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Author Topic: Australia by Tibrogargan January 2007 - present and 155216+ views later!  (Read 538905 times)
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Tibrogargan
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« Reply #160 on: February 12, 2007, 09:14:58 PM »

SOME BUSH TUCKER

BUSH BANANA - Only able to eat the skin as inside is a mass of small seeds.



COOKING MUD CRABS :

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« Reply #161 on: February 12, 2007, 11:40:09 PM »

What does the skin of the Bush Banana taste like?
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Tibrogargan
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« Reply #162 on: February 13, 2007, 01:48:26 AM »

Klaas - I have never tasted this fruit/vegetable.  Stay away from most of these things as allergic to lots of fruits, pollens etc.

Found this description and photo, and this says you can eat the seeds but I don't think the Aboriginal do so - they probably just munch on the skins for moisture.

BUSH BANANA ALSO CALLED BUSH PEAR
Where do some of these early common names come from?! The fruit looks nothing like a pear or banana. I think a more accurate name could be the Giant Wild Pea as that's exactly what the young seed cluster tastes like - beautiful sweet green peas! The pods can grow up to around 10cm, but get  tougher aid more bitter. Best size is 4-5 cm long - when peeled, reveals perhaps the most stunning and intricate looking vegetable on earth. These hardy vines need a trellis, host tree or fence upon which to climb and produce clusters of nectar sweet flowers followed by the fruit. There is also an edible tuber which grows undergound. Unfortunately, more often than not, the plant is destroyed by harvesting. The tuber has a starchy watery texture with a subtle flavour.



WILD RASPBERRY

This superb fruit has clusters of juicy, pink to bright red lobes which form the berry, some 1-3 cm in diameter. They grow on a bramble thicket with regularly spaced sharp barbs on the stems. Flavour is a superb sharp berry-raspberry, stronger than exotic raspberries.

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« Reply #163 on: February 13, 2007, 08:08:49 AM »

Quote from: "Tibrogargan"
A COUPLE OF ITEMS FROM OUR LOCAL NEWSPAPER TODAY THAT MAY INTEREST SOME OF MY MONKEY FRIENDS.

IRWIN  GRANT

Steve Irwin's environmental legacy will live on with a fellowship giving US high school students the chance to travel to Australia.  The fellowship will enable a US Midwest high school student to travel to Australia for two weeks to work closely with staff at the Irwin family's Australia Zoo on Queensland's Sunshine Coast and at Sydney's Taronga Zoo.

The Examiner 3 Feb 2007


Wow! Justin would love to do this once he is old enough!
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Tibrogargan
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« Reply #164 on: February 17, 2007, 09:13:18 PM »

Quote from: "justinsmama"
Quote from: "Tibrogargan"
A COUPLE OF ITEMS FROM OUR LOCAL NEWSPAPER TODAY THAT MAY INTEREST SOME OF MY MONKEY FRIENDS.

IRWIN  GRANT

Steve Irwin's environmental legacy will live on with a fellowship giving US high school students the chance to travel to Australia.  The fellowship will enable a US Midwest high school student to travel to Australia for two weeks to work closely with staff at the Irwin family's Australia Zoo on Queensland's Sunshine Coast and at Sydney's Taronga Zoo.

The Examiner 3 Feb 2007


Wow! Justin would love to do this once he is old enough!


It would be a wonderful opportunity for any youngster that was interested in the environment.  Two weeks seems such a short while to learn much but would certainly whet their appetite for more study.
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Tibrogargan
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« Reply #165 on: February 17, 2007, 09:20:29 PM »

HAHNDORF

    Located 28 km south-east of Adelaide, Hahndorf is a major tourist destination. It is a little piece of Silesia, Prussia and Germany in the Adelaide Hills. It is characterised by beautiful shady, tree-lined streets, lots of advertisements and shop signs in Teutonic script, and lots of German tourists being entertained in cafes, bars and restaurants run by the descendants of the town's early German settlers. The town is 330 m above sea level, has a rainfall of 990 mm and promotes itself as 'Australia's Oldest German Town'.

    The history of Hahndorf starts in 1838 when George Fife Angas went to London as a director of the South Australian Company to try and promote colonisation. While he was there he met Pastor August Ludwig Christian Kavel who was trying to organise for Lutherans (who were being persecuted by the King of Prussia, Friedrich Wilhelm III) to emigrate. Angas was moved by the plight of the Lutherans and not only persuaded Kavel that South Australia was a suitable place for emigration but also financially assisted them with a generous £8,000. The first German settlers arrived on 25 November, 1838 at the unfortunately named Port Misery. These settlers were to establish distinctly German villages at Klemzig, Glen Osmond, Lobethal and most famously Hahndorf.

    Hahndorf's history is connected to the arrival at Port Adelaide, on 28 December, 1838 of the 344 ton ship, Zebra, under the control of Captain Dirk Hahn. He was impressed by his passengers to such a point that upon their arrival in South Australia he was determined to help them. Although a Dane it is he who is honoured with his name being the basis of the town's name.

    The ship was carrying 187 German immigrants. For a time the immigrants lived in tents at Port Adelaide then Hahn came to an agreement to rent 150 acres of land (this was the present site of Hahndorf) which would be divided up so there was 38 acres for living quarters and the rest for farming. Later the grant was expanded to 240 acres. A group of twelve men on horseback and some ladies in a carriage travelled to inspect the site and Hahn was so taken by it that he declared 'It seems to me as if nature had lavished her choicest gifts on South Australia, I should like to end my days here and never return to the busy world.'

    The conditions for settlement were generous. The Germans were given provisions for the first year. They were also provided with a preacher and a substantial amount of livestock. All that was required was that they worked hard and produced a reasonable return on the land and livestock.

    Not surprisingly the early settlers worked hard planting crops and grazing the cattle they had been given. They all contributed to the construction of a church which was completed within a year of the settlement. It stood where St Michael's Church now stands.

    Within the first decade the town prospered. Vineyards were established, the women worked as shepherds, the men hired themselves out to the surrounding landowners as cheap labour and slowly substantial houses, many of which still stand, were built.

    The town was struck by intense anti-German feelings during World War I (rather stupid given that most of the residents could trace their origins back to 1839) and the name was changed to Ambleside by a 1917 Act of Parliament. The German Arms Hotel, for example, became the Ambleside Hotel and did not change its name back until 1976.

    Today it is one of South Australia's premier tourist attractions. There are few places in the country where you can drive through typically Australian countryside and, quite suddenly, enter a world which seems to have been lifted from Central Europe.

MAIN STREET OF HAHNDORF ;



DIRK HAHN MONUMENT :



GERMAN ARMS HOTEL :



ST MICHAELS CHURCH :

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Tibrogargan
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« Reply #166 on: February 17, 2007, 09:25:15 PM »

Just outside of Hahndorf there is an original German style house fully preserved.



How would we like to cook like this today on this German Outdoor Oven.



Back in Hahndorf, it is good to see that with all their religious and hardworking history, they still have a sense of humour :

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Tibrogargan
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« Reply #167 on: February 18, 2007, 06:21:43 AM »

SOME MORE UNUSUAL CREATURES ;

The Goanna, iguana or monitor lizard, can grow to well over a metre in length and is prized as a food source among Aboriginal people.

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Tibrogargan
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« Reply #168 on: February 18, 2007, 06:23:16 AM »

A large Estuarine or saltwater crocodile basks along Yellow Waters Lagoon. These reptiles are dangerous but fully protected.

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Tibrogargan
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« Reply #169 on: February 18, 2007, 06:24:52 AM »

Freshwater Crocodile is not considered dangerous but could give you a nasty bite when protecting its young.

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Tibrogargan
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« Reply #170 on: February 18, 2007, 06:26:01 AM »

The Mountain Devil is a harmless denizen of the desert, despite its fearsome appearance.

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Tibrogargan
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« Reply #171 on: February 18, 2007, 06:27:51 AM »

Bearded Dragons are native lizards from Central Australia.

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Tibrogargan
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« Reply #172 on: February 18, 2007, 06:30:17 AM »

Pelicans float serenely on Yellow Waters Lagoon at Cooinda, Kakadu National Park, Northern Territory. A boat trip early in the morning is a must here.

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Tibrogargan
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« Reply #173 on: February 18, 2007, 06:31:38 AM »

The Curtain Fig Tree, its aerial roots like a curtain dropping 15 metres to the ground, 3 km from the small town of Yungaburra on the Atherton Tablelands.

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« Reply #174 on: February 18, 2007, 06:33:35 AM »

Barron Falls or Din-Din, as it was known to the local Djabugay Aboriginal people, on the Barron River near the small town of Kuranda above Cairns. Most of its water is diverted to the power station, but in the wet season it remains a spectacular sight

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Tibrogargan
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« Reply #175 on: February 18, 2007, 06:35:54 AM »

Cairns taken from the Kuranda Railway in far north Queensland

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« Reply #176 on: February 18, 2007, 06:38:41 AM »

Beautiful Millaa Millaa Falls on the southern Atherton Tablelands in Far Northern Queensland, during the wet season.

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Tibrogargan
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« Reply #177 on: February 18, 2007, 06:40:04 AM »

Millstream Falls, Australia's widest waterfall, on the Great Dividing Range near the town of Ravenshoe is a welcome sight for a swim.

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« Reply #178 on: February 18, 2007, 06:42:37 AM »

The Blue Mountains National Park, just to the south west of Sydney, offers impressive vistas and great hiking

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« Reply #179 on: February 18, 2007, 06:44:58 AM »

Port Jackson, Sydney NSW, as seen from Australia Square, looking towards Parramatta, with Gladesville Bridge and the Blue Mountains in the background

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....And at night the wond’rous glory of the everlasting stars..  A.B (Banjo) Paterson
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