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Author Topic: Australia by Tibrogargan January 2007 - present and 155216+ views later!  (Read 550175 times)
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Tibrogargan
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« Reply #300 on: March 11, 2007, 06:31:01 AM »

ULURU IN THE NORTHERN TERRITORY

Once called Ayers Rock, Uluru rises from seemingly nowhere in the deep centre of Australia, and is one of the world's great natural wonders.
Most visitors would have seen photographs, or advertisements featuring Uluru, but nothing prepares you for the physical impact of this vast monolith. Its sheer immensity dwarfs everything around it. Uluru has acquired its reputation not just because it is such a unique landform, but also because of the effect the sun has on its colours and appearance. Sunrises and Sunsets cause changes to its colour from browns though oranges, reds to finally grey.



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« Reply #301 on: March 11, 2007, 06:35:45 AM »

Welcome to Aboriginal land,
welcome to our home.

Pukul ngalya yanama, Ananguku Ngurakutu
welcome greeting in Yankunytjatjara

Pukulpa Pitjama, Ananguku Ngurakutu
welcome greeting in Pitjantjatjara

We, the traditional land owners of Uluru - Kata Tjuta National Park, are direct descendants of the beings who created our lands during the Tjukurpa (Creation Time). We have always been here. It is our duty to look after the land, which includes passing on its history to our children and grandchildren. We call ourselves Anangu, and would like you to use that term for us.
Some of us speak Yankunytjatjara and others speak Pitjantjatjara as first languages. We teach our language to our children.
"This is Aboriginal land and you are welcome. Look around and learn, in order to understand Aboriginal people and also understand that Aboriginal culture is strong and alive."
Nellie Patterson, traditional owner.



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« Reply #302 on: March 11, 2007, 06:39:41 AM »

Our land is a unique and beautiful place. This is recognised by its listing as a World Heritage Area for both its cultural and natural values. We would like all people with an interest in this place to learn about the land from those who have its knowledge. Please respect this knowledge and open your minds and hearts to our enduring culture.
You are welcome to visit Uluru to be inspired by the natural beauty, to enjoy it. We are greatly concerned about your safety while on our land, because we want you to return to your families to share the knowledge about our culture that you have gained.



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« Reply #303 on: March 11, 2007, 06:44:59 AM »

Please Don't Climb Uluru

Nganana Tatintja Wiya - 'We Never Climb'

The Uluru climb is the traditional route taken by ancestral Mala men upon their arrival to Uluru. Anangu do not climb Uluru because of its great spiritual significance.
Anangu have not closed the climb. They prefer that you - out of education and understanding - choose to respect their law and culture by not climbing. Remember that you are a guest on Anangu land.
Also, Anangu traditionally have a duty to safeguard visitors to their land. They feel great sadness when a person dies or is hurt.







Some of the many other ways to enjoy Uluru besides the coach and 4WD tours.
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« Reply #304 on: March 11, 2007, 06:50:23 AM »

Mala return to Uluru

Anangu and Parks Australia have completed the construction of a 170 hectare feral proof enclosure, which is the new home for 25 Mala, reared in Watarrka National Park in the Northern Territory. It is hoped that the Mala will adapt to their new home, breed and eventually be released into the wild and contribute to the long-term survival of the species.
The Mala, or rufous hare-wallaby, once inhabited spinifex country throughout Central Australia. Today the Mala is extinct in the wild, wiped out by European settlement, changing fire regimes and feral predators such as cats and foxes. There have been no Mala in Uluru – Kata Tjuta National Park since the mid 1900s. But for Uluru’s traditional owners, Anangu, the Mala or 'hare wallaby people' are important ancestral beings. For tens of thousands of years, the Mala have watched over them from rocks and caves and walls, guiding them on their relationships with people, plants and animals, rules for living and caring for country. Mala Tjukurpa, the Mala Law, is central to their living culture and celebrated in story, song, dance and ceremony.

The Mala story

In the beginning, Mala men women and children travel a long way to reach Uluru. When these hare wallaby people arrive, they camp at sites separate from one another: young men in one place, old men in another, senior single and married women elsewhere, all surrounding the other women and children in the middle.
Senior Mala men come from the north-west, bearing a ceremonial pole which they plant at a high point on Uluru. Now the Inma or ceremony can begin. Everything is done in a proper way, even everyday jobs like hunting, gathering and preparing food, collecting water, talking to people, or just waiting. This has been Tjukurpa, the Law, for men, women and children ever since.
Luunpa, the kingfisher bird, cries out a warning “Purkara, purkara!”: an evil dog –like creature called Kurpany has been created by people in the west to destroy the Mala ceremony. The warning is ignored and Kurpany kills two Mala men, and everyone, men, women and children run away.

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« Reply #305 on: March 12, 2007, 04:32:46 AM »

MONKEY MIA - WESTERN AUSTRALIA

Located at Dolphin Beach, famous for its kilometres of secluded crystal blue waters and pristine white-shell beaches, Monkey Mia has attracted schools of dolphins to its tranquil shores daily for more than forty years.

Wonderful things started happening in the early 1960s, when a pod of bottlenosed dolphins began what has become a ritual. Every day a number of dolphins swim into the clear shallows of the bay to interact with humans, delighting visitors with their intelligence and grace. As the dolphins are wild, numbers and the exact time of their visit varies, however they usually visit the shore several times a day and more frequently in the mornings

This dolphin interaction is known to be one of the most reliable meeting places for dolphins in the world.  Dolphins have visited everyday in the last five years excluding only four times.  It is the only place in Australia where dolphins visit daily, not seasonally, and researchers from across the world come to Monkey Mia to study the dolphins.
Monkey Mia dolphins are the only dolphins in the world known to use ‘tools.’ For example some use sea-sponges to protect their snouts when they hunt!
The brain of a bottlenose dolphin is bigger than that of a human!
‘Wedges,’ one of the local dolphins, enjoys catching Golden Trevally (a large Australian fish). He was once seen hunting a particular Trevally for over an hour!
Many dolphins of the region often herd fish onto the beach and then search in waters just several centimetres deep to catch them!
Adult dolphins hang out in groups of two or more called ‘alliances.’ These alliances cruise together in search of a female and just like a group of boys they’ll compete to win her heart! They may spend up to a month pursuing a particularly attractive female.
Dolphin youngsters have a close bond with their mother who teaches them hunting, survival and social skills.







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« Reply #306 on: March 12, 2007, 05:38:21 PM »

STEVE IRWIN DOLLS GO NATIONAL

March 11, 2007 11:00pm     The Courier Mail
Article from: AAP

STEVE Irwin dolls are to be dispatched from their Australia Zoo home in a crusade to raise money to save endangered species.
And they soon may be joined by Bindi The Jungle Girl, with plans under way for a doll of the late Crocodile Hunter's daughter Bindi.

Australia Zoo's Brian Dore today said a new line of animal toys and Steve Irwin dolls currently only sold at Australia Zoo would be sold at stores across Australia by the end of the month.  The new toys were launched in the US last month at the 2007 International Toy Fair.

Mr Dore said it was hoped the range would "excite and engage children, igniting their passion for wildlife and the environment".

All royalties received would go directly to the zoo's endangered species program, which supports conservation around the world, he said.
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« Reply #307 on: March 12, 2007, 08:52:15 PM »

Tibro,
Oh, I'm so glad you posted about the Dolphins at Monkey Mia.  I saw something about this on Discovery channel.  I just love Dolphins, (don't tell anyone but I love them more than Hummingbirds) I swam with two of them in California 3 years ago.  It was the most magical day of my life.  I was in the pool with 5 other people.  I was positioned on the wrong side of the trainer when he had the dolphin do a jump, and the dolphin sorta hit the side of my left arm. Oh man, they are so powerful, anyway after the dolphin did that, she came over to me real close and looked into my eyes as if to say "I'm so sorry I hit you".  It brought tears to my eyes, I felt so special because  of what that dolphin did.
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« Reply #308 on: March 13, 2007, 02:25:37 AM »

hummingbird that is just such a special experience.  They are so intelligent and I am sure they wish to communicate with us.  We are just too dumb!
I had a similar moment with a Dolphin at Sea World on our Gold Coast.  We were among the crowd watching them swim around in a smaller pool where they come to be fed by some of the visitors.  People are not allowed to swim in the pool with them, which I think is because of chance of illness as they do not swim freely out in the ocean.  They have a very large fenced off ocean area to keep the sharks away where they can swim away from the people.
Anyway one dolphin swam a little away from the others and as I was on the edge of the crowd I concentrated on this dolphin and was thinking what a beautiful creature it was when it swam right over in front of me and nodded its head up and down.  It stayed there for a couple of minutes looking at me while I spoke to it and then it glided off.  It was a very warm and fuzzy moment.
I will find some more pictures to post that you would like.  Thank you for your interest in this thread.
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« Reply #309 on: March 13, 2007, 02:43:23 AM »

MONKEY MIA  
Monkey Mia (pronounced My-Ah) was named after a pearling boat called Monkey that anchored there in the late 19th century when there was a large pearling industry in the region.
It is totally up to the dolphins to come to swim with people and the feeding is strictly controlled to ensure the very smart dolphins do not pick up a "free feeding pattern" so they do not become dependent on humans for their food.







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« Reply #310 on: March 14, 2007, 06:16:04 AM »

KURANDA - FAR NORTH QUEENSLAND

Kuranda is a romantic village, shrouded by pristine rainforest and nestled alongside the mighty Barron River and the big boisterous Barron Falls. First settled by Europeans in 1885 and then connected to Cairns by rail in 1891, Kuranda quickly earned a well-deserved reputation as a premium visitor destination, a cool mountain retreat removed from the sweltering heat and humidity of the tropical coast. Today Kuranda is known as the "village in the rainforest" an exciting vibrant community on Cairns' doorstep. Kuranda is a pulsating township that exudes a bohemian character. Kuranda' s natural beauty, prolific wild life and embracing year round climate has mesmerised people of all ages, creeds & cultures. An atmosphere of kinship surfaces then radiates from the picturesque village, a community united in its love of Kuranda and her tranquillity. Kuranda sees a diverse multi-cultural population come together as a bonded community; today, exhibited by all to few other places in the world. Kuranda citizenry's passion for home and habitat dominos into a generous community spirit, where neighbours sincerely care for each other in a measure from a bygone era; a return to an age of grace. Kuranda is a Mecca for artists of every genre painters; sculptors, visual artists, musicians, and thespians. Kuranda enjoys a burgeoning cottage industry community, people inspired by its majesty and drawn by its charm. Gifted artisans and crafts people market their hand made wares from quaint shops, studios and bazaars where the artist, artisan, miner or crafts person by being on-hand, provides the visitor with the opportunity to buy, first hand. Do something daring buy original and be different. Every lady still drawing breath will fall in love with Kuranda's shopping; language is no barrier as most staff are multilingual. She will discover unique jewellers who create from rare diamonds coloured with hues of rose & champagne. Look on as the jeweller turns and polishes opal then facets gem stones. Tour Kuranda and unearth aromatic leatherwear of distinction, alluring pelts taken from the kangaroo, crocodile, barramundi, emu and flamboyant sea snakes. Artwork may be found everywhere on canvas, ceramics, glass, metals, textiles, earthenware, stoneware, terracotta and clay pots. Hideaway antiques stores and photo galleries must be prospected for that special little, "stumble upon". Rainforest timbers with richly coloured grains are shaped and sculptured as you watch on. Stylish boutiques and market stalls offer garments reflecting the colours, culture and lifestyle of Kuranda. Souvenir an inexpensive t-shirt or treat yourself to a one-off, hand sewn creation by a local couturier. Kuranda Heritage Markets and The Original Kuranda Markets provide a timeless wander through a beautiful rainforest setting where you may also observe artists at work and sample the local produce, picked at sunrise by the same farmer standing before you, ready to serve. The rainforest setting has been and continues to be an inspiration for artists. Kuranda over the years has attracted some of the world's best artists to reside in or near the village.

KURANDA STREET



KURANDA SCENIC RAILWAY STATION



KURANDA RAIL PASSING BARRON FALLS

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« Reply #311 on: March 14, 2007, 06:20:27 AM »

SKYRAIL RAINFOREST CABLEWAY

Stretching for 7.5 kilometres (4.7 miles), Skyrail is the world's longest gondola cableway. There are 32 towers along the way, with the tallest being 40.5 meters above the rainforest floor. Skyrail is indisputably the most admired and most popular tourist attraction in North Queensland, you will see why the moment you step aboard your gondola. The cableway voyage grants amazing panoramic views of Cairns City and environs, the Coral Sea, coastal tropical islands and the Great Barrier Reef, enchanting visitors with a literal birds eye perception of the beauty of Tropical North Queensland. As the gondolas soar over the mountaintops towards Kuranda village, the scenery transforms into dense rainforest, one moment you are gliding along with the rainforest canopy only meters below your feet, then across wild impenetrable, ravines, gorges and thunderous waterfalls.

VIEW OVER CAIRNS FROM CABLE CAR



RAINFOREST TRIP IN CABLE CAR



CABLE CAR TRAVELS OVER RIVER

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« Reply #312 on: March 14, 2007, 06:25:58 AM »

CASSOWARY

The Southern Cassowary (Casuarius casuarius), the most famous bird in the Wet Tropics has become a rare sight since it was listed as endangered Federally in April 1999. It is the largest and most spectacular flightless bird in the Australian rainforest, which flourished in Gondwanaland around 100 million years ago. Cassowaries are amongst the most ancient birds on earth. They belong to the Ratite Family like the Emu, Ostrich, Rhea and Kiwi. They are fruit-eating (frugivore) animals that disperse over a hundred species of rainforest trees and vines. Therefore, this "Rainforest gardener" plays an important role in rainforest regeneration and diversity.
There are three cassowary species in the world: the Southern Cassowary in Australia, New Guinea and Ceram; the Single Wattled Cassowary (Cassowary unappendiculatus) in Northern New Guinea; and the Dwarf Cassowary (Casuarius bennetti) in Montane New Guinea. The name cassowary is of Papuan origin. It comes from 'kasu' meaning horned and 'weri' meaning head, in reference to the casqued or helmeted head.
These birds can be dangerous and inflict serious wounds if threatened or cornered.





WALKWAY OVER MOSSMAN GORGE

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« Reply #313 on: March 15, 2007, 06:06:25 PM »

MOUTH-TO-MUZZLE SAVES DOG

By Glenis Green
March 15, 2007 11:00pm   Article from:  The Courier Mail

 IT was lucky for Beethoven that Kingaroy ambulance officer Travis Comello didn't mind dog's breath. If he had, the lively little collie would not be here today.
Mr Comello, a patient transport officer, went above and beyond the call of duty to give the kiss of life to Beethoven recently when the dog choked while playing with a ball.
A reluctant hero, Mr Comello said yesterday he did not even know if administering mouth-to-mouth resuscitation on the apparently lifeless dog would even work "but it just happened".
He said the drama began just after he had arrived back from work at his home in Harris Rd, Kingaroy, when he heard his neighbour, Rosalie Rudd, yelling for help.
When he saw Beethoven lying on the ground, Mr Comello thought at first the animal had been hit by a car but was told he had choked on a ball.
Putting his fingers down the dog's throat to extract the ball, Mr Comello said Beethoven was still not breathing but he was able to detect a very faint heartbeat.
Cupping his hand into a fist, he put it against Beethoven's muzzle and blew in a few puffs of air and then pushed firmly on the dog's ribs.
"To be honest, I didn't think it would work but she (Mrs Rudd) was so upset that I thought I'm going to at least try," he said.
Mr Comello said Beethoven had been "completely out of it . . . not moving at all" but after he administered mouth-to-mouth the dog had gasped several times and regained consciousness.
"He was sitting up in five minutes," he said.
"He was a bit away with the fairies for a while – a bit dopey and disoriented – but in about 10 minutes he was fine. I was amazed."
Mr Comello, who has been with the ambulance service for nine years, admitted it was the first time he had saved a dog's life and only thought of trying the kiss of life "because I'd seen something like that on telly".
Mrs Rudd said Beethoven would probably have died if not for Mr Comello's quick actions.
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« Reply #314 on: March 15, 2007, 06:13:48 PM »

That was a good news story to start our day.  Kingaroy is an outback town in Queensland and is noted for peanut growing (ground nuts)

Here is a picture of Beethoven :



Beethoven with his rescuer and his owner :

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« Reply #315 on: March 15, 2007, 06:54:44 PM »

I love good news stories, Tibro.
Thanks
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« Reply #316 on: March 16, 2007, 04:51:34 PM »

Yes, Sam they do not print or report enough of the good things people do for each other.  There are some very kind and compassionate people in the world but they get swept aside by all the negative ones and their wrong doings, and the media's preoccupation with all the grubby details.
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« Reply #317 on: March 16, 2007, 04:59:32 PM »

KINGAROY - Australia's Peanut Capital

Kingaroy is a rather pleasant, middle-sized town which proudly boasts that it is both the 'Peanut Capital of Australia' and the 'Baked Bean Capital of Australia'. For a time it was one of Australia's best known country towns. The reason: It is the home of Sir Johannes Bjelke-Petersen, long time Premier of Queensland, would-be aspirant Prime Minister in the 'Joh for PM' campaign, and one of the most controversial, frustrating and entertaining politicians of recent times. Love him or hate him the political scene changed when he departed. It is not surprising that his name appears everywhere. There's the Johannes Bjelke-Petersen Airport (which is conveniently located next to the property of the former premier) and the Bjelke-Petersen Research Station. And, if you want a memento of your brief visit to Bjelke-Petersen country, you can buy tea towels which combine a picture of Lady Flo with the recipe for her famous pumpkin scones.
Located 431 m above sea level and 225 km northwest of Brisbane on the D'Aguilar Highway, Kingaroy was probably named after the Aboriginal word 'kinjerroy' which was a term used to describe a particular type of red ant. However, there is a school of thought that says the town was named after an early settler named King but there is little evidence to support this claim.
Like so much of the land north of Moreton Bay, Kingaroy was opened up in the 1840s when Henry Stuart Russell and the Haly brothers moved into the area. Taabinga Station homestead (now listed on the National Estate) was built in 1846.
The old homestead is described as follows: 'A slab building erected in 1846 by the Haly brothers. The west elevation is sandstone blocks, 60 centimetres thick, quarried on the site. The shingled roof is now covered with corrugated iron and the wide verandahs with trellises and weatherboards. Stables and yards are in excellent condition. This is a fine example of the early homesteads of the Kingaroy district.' It is located 5 km south of Kingaroy and is closed to the public.
Areas of the vast Taabinga Station were set aside for a town as early as the 1880s but it wasn't until 1902 that any serious development of the town centre began. In the next five years the town grew rapidly. In 1904 the railway arrived (thus ensuring the town's continuing existence), the Post Office and Police Station were built, and the first hotel was constructed. Three years later Taabinga Station was opened up for closer settlement and a butter factory was built.
The next major stage in the town's development occurred in the 1920s when the first significant crops of peanuts was harvested and the first peanut silo was built (1928). Today the town seems to be run by peanuts. There are big peanut signs in the street, peanut selling points known as 'The Peanut Van' are located at either end of the town, the peanut silos dominate the town, and even the Visitors Centre gets in on the act by ensuring it has peanuts for sale.
The town is now one of Australia's major peanut producers with part of the crop being exported to New Zealand, Britain and Japan. The huge peanut silos are 29 m high and capable of holding 12 000 tonnes.

View of Kingaroy coutryside



Peanut Silos and Sheepdog Trials



Peanut Fields

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« Reply #318 on: March 16, 2007, 05:03:53 PM »

BUNYA MOUNTAINS NATIONAL PARK

One of the true natural highlights of the area is the Bunya Mountains National Park which is about 60 km from Kingaroy.
This pleasant and isolated area of the Great Dividing Range has bushwalks, camping facilities and excellent picnic sites. With an average elevation of 975 m and a diversity of flora including rainforests, woodlands and grasslands it is an area rich in history and typical of the development of much of the region.
The Queensland National Parks and Wildlife Service, who administer the area, record the park's interesting history in numerous brochures and leaflets.
'Every three years in February and March, the bunya pine produces a heavy crop of cones. Aboriginal tribes came from as far as the Maranoa, the Clarence and Maryborough area for six weeks of tribal ceremonies, hunting, feasting, mock fighting and corroborees. Most evidence of this important gathering of tribes is gone.
'European settlers moved into the region in the early 1840s; however, the Bunya Mountains were not opened for selection until 1878. In the late 1860s, sawmillers arrived to log red cedar; initially, the bunya pine was not cut because of its significance to Aboriginals. The last great bunya feast took place in 1875 and remnants of the tribes continued to assemble until 1883 when the Great Bunya Sawmill opened and commenced cutting bunya pine. The last sawmill on the mountain closed in 1945.
'In 1908, 9303 hectares were gazetted as the Bunya Mountains National Park - the second national park in Queensland. The park now covers 11 700 hectares.

Bunya pines in National Park



Bunya Pine Cones



Hiking country in Bunya National Park

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« Reply #319 on: March 16, 2007, 05:06:09 PM »

Sunset over Kingaroy Fields

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