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Author Topic: Australia by Tibrogargan January 2007 - present and 155216+ views later!  (Read 570342 times)
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Seamonkey
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« Reply #200 on: February 20, 2007, 06:39:11 AM »

Good Morning Tibrogargan, though I am sure it is your evening lol.

 We have crayfish too, I think it depends in what part of the country you are in that they are also called crawdads. I wonder if what we call crayfish and crawdads are the same thing within our own country. Mini lobsters, and very yummy but a lot of work for so little meat lol. But still not as bad as all the work to get out of a crab. I got rather lazy with my hardshell fish being on the Maine coast most my life I like the almost no work compaired to get the meat from lobsters. lol.

 InRe: Sculpted tshirt lobster. They are tshirts I sculpt to look like lobsters, I then airbrush them, add eyes, then antennae. I call them Louies and B-Louies (blue ones). They were rather popular in the gift shops and tourist spots here until I had to stop making them from a lack of space in our new home, but I am hoping to convert part of our barn into a "louie making studio" lol. When these tshirts are opened, which I don't like to think about, they look like a tie dyed shirt. I had a patent pending on them.
 We have a festival here called the Lobster Festival, people from all over the world come to it, in a 4 day period 100's of thousands of people pass through those gates, my dream is to one day have my louies and b-louies in it. But I will need to make at the very LEAST 500 of them to sell.
 I will try to post a piccy of them..I never posted a picture within my post so i have no idea if it will work.
 

 Ohhh I think it worked!!! I am so use to html and have no idea how this code works. I guess the same way only with boxed ends. lol

 Anyways, where was I?.. Those are the louies and b-louies. Not a fantastic picture but it gives you an idea what they look like.

 That is VERY interesting about the vegemite history. I read somewheres that the reason us "yanks" are so cranky is because we do not eat vegemite lol I guess that is because it is so rich in Vitamin B ( the make you happy vitamin) that we do not get it lol.  And the USA banning it I think was a hoax after I dug around a bit about it.
 I also love the song they have to go with the vegemite lol I am beginning to sound vegemite obsessed. Wink

 Yes, and perhaps a thread on USA would be good too, because obviously within our own country there are many differing cultures that would be nice to learn from.
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Sleuth
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« Reply #201 on: February 21, 2007, 02:46:42 AM »

Quote from: "Seamonkey"
 
 I do have a question though in regards to vegemite (which I love). I was told there was an old fable the parents would tell thier children to get them to eat thier vegemite, if I remember correctly it had something to do with an animal..a bear?? it had a name. I do not remember it well at all but do remember how cool of a fable. Do you recall it to share with us ?
 


 Laughing

Dispelling the Urban Legend that surrounds the Australian Dropbear
Dropbears
Copyright 2002 Ashley Gittins

It is a disturbing trend, but many people seem to take great pleasure in spreading fear and mis-information. Sadly, the Australian Dropbear is another victim of this type of treatment. For many years, visitors to Australia have been warned of this almost mythical sounding creature which stalks the forest canopy, waiting for a meal to pass by below. Whilst wide-eyed newcomers are listening intently to this new information, the informant-turned-storytellermay stoop to embelishment. This is unacceptable, as the threat posed tohumans by the Dropbear is very real, and should be treated with the utmost seriousness.

I think it's safe to say that most people understand that Aussie's love a good yarn. Indeed, competitions for the telling of tall stories are held at many folk and music festivals around the country. While I think that these in themselves are a great thing, perhaps we should be wary of how we allow our storytelling to alter what in effect should be public service announcements. Some of the un-truths I have heard about the Australian Dropbear include:

The Wrestler
This embellishment claims that the Dropbear resulted from a chance mating between a native Koala and a Pro Wrestler in the mid to late 1970's. Please! This type of rubbish only serves to dilute the credibility of the Dropbear threat. Goodness knows we have enough trouble with the Government in ourCountry doing everything they can to conceal the Dropbear's very existence without resorting to blatant jests (look how well they did at hiding the fact that Tasmania has Tigers roaming freely about). It is well understood that the dropbear has evolved over thousands of years. It's diminutive cousin the Koala was more often found in dryer areas of Australia where it's herbivorous lifestyle was a natural adaptation to scarce food supplies. Conversely, Dropbear prides were more common in sub-tropical forests, where larger mammals (a primary food source) were more prevelant. The population density along coastal areas accounts for the less than comfortable relationship shared over the years by humans and Dropbears. Due to habitat destruction, many Dropbear prides have divided over the years, some of which head further inland in search of more plentiful food sources, and safer environments in which to raise cubs. This in turn has displaced some koala populations. This in fact serves to provide the Australian government with a convenient cover story. They (and others) claim that coastal Koala habitats are being destroyed, thereby lowering the count of koala's typically seen around urban Australia. This is a fallacy, as koala's never inhabited coastal areas in any great numbers due to the Dropbear not being particularly concerned with matters of ettiquette regarding feeding on relatives. However, since many tourists tend to be dissapointed that they do not see a koala in every eucalytpus tree, the government perpetuates this story of an endagered species in a shrinking habitat. As horrible as it is, it sounds a lot better than saying "Oh, those cuddly things? Yeah, the dropbears ate them all".

Vegemite
I have heard it claimed that Vegemite (a black foodstuff, high in vitamin B, manufactured as a joke to play on tourists) is a good Dropbear repellent when applied to the face and neck. I find this very difficult to believe, but cannot in truth disprove it. The fact is that the only true Dropbear repellent is Aeroguard. It is 100% effective, and not a single confirmed dropbear killing has been recorded against a person protected with Aeroguard (not to mention the fact that smearing Vegemite over your body is far less pleasant than a few sprays of Aeroguard). Due to political pressure Aeroguard is marketed as an insect repellent (a task it also performs rather well).

We all have our strange marketing laws, and just as in the USA it is illegal to advertise the health benefits of a non-drug product, in Oz it is illegal to market protection products against "Creatures of plausible deniability". Go figure.

More at:  http://www.purple.dropbear.id.au/curios/dropbear.html
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Sleuth
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« Reply #202 on: February 21, 2007, 02:46:58 AM »

Quote from: "Seamonkey"
 
 I do have a question though in regards to vegemite (which I love). I was told there was an old fable the parents would tell thier children to get them to eat thier vegemite, if I remember correctly it had something to do with an animal..a bear?? it had a name. I do not remember it well at all but do remember how cool of a fable. Do you recall it to share with us ?
 


 Laughing

Dispelling the Urban Legend that surrounds the Australian Dropbear
Dropbears
Copyright 2002 Ashley Gittins

It is a disturbing trend, but many people seem to take great pleasure in spreading fear and mis-information. Sadly, the Australian Dropbear is another victim of this type of treatment. For many years, visitors to Australia have been warned of this almost mythical sounding creature which stalks the forest canopy, waiting for a meal to pass by below. Whilst wide-eyed newcomers are listening intently to this new information, the informant-turned-storytellermay stoop to embelishment. This is unacceptable, as the threat posed tohumans by the Dropbear is very real, and should be treated with the utmost seriousness.

I think it's safe to say that most people understand that Aussie's love a good yarn. Indeed, competitions for the telling of tall stories are held at many folk and music festivals around the country. While I think that these in themselves are a great thing, perhaps we should be wary of how we allow our storytelling to alter what in effect should be public service announcements. Some of the un-truths I have heard about the Australian Dropbear include:

The Wrestler
This embellishment claims that the Dropbear resulted from a chance mating between a native Koala and a Pro Wrestler in the mid to late 1970's. Please! This type of rubbish only serves to dilute the credibility of the Dropbear threat. Goodness knows we have enough trouble with the Government in ourCountry doing everything they can to conceal the Dropbear's very existence without resorting to blatant jests (look how well they did at hiding the fact that Tasmania has Tigers roaming freely about). It is well understood that the dropbear has evolved over thousands of years. It's diminutive cousin the Koala was more often found in dryer areas of Australia where it's herbivorous lifestyle was a natural adaptation to scarce food supplies. Conversely, Dropbear prides were more common in sub-tropical forests, where larger mammals (a primary food source) were more prevelant. The population density along coastal areas accounts for the less than comfortable relationship shared over the years by humans and Dropbears. Due to habitat destruction, many Dropbear prides have divided over the years, some of which head further inland in search of more plentiful food sources, and safer environments in which to raise cubs. This in turn has displaced some koala populations. This in fact serves to provide the Australian government with a convenient cover story. They (and others) claim that coastal Koala habitats are being destroyed, thereby lowering the count of koala's typically seen around urban Australia. This is a fallacy, as koala's never inhabited coastal areas in any great numbers due to the Dropbear not being particularly concerned with matters of ettiquette regarding feeding on relatives. However, since many tourists tend to be dissapointed that they do not see a koala in every eucalytpus tree, the government perpetuates this story of an endagered species in a shrinking habitat. As horrible as it is, it sounds a lot better than saying "Oh, those cuddly things? Yeah, the dropbears ate them all".

Vegemite
I have heard it claimed that Vegemite (a black foodstuff, high in vitamin B, manufactured as a joke to play on tourists) is a good Dropbear repellent when applied to the face and neck. I find this very difficult to believe, but cannot in truth disprove it. The fact is that the only true Dropbear repellent is Aeroguard. It is 100% effective, and not a single confirmed dropbear killing has been recorded against a person protected with Aeroguard (not to mention the fact that smearing Vegemite over your body is far less pleasant than a few sprays of Aeroguard). Due to political pressure Aeroguard is marketed as an insect repellent (a task it also performs rather well).

We all have our strange marketing laws, and just as in the USA it is illegal to advertise the health benefits of a non-drug product, in Oz it is illegal to market protection products against "Creatures of plausible deniability". Go figure.

More at:  http://www.purple.dropbear.id.au/curios/dropbear.html
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« Reply #203 on: February 21, 2007, 02:51:54 AM »

Sorry about the double post.   The good news it is worth a second read   Wink
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« Reply #204 on: February 21, 2007, 02:53:11 AM »

Hi Seamonkey I love the Louie Lobsters!  I have never seen anything like that here, even in the fishing/tourist villages.  I hope you are able to make the 500 to have them at the Festival.  They would be a big hit.  
We have a wide variety of fish, all called different names depending on where you are, and shellfish.  I prefer the fish to eat but will eat shellfish at times.  DH loves shellfish. We also have yabbies which live in freshwater and it is a great sport for kids catching them.  They live in earth dams as well but because they dig burrows to hide in during the dryer times they undermine the dam walls.  We have several types of prawns (shrimp) moreton bay bugs, also called balmain bugs in Sydney, as well as sand crabs and mud crabs, oysters and of course the crays and lobsters.  I realised after I wrote the last post that here in Tas we call the saltwater ones crays and on the mainland they call them lobsters.  Exactly the opposite.  Our largest freshwater fish is the Murray Cod which can grow to enormous sizes.  There are a lot of reef or coral fish which are yummy, and our cold water fish are great too : Trevally, Orange Roughy and Blue Grenadier are my favourites.  Don't go much on the baby octopus but like the calamari.  
We will hear Cat over here purring before too long!
I wonder how many other Monkeys would like to contribute to an American  thread as we talked about earlier?
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« Reply #205 on: February 21, 2007, 02:57:08 AM »

YUM, YUM - both moreton bay bugs and balmain bugs are delicious.   Cat, you can have my leftovers.....
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« Reply #206 on: February 21, 2007, 03:00:03 AM »

Yes, Tib, the shamrocks provide a good substitute to my normal eucalyptus diet....   Wink

We are not sure of our exact plans, but definitely will be coming as far south as Melbourne.  Either Tas or New Zealand...
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« Reply #207 on: February 21, 2007, 03:01:36 AM »

G'day Sleuth They must keep that story for the overseas tourists as I have not heard it before!  I suppose most of my touring has been with locals when I have been interstate and have not been let loose among the tour guides, which seems like it was a good move judging by this story.  I certainly enjoyed reading it.
By the way they still have not proven that Tasmanian Tigers are extinct.  There are still some sightings by very reputable people.  The southwest where they could be living is very dense forest and you could lose a tribe of aboriginals in there without knowing they exist.
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« Reply #208 on: February 21, 2007, 03:04:54 AM »

Quote from: "Sleuth"
Yes, Tib, the shamrocks provide a good substitute to my normal eucalyptus diet....   Wink

We are not sure of our exact plans, but definitely will be coming as far south as Melbourne.  Either Tas or New Zealand...


Both Tas and NZ are very nice to visit.  Get my email from Klaas if you need any other info at all.  Happy to help my monkey friends. Wink  Wink
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« Reply #209 on: February 21, 2007, 03:29:42 AM »

Dainty Swallow Tail Butterfly:

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« Reply #210 on: February 21, 2007, 03:30:56 AM »

King Parrot male and baby:

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« Reply #211 on: February 21, 2007, 07:11:41 AM »

THE TALE OF THE TASMANIAN TIGER
   
More than 60 years ago, in a chain-link cage at the Hobart Zoo, in Australia, a creature with a five foot long, low dog-like body died. Its death marked the extinction of the Tasmanian Tiger.
Maybe.............
Ever since that specimen died in captivity, there have been sporadic but unconfirmed reports of tigers being sighted in the wilds near their old habitats. In 1995, a park ranger spotted what looked like a Tasmanian Tiger in the Pyengana region of Tasmania. Two years later, villagers in two remote mountain towns on the island of Irian Jaya, Indonesia, reported a pack of six or seven of the creatures were attacking the villager's chickens and pigs. A hundred years ago the tigers (which are not cats at all, but marsupial wolves) were common on the Island of Tasmania. In the distant past they also populated the continent of Australia, and perhaps many of the surrounding islands, but became extinct about 2000 years ago as they were pushed out by competing animals. They carried their young in pouches as do other marsupials like the kangaroo and the koala. They also sported a long, heavy, kangaroo-like tail. The name "tiger" comes from dark strips that ran across the flanks of the creature's yellow-brown fur. The animals were also referred to as Tasmanian Wolves, or thylacines (their scientific name is Thylacinus cynocephalus). The tigers' primary food source were small mammals like wallabies, kangaroos and rats. The tiger's feet left a five toed print which is similar, but easily distinguished from a dog's. Dogs have only four toes. While the creatures looked fierce because of their large heads and wide jaws (opening larger than that of any other mammal), they were actually shy and retiring. The largest of them grew six feet long, including the tail, and they stood two feet high at the shoulder. At the end of the 19th century as humans moved into the tiger's territories, conflicts arose. Farmers blamed the tigers for livestock losses. Development of cultivated land also interfered with the animal's habitat. A bounty was placed on the creatures and thousands of them were killed. By the time the Australian government moved to protect the tigers, it was too late. Most of the recent reports of Tasmanian Tigers come from the Island of Tasmania, a state of Australia, which lies just south of the eastern portion of the continent. Tasmania covers 26,383 square miles and about a half-million people live there. There are still wild sections where the creature could be hiding. In 1995 the government launched an investigation to try and find the tiger. Also, many amateur cryptozoologists have searched for the animals. So far, if the tigers are still alive, they have evaded science's eyes.
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« Reply #212 on: February 21, 2007, 07:18:22 AM »

EARLY PHOTOGRAPH OF TASMANIA TIGERS IN CAPTIVITY :



PAINTING OF TASMANIAN TIGERS :

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« Reply #213 on: February 21, 2007, 07:36:30 AM »

Sleuth -- That's the one!! The dropbear. Now I remember it. Oh thank you so much, it has been nagging at me to remember, ya know? like a song you keep humming but can't remember the name to? I love all the stories you shared. Yes, it was worth a second read. Smile Thank you again.

Tibrogargan -- Thank you, I never had seen a louie either. I had a chat friend about 5 years ago, he was talking about his trip to the Maine coast, he lived in New Jersey, he mentioned picking up quite unique art piece that looked like a lobster. I was joking and said " a Louie?" he said "yeah and a B-louie, how do you know" ..being on chat he never knew my real name and all he knew about me was I basically would sculpt with anything i could get my hands on back then lol. I then recited exactly what was on his label that came with the Louie. Over the last 10 years I have met others who have also gotten a louie just by being a tourist lol Makes me very proud and happy to know what was just once a thought and a doodle is appreciated by so many.

 Your animals are so interesting. I love all you are sharing with us Smile
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« Reply #214 on: February 21, 2007, 05:02:31 PM »

Good morning Seamonkey Guess you are asleep now  Laughing
I am glad Sleuth answered your question about the dropbears.  After reading Sleuth's posting (twice)  Wink  I googled "Dropbears" and came up with the most outlandish collection of tales I think I have ever read!  No wonder tourists come here and think we are all slightly mad.  With dropbears and all the other "leg pulling" antics the average Aussie tries out on the unsuspecting tourist it is a wonder we have any visitors.  You certainly need a sense of humour here, especially if you are talking to some of the oldtimers around the backblocks.  Hee hee  Maybe I should print an Aussie slang dictionary?
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« Reply #215 on: February 21, 2007, 07:26:01 PM »

Hello Tibrogargan, Ummm would it be good arvo (afternoon) to you? Or doesn't all of australia say that?
 It's the "leg-pulling" that is half the reason I am so fascinated by Australia. I love folklores and legends. And as far as being outlandish..hehehe I am irish, need I say more? lol. But we call it "spinning a yarn" or making things a bit more "illistrative". Smile

 Yes, you should do an aussie slang dictionary ! My favorite would be "sticky beak" lol.
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« Reply #216 on: February 22, 2007, 04:44:28 AM »

OPAL MINING

Opal is one of the world's most rare and valuable gemstones, and it comes in every colour of the spectrum. Opal is made of tiny, microscopic spheres of silica. It is these tiny spheres that give opal its amazing colours, by breaking white light up into rays of different colours. When white light enters a precious opal, it hits the spheres of silica. The spheres split light into rays of different wavelengths, which we see as different colours. The colours and patterns in an opal are determined primarily by the size and arrangement of the silica spheres it contains.

Opal forms within spaces in rock. It is found within sedimentary rocks, such as sandstone; and in volcanic rocks that have hardened from molten lava with air bubbles trapped inside.
The basic ingredients for opal are water and silica - but the exact conditions required for opal formation are still not fully understood. On the extremely rare occasion that conditions are just right, silica collects in spaces within the rock and gradually hardens to form opal. The opal takes the shape of the space it is filling. Where the rock cavities once contained plant or animal remains, opalised fossils are formed.
More than 95 per cent of the world's opal is found in Australia. Most of this opal is found in the Australian outback, around the margins of an ancient inland sea that once covered almost one third of Australia - around 110 million years ago, during the Cretaceous period. The opal is found in small pockets between layers of sandstone in clay beds that once formed the floor of this great lost sea.
Some scientists think this Australian opal took thousands of years to form, at high temperatures and under great pressure; others think the opal formed relatively quickly, at about 20 degrees celcius. It seems that at least some opal formed when bacteria took silica from the surrounding clay or stone, then deposited it in spaces in the rock, where the silica became opal.

Opal mining is just about the only mining enterprise still run by individual operators or small partnerships, rather than by large companies. This is mainly because opal is so rare, and occurs so unpredictably. Despite its rarity (indeed - because of it!), opal is extremely valuable, and is an important export product for Australia. It is also this chance of 'striking it rich' that inspires opal miners to stick to their tough and risky occupation.
The equipment used for opal mining depends on whether the opal is mined underground or by the open cut method; and also on the miner's budget. Equipment ranges from hand picks through jackhammers to small machines called diggers and boggers; right up to large earth moving equipment. Most miners start out with the basics, then upgrade when they strike opal.
Most opal is mined from underground, where it formed. In Australia, opal is found down to around 25 metres below ground level. Occasionally opal is found on the surface after it has been brought there by years of weathering and erosion.
In some areas of Australia opal is mined by the open cut method, whereby all of the ground above the opal is removed to expose the 'opal level ' - the layer of rock in which opal may be found. Material from this layer is known as opal dirt.
Where opal is deep underground or is found in only small, elusive patches, the open cut method is uneconomical. Moving such large amounts of earth is too expensive unless there is a good chance of finding a relatively large amount of opal.
In these cases, underground mining methods are used. A narrow vertical shaft is dug or drilled down to the opal level, then horizontal tunnels called 'drives' are dug out in the search for opal. Miners climb up and down their shafts on ladders; opal dirt is usually taken out of the mine using an automatic hoist or a blower, which uses suction to transport opal dirt out of the mine and into a truck waiting above. Most opal mining at Lightning Ridge is done this way.
At Lightning Ridge, miners tumble or wash their opal dirt to remove bulky clay or sandstone from the opal. This washing process is done in a large agitator - usually a modified cement mixer. The products of the washing process are called tailings, and these are carefully sorted for any trace of the elusive, precious opal.

UNDERGROUND OPAL MINER :


OLD TIME MINERS COTTAGE :



OUTBACK OPAL MINE BUILDINGS :

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« Reply #217 on: February 22, 2007, 04:48:17 AM »

ROUGH OPALS



FREE FORM OPAL

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« Reply #218 on: February 22, 2007, 04:50:53 AM »

ELECTRIC CRYSTAL OPAL :



LUMINOUS GREEN BOULDER OPAL :

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« Reply #219 on: February 22, 2007, 04:59:54 AM »

UNDERGROUND BUILDINGS AT OPAL MINING TOWN OF COOBER PEDY :

CATHOLIC CHURCH



SERBIAN CHURCH



Buildings used to have to be dug out of the sandstone by hand with picks and shovels but are now done by machinery which gives a smoother finish.  A whole new meaning to adding a room or renovating a house, as most of the population live underground.  Shops, bars and resort motels can also be found underground to escape the intense heat.
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....And at night the wond’rous glory of the everlasting stars..  A.B (Banjo) Paterson
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