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Author Topic: Morgan Dana Harrington #2 7/1/10 -  (Read 333622 times)
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trimmonthelake
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« Reply #320 on: January 25, 2011, 04:32:49 PM »

http://www.whsv.com/news/headlines/One_Year_After_Morgan_Harringtons_Remains_Found_114584309.html?ref=309
Posted: 2:38 PM Jan 25, 2011
One Year After Morgan Harrington's Remains Found
Albemarle County
Wednesday marks the one-year anniversary of the discovery of Morgan Harrington's body on Anchorage Farm in Albemarle County.
Reporter: Jessica Jaglois (WCAV)


As investigators put the spotlight on a still unsolved murder case, Morgan Harrington's parents are spending Tuesday tracing their daughter's footsteps on the night she went missing.

Along with the media, Dan and Gil Harrington will also be allowed a first look at the site where their daughter's skeletal remains were found.

Agent Dino Capuzzo gives a "walk thru" of the night Morgan disappeared.

It starts on the night of October 17, 2009, when Morgan Dana Harrington parked her car outside the John Paul Jones Arena around 6:15 p.m. to attend a Metallica concert.

Investigators will then retrace her steps, from when she mysteriously landed outside the arena and was denied re-entry to the parking lot where her purse and cell phone were later recovered. Those items were left by Morgan before she tried to hitch-hike along the Copeley Road Bridge around 9:30 p.m.

From there she vanished.

"This location, basically up here on [Copeley] Bridge, is the last known location that we are able to confirm where Morgan was last seen alive. We have no other locations. No other stores. No location out in the County. Just here," says Capuzzo.

The Harringtons held hands as they followed investigators and listened to police describe their late daughter as incoherent and vulnerable.

More than three months later, on January 26, 2010, the Virginia Tech student's remains were found in a field on Anchorage Farm, ten miles from the place she was last seen alive.

The owner of the farm contacted police when he found human remains on his sprawling 700-plus acres of land.

The difficult terrain of Anchorage Farm has led investigators to believe the only suspect in the case, whose sketch was released in July 2010, knew the farm and surrounding area well.

The media will again meet with police and the Harringtons Tuesday afternoon. Together, everyone will navigate the terrain and visit the places Morgan last traveled before her life was cut short.

Police continue to hope publicity that the case could convince an up-to-now silent witness to start talking.

The public is still encouraged to call in tips to the Virginia State Police tip line at 434-352-3467 or the Jefferson Area Crime Stoppers at 434-977-4000.

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« Reply #321 on: January 25, 2011, 04:42:05 PM »

http://www.whsv.com/video/?autoStart=true&topVideoCatNo=default&clipId=5500689&flvUri=&partnerclipid=
One Year After Morgan Harrington's Remains Found
Wednesday marks the one-year anniversary of the discovery of Morgan Harrington's body on Anchorage Farm in Albemarle County.
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« Reply #322 on: January 25, 2011, 04:50:52 PM »

http://www.roanoke.com/news/breaking/wb/274919
Morgan Harrington update: Parents walk field where remains were found
01/25/11
By Duncan Adams | The Roanoke Times


Gil and Dan Harrington of Roanoke County visit the south Albemarle County farm where Morgan's remains were found last January. Morgan Harrington disappeared Oct. 17, 2009, after leaving a rock concert in Charlottesville.
CHARLOTTESVILLE –  For the first time, Morgan Harrington's parents walked the hayfield today where a farmer discovered their daughter's skeletal remains nearly one year ago.

When they reached the secluded spot on the 740-acre farm where the remains were found, Gil Harrington buried her face in her husband's chest and wept.

Minutes later, she knelt at that spot and ran her hands through the dirt and grass.

"I don’t feel Morgan here," she said. "She’s gone. I had to be here and look and feel if there was anything here.

"Land is growth and renewal but there was evil here," she said.
 
The Virginia State Police and a few reporters accompanied Gil and Dan Harrington of Roanoke County during their visit to the south Albemarle County farm where Morgan’s remains were found Jan. 26, 2010.

The police and the Harringtons invited media to tour the unsolved crime’s key locations in hopes that resulting coverage would jog the memory or conscience of someone with knowledge of the circumstances of their daughter’s abduction and killing.


Gil Harrington, 53, said Monday that she has frequently tried to picture what happened in the hayfield where Morgan’s remains were found. She has imagined at least two scenarios: her daughter’s attempted flight from her abductor or abductors; or simply the final act of a killer or killers trying to hide the body of the young life taken elsewhere.

“I have had thoughts of her running through that field like a deer,” Gil Harrington said. “I’ve also had thoughts of her body dumped there like a deer carcass.”
Gil Harrington also said she continues to believe more than one person could have been involved in her daughter's murder.

Morgan Harrington of Roanoke County was 20 years old and a Virginia Tech student when she disappeared Oct. 17, 2009, after prematurely leaving a rock concert at the John Paul Jones arena in Charlottesville.

Investigators have said Morgan stepped outside the arena, learned she could not return to the Metallica concert without a ticket stub and then used her cellphone to tell friends inside the arena that she would find a ride home. She was last seen that night walking on the Copeley Road railroad bridge between about 9:20 p.m. and 9:30 p.m.
 
Authorities have declared her death a homicide but have not publicly disclosed the cause of her death.

In July, state police released a sketch of a man, still unidentified, who is wanted in the abduction and sexual assault of a woman in Fairfax five years ago.

Forensic evidence links the two crimes, state police said.
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« Reply #323 on: January 25, 2011, 05:01:28 PM »

http://www.wset.com/Global/story.asp?S=13904378

Gil and Dan Harrington walk to remember their daughter Tuesday

Morgan Harrington
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« Reply #324 on: January 25, 2011, 08:37:42 PM »

http://www.readthehook.com/blog/index.php/2011/01/25/familial-pain-harrington-family-presses-police-for-controversial-test/
Familial pain: Harringtons press police for controversial DNA test
by Courteney Stuart
stuart@readthehook.com (434) 295-8700 x236
published 7:19pm Tuesday Jan 25, 2011



Dan and Gil Harrington visit the secluded spot on Anchorage Farm where their daughter Morgan’s remains were discovered one year ago.
PHOTO BY JEN FARIELLO

Dry grass snaps underfoot as Gil and Dan Harrington make their way across the winter-yellowed fields of Anchorage Farm, where one year ago a farmer checking fences discovered the badly decomposed remains of their daughter, Morgan Harrington. The discovery brought a tragic end to a three-month search for the 20-year-old blond beauty, who disappeared after leaving a Metallica concert at the John Paul Jones Arena.

“This is not evil land,” says the bereaved mother, kneeling on the spot her daughter’s body lay and touching the earth. “But there was an evil man or men here who killed my daughter.”

Joined by a clutch of reporters, the parents undertook their first visit to the field, and on the walk down  to the site, the 53-year-old mother clutched the arm of her husband, Dan, and cried softly amid the rolling hills nine miles south of Charlottesville.

Gil Harrington’s outpouring of emotion stands in sharp contrast to the stoic frustration she expressed both in the early days of her ordeal and again in recent months as she has learned of a powerful new tool that could assist the investigation.

With police expressing their own frustration at finding a suspect, Gil Harrington has begun speaking out about the tool, which recently helped California investigators nab an alleged serial killer. It hasn’t yet been used in her daughter’s case— not because there’s any law preventing it, but because there’s no policy regarding it at all.
“That,” says Harrington, “is not an acceptable delay to use technology.”

The tool she’s talking about is familial DNA searching, a process by which an unidentified DNA profile— like the one investigators have obtained in the Harrington case, which linked it to an unsolved 2005 Fairfax rape— is run through the state’s DNA databank looking not for an exact match but for a close match that would identify a family member of an unidentified perpetrator and could point in the direction of potential suspects.

The method went high profile last summer with California’s so called “Grim Sleeper” case, and now law enforcement officials across the country are wondering if some of their own toughest cases might be cracked with familial DNA.

The ‘Grim Sleeper’
Beginning in 1985, Los Angeles detectives were stumped by a series of murders of women, many of them prostitutes, whose bodies were found in alleyways on the city’s southside. After a series of exposés by the L.A. Weekly in 2007, including an interview with the killer’s only known surviving victim, police feeling the heat of public pressure ran DNA of the unidentified perpetrator (dubbed the Grim Sleeper because of an apparent 14-year hiatus in killings) through the California DNA database looking for a familial connection. After linking the killer’s DNA to DNA taken from a man convicted on a felony weapons charge— a man who turned out to be the killer’s son– police homed in on 57-year-old Lonnie David Franklin Jr., and believed they’d found the killer. Franklin was arrested in July 2010 and has pleaded not guilty to 10 murder charges.
Only one state besides California— Colorado— currently use familial DNA searching, but Virginia, a leader in the forensic use of DNA and the first state to fully fund its DNA databank in the mid-1990s, may soon follow suit, according to Gail Jaspen, chief deputy director of the Virginia Department of Forensic Science. In fact, she says, both the Attorney General’s office and the Virginia Crime Commission have ruled that there’s no legal obstacle preventing the state crime lab from conducting such searches and releasing results to law enforcement. The reason it hasn’t already begun, she says, is that Virginia simply didn’t have the necessary technology.

“We are indeed interested in acquiring the capability to do this as expeditiously as possible,” says Jaspen.

That would be welcome news to the Harringtons, for whom the idea that any stone has been left unturned in the search for their daughter’s killer is source of pain and fear— fear that another woman will be killed by the same man, and another family forced to endure the agony they’re suffering.

“It seems like it’s getting harder now, perhaps because that protective cloaking of shock is dissipating,” says Gil Harrington. “It’s more apparent that she’s not here, her closet doesn’t smell like her anymore, we’re starting to forget what her voice was like.”

No named suspects
The Morgan Harrington case began October 17, 2009 when a disoriented Harrington left the concert alone and began hitchhiking on the Copeley Road Bridge. During the recent media tour, the lead investigator, State Police Agent Dino Cappuzzo, told reporters that a bloodhound and eyewitness accounts confirm the area around the bridge as the last place the Virginia Tech student was spotted alive.
The case has stumped investigators, and a series of revelations over the past 12 months— starting with the discovery of Morgan’s body— have provided evidence to work with but yielded no named suspects. Perhaps the most significant revelation came in July, when investigators confirmed that forensic evidence— later confirmed to be DNA— had linked Morgan’s case to a 2005 unsolved brutal rape in Fairfax. A sketch of the suspect in the Fairfax case generated dozens of new leads, but none have led to an arrest. If Morgan’s killer has a parent, sibling, or child who’s been convicted of a felony since the Virginia DNA databank was launched in 1989, her parents say, there’s a chance a familial DNA search could narrow the potential field of suspects in her case down from countless thousands to a few dozen.
The Harringtons aren’t the only ones eager to see familial DNA searching become a standard weapon in Virginia law enforcement’s crime-fighting arsenal— particularly in violent crimes where a predator remains on the loose.

“A lot of times when you have a convicted felon, you’ll find other felons in the family,” says Albemarle County Sheriff Chip Harding, who pushed for and helped win legislation to fully fund Virginia’s DNA databank back in the late ’90s after learning that 150,000 DNA samples had been collected from felons but hadn’t been entered into the databank.

Thanks to that funding, as of December 31, the Virginia DNA databank holds neary 328,000 DNA samples taken from convicted felons and those arrested for violent crimes. By the end of last year, says Harding, law enforcement officials had had 6,957 “hits”— when DNA evidence taken from a crime scene matched a DNA profile in the databank, in many cases leading to a conviction.

Harding recalls one local case that highlighted the critical importance of the databank in solving crimes. In 1999, a man broke into a UVA student’s apartment and raped her while holding her boyfriend at gunpoint. The police had no suspects, just some saliva on a beer can.

Because of a backlog of cases, it took a month for the state crime lab to finally process the DNA. And then came the “cold hit,” an event Harding calls “my most exciting moment in law enforcement.” The DNA from the apartment pointed to a man named Montaret Davis as responsible for the assault and paved the way to a conviction.

The validation process
In late December– after lobbying by the Harringtons— the state came one step closer to making familial DNA searches a reality as the Department of Forensic Science received and installed the familial DNA searching software used in Denver crime labs. Currently, says Jaspen, the software is going through a validation process to “ensure that it does what it’s purported to do and that our people are qualified to perform the searches.”

State police Special Agent Dino Cappuzzo, the lead investigator, points to the spot where Harrington’s remains were found.
PHOTO BY JEN FARIELLO
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« Reply #325 on: January 25, 2011, 08:40:36 PM »

http://www.readthehook.com/blog/index.php/2011/01/25/familial-pain-harrington-family-presses-police-for-controversial-test/
Continued ...
But installing software and actually using it are two different things– particularly in the Harrington case, according to State Police spokesperson Corinne Geller, who says investigators must proceed cautiously with any further DNA testing because the “amount of the evidence available is limited.” (DNA evidence is destroyed when it is tested.)

Limited DNA samples aren’t the only potential stumbling block for investigators. The use of familial DNA searches has already attracted the attention of the ACLU, which filed a legal challenge against California’s policy of collecting DNA from arrestees (as opposed to only from convicted felons).

A July 15 editorial posted on the ACLU of Southern California’s website explains the concerns about familial DNA testing.

“Whether we should expand familial searching isn’t just about the success in this case,” the editorial states in the wake of the Grim Sleeper arrest. “It’s about whether familial DNA searching is really the silver bullet prosecutors suggest, and whether privacy and civil rights concerns have been adequately addressed. The answer to both questions, for the moment, is no.”

And any use of familial DNA here in Virginia will receive similar scrutiny, says Kent Willis, head of the Virginia ACLU, who sees DNA profiling of any kind– particularly of those arrested but not convicted of a crime– as a possible slippery slope.
moved to anyone arrested for a violent felony,” he says of Virginia’s DNA collecting policies. “We’re concerned that what may happen with familial DNA testing is that once you’ve started the process, unless you create strict protocols, that its use will continue to be expanded and expanded.” For instance, he says, “there are always calls to expand [DNA collection] to anyone arrested for felony or misdemeanor. The ultimate extension is that we should take everyone’s DNA at birth.”

Harding, however, scoffs at the notion that the system would be abused, and says he believes concerns about privacy issues with DNA are overblown— and that old school investigative practices are actually far more invasive.

“I’d argue that intrusion was at its greatest in the old days, the late 70s, early 80s, when there was no such thing as DNA,” he says. Harding, who worked for the Charlottesville Police Department for three decades before his 2007 election to sheriff, recalls following up on tips by digging into the alibis of anyone whose name came up in the course of the investigation— in some cases, hundreds of people.

By contrast, he says, “If I get a list with five or six names on it from a familial DNA search– if one is extremely close, it’s a really good lead– all I’m seeing is who in the family tree might meet the profile, then I put them under surveillance and take a sample.”

“Taking a sample” helped Charlottesville police finally catch the Charlottesville serial rapist back in 2007. After one of Nathan Antonio Washington’s victims recognized the butcher at the Barracks Road Harris Teeter as the man who’d brutalized her, police followed Washington and plucked from the trash a Burger King soda cup he’d just discarded. DNA on the straw matched the profile of the assailant who’d eluded police for nearly a decade. Washington was arrested and is currently serving four life sentences.
The ACLU’s Willis says the capture of violent criminals like Washington– and DNA’s proven ability to exonerate the wrongly convicted– make objecting to its use in criminal matters complicated. But he hopes the state will proceed with caution.

“What we want to see come out of the Virginia Crime Commission is a proposed bill that would prevent police from implementing familial DNA and would instead create a study to determine its cost, efficacy, and consider potential invasions of privacy and its impact on fairness in criminal justice system,” says Willis, stressing that the ACLU is “not opposing familial DNA testing; just arguing that the state ought to move slowly into this and know exactly what it’s doing and what the consequences might be.”
The Harringtons, however, say moving slowly when their daughter’s killer remains at large is “crazy.”

“It’s a tool and a technology that exists, and it should be in the hands of law enforcement in this state,” says Gil Harrington. “I don’t know why it would require such prodigious time.”
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« Reply #326 on: January 25, 2011, 08:43:52 PM »


“It’s striking to me how isolated this is,” said Dan Harrington, surveying the secluded field where his daughter’s body was found. Harrington agrees with investigators’ longheld assertion that the person or people who took Morgan to Anchorage Farm know the property well and very likely remain living nearby.
PHOTO BY JEN FARIELLO


 Crying or Very sad
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« Reply #327 on: January 26, 2011, 06:51:54 AM »

http://www.roanoke.com/274992
One year later, Morgan Harrington's parents revisit hayfield in Charlottesville where her body was found
By Duncan Adams | The Roanoke Times

CHARLOTTESVILLE -- For the first time, Morgan Harrington's parents walked the hayfield Tuesday where a farmer discovered her skeletal remains one year ago today.

When they reached that secluded site on the 740-acre farm in Albemarle County, Gil Harrington buried her face in her husband's chest and wept.

Moments later, with Dan Harrington at her shoulder, she knelt at the spot that once cradled her daughter's bones and ran her hands through the dark soil and wheat-colored grass.

"I don't feel Morgan here," Gil Harrington said. "She's gone. I had to be here and look and feel if there was anything [of Morgan] here."

She added, "Evil happened here."

Morgan Harrington was 20 years old and a Virginia Tech student when she disappeared the night of Oct. 17, 2009, after leaving a rock concert before the main act and being barred from re-entry at the John Paul Jones Arena in Charlottesville.

State Police Special Agent Dino Cappuzzo said Morgan was last seen about 9:20 p.m. on the Copeley Road bridge with her thumb extended as though hitchhiking.
Cappuzzo and the Harringtons, who are residents of Roanoke County, led a small group of TV and newspaper reporters Tuesday on a walking tour of the key known events of Oct. 17, 2009.

When Gil Harrington's weeping began at the farm, all cameras swiveled in her direction. The Harringtons said Tuesday's media tour was emotionally grueling. But they emphasized that, if renewed coverage of the case leads to capturing the killer, the raw grief provoked will justify the pain.

Gil Harrington said she believes more than one person might have participated in the killing. Cappuzzo declined to say whether investigators share this view. His narrative throughout the day generally referenced a single killer who was male.

He confirmed that DNA analysis definitively links Morgan's case to a similar crime in Fairfax County in 2005. Police previously released a sketch of that suspect.

Cappuzzo said behavioral and geographical crime scene specialists have convinced authorities that Morgan's killer was familiar with the territory where her remains were found in a small clearing near a tree-lined creek.

"They did not feel they would be discovered in bringing her here," Cappuzzo said. "The location is not something a person unfamiliar with this area is likely to find on a whim."

He said the site could have been reached via different routes, with the nearest access point being about 100 yards from the place where Morgan's remains were found.


Cappuzzo declined to say whether police believe she was killed at the site or dumped there. He would not say whether tire tracks were detected at the scene. And he would not disclose the suspected cause of death or say whether the cause has been determined.

But Cappuzzo said investigators believe the man who abducted and killed Morgan is still "moving about" in the nearby Red Hill and North Garden sections of Albemarle County.

"I feel very confident this case will solve," he said.
He would not say whether police have a specific suspect in mind. But he added, "That person doesn't know it yet, but we're getting closer."


The disappearance

Three friends accompanied Morgan to the Metallica concert Oct. 17, 2009. They rode from Harrisonburg in Morgan's car and parked at the John Paul Jones Arena at the University of Virginia about 6:15 p.m., Cappuzzo said. He said a friend was the night's designated driver, which is why Morgan had no car keys later.

The women entered the arena and took their seats, he said. About 8:15 p.m., Morgan said she was going to the restroom. At some point, Cappuzzo said, witnesses saw Morgan fall as she walked through the arena's concourse. She might have bloodied her chin, he said, but refused help from people who witnessed her spill.

For some reason, he said, Morgan then exited the arena. She was warned she could not return without a ticket stub, Cappuzzo said. People outside the arena who encountered Morgan told police they believed "she was impaired in some way," he said.

"I can say that Morgan had been drinking alcohol that night, but I'm not going to say what degree of intoxication there was, in deference to the family and this investigation," Cappuzzo said.

At 8:48 p.m., one of Morgan's friends inside the arena called her cellphone to inquire about Morgan's whereabouts. Cappuzzo said Morgan described being barred from the concert and then said, essentially, "Don't worry about me. I'll find a ride."

Cappuzzo said Morgan joined a group of male students who were leaving the arena and heading toward their cars in a lot at Lannigan Field, a spot where UVa athletes often park. Morgan occasionally supported herself along the way by leaning against parked cars, he said. They soon reached the vicinity of Lannigan Field -- where Morgan's backpacklike purse, umbrella and cellphone were later found.

"She asked them for a ride, but, based on her behavior, they did not give her a ride," he said.

None is a suspect, Cappuzzo said.
Morgan then walked to the nearby Copeley Road bridge and apparently began hitchhiking. Authorities believe a vehicle stopped and that Morgan probably entered willingly, he said.

In drizzling rain, she wore a black miniskirt, black tights, knee-high black boots with high heels and a black T-shirt with "Pantera" written on the front.

"She has no coat, the weather is beginning to deteriorate. She doesn't have her phone," Cappuzzo said. "She's in a vulnerable and compromised position. The logical conclusion is that she got in a vehicle somewhere on Copeley Road between the bridge and the intersection with Ivy Road."

On Nov. 11, a college student found a T-shirt investigators have determined was Morgan's at the corner of Grady Avenue and 15th Street in Charlottesville -- an area in the opposite direction from which an abductor would have driven the 10 or 11 miles to the Anchorage Farm.

Cappuzzo said behavioral specialists recommended Tuesday's recap of Morgan's disappearance and death. Gil Harrington described the couple's feelings about finding those responsible.

"For Dan, it's personal," she said. "As a father and with a father's protective instincts, he wants punishment.

"For me, I feel punishment will be delivered, if not here then later. But I don't want anyone else to live through this. My child is dead, and nothing will bring her back. But I can't give up on the next girl."
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« Reply #328 on: January 26, 2011, 06:56:14 AM »

http://arklatexhomepage.com/fulltext/?nxd_id=152696
Search For Killer Continues 01/26/11
Video at link
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« Reply #329 on: January 26, 2011, 07:07:23 AM »

OMNI Morgan Harrington Education Wing Dedication     an angelic monkey
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Br1JRwbLhs&feature=player_embedded
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Justice for Natalee


« Reply #330 on: January 26, 2011, 12:21:08 PM »

Trimm, thank you so much for all the articles.

God, bless and take care of Gil, Dan and all of Morgan's family.

RIP Sweet Morgan
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« Reply #331 on: January 26, 2011, 02:22:50 PM »

http://www2.wsls.com/news/2011/jan/25/state-police-retrace-steps-morgan-harrington-case-ar-798604/
State Police retrace steps in Morgan Harrington case
<a href="http://vp.mgnetwork.net/traveler.swf?embed_referer=scaredmonkeys.net&amp;u=ebcefdcc7a31102ea6fd001ec92a4a0d&amp;z=SLS&amp;embed_player=1" target="_blank">http://vp.mgnetwork.net/traveler.swf?embed_referer=scaredmonkeys.net&amp;u=ebcefdcc7a31102ea6fd001ec92a4a0d&amp;z=SLS&amp;embed_player=1</a>


<a href="http://vp.mgnetwork.net/traveler.swf?embed_referer=scaredmonkeys.net&amp;u=44fe3f2c7a62102ea6fd001ec92a4a0d&amp;z=SLS&amp;embed_player=1" target="_blank">http://vp.mgnetwork.net/traveler.swf?embed_referer=scaredmonkeys.net&amp;u=44fe3f2c7a62102ea6fd001ec92a4a0d&amp;z=SLS&amp;embed_player=1</a>

Virginia State Police Talk About Morgan Harrington's Case
Almost one year after Morgan Harrington's remains were located in Albemarle County, Virginia State Police Special Agent Dino Cappuzzo and Dan and Gil Harrington visit the site on Jan. 25, 2011.
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« Reply #332 on: January 26, 2011, 02:23:22 PM »

Trimm, thank you so much for all the articles.

God, bless and take care of Gil, Dan and all of Morgan's family.

RIP Sweet Morgan

 an angelic monkey
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« Reply #333 on: January 26, 2011, 11:23:35 PM »

I am feeling a glimmer of hope in Special Agent Cappuzzo's words.  Please God, give these good people and Morgan the peace and justice they so deserve.

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Thanks for all of the articles, Trimm, I haven't been able to get here for a day or so and I would miss these if it weren't for you.
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I will ALWAYS stand with the girls, Natalee and Caylee, forever.
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« Reply #334 on: January 27, 2011, 08:04:40 AM »

I am feeling a glimmer of hope in Special Agent Cappuzzo's words.  Please God, give these good people and Morgan the peace and justice they so deserve.

2 4 1

Thanks for all of the articles, Trimm, I haven't been able to get here for a day or so and I would miss these if it weren't for you.

You welcome.
2 4 1 Justice for Morgan
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« Reply #335 on: January 27, 2011, 08:06:44 AM »

http://www.readthehook.com/stories/2011/01/27/question-1004.aspx
QUESTION OF THE WEEK- Do you think Morgan Harrington's killer will ever be caught?
By HOOK STAFF
Published January 27, 2011 in issue 1004 of the Hook
video at link

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« Reply #336 on: January 28, 2011, 03:56:57 PM »

http://findmorgan.com/category/upcoming-events
2/23/11
Dan and Gil keynote speakers at the National Conference for Responding to Missing and Unidentified Persons in Wisconsin
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« Reply #337 on: January 29, 2011, 10:58:57 AM »

http://www.cavalierdaily.com/2011/01/28/harringtons-visit-anchorage/
Harringtons visit Anchorage
Family retraces daughter’s steps for first time in hopes of increasing public interest in her case
By Rebecca Rubin, Associate Editor on January 28, 2011

<snipped>
Yesterday, Dean of Students Allen Groves said even though a year has passed, Morgan’s story should not be forgotten.

“A promising young life was lost, and a family still grieves,” Groves said. “They should remain in our thoughts regardless of the passage of time. We must also remember that the person or persons who did this remain at large, a reminder that every student should remain vigilant for their own safety and that of their friends.”

Virginia State Police spokesperson Corinne Geller said the goal of Wednesday’s media event was to advance the progress of the investigation. “We are hoping to bring the case back to forefront of people’s attention,” Geller said. “Sometimes time helps trigger people’s memories or make them feel more conformable coming forward.”

The department’s hopes may have come true — it has seen an uptick in the number of leads coming in, and investigators are actively pursuing those new clues, Geller said.
<snipped>
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« Reply #338 on: February 02, 2011, 09:31:10 AM »

http://www.roanoke.com/news/roanoke/wb/275685
Update in Morgan Harrington case: Necklace wasn't with body
State police, who are trying to track down the jewelry, also said DNA links the case to another.
By Duncan Adams | The Roanoke Times
Wednesday, February 02, 2011


Courtesy of Virginia State Police
Morgan Harrington was wearing a Swarovski crystal necklace like this one the night she disappeared in Charlottesville.

<snipped>
Virginia State Police confirmed for the first time this week that investigators had not previously disclosed that a distinctive Swarovski-brand necklace Morgan Harrington wore the night she disappeared has not been recovered.

At the time of her disappearance in October 2009, to inform the massive search that followed, police released a description of Harrington's attire when she disappeared. The details referenced clothing and other items, including the Swarovski necklace.

Corinne Geller, a state police spokeswoman, confirmed Monday that investigators had not previously reported that the necklace was missing when Harrington's skeletal remains were found Jan. 26, 2010, by an Albemarle County farmer in a hayfield. Her death was ruled a homicide. The case has not been solved, and authorities have not commented on the cause of death.

State police also announced for the first time last week that a previously disclosed link between Harrington's case and another in Fairfax is DNA-based.
<snipped>
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« Reply #339 on: February 02, 2011, 11:16:54 AM »

http://www.wdbj7.com/news/wdbj7-police-slain-va-tech-students-necklace-missing-20110202,0,1926930.story
Police: Slain Va Tech student's necklace missing
Police say a distinctive necklace worn by Morgan Harrington the night she disappeared is missing.
10:30 a.m. EST, February 2, 2011

<snipped>
Geller says a state police investigator has been checking with pawn shops and flea markets to see if the missing necklace has turned up.
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  ~241~ "The Longer You Love,The Longer You Live,The Stronger You Feel,The More You Can Give."
~ Peter Frampton
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