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Author Topic: Australia by Tibrogargan January 2007 - present and 155216+ views later!  (Read 517366 times)
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Carnut
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« Reply #20 on: January 17, 2007, 12:09:41 AM »

Thanks a bunch Tibro, keep it up.

Kinda appears that most of the folks there were straight from Britain instead of from all over Europe.

So except for the aborigines population would be a little more homogeneous than here.

Was wondering how the acreage was handed out, with the stipulations and normal real world economics I imagine some folks were a bit more successful than others and managed to accumulate more property thru purchase or default.

Though even economics probably dosen't really account for the really big 'stations' we've heard of.

Guess there must have been some folks who headed out into the no man's land and took their own property grants as what ever they could manage to hold or something like that.
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Lala'sMom
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« Reply #21 on: January 17, 2007, 12:24:39 AM »

Tibro
I would love to hear about the native wildlife there.  Which are your favorites?  

Tell me about the education system there.  Are there many universities and colleges?  What is your national pastime?  Soccer?  Rugby?  I am afraid I have no idea.   What is your main export?  What city do you live in?  

You will find I often have many questions.   Laughing
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« Reply #22 on: January 17, 2007, 12:34:02 AM »

I know that in-vitro fertilization was developed by an Australian DR. About 25 years ago, a group of Australians came to the University of Alabama in Birmingham ( UAB) and began doing the procedure there. It was called IVF - Australia. They were a fascinating group.
When I was in the 5th grade, I had a classmate who moved to Birmingham from Melbourne while her father studied medicine at UAB. We all thought she had the neatest accent. Bindi Irwin reminds me of that little girl.
Australia has a great healthcare system, and some talented doctors.

Thanks, Tibro, for all the info on cattle and sheep stations. It's so interesting, and you are so gracious. I really want to visit one some day.
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« Reply #23 on: January 17, 2007, 12:35:38 AM »

Doing a little fix to Tibro's post on her request.
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« Reply #24 on: January 18, 2007, 11:11:16 PM »

What kind of monkey is that in your avatar?.....is he from Australia?
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Tibrogargan
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« Reply #25 on: January 18, 2007, 11:37:15 PM »

Some answers to your kind questions :

Carnut  Our earliest immigrants would have been Chinese who came to work in the gold fields and were well regarded for their hard work and peaceful lifestyle.  Next of course were the British.  This did not change much until the big Snowy Mountains hydro-electric power scheme where they brought out many Europeans to work building the dam and power station.  This was from the early 1950s onwards.  Then they opened it to other Asians and countries.  We have a large percentage of population from Asia.

I would imagine that land holdings could have been just established because either no one else wanted that particular area or they fought and/or pushed aside the aborigines for the land.  The aborigines in lots of cases became friendly with the settlers and worked for them also.

Marriage and other mergers would have helped to increase holdings and during the depression there would have been takeovers etc.  Since then drought, financial problems and lack of family to carry on (sometimes all the sons would have been killed in the wars and daughters marry and go elsewhere) would mean properties being sold.  Some of the really big stations are now owned by companies or a consortium.
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Tibrogargan
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« Reply #26 on: January 18, 2007, 11:59:52 PM »

BB  My avatar is a Golden Lion Tamarin or Golden Marmoset.  A small monkey native to Brazil.  Said to be one of rarest animals in world with only about 1000 in wild and 500 in captivity.  They are trying to increase their population.
We do not have any monkeys native to Australia.

pdh3  We have some clever medical and scientific Aussies.  Sister Kenny pioneered treatment for polio victims.  A lady doctor recently developed a new treatment for burns patients after the Bali bombings which caused so many horrific burn injuries.  Those are just two I can think of on the spur of the moment.  Bindi Irwin is a real chip off the old block and I am sure Terri will watch her carefully with all the media exposure.
We do have a good government run healthcare system plus private health insurance available so no reason for anyone to lack good medical care.

Lala'sMom  Going to do separate article on our wildlife.  I think I like Koalas best but they are all appealing in their own way.

We have a lot of universities and colleges.  Education is state run and you have choice of state primary and secondary (high) schools or private schools usually set up and run by religious organisations such as Roman Catholics,  Anglican,  Protestant and Quakers.  As for the comparative standards I cannot help but have several friends who are/have been teachers so could source any extra info you may like.

National pastimes ??  Main winter sports are Australian Rules Football, Rugby, and Soccer in that order.   Summer is cricket, tennis and water sports.

Main exports were wool and wheat.  May have changed lately.

I live in Launceston, second largest city in Tasmania, which is an island state south of mainland Australia.  We are near northern coast of the island (Hobart the capital is on southern end).  Also lived in Brisbane, capital of Queensland for many years and travelled around  most of our states except for Western Australia so know a little bit about some of them all.
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Tibrogargan
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« Reply #27 on: January 19, 2007, 12:59:06 AM »

pdh3   Lady doctor I was trying to think of is Dr Fiona Wood.  Originally from England, marries an Aussie and now living here.  Developed a spray on skin grown in lab from patients own good skin cells.
Prof Ian Frazer is a Scot/Aussie and developed cervical cancer vaccine.
Also Prof Graeme Clark perfected multiple channel cochlear implant.
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« Reply #28 on: January 19, 2007, 02:02:03 PM »

Tibro

I have a really stupid question, but I'm going to ask it anyway.  Embarassed  Laughing

Someone told me that even though koalas are the cutest thing in the world, they smell really bad. Do you know if that's true?

TY
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« Reply #29 on: January 19, 2007, 02:52:52 PM »

Australian Rules Football Exclamation

I am a football nut,  would love to hear more about the Australian Rules,  Is it more along the lines of Rugby?

TIA

Ms.DV
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« Reply #30 on: January 19, 2007, 06:09:07 PM »

Does Australia worry about China and Korea?
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« Reply #31 on: January 19, 2007, 06:14:53 PM »

Quote from: "BTgirl"
Tibro

I have a really stupid question, but I'm going to ask it anyway.  Embarassed  Laughing

Someone told me that even though koalas are the cutest thing in the world, they smell really bad. Do you know if that's true?

TY


Hi BT,

I have cuddled a few Koalas at theme parks and they do not smell bad at all.  In fact they smell a bit like antiseptic from the eucalyptus oil in the gum leaves they eat!  Their fur is very dense and springy not  soft as you would expect.  You have to hold them very firmly and support their bottoms or they will grab onto you to stop from slipping.  They have long sharp claws.  I do not think they bite but have been known very occasionally to pee on people holding them!  One did so on a politician once and the pollie has never lived it down!!
The one animal that can smell really bad is the Tasmanian Devil because they live on flesh and are not fussy how fresh it is.  Also very quarrelsome and noisy little creatures.   In captivity they are kept clean and fed fresh meat so are not so smelly.
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Tibrogargan
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« Reply #32 on: January 19, 2007, 06:20:36 PM »

Quote from: "LilPuma"
Does Australia worry about China and Korea?


Yes - big time.  Also see Indonesia as even more of a threat to us.  All far too close for comfort.   We trade with these countries but many of our political watchers keep a wary eye on them.  The inscrutable Orient.
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LilPuma
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« Reply #33 on: January 19, 2007, 06:24:09 PM »

Have you ever seen a Tasmanian Devil outside of a zoo?  They seem very much like nasty little badgers and noisy and all heck!
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« Reply #34 on: January 19, 2007, 06:58:40 PM »

Quote from: "Ms.DarthVada"
Australian Rules Football Exclamation

I am a football nut,  would love to hear more about the Australian Rules,  Is it more along the lines of Rugby?

TIA

Ms.DV


I will try to explain the game which is the main winter sport in most of our states and is slowly becoming established in the other couple of rugby mad states.  Originally based loosely on Rugby and Gaelic Football the earliest teams can trace their beginnings from 1850s.  A game is played on an oval shaped ground by two teams of 18 players each.  They all have set positions but can move anywhere on the ground depending on the flow of the game.
Games consists of 4 quarters of 20 minutes each with a long break in the middle and the teams change ends each quarter.
There are four posts each end - centre two posts are about 6 metres high and outer two posts are 3 metres high.  Aim is to kick the oval shaped ball through the centre posts of opposition team end to score a goal worth 6 points. If ball goes between one goal post and the outer post that is a behind which is worth 1 point.

                                 l         l
                                 l         l
                       l         l         l          l
                       l         l         l          l

                          B        Goal     B

To start the game the ball is bounced in centre of ground by the main umpire and this is contested by both teams by leaping up and "marking" or grabbing the ball or by punching it out to teammates.   Can be some spectacular marks taken both there and during the play around the ground.  Once possession of the ball is gained it is then kicked or hand passed to a teammate . If the player who has the ball is not tackled he can also run with the ball but has to bounce it every 15 metres.  Aim is of course to get the ball to the oppositions goal end and kick a goal.  If a behind is scored the opposition then gain control and restart the game by kicking the ball from their goal square.  If a goal is scored ball returns to umpire for a centre bounce again.  If ball goes out of bounds (goes over the white line all around the oval playing area) it is thrown in by boundary umpires.  Free kicks to opposing team are awarded for any infringements.
Final scores could look like this :    
Team A   10 goals    5 behinds =  65 points.  
Team B     8 goals  12 behinds =  60 points.      Team A wins!

Hope this helps you understand the game.  I believe there are AFL teams in some parts of the US and also in Canada.
Usually find a impromptu game going wherever there are Aussie troops stationed.
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Tibrogargan
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« Reply #35 on: January 19, 2007, 07:01:05 PM »

Well - my illustration of the goal posts did not come out as intended.  Sorry.
Not sure how else to illustrate it properly so will have to hope the description works OK
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Tibrogargan
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« Reply #36 on: January 19, 2007, 07:05:20 PM »

Quote from: "LilPuma"
Have you ever seen a Tasmanian Devil outside of a zoo?  They seem very much like nasty little badgers and noisy and all heck!


Yes but they are usually nocturnal and you hear them well before you see them fighting over their kill or carrion.   Have also seen other very shy creatures like wombats and platypus in the wild
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« Reply #37 on: January 19, 2007, 07:51:31 PM »

Quote from: "pdh3"

I'd also like to know how the Great Barrier Reef is faring.


pdh3 - The health of the Great Barrier Reef is of great concern to all conservationists and ecologists and of course the tourist operators even though they are a great part of the  problem.  There have been government grants and much research going on to rescue and preserve it.  I will take this opportunity to describe some of it for those who are not familiar with what is probably one of our greatest tourist attractions and is the only living organic collective visible from Earth's orbit.  Is is off the east coast (Pacific ocean) of our northern state of Queensland and is the world's largest coral reef ecosystem.  It has been declared a World Heritage area and is scattered with islands, coral cays, over 3000 reefs  and would cover close to 200,000 square miles.  Damage has been caused mainly by pollutants especially spilled fuel from boats and they say the wetlands has halved since European settlement here.  There have been many shipwrecks in the area also.
Coral make up the reefs and cays and support the many sea and animal life.  Coral is really tiny live creatures that join together and form colonies in many interesting shapes such as fans, antlers, brains and plates.   Some types grow fast and others more slowly and these can be hundreds of years old.  They thrive in warm shallow salty water with plenty of light.
The live coral comes in many beautiful colours and dead coral is white.
The Crown of Thorns starfish is a great danger and has been known for past 40 years.  It kills the coral and thus has an impact on bird and sea life.  Also harming the coral is bleaching which is caused by rising water temperatures.   (Global warming?)
Some of the wildlife that live on and around the reef are turtles, dolphins, whales, dugongs, thousand of types of fish and shellfish and birds.   Many of these creatures are protected and fishing is strongly curtailed and totally restricted in some areas.
Tourists are probably the main danger to the reef.  Latest figures show more than 2 million tourists visit the reef in a year and are carried throughout the marine park's reef system by commercial boats.  The income earned and employment created is enormous and many ways are being sought to minimise their impact on this fragile environment while keeping the reef available to visitors.
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« Reply #38 on: January 19, 2007, 07:53:31 PM »

Quote from: "Tibrogargan"
Quote from: "BTgirl"
Tibro

I have a really stupid question, but I'm going to ask it anyway.  Embarassed  Laughing

Someone told me that even though koalas are the cutest thing in the world, they smell really bad. Do you know if that's true?

TY


Hi BT,

I have cuddled a few Koalas at theme parks and they do not smell bad at all.  In fact they smell a bit like antiseptic from the eucalyptus oil in the gum leaves they eat!  Their fur is very dense and springy not  soft as you would expect.  You have to hold them very firmly and support their bottoms or they will grab onto you to stop from slipping.  They have long sharp claws.  I do not think they bite but have been known very occasionally to pee on people holding them!  One did so on a politician once and the pollie has never lived it down!!
The one animal that can smell really bad is the Tasmanian Devil because they live on flesh and are not fussy how fresh it is.  Also very quarrelsome and noisy little creatures.   In captivity they are kept clean and fed fresh meat so are not so smelly.


Thanks for answering my question, Tibro. I'm so envious that you've been able to hold a koala. That's been a lifelong dream of mine, and I just couldn't believe anything that looked that adorable could smell bad!
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« Reply #39 on: January 19, 2007, 11:58:37 PM »

Quote from: "BTgirl"
Tibro

I have a really stupid question, but I'm going to ask it anyway.  Embarassed  Laughing

Someone told me that even though koalas are the cutest thing in the world, they smell really bad. Do you know if that's true?

TY


 Shocked  Shocked  Shocked

This koala prefers Victoria Secret's "Heavenly".  Most say it smells nice.  Laughing  Laughing
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