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Author Topic: I stil can't forgive the Pardon.  (Read 2800 times)
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Carnut
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« on: January 02, 2007, 12:27:50 PM »

Even as all the newscasters keep saying that the pardon was a good thing for the country, I still can't forgive Pres Ford for the pardon.

Guess I just hold grudges or something.
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pdh3
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« Reply #1 on: January 02, 2007, 12:58:47 PM »

I guess all we can do Carnut, is try to put it into the context of the times Ford was living in. The country had been through so much civil upheaval, and a long, costly war. I think that Ford thought putting the former Pres. in jail would not heal this country. And it may have turned Nixon into a martyr. Nixon suffered humiliation and was ostracized by many. He had to see his family suffer as well, so he didn't go without some punishment. I agree it wasn't enough, but I think Ford was in a no-win situation. He would have been screwed no matter what he did.
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Bobo2
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« Reply #2 on: January 02, 2007, 05:16:25 PM »

Kind of have to agree with you Carnut.  I had just turned 18 when Ford took office.  Were you around that age too?  I read somewhere that many in my age group never did forgive him.
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Carnut
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« Reply #3 on: January 02, 2007, 08:15:32 PM »

Quote from: "Bobo2"
Kind of have to agree with you Carnut.  I had just turned 18 when Ford took office.  Were you around that age too?  I read somewhere that many in my age group never did forgive him.


Ah, I was a little past that age at the time. Dunno if I would still be considered in that age group or not, think I'm considered a baby boomer.

I suspicion I just don't understand how 'the pardon' just saved the nation, guess I don't think 'big enough'.

As a registered GOP type at the time, I think I just felt betrayed by Nixon and thought the fix was in before Nixon resigned.
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LouiseVargas
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« Reply #4 on: January 02, 2007, 09:01:25 PM »

In my humble opinion, Richard M. Nixon was a great man (with personal flaws) brought down by his own petty corruption, the corruption of his staff and his own paranoia. If Watergate happened today [spying on the Democratic convention headquarters], it would be nothing compared to the ever growing list of bigger and bigger presidential scandals. Can you compare a hotel conference room being bugged to the Katrina scandal of Bush 43? How about Bush 43 taking us into Iraq where our young men are being killed every day? How about Bush 41 and 43 kissing up to the Saudis? I can never forgive the fact that Nonesuche's husband died from having to fight in the first gulf war.  

Don't get me wrong, I remember Kent State University. The Kent State shootings took place on May 4, 1970. The Ohio National Guard was called in by Nixon and four students were killed and nine others wounded. The reason is because the students were anti war protesters and Nixon didn't know what to do. I hated him and everyone I knew hated him.

Nixon decided to resign. In a nationally televised address on the evening of August 8, 1974, he announced he would resign effective noon on August 9.  He was immediately succeeded by Gerald Ford, who on September 8, 1974, issued a pardon for Nixon, immunizing him from prosecution for any crimes he may have committed as President. I agree with pdh3, Ford was in a no-win situation. He would have been screwed no matter what he did.

However, as time passes, people grow and change. As one ages, one's outlook also changes. I'd like to think that people grow in wisdom via the experiences we have along the way. Nixon was the first President to talk to China, which was a big breakthrough. Many times after his resignation, I saw Nixon interviewed on TV by people like David Frost (remember him?). Every word and thought that came out of Nixon's mouth was a precious gem. He was an extremely intelligent man with great insight, which of course, comes from having had a lifetime of experiences and perhaps his paranoia made him more aware and careful. And being out of the presidential scrutiny, Nixon became more and more respected as a statesman.

By the time he died, Nixon was very highly respected. Just ask Henry Kissinger if you don't believe me.

My last memories of Richard M. Nixon were his beautiful funeral at his presidential library in Yorba Linda, CA on April 22, 1994. It had rained all night and the weather didn't look good for the outdoor funeral they had planned. It turned out the next morning, the sun was shining, the folded chairs wiped dry and it was a gorgeous day in Yorba Linda. I programmed my VCR to tape the whole thing which was about an hour and a half long. There was pomp as well as humility. All the former living president were there with their wives. It was incredible. Beautiful music was played and sung. I loaned this tape to my daughter and she watched it so many times, it took a year before she gave it back to me.

I'm not trying to change anyone's mind. I'm just giving you my impressions. He was a great man.

Bobo, if you were 18 in 1974 when the reins of power were handed over to Gerald Ford, you are now 50 years old. Although 18 year olds are allowed to vote and to fight in Iraq, 18 is still very young and not very experienced. I'm not saying this is bad or good, just that one needs more than 18 years to be able to judge what presidents do and why they do it.
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Tylergal
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« Reply #5 on: January 03, 2007, 12:09:33 AM »

Nixon never lied under oath and was not given the opportunity to redeem himself at hearings.  Sure, he was flawed.  Let he who is not cast the first stone and those who are without flaw vote for the perfect person.  Note is made here that you will never vote again in that case.
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Carnut
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« Reply #6 on: January 03, 2007, 01:10:22 AM »

Quote from: "Tylergal"
Nixon never lied under oath and was not given the opportunity to redeem himself at hearings.  Sure, he was flawed.  Let he who is not cast the first stone and those who are without flaw vote for the perfect person.  Note is made here that you will never vote again in that case.


Heh, heh, actually if any were without flaws and worth voting for I might start voting again. Really don't think my vote ever counted anyway since I generally voted against rather than for anyone.

I don't think an individuals vote much counts anyway, it's the political activist types and workers who support a candidate who get the electing done.

Think I've seen Tyler mention she's been that type and she deserves the credit when her guy gets elected.
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Bobo2
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« Reply #7 on: January 03, 2007, 04:37:00 PM »

Quote from: "LouiseVargas"

Bobo, if you were 18 in 1974 when the reins of power were handed over to Gerald Ford, you are now 50 years old. Although 18 year olds are allowed to vote and to fight in Iraq, 18 is still very young and not very experienced. I'm not saying this is bad or good, just that one needs more than 18 years to be able to judge what presidents do and why they do it.


Yes Louise, I am 50 now and agree that 18 year olds are very young and inexperienced, as well as more than a bit naive.  I see the entire situation differently now at 50 than I did at 18, but still can't forgive the pardon.  I can now see the big picture but can't shake the 32 year old feeling that Nixon should have been held accountable.

In 1974 I was an active Democratic party worker, disgusted that "they" were spying on "us" and then lying to cover it up.  Now I consider myself a Republican but am no longer active politically. Yes, I guess I have changed quite a bit.   But still can't get over that hurdle to forgive and totally agree the pardon was the right thing to do.

The break-in was aptly called a dirty trick, but a minor crime.  It was the lies and extensive cover-up that did Nixon in and to me revealed the moral character of the man.   I have to say I did not respect Nixon any more in 1994 than in 1974.  

I always enjoy reading your viewpoint  even when I disagree - thank you for sharing it and making me think.
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LouiseVargas
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« Reply #8 on: January 03, 2007, 11:35:33 PM »

Dearest Bobo,

Thank you for your informative post. I really enjoy reading your posts, too, and I highly respect your point of view.

I love your beautiful avatar of a right eye. Ya know, they are the mirrors of our souls.

From my eye to yours, I'm happy we can share our thoughts here on Scared Monkeys in a civilized manner. There is no reason to try to force someone to see our own point of view. All our various viewpoints make us a very informed, intelligent and insightful group.

Love you Bobo,
Louise
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