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Author Topic: Australia by Tibrogargan January 2007 - present and 155216+ views later!  (Read 543412 times)
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Tibrogargan
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« Reply #180 on: February 18, 2007, 06:46:36 AM »

Magnificent Sydney Harbour as seen from Australia Square, with Sydney Harbour Bridge, Circular Quay and the Sydney Opera House and the suburbs of North Sydney and Manly in the background.

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....And at night the wond’rous glory of the everlasting stars..  A.B (Banjo) Paterson
Tibrogargan
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« Reply #181 on: February 18, 2007, 06:47:56 AM »

The Sydney Harbour Bridge, locally nicknamed the "Coathanger", was opened by Premier Jack Lang on 19 March 1932. It has become an icon of Sydney and these days tourists climb it for a great view.

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....And at night the wond’rous glory of the everlasting stars..  A.B (Banjo) Paterson
Tibrogargan
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« Reply #182 on: February 18, 2007, 06:49:39 AM »

The Sydney Harbour Bridge makes a wonderful setting for Fireworks displays.



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« Reply #183 on: February 18, 2007, 11:13:47 AM »

What is Paul Hogan up these days?
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« Reply #184 on: February 18, 2007, 11:24:13 AM »

Tibrogargan, thank you for sharing your pictures they are beautiful. Very Happy
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« Reply #185 on: February 18, 2007, 11:37:32 AM »

Quote from: "Leslie"
What is Paul Hogan up these days?

Bring back the edit option!  I meant to say " what is Paul Hogan up to these days?"  I remember his commercials inviting everyone to Australia and saying "we will put another shrimp on the barbi"  lol
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« Reply #186 on: February 18, 2007, 12:21:20 PM »

beautiful.I hope to see it some day.CAT
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« Reply #187 on: February 18, 2007, 12:56:17 PM »

Wow Tibrogargan!! I waited to read this thread when I could actually just sit and enjoy it. Enjoy it I did!! Totally !!

 I always wanted to go there..and probably will one day. But even if I do I am sure I would not have learned or seen as much as you have so graciously have shared with us.

 I do have a question though in regards to vegemite (which I love). I was told there was an old fable the parents would tell thier children to get them to eat thier vegemite, if I remember correctly it had something to do with an animal..a bear?? it had a name. I do not remember it well at all but do remember how cool of a fable. Do you recall it to share with us ?

 I love folklores from different countries. I wish I could remember this one.

 Thank you SOOoo much for all you are sharing with us. BTW I think Tasmanian Devil babies are so cute!!

Sincerely,
 SeaMonkey Smile
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« Reply #188 on: February 18, 2007, 05:48:33 PM »

Quote from: "Leslie"
Quote from: "Leslie"
What is Paul Hogan up these days?

Bring back the edit option!  I meant to say " what is Paul Hogan up to these days?"  I remember his commercials inviting everyone to Australia and saying "we will put another shrimp on the barbi"  lol


A bit of trivia - Paul Hogan once had a job painting the Sydney Harbour Bridge...
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« Reply #189 on: February 18, 2007, 05:49:41 PM »

Quote from: "Cat"
beautiful.I hope to see it some day.CAT


I am currently planning next year's trip!
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« Reply #190 on: February 18, 2007, 09:34:22 PM »

Do your box jelly fish taste good on toast.CAT   and can your cat come out and play
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Tibrogargan
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« Reply #191 on: February 18, 2007, 11:15:51 PM »

Quote from: "Leslie"
Quote from: "Leslie"
What is Paul Hogan up these days?

Bring back the edit option!  I meant to say " what is Paul Hogan up to these days?"  I remember his commercials inviting everyone to Australia and saying "we will put another shrimp on the barbi"  lol


Paul Hogan lives on your side of the world now.  Think it is Santa Barbara?  Last time I saw him on TV he was almost unrecognisable with botox or face lifts.  Could barely smile and a lot smoother in face where before he looked quite weatherbeaten.  Definitely not aging in the usual sense!
Last week there was an article in the newspapers that he was involved in tax fraud investigation.  Will look up the article and post interesting parts of it.
I always felt sorry for his first wife as she appeared down to earth and very pleasant and was left with the 5 kids.
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....And at night the wond’rous glory of the everlasting stars..  A.B (Banjo) Paterson
Tibrogargan
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« Reply #192 on: February 18, 2007, 11:23:08 PM »

Seamonkey You have caught me on that one.  I do not know of any fable about Vegemite.  Plenty of interesting history about the produce.  May do an article on it.  The Americans were going to ban it but have not gone ahead with that and now our souvenir websites advertise exporting it to the US as one of our icons.
The only thing I can think of as a Aussie fable is the bunyip?  Maybe that is what you remember as it would be similar to the BigFoot and Yeti fables.
Will see what I can find and post as a bit of folklore.
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....And at night the wond’rous glory of the everlasting stars..  A.B (Banjo) Paterson
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« Reply #193 on: February 18, 2007, 11:25:16 PM »

Quote from: "Sleuth"
Quote from: "Cat"
beautiful.I hope to see it some day.CAT


I am currently planning next year's trip!

Hope you are including Tasmania!  We have a spare bedroom for monkey friends too.
BTW I love your shamrock camouflage.  Bet they do not taste as good as gum leaves. Laughing
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....And at night the wond’rous glory of the everlasting stars..  A.B (Banjo) Paterson
Tibrogargan
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« Reply #194 on: February 18, 2007, 11:27:12 PM »

Quote from: "Cat"
Do your box jelly fish taste good on toast.CAT   and can your cat come out and play

You would not be a happy Cat if you tried to eat them.
Are you the handsome tabby that has won my kitty's heart?
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....And at night the wond’rous glory of the everlasting stars..  A.B (Banjo) Paterson
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« Reply #195 on: February 19, 2007, 05:07:39 AM »

Paul Hogan linked to $300m tax fraud case
The Australian Newspaper
By Susannah Moran
February 13, 2007 01:00am

ENTERTAINER Paul Hogan has for the first time been linked to court proceedings involving Australia's biggest tax fraud investigation.
Despite Hogan's repeated denials of problems with the tax office, a string of companies associated with him, his financial adviser Anthony Stewart and his artistic collaborator John Cornell, have been named in Federal Court proceedings relating to the $300 million investigation.
Court documents reveal Hogan, Mr Cornell and Mr Stewart are linked to two Federal Court cases that have been launched to try to stop Australian Crime Commission investigators using seized documents as part of the watchdog's investigations into illegal tax schemes. The documents list 23 companies, including Paul Hogan Enterprises and Stewart Property Trust, that have been subject to investigations by the ACC as part of Operation Wickenby.
The court case has been brought by two men - one described as a financial adviser, and the other as his client, an offshore resident who used to live in Australia.
 Hogan wrote to The Australian last year, following a report that he was being investigated for not disclosing to the Australian Taxation Office that he was holding $40 million in offshore trusts.
"You got me. Almost. The last problem I had with the ATO was in 1972 when they claimed I had fudged the overheads on my earnings from my pub chook raffles," Hogan said.

NOTE: This article has been edited to exclude unnecessary details of other respondents.
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Tibrogargan
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« Reply #196 on: February 19, 2007, 05:30:58 AM »

BUNYIP

A bunyip is a legendary spirit or creature of the Australian Aborigine. Bunyips haunt rivers, swamps, creeks and billabongs. Their main goal in life is to cause nocturnal terror by eating people or animals in their vicinity. They are renowned for their terrifying bellowing cries in the night and have been known to frighten Aborigines to the point where they would not approach any water source where a bunyip might be waiting to devour them.

There are many reports by white settlers who have witnessed bunyips, so cryptozoologists may still be searching for these creatures. They may have some difficulty in locating their prey, though, since Aboriginal tribes do not all give the same visual description of the creature. Some say the bunyip looks like a huge snake with a beard and a mane; others say it looks like a huge furry half-human beast with a long neck and a head like a bird. However, most Australians now consider the existence of the bunyip to be mythical. Some scientists believe the bunyip was a real animal, the diprotodon, extinct for some 20,000 years, which terrified the earliest settlers of Australia.

According to Oodgeroo Noonuccal (Kath Walker) in Stradbroke Dreamtime, the bunyip is an evil or punishing spirit from the Aboriginal Dreamtime. Today the bunyip mainly appears in Australian literature for children and makes an occasional appearance in television commercials.
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« Reply #197 on: February 19, 2007, 05:45:24 AM »

BUNYIPS

Aboriginal rock drawing of a Bunyip



Two Australian Stamps showing Bunyips.



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« Reply #198 on: February 19, 2007, 07:15:07 AM »

Hello Tibrogargan Smile

 I knew about the bunyip, which I totally love that whole fable,  maybe it was link to vegimite as I was told it too, I can't remember. I almost think it was a bear like creature though. Maybe it was a regional thing?

 I wouldn't understand it if America bans it though, the jar I was given was made by the same company that makes our active bread yeasts. Then again a lot of what the USA bans and restricts have not ceased to amaze me lately. Don't get me wrong, I love my country, but it is slowly turning into a country I find hard to even recognize at times.

 I love everything you are sharing Smile Is there anything you would like to know about the North East of the USA ?? Ummm like here is something trivial, only one in a million lobsters (lobstahs, as we "Mainers/Maniacs" pronounce it) are blue, and one in a couple a million are white. The blue ones are actually considered albino. Lobsters that come out of the ocean are generally blackish green to a brownish, they only turn red AFTER being cooked. If you want any technical facts I will have to look it all up, I am posting this from memory. From when I did research on them when I was making sculpted tshirt lobsters to know what colors to make them lol.
 But whenever I have had friends overseas some were amazed they did not come out of the ocean red. I don't assume you didn't know that, I just thought I would share since you are sharing so much too Smile

 Sincerely,
 SeaMonkey
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« Reply #199 on: February 20, 2007, 04:18:41 AM »

Thank you Seamonkey. I am glad you enjoy this thread.  Yes, I would love to know more about your wonderful country.  So much is similar to ours and yet so different in many ways. What do you think about an American thread too?  I am sure that your people in different parts of your country would like to know more about the lifestyle in other areas.  We might ask Klaasend what she thinks about the idea? Wink  Wink
I was interested that you have blue Lobsters.  We have Lobsters here but they are freshwater and the salt water ones are called Crayfish, just to be different.  I know some people who see the fresh or "green" prawns here in the markets think there is something wrong with them when they are not red in colour  Laughing  What is a sculpted tshirt lobster?  I guess it is a craft project?

Now for some history on Vegemite :

The uninitiated spread it with abandon  - and then gasp with horror - but to those who have grown up with it, Vegemite on toast tastes like home

By Chris Sheedy     (Story courtesy of Sunday Life Magazine, Sun-Herald 23 Jan 2005)

In every culture, there are foods locals adore and from which outsiders recoil.   The French love escargot.   On Thanksgiving Day, Americans devour candied yams.   Even the most cultured Italian salivates at the thought of tripe in a white wine and tomato sauce.   We Australians have bottled our internationally reviled obsession.   It's a gooey, black substance, similar in appearance to axlegrease, and it sits proudly in eight out of 10 Australian pantries.

The first jar of the product now known as Vegemite was labelled "pure vegetable extract" by food technologist Dr Cyril P. Callister.   The Fred Walker Company, which produced, sold and exported cheese (and eventually became Kraft Foods Ltd), had hired Callister in 1922 to create a foodstuff from waste brewer's yeast obtained from Melbourne's Carlton & United Breweries.   Yeast cells were taken from a beer vat and washed before being broken down by enzymes, allowing vitamins, minerals and proteins to leach out into the liquid.   It was then concentrated into a thick paste and seasoned with salt and vegetable extracts such as onion and celery.

A national naming competition followed, offering 50 pounds to the winner - an enormous amount at the time.   But although it was launched with much fanfare in 1923, Vegemite did not immediately seduce the Australian palate and, in 1928, poor sales convinced Walker  to change the name to Parwill in an attempt to piggyback on the success of Britain's Marmite ("If Marmite, then Parwill").

Thankfully, Walker reverted to the original name and in 1937, after two years of giving away a free jar of Vegemite with other Fred Walker products, the nation was finally hooked.   But Walker, who died of heart failure in 1935, never witnessed Vegemite's success.

During World War II, Australian troops were kept well fed with Vegemite, creating great goodwill towards the brand.   After the war, its high levels of vitamin B made it a favourite with mums.   Today we consume almost 23 million jars of Vegemite a year and the dark spread is found in one out of every three sandwiches eaten.

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....And at night the wond’rous glory of the everlasting stars..  A.B (Banjo) Paterson
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