assisting those affected by the incident and their families, both physically and emotionally.

"In behavioral health, we could be at the eye of the storm, because it might take some time for some of these problems to manifest themselves," he said. "We're committed to finding them as soon as possible."

Army 1st Sgt. James McLeod, of Fort Hood's 467th Combat Stress Control Detachment, told reporters he was there when the shootings occurred.

"Everyone went into doing their job immediately," he said. "... Just soldiers taking care of soldiers."

"I can't really say that the perpetrator of this was really one of our own," McLeod said. "Soldiers do not do this to each other, so this is something a little bit different."

http://www.cnn.com/2009/US/11/11/fort.hood.wounded.soldier/




Ft. Hood Shooting Survivor Shares His Story

KILLEEN (November 11, 2009)-Fort Hood shooting victim, Spc. Logan Burnette, 24, shared his story of survival Wednesday morning from Metroplex Hospital in Killeen.


KILLEEN (November 11, 2009)-Fort Hood shooting victim, Spc. Logan Burnette, 24, shared his story of survival Wednesday morning from Metroplex Hospital in Killeen.

Burnette said he was sitting in the Soldier Readiness Center last Thursday when a gunman now identified as Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan walked in, shouted, "Allahu Akbar!" and then began firing into the crowd.

The Arabic phrase translates to mean "God is great" in English.

Burnette said he threw a chair at the gunman, who then fired, striking Burnette in the hip and abdomen.

One bullet remained lodged in Burnette's hip.

Burnette escape to a nearby building where EMS workers treated him and then transported him to Metroplex Hospital in Killeen.

Because he was still recovering from his injuries, Burnette was not able to attend Tuesday's memorial service on post.

An emotional Burnette said Wednesday the gunman was "swift" and "precise" in his shooting.

He downplays his own actions, saying, "There were a lot of heroes that day."

He's scheduled to be transferred to San Antonio later Wednesday to continue his recovery.

Once he's gone, Fort Hood civilian police Sgt. Kimberly Munley will be the only injured survivor of the shooting still at Metroplex.

She and another officer, Mark Todd, are credited with shooting Hasan and ending the rampage.

Munley was shot in an exchange of gunfire with Hasan.

Todd was not injured.

Hasan, meanwhile, remains under guard at Brooke Army Medical Center.

He has an attorney, but has directed the hospital not to release any information about his condition.
http://www.kbtx.com/local/headlines/69794777.html
Logged

Heart
Heart
Monkey All Star Jr.
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 7717



« Reply #653 on: November 11, 2009, 09:37:22 PM »

Fort Hood suspect's superiors questioned behavior

Posted Wednesday, Nov. 11, 2009

By BRETT J. BLACKLEDGE and RICHARD LARDNER

Associated Press Writers

WASHINGTON — A group of doctors overseeing Nidal Malik Hasan's medical training discussed concerns about his overly zealous religious views and strange behavior months before the Army major was accused of a shooting rampage at Fort Hood, Texas, that left 13 dead and 29 wounded.

Doctors and staff overseeing Hasan's training viewed him at times as belligerent, defensive and argumentative in his frequent discussions of his Muslim faith, a military official familiar with several group discussions about Hasan said. The official was not authorized to speak publicly about the meetings and spoke on condition of anonymity.

Hasan was characterized in meetings as a mediocre student and lazy worker, a matter of concern among the doctors and staff at Walter Reed Army Medical Center and the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, a military medical school in Bethesda, Md., the official said.

The concerns about Hasan's performance and religious views were shared with other military officials considering his assignment after he finished his medical training, and the consensus was to send the 39-year-old psychiatrist to Fort Hood, the official said.

Fort Hood, one of the country's largest military installations, was considered the best assignment for Hasan because other doctors could handle the workload if he continued to perform poorly and his superiors could document any continued behavior problems, the official said.

The group saw no evidence that Hasan was violent or a threat. It was more that he repeatedly referred to his strong religious views in discussions with classmates, his superiors and even in his research work, the official said. His behavior, while at times perceived as intense and combative, was not unlike the zeal of others with strong religious views. But some doctors and staff were concerned that their unfamiliarity with the Muslim faith would lead them to unfairly single out Hasan's behavior, the official said.

Sharon Willis, a spokeswoman for the Uniformed Services University, referred questions Wednesday about Hasan to his lawyer. The attorney, John Galligan of Belton, Texas, did not immediately return a telephone call seeking comment.

The revelations about the concerns that Hasan's superiors had before sending him to Fort Hood come amid a growing debate over what warning signs the military and law enforcement officials might have missed before last week's massacre.

A joint terrorism task force overseen by the FBI learned late last year of Hasan's repeated contact with a radical Muslim cleric who encouraged Muslims to kill U.S. troops in Iraq. A law enforcement official said Wednesday that the task force did not refer early information about Hasan to superiors because it concluded he wasn't linked to terrorism.

The doctors and staff who discussed concerns about Hasan had several group conversations about him that started in early 2008 during regular monthly meetings and ended as he was finishing a fellowship in disaster and preventive psychology this summer, the official familiar with the discussions said.

WASHINGTON —  They saw no signs of mental problems, no risk factors that would predict violent behavior. And the group discussed other factors that suggested Hasan would continue to thrive in the military, factors that mitigated their concerns, the official said.

According to the official, records reviewed by Hasan's superiors described nearly 20 years of military service, including nearly eight years as an enlisted soldier; completion of three rigorous medical school programs, albeit as a student the group characterized in their discussions as mediocre; his resilience after the deaths of his parents early in his medical education, and an otherwise polite and gentle nature when not discussing religion.

The Army has said it has no record of enlisted service for Hasan, instead noting that his military service began when he started the medical school program in 1997.

The official said the group became increasingly concerned about Hasan's religious views after he completed two research projects that took a decidedly religious tone - one at the end of his residency at Walter Reed that advocated allowing Muslim soldiers to be released as conscientious objectors instead of fighting in wars against other Muslims, and the other as he pursued his master's degree in public health that discussed religious conflicts for Muslim U.S. soldiers.

Some of those in the group questioned Hasan's sympathies as an Army psychiatrist, whether he would be more aligned with Muslims fighting U.S. troops. And there was some concern about whether he should continue to serve in the military, the official said.

Some in the group shared their experiences with Hasan, all telling similar stories about repeated instances when he made religion an issue.

Officials involved at various times in the meetings about Hasan included John Bradley, Walter Reed's chief of psychiatry; Scott Moran, Walter Reed's psychiatric residency program director; Robert Ursano, chairman of the Uniformed Services University's psychiatry department; Charles Engel, the university's assistant chair of psychiatry, and David Benedek, an associate professor of psychiatry at the university.

Those officials either declined to comment or did not return telephone calls and e-mails seeking comment Wednesday.

Meanwhile, the Pentagon has found no evidence that Hasan formally sought release from the Army as a conscientious objector or for any other reason, two senior military officials told The Associated Press. Family members have said he wanted to get out of the Army and had sought legal advice, suggesting that Hasan's anxiety as a Muslim over his pending deployment overseas might have been a factor in the deadly rampage.

Hasan had complained privately to colleagues that he was harassed for his religion and that he wanted to get out of the Army. But there is no record of Hasan filing a complaint with his chain of command regarding any harassment he may have suffered for being Muslim or any record of him formally seeking release from the military, the officials told the AP.

The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because the case is under investigation.

Another Army official, Lt. Col. George Wright, said Wednesday that Hasan likely would have had to commit to another year in the military when he was transferred to Fort Hood earlier this summer. It is common for an officer to incur a one-year service extension when they receive a transfer to another post.

Associated Press writers Devlin Barrett, Pauline Jelinek, Lolita C. Baldor, Eileen Sullivan and Pamela Hess in Washington; David Dishneau in Hagerstown, Md., and Justin Pritchard in Los Angeles contributed to this report.

http://www.star-telegram.com/190/story/1755160.html
Logged

Heart
Heart
Monkey All Star Jr.
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 7717



« Reply #654 on: November 11, 2009, 09:46:32 PM »


An unidentified solider, third from left, holds his son as the prayer Invocation is given by Col. Michael Lembke, III Corps Chaplain during the memorial ceremony for victims of the Fort Hood shooting held at U.S. Army's III Corps headquarters, Tuesday, Nov. 10, 2009, at Fort Hood, Texas.

Apartment manager Alice Thompson looks out the doorway of Nidal Hasan's apartment in Killeen, Texas, Wednesday, Nov. 11, 2009. Hasan is accused of killing 13 people and wounding dozens more at the Fort Hood military base on Nov. 5.

A prayer rug rest against the wall in the apartment of Maj. Nidal Hasan in Killeen, Texas, Wednesday, Nov. 11, 2009. Hasan, an Army psychiatrist, is accused of killing 13 people and wounding dozens more Nov. 5 at the Fort Hood military base.

Clothing left behind inside the apartment of Maj. Nidal Hasan is seen, Wednesday, Nov. 11, 2009, in Killeen, Texas. Hasan, an Army psychiatrist, is accused of killing 13 people and wounding dozens more Nov. 5 at the Fort Hood military base.

The apartment complex where Nidal Hasan lived is seen in Killeen, Texas, Wednesday, Nov. 11, 2009. Hasan is accused of killing 13 people and wounding dozens more at the Fort Hood military base on Nov. 5.

A neighbor walks past the apartment of Nidal Hasan in Killeen, Texas, Wednesday, Nov. 11, 2009. Hasan is accused of killing 13 people and wounding dozens more at Fort Hood military base on Nov. 5.
Logged

Heart
Heart
Monkey All Star Jr.
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 7717



« Reply #655 on: November 11, 2009, 09:57:46 PM »

Long, complex prosecution ahead for Fort Hood suspect

FORT WORTH, Texas _ Complicated by a federal investigation into possible terrorist ties and the prospect of mental issues, the prosecution of Army Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan will likely be a lengthy and intricate process, military legal experts say.

Hasan has been identified by military officials as the lone suspect in the Fort Hood, Texas, shootings last week that left 13 dead and more than 30 wounded _ the deadliest mass shooting at a U.S. military installation.

A former Army staff judge advocate and military law expert at Texas Tech University suggests that it could take about two years to go to the military equivalent of a trial, depending on the defendant's health. And the outcome of the case would likely end up mired in complex appeals.

"We never had a case quite like this before ... because of pretrial publicity, it will create a lot of complications," said Richard Rosen, vice chairman of the university's law school and former military justice attorney at Fort Hood.

Many factors will make the legal process challenging for prosecutors and defense attorneys: the number of witnesses, whether the suspect's actions were related to terrorism, his mental capacity and the prospect of the death penalty. What may be the most difficult decision, military legal experts say, is whether the case will be tried at Fort Hood.

The convening authority in the case, which will be one of Hasan's commanders, could request a change of venue.

Still, Rosen said, Hasan could get a fair trial.

"There could be a lot of prejudice there and, because of the tremendous pretrial publicity, there could be pressure to move the case elsewhere," he said. "But experience has been that military jurors are an independent bunch. The military jurists are smart people. The officers will all be college-educated and people with advanced degrees."

Federal officials have indicated that the case against Hasan would be handled by military justice because the suspect is a service member, the victims are Defense Department employees and the incident occurred at a military installation. It also signals that federal officials will not pursue a terrorism angle, but military legal experts say federal prosecutors could revisit terrorism-related crimes separately.

But if Hasan faces military death-penalty charges, prosecutors will be required to prove premeditation.

Fort Worth attorney Jim Lane, who made headlines three decades ago defending U.S. soldiers involved in the My Lai massacre during the Vietnam War, said many questions swirling in the media about the suspect's motive may not be answered until the trial.

"It's not a question of what happened, but the question is why it happened," he said. "It will be a most interesting and provocative defense."

Hasan's attorney, John Galligan, did not return phone or e-mail messages Tuesday which in part asked whether Hasan has been read his rights or whether he has spoken with investigators.

Galligan, a retired colonel hired Monday by Hasan's family, has asked that federal investigators not interview Hasan because it was unclear whether he had been cleared medically to talk, according to The Associated Press.

Former and current military attorneys say they would request a medical and mental evaluation of Hasan as soon as possible.

"If defense counsel has any concerns that his or her client is not competent to stand trial, he or she is obligated ... to refer their client for evaluation," said Maj. Craig Driskell of the Texas National Guard, where he serves as a military justice attorney and most recently as a brigade judge advocate in Iraq.

But, he said, any attorney involved in the case should request a mental evaluation if it is suspected that a defendant is not competent to stand trial.

It is unclear whether Hasan's defense attorneys will raise the possibility of insanity, or "lack of mental responsibility" as defined under the Uniform Code of Military Justice _ the legal framework governing service members similar to state and federal criminal statutes.

Michael Waddington, a criminal defense attorney from Evans, Ga., who has handled high-profile military cases, suggests that the military justice system is stacked in favor of the prosecution. He says on his Web site that the government prosecutors typically outnumber a defendant's assigned team 5-to-1.

"They will often manipulate every aspect of the case and fight hard to deprive you of your ability to mount a legal defense," the Web site says. "Some will use underhanded tactics to win."

The Fort Hood case closely resembles the death-penalty case against Sgt. Hasan Akbar, who is accused of killing two service members and wounding 14 others who were sleeping in tents in the northern Kuwaiti desert on March 22, 2003. Akbar, who was said to have rolled grenades into three tents on the night before the troops were to have crossed into Iraq, was sentenced to death in 2005.

Attorneys for Akbar, a Muslim convert, argued that he was mentally incompetent at the time of the attacks.

Four years after his conviction, Akbar's case remains pending before the Army Court of Criminal Appeals.

Several service members have been sentenced to death since the military death penalty was reinstated in 1984, but all have won appeals and stays of execution. The last execution of a U.S. service member was in 1961.

"The Kuwait case is very similar, and it doesn't matter if it was on American soil or on a base overseas, they will be handled the same," said Lane, who successfully defended soldiers involved in military trials until 10 years ago. "The pretrial publicity is what is going to make this case different. Obviously, you can't try that case at Ford Hood."

Still, Lane said the military justice system is one of the fairest in the world.

Hasan, Lane said, "should be thankful he's being tried in a military court."

http://www.americanchronicle.com/articles/yb/137631602
Logged

Heart
Fanny Mae
Monkey Mega Star
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 16655



« Reply #656 on: November 11, 2009, 10:42:06 PM »

HEART, You are well named. 
Logged

Jesus loves the little children, all the children in the world.
Red and yellow, black and white, they are precious in his sight. Jesus loves the little children of the world.

 Words: C. Her­bert Wool­ston (1856-1927)  Music: George F. Root (1820-1895)
2NJSons_Mom
Monkey All Star
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11324



« Reply #657 on: November 12, 2009, 10:20:16 AM »

Print Back to story 
 
Shooting suspect's superiors questioned behavior


By BRETT J. BLACKLEDGE and RICHARD LARDNER, Associated Press Writers Brett J. Blackledge And Richard Lardner, Associated Press Writers 1 hr 30 mins ago
WASHINGTON – Nidal Malik Hasan's overly zealous religious views and strange behavior worried the doctors overseeing his medical training, but they saw no evidence that he was violent or a threat.

Months later, the Army major is accused of a shooting rampage at Fort Hood, Texas, that left 13 dead and 29 wounded.

Doctors and staff overseeing Hasan's training viewed him at times as belligerent, defensive and argumentative in his frequent discussions of his Muslim faith, a military official familiar with several group discussions about Hasan said. The official was not authorized to speak publicly about the meetings and spoke on condition of anonymity.

Hasan was characterized in meetings as a mediocre student and lazy worker, a matter of concern among the doctors and staff at Walter Reed Army Medical Center and the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, a military medical school in Bethesda, Md., the official said.

The concerns about Hasan's performance and religious views were shared with other military officials considering his assignment after he finished his medical training, and the consensus was to send the 39-year-old psychiatrist to Fort Hood, the official said.

Fort Hood, one of the country's largest military installations, was considered the best assignment for Hasan because other doctors could handle the workload if he continued to perform poorly and his superiors could document any continued behavior problems, the official said.

Hasan repeatedly referred to his strong religious views in discussions with classmates, his superiors and even in his research work, the official said. His behavior, while at times perceived as intense and combative, was not unlike the zeal of others with strong religious views. But some doctors and staff were concerned that their unfamiliarity with the Muslim faith would lead them to unfairly single out Hasan's behavior, the official said.

Some in the group questioned Hasan's sympathies as an Army psychiatrist, whether he would be more aligned with Muslims fighting U.S. troops. And there was some concern about whether he should continue to serve in the military, the official said.

At one point, Hasan's supervisors ordered him to attend a university lecture series on Islam, the Middle East and terrorism, hoping to steer him toward productive work addressing potential concerns of Muslims in the military, according to The Washington Post. Hasan attended the lectures late last year or early this year, The Post reported Thursday, quoting a Walter Reed staff member who spoke anonymously because he wasn't authorized to speak publicly.

Sharon Willis, a spokeswoman for the Uniformed Services University, referred questions Wednesday about Hasan to his lawyer. The attorney, John Galligan of Belton, Texas, did not immediately return a telephone call seeking comment.

The revelations about the concerns that Hasan's superiors had before sending him to Fort Hood come amid a growing debate over what warning signs the military and law enforcement officials might have missed before last week's massacre.

A joint terrorism task force overseen by the FBI learned late last year of Hasan's repeated contact with a radical Muslim cleric who encouraged Muslims to kill U.S. troops in Iraq. The FBI said in a statement late Wednesday that the task force did not refer early information about Hasan to superiors because it concluded he wasn't linked to terrorism.

The doctors and staff who discussed concerns about Hasan had several group conversations about him that started in early 2008 during regular monthly meetings and ended as he was finishing a fellowship in disaster and preventive psychology this summer, the official familiar with the discussions said.

They saw no signs of mental problems, no risk factors that would predict violent behavior. And the group discussed other factors that suggested Hasan would continue to thrive in the military, factors that mitigated their concerns, the official said.

According to the official, records reviewed by Hasan's superiors described nearly 20 years of military service, including nearly eight years as an enlisted soldier; completion of three rigorous medical school programs, albeit as a student the group characterized in their discussions as mediocre; his resilience after the deaths of his parents early in his medical education, and an otherwise polite and gentle nature when not discussing religion.

The Army has said it has no record of enlisted service for Hasan, instead noting that his military service began when he started the medical school program in 1997.

The official said the group became increasingly concerned about Hasan's religious views after he completed two research projects that took a decidedly religious tone — one at the end of his residency at Walter Reed that advocated allowing Muslim soldiers to be released as conscientious objectors instead of fighting in wars against other Muslims, and the other as he pursued his master's degree in public health that discussed religious conflicts for Muslim U.S. soldiers.

Some in the group shared their experiences with Hasan, all telling similar stories about repeated instances when he made religion an issue.

Officials involved at various times in the meetings about Hasan included John Bradley, Walter Reed's chief of psychiatry; Scott Moran, Walter Reed's psychiatric residency program director; Robert Ursano, chairman of the Uniformed Services University's psychiatry department; Charles Engel, the university's assistant chair of psychiatry, and David Benedek, an associate professor of psychiatry at the university.

Those officials either declined to comment or did not return telephone calls and e-mails seeking comment Wednesday.

Meanwhile, the Pentagon has found no evidence that Hasan formally sought release from the Army as a conscientious objector or for any other reason, two senior military officials told The Associated Press. Family members have said he wanted to get out of the Army and had sought legal advice, suggesting that Hasan's anxiety as a Muslim over his pending deployment overseas might have been a factor in the deadly rampage.

Hasan had complained privately to colleagues that he was harassed for his religion and that he wanted to get out of the Army. But there is no record of Hasan filing a complaint with his chain of command regarding any harassment he may have suffered for being Muslim or any record of him formally seeking release from the military, the officials told the AP.

The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because the case is under investigation.

Another Army official, Lt. Col. George Wright, said Wednesday that Hasan likely would have had to commit to another year in the military when he was transferred to Fort Hood earlier this summer. It is common for an officer to incur a one-year service extension when they receive a transfer to another post.

___

Associated Press writers Devlin Barrett, Pauline Jelinek, Lolita C. Baldor, Eileen Sullivan and Pamela Hess in Washington; David Dishneau in Hagerstown, Md., and Justin Pritchard in Los Angeles contributed to this report.

Copyright © 2009 Yahoo! Inc. All rights reserved.Questions or CommentsPrivacy PolicyTerms of ServiceCopyright/IP Policy

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20091112/ap_on_go_ca_st_pe/us_fort_hood_shooting/print
Logged

R.I.P Dear 2NJ - say hi to Peaches for us!

I expect a miracle _Peaches ~ ~ May She Rest In Peace.

SOMEONE KNOWS THE TRUTH  

None of us here just fell off the turnip truck. - Magnolia
Tamikosmom
Monkey Mega Star
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 37075



« Reply #658 on: November 12, 2009, 11:06:52 AM »

 


Military Doctors Worried Hasan Was 'Psychotic,' Capable of Killing Fellow Soldiers
Thursday, November 12, 2009


U.S. military doctors overseeing Nidal Malik Hasan's medical training were concerned he was "psychotic" and possibly capable of killing other American soldiers, before the Army major allegedly went on a deadly shooting rampage at Fort Hood, Texas.

Psychiatrists and medical officials at Walter Reed Army Medical Center held a series of meetings beginning in the Spring of 2008 to discuss serious concerns about his work and behavior, National Public Radio reported.

One of the questions they asked: Was Hasan psychotic?

"Put it this way," one official told NPR. "Everybody felt that if you were deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan, you would not want Nidal Hasan in your foxhole."

One official who participated in the discussions reportedly told others he was worried that if Hasan was deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan, he might leak covert military information to Islamic extremists, NPR reported.

Another official "wondered aloud" to colleagues whether Hasan might be capable of killing fellow soldiers in the same way a Muslim sergeant in 2003 had set off grenades at a base in Kuwait, killing two and wounding 14, the radio network reported.

The officials who discussed Hasan's status were unaware — as some top Walter Reed hospital officials were — that intelligence agencies had been tracking Hasan's e-mails to a radical imam since December 2008, NPR said.

Officials considered kicking Hasan out of the program but chose not to partly because firing a doctor is a "cumbersome and lengthy" process that involves hearings and potential legal conflict, sources told NPR.

Officials also believed they lacked solid evidence that Hasan was unstable and were concerned they could be accused of discriminating against him because of his Islamic identity or views.


The concerns about Hasan's performance and religious views were shared with other military officials considering his assignment after he finished his medical training, and the consensus was to send the 39-year-old psychiatrist to Fort Hood, an official told the Associated Press.

Hasan was characterized in the meetings as a mediocre student and lazy worker, a matter of concern among the doctors and staff at Walter Reed and the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, a military medical school in Bethesda, Maryland, an official told The Associated Press.

Fort Hood, one of the country's largest military installations, was considered the best assignment for Hasan because other doctors could handle the workload if he continued to perform poorly and his superiors could document any continued behavior problems, the official said.

Sharon Willis, a spokeswoman for the Uniformed Services University, referred questions Wednesday about Hasan to his lawyer. The attorney, John Galligan of Belton, Texas, did not immediately return a telephone call seeking comment.

The revelations about the concerns that Hasan's superiors had before sending him to Fort Hood come amid a growing debate over what warning signs the military and law enforcement officials might have missed before last week's massacre.

A joint terrorism task force overseen by the FBI learned late last year of Hasan's repeated contact with a radical Muslim cleric who encouraged Muslims to kill U.S. troops in Iraq. The FBI said in a statement late Wednesday that the task force did not refer early information about Hasan to superiors because it concluded he wasn't linked to terrorism.

The doctors and staff who discussed concerns about Hasan had several group conversations about him that started in early 2008 during regular monthly meetings and ended as he was finishing a fellowship in disaster and preventive psychology this summer, the official familiar with the discussions said.

They saw no signs of mental problems, no risk factors that would predict violent behavior. And the group discussed other factors that suggested Hasan would continue to thrive in the military, factors that mitigated their concerns, the official said.

According to the official, records reviewed by Hasan's superiors described nearly 20 years of military service, including nearly eight years as an enlisted soldier; completion of three rigorous medical school programs, albeit as a student the group characterized in their discussions as mediocre; his resilience after the deaths of his parents early in his medical education, and an otherwise polite and gentle nature when not discussing religion.

The Army has said it has no record of enlisted service for Hasan, instead noting that his military service began when he started the medical school program in 1997.

The official said the group became increasingly concerned about Hasan's religious views after he completed two research projects that took a decidedly religious tone — one at the end of his residency at Walter Reed that advocated allowing Muslim soldiers to be released as conscientious objectors instead of fighting in wars against other Muslims, and the other as he pursued his master's degree in public health that discussed religious conflicts for Muslim U.S. soldiers.

Some in the group shared their experiences with Hasan, all telling similar stories about repeated instances when he made religion an issue.

Officials involved at various times in the meetings about Hasan included John Bradley, Walter Reed's chief of psychiatry; Scott Moran, Walter Reed's psychiatric residency program director; Robert Ursano, chairman of the Uniformed Services University's psychiatry department; Charles Engel, the university's assistant chair of psychiatry, and David Benedek, an associate professor of psychiatry at the university.

Those officials either declined to comment or did not return telephone calls and e-mails seeking comment Wednesday.

Meanwhile, the Pentagon has found no evidence that Hasan formally sought release from the Army as a conscientious objector or for any other reason, two senior military officials told The Associated Press. Family members have said he wanted to get out of the Army and had sought legal advice, suggesting that Hasan's anxiety as a Muslim over his pending deployment overseas might have been a factor in the deadly rampage.

Hasan had complained privately to colleagues that he was harassed for his religion and that he wanted to get out of the Army. But there is no record of Hasan filing a complaint with his chain of command regarding any harassment he may have suffered for being Muslim or any record of him formally seeking release from the military, the officials told the AP.

The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because the case is under investigation.

Another Army official, Lt. Col. George Wright, said Wednesday that Hasan likely would have had to commit to another year in the military when he was transferred to Fort Hood earlier this summer. It is common for an officer to incur a one-year service extension when they receive a transfer to another post.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,574285,00.html
Logged

Loving Natalee - Beth Holloway
Page 219: I have to make difficult choices every day.  I have to make a conscious decision every morning when I wake up not to be bitter, not to live in resentment and let anger control me.  It's not easy.  I ask God to help me.
_____

“A person of integrity expects to be believed and when he’s not, he let’s time prove him right.” -unknown
Tamikosmom
Monkey Mega Star
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 37075



« Reply #659 on: November 12, 2009, 11:17:15 AM »

Updated November 11, 2009
Free Speech Rights Prevented Probe Into Hasan E-Mails, Investigators Say
by Catherine Herridge
, FOXNews.com

 
The claim comes as officials in different branches of law enforcement and the military squabble over who knew what when about Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan's leanings toward faith-inspired violence, and as charges fly that 'political correctness' prevented officials from taking action and is still being used as a crutch in explaining the rampage after the fact. .....

More:
http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2009/11/10/coverage-fort-hood-shooting-press-dodges-religious-component/
 
Logged

Loving Natalee - Beth Holloway
Page 219: I have to make difficult choices every day.  I have to make a conscious decision every morning when I wake up not to be bitter, not to live in resentment and let anger control me.  It's not easy.  I ask God to help me.
_____

“A person of integrity expects to be believed and when he’s not, he let’s time prove him right.” -unknown
Pages: « 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 »   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Use of this web site in any manner signifies unconditional acceptance, without exception, of our terms of use.
Powered by SMF 1.1.13 | SMF © 2006-2011, Simple Machines LLC
 
Page created in 6.156 seconds with 19 queries.