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Author Topic: Australia by Tibrogargan January 2007 - present and 155216+ views later!  (Read 551398 times)
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Tibrogargan
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« Reply #220 on: February 22, 2007, 05:13:49 AM »

Quote from: "Seamonkey"
Hello Tibrogargan, Ummm would it be good arvo (afternoon) to you? Or doesn't all of australia say that?
 It's the "leg-pulling" that is half the reason I am so fascinated by Australia. I love folklores and legends. And as far as being outlandish..hehehe I am irish, need I say more? lol. But we call it "spinning a yarn" or making things a bit more "illistrative". Smile

 Yes, you should do an aussie slang dictionary ! My favorite would be "sticky beak" lol.


Yes most of Australia say "arvo".  Most of our early settlers came from England and Ireland so I guess that is where the humour came from.  Australians have always had a reputation for being larrikins and not very class conscious!  "Jack is as good as his Master" was often quoted.  We also have some rhyming slang which would have come from the Cockney English.

Larrikin : harmless prankster

Sticky Beak or Treacle Beak : An inquisitive person.

Having a sticky beak : Looking for something

Yarning or Having a Yarn : Talking to someone
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Tibrogargan
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« Reply #221 on: February 23, 2007, 06:02:11 AM »

SHIP HITS HOBART BRIDGE  

Lake Illawarra was a steel motor vessel, bulk carrier, 7274/4343 tons. Captain B. J. Pelc. Undoubtedly Tasmania's most sensational shipping disaster which sank after running into and demolishing part of the Tasman Bridge crossing the Derwent River at Hobart, 5 January 1975.  Seven of her crew and five people in cars that went over the bridge lost their lives. Sailed from Port Pirie, South Australia, with a cargo of zinc concentrate for the Electrolytic Zinc Company's Risdon works. Approaching the bridge she was surging forward at eight knots, apparently under the influence of a strong flood tide, and the master dropped speed to approach the bridge at a 'safe' speed. As the vessel came closer it was seen she was out of line for the central navigation span of the bridge, and despite several changes of course the ship proved quite unmanageable, apparently due to insufficient speed relative to the current to maintain steerage way. In desperation the master finally called out full speed astern, at which point all control was lost and the vessel drifted bodily towards the bridge about midway between the navigation span and the eastern shore, crashing first into the pile capping of pier 18 and then pier 19, bringing the three unsupported spans crashing onto the vessel's hull. The ship listed to starboard and sank within minutes in deep water a short distance to the south, where most of it remains to this day in 110 feet of water.  The master had his certificate suspended for six months after it was found that had not handled the Lake Illawarra in a proper and seamanlike manner. The ship herself could not be moved without high risk of further damaging the bridge, and after all oil was recovered from the wreck to reduce the likelihood of pollution, she was left where she lay. The damage to the eleven year-old bridge wrought havoc on the city of Hobart, the residents of the heavily populated residential eastern shore being forced to drive a considerable distance to Bridgewater in order to cross the Derwent River and then drive the same distance along the river’s western shore to Hobart city area where most were employed. The disruption to the livelihood of the eastern shore residents resulted in large shopping centres and business branches being established there as well as all other essential services. A temporary Bailey Bridge was erected by the Army further up  river but the amount of traffic using this was restricted.  The Tasman bridge was repaired and reopened for traffic on 8 October 1977.
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Tibrogargan
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« Reply #222 on: February 23, 2007, 06:35:06 AM »

Photograph showing cars suspended on edge of bridge.
One of the drivers had only one arm and was fortunate to be able to exit his vehicle.  Some lucky motorists who managed to stop in time tried to flag down others who were speeding across the bridge in the sudden darkness but were ignored.  I used to work with one young woman who, with her husband and unborn baby,  perished in the tragedy as they were driving home across the bridge at the wrong time.  All lighting, electricity and telephones to the eastern shore were cut as the bridge carried the cables for these services.  It was total chaos for many days.  Owners of small boats helped the only ferry service operating to carry people across the river for many weeks.  Several more ferries were purchased or borrowed from interstate and these did a roaring trade in the three years it took to restore the bridge.



Side view of bridge showing the extent of the damage :

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Tibrogargan
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« Reply #223 on: February 23, 2007, 06:48:03 AM »

PRESENT DAY PHOTO OF TASMAN BRIDGE WITH LIGHTNING :

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pdh3
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« Reply #224 on: February 23, 2007, 12:43:12 PM »

Thanks for the bridge story. Very interesting, and very sad.

I think my favorite Aussie word is "tosser" ! I take it to mean someone who drinks a lot, or "tosses" back a few quite often. Is that right? We'd say someone is a drunk, and an Aussie would say someone is a tosser?
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« Reply #225 on: February 23, 2007, 06:22:34 PM »

Hi pdh3
That was a well thought out meaning.  Tosser is a word we have borrowed (poached) from the English (poms) and actually means an idiot.
The word was given some publicity lately as the anti-litter council used it as a slogan "Don't be a tosser" which could mean both an idiot and/or someone who tosses (throws) rubbish away in public places.
Someone who drinks too much can be called a boozer, as well as other less polite terms.  Booze is slang for alcohol and the boozer also can mean a pub (hotel).
An idiot can also be described as a galah, a sandwich short of a picnic or a few kangaroos short in the top paddock.  No offence meant to galahs which are really quite clever birds but at certain times in the year they feed on wild nectars which have an effect on them and you can see flocks of them staggering around on the ground looking quite stupid.  Boozed you could say!
Hope that helps  Laughing  Laughing
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« Reply #226 on: February 23, 2007, 07:08:29 PM »

GALAH



PAIR OF GALAHS

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« Reply #227 on: February 23, 2007, 07:13:49 PM »

LYREBIRD

A very shy and wary, drab coloured bird about the size of a chicken.  So called because of shape of male bird's tail when displayed is like the musical instrument.  They hide in heavily wooded areas and are great mimickers of other bird's calls.

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« Reply #228 on: February 23, 2007, 07:15:35 PM »

SCARLET ROBIN

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« Reply #229 on: February 23, 2007, 07:16:50 PM »

CLOSE-UP OF CRIMSON ROSELLA

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« Reply #230 on: February 23, 2007, 07:17:45 PM »

RAINBOW LORIKEETS

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« Reply #231 on: February 23, 2007, 07:20:46 PM »

Thanks for the clarification! I had seen the use of tosser on another forum where Aussies post, and the discussion was about people in rehab, so I was interpreting it in that context. One Aussie called the person in rehab a tosser! Laughing
So the next time I want to call someone an idiot, I'll just use tosser instead. Wink

Another thought.....this is why culture plays such an important role in interpreting language. It's so easy to get it wrong.
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« Reply #232 on: February 23, 2007, 07:29:51 PM »

BAY OF FIRES, EAST COAST OF TASMANIA

The unusual name for this area was given by Capt. Tobias Furneaux as he sailed along the Tasmanian coast in 1773 because of numerous fires burning which led him to believe the country was densely populated.  Abundant evidence of this occupation by Aboriginals can be seen today by their middens (shell and bone deposits) in the sand dunes.

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« Reply #233 on: February 23, 2007, 08:20:48 PM »

We have a very well respected Maritime College here in Tasmania, where students study Fisheries, Marine Resources and Aquaculture and also an Antarctic Research Station which is the home port for Antarctic expedition icebreaker ships going to our Southernmost bases.

One marine biologist was telling his friend about some of the most recent research findings into the whale songs.  "Some whales can communicate at a distance of 300 miles" he said.
"What the hell would one whale say to another whale 300 miles away?" the friend asked sarcastically.
The biologist replied : "Well, I am not absolutely sure, but it sounds something like : Can you hear me now?"

Humpback Whales in Antartica :

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« Reply #234 on: February 24, 2007, 11:46:34 PM »

A GOOD NEWS STORY ABOUT CROSS COUNTRY CHILD ABDUCTION

Finally back together: Malaysian prince meets long-lost Australian mother
Published: August 25, 2006

A MOTHER, son and daughter separated by one of Australia’s most notorious custody battles embraced in a Melbourne garden today - all together for the first time in 14 years.

Jacqueline Pascarl was rejoicing at the surprise arrival in Australia of her 23-year-old son, Iddin. He was following in the footsteps of his sister Shahirah, 21, who was reunited with her mother in April and now lives permanently with her in Melbourne.  Iddin, then nine, and Shahirah, seven, were snatched from their mother in 1992 during an access visit to Australia by their father, Malaysian prince Raja Bahrin.  Then known as Jacqueline Gillespie, Ms Pascarl fought a protracted and unsuccessful battle with her former husband for her children’s return. She secretly rekindled her relationship with them through emails and phone calls and finally, in April, Shahirah travelled from Malaysia to be with her mother.

Today, Iddin also held his mother and told reporters:”I’ve got two homes now.” Asked why he had returned to Melbourne, he said: “Because I want to see my mum. I miss her a lot. I love her a lot.” Iddin indicated he would stay in Melbourne “a really, really long time” but did not say if he intended to stay permanently.  “Well, he’s had 14 years to think about this,” Ms Pascarl smiled. “Australia is his home, too.”

Ms Pascarl, who has two other children from a later marriage, said Shahirah and Iddin had surprised her with Iddin’s arrival in Melbourne.“It’s absolutely blissful and wonderful,” Ms Pascarl said as the three stood arm in arm outside her home in suburban Hawthorn today. “I have four beautiful, unique and amazingly individual children and a wonderful husband and we are overjoyed to be together as a family for the first time in 14 years,” Ms Pascarl said.

“We need to get to know each other and they (Iddin and Shahirah) need to get to know me, and they need to get to know themselves, which is really important. “I’m just so overjoyed that my children are at home together and they’re here with me, and we are happy. We want to thank everyone for your support and the generous good wishes all through the years, and the people who have just sort of stuck in there with us.”

Ms Pascarl married Raja Bahrin in 1980 and Iddin and Shahirah were born in Malaysia.  She returned to Australia with the children after the prince took a second wife under Islamic law. He abducted Iddin and Shahirah in 1992, driving them to Queensland, where they were smuggled by boat to Indonesia and then Malaysia.
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« Reply #235 on: February 25, 2007, 12:04:14 AM »

Shahirah and her mother reunited :



Iddin, their mother and Shahirah reunited :

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« Reply #236 on: February 25, 2007, 05:21:41 AM »

SUNSET OVER DERWENT RIVER SHOWING TASMAN BRIDGE

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« Reply #237 on: February 25, 2007, 05:45:47 AM »

IRWIN ZOO TO EXPAND FOR SAFARI EXPERIENCE

(The Examiner Newspaper 24 Feb 2007)

The zoo made famous by crocodile hunter Steve Irwin is to be enlarged and developed as a world-class tourist destination after a land deal with the Queensland Government.
The Government has agreed to hand over a parcel of state land so Australia Zoo can set up an open-range experience, incorporating wildlife from Africa, South-East Asia and North America.
In return for the land, the zoo will give the Government a larger piece of land near the Peachester State Forest, to be used for forestry. The zoo also will pay the state the difference in land value for the swap.
Queensland Environment Minister Lindy Nelson-Carr said the move would bring to fruition Steve and Terri Irwin's dream of a stand-alone world-class tourist destination.
The zoo's new piece of land will be excised from the Beerwah State Forest, to the south-east of the attraction's existing facilities.  A spokeswoman for the zoo said the deal was welcome.  "There are a number of processes which Australia Zoo must implement to realise its dream, but the agreement on forestry land which it has reached with the Government brings expansion one step closer" she said.
Irwin, 44, died last September when a stingray barb pierced his chest as he filmed a documentary on the Great Barrier Reef.
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« Reply #238 on: February 25, 2007, 06:01:07 AM »

Missed by The Examiner, but included by other newspapers, with the above  article :

Steve's legacy conservation fund, Wildlife Warriors, has attracted millions of dollars in donations since his death, with some of the money to go towards building a new animal hospital at the zoo.
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« Reply #239 on: February 25, 2007, 06:54:26 PM »

GORDON RIVER - WEST COAST OF TASMANIA

Two wild rivers hurtle through mountainous rainforest wilderness and merge as the Gordon River, which flows into the vast Macquarie Harbour on the west coast. The scene is the Franklin-Gordon Wild Rivers National Park, in the Wilderness World Heritage Area of the south-west. The rivers were the centre of a controversy in the 1980s, when they were to have been dammed for hydro-electricity, but the scheme was quashed by an environmental campaign.

Part of Gordon River showing wilderness :



Cape Sorell at mouth of Gordon River :

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....And at night the wond’rous glory of the everlasting stars..  A.B (Banjo) Paterson
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