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Author Topic: Australia by Tibrogargan January 2007 - present and 155216+ views later!  (Read 579267 times)
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Seamonkey
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« Reply #340 on: March 23, 2007, 07:36:03 AM »

OH stunning!! I can see why that is your favorite area!

 I also had fun going through that Aussie site of goodies. YUmmm.
I also know where I can replace my Ughs if they ever wear out lol They are over 12 yrs old and still look new. The boots there look like the same type. Most comfy boots I ever wore and warm too, which in Maine I NEED.

 I am gonna put in a few orders probably this month, yummm I can smell the vegemite now lol
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« Reply #341 on: March 23, 2007, 07:49:31 PM »

Glad you enjoyed that site, Seamonkey.  I see they now have new stocks of Tim Tams, a favourite of my DH.  My favourites are the chocky Teddy Bears!
Also worth trying is the Buderim Champagne Sensation, particularly if you prefer a less sweet jam.  It has a nice tang to it.
The prices of the foodstuffs look very reasonable.  I think it is AU$1 = US80c at present and the prices they quote are close to our supermarket prices.
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« Reply #342 on: March 23, 2007, 08:11:20 PM »

I found the prices very reasonable.
 I want to try those tim tams, those look sooo yummmy! And I may follow your advice and try the Buderim Champagne Sensation, I do like my jellys and stuff on the less sweeter side.
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« Reply #343 on: March 24, 2007, 05:09:39 AM »

An explanation of the saying "doing a Harold"

Prime Ministers of Australia ....Harold Holt ....1966-67

Harold Holt had plenty of time to find out what being Prime Minister would be like - he served for ten years as Deputy Leader of the Liberal Party under Menzies. He took over as Prime Minister when Menzies retired in 1966 and later that year won a sweeping victory at the polls on the issue of support for the Australian and United States involvement in the Vietnam War. Late in 1967 he disappeared while swimming in the ocean, making him the third Australian Prime Minister to have died while still in office.Rt Hon. Harold Edward Holt was Prime Minister from 26 January 1966 to 19 December 1967. Born: 5 August 1908 at Sydney, New South Wales. Presumed dead: 19 December 1967 (Melbourne) Harold Edward Holt was born in Sydney on 5 August 1908, and disappeared, presumed drowned, on 17 December 1967.



Robert Menzies (left) with Harold Holt.

When R.G. Menzies retired as Prime Minister, Holt took over the leadership of the Liberal Party, having been deputy leader since 1956. As the war in Vietnam grew more intense, Holt visited the USA in June 1966 to discuss the situation with US President L.B. Johnson. Holt confirmed his government's full support for USA's Vietnam policy, and adopted the slogan 'All the way with LBJ'. On the 14 February 1966, Holt introduced decimal currency - dollars and cents.
The war in Vietnam was growing bigger. 4,500 soldiers were sent in 1966, including the first conscripts (non-volunteers). By the end of the year the number had risen to 6000. The first major battle in which Australians were involved, Long Tan, was fought in June 1967, leaving 18 Australian soldiers dead.
As more and more people in Australia began to protest against sending Australian troops to Vietnam, Holt campaigned for a general election on 26 November 1966 with Australian involvement in the war as a major issue. It seemed that, for the most part, the people of Australia agreed with his war policy, as his government was returned with an impressive ten seat gain. On the 14 February 1966, Holt introduced decimal currency - dollars and cents. More and more people became opposed to sending our troops to Vietnam. Holt's government was also under attack over various other issues, including its handling of the Voyager disaster, VIP aircraft flights, and a proposal to break the nexus between the two federal houses of parliament.
When US President L.B. Johnson visited Australia in October 1966, demonstrators protested fiercely in the streets of Sydney and Melbourne.In August 1966 the Aboriginal stockworkers of the Gurindji tribe living on Wave Hill station in the Northern Territory went on strike and walked off the property in protest over low wages and living conditions. In March 1967 they occupied part of the station in an attempt to force the government to return their tribal land, an action which was later seen as being the beginning of the Aboriginal land rights movement.
On the 27 May 1967 Australians voted 'Yes' in a Referendum to change the Commonwealth constitution. 'Full-blood' Aborigines could now be counted in the national census, which meant that the federal government was now just as responsible as the states for Aboriginal affairs.
Harold Holt disappeared while swimming in heavy surf near Portsea, Victoria, on 17 December 1967. Despite a major search his body was never found. His memorial service in St Paul's Cathedral, Melbourne, on 22 December was attended by US President L.B. Johnson, the Prince of Wales, UK Prime Minister Harold Wilson and other heads of state and government.



Lyndon B & "Ladybird" Johnson with Harold Holt


An article by Ross Coulthard of Nine Network Australia outlining some of the speculation that followed the disappearance of Harold Holt :

Sink or Swim? Spy or Suicide?

On a beautiful sultry Summer's day, just before the Christmas of 1967, Australia's then Prime Minister Harold Holt - a keen and highly competent skindiver - went out for a snorkel at Cheviot Beach, just near his Portsea beach house. Holt was cast as a '007' wetsuit-clad James Bond character by the popular press because of his enthusiasm for watersports. But after he entered the water at about noon on December 17, he was never seen again. Thirty years on, conspiracy theories still rage about what happened to Australia's then 59-year-old Prime Minister. A colleague tells me of how he recently heard a classic Holt conspiracy yarn: While travelling in far North Australia he bumped into a man who claimed to be a former spook for the Australian Government who had helped Holt return to Australia several times since his death. Holt travelled incognito from a home in France. It appears the PM had swum around to the next bay, hopped in a car driven by a lover, and slipped out of the country. The spook claimed Holt had later died of a heart attack on the French South Coast sometime during the 1980s. The conspiracy theory has it that many people know about this, including one very senior Liberal Party figure. Just when we were trying to laugh away this theory, one former very senior Labor Minister told us he had "the astounding truth" about Holt buried in his confidential files -- only to be released in the event of his and his informant's death. Some of the wilder theories had it that Holt was assassinated by the CIA because he wanted to get Australia out of Vietnam. The best one of all came in 1983 when British author Anthony Grey published a book claiming that Holt was a Chinese spy and fled Australia via a Chinese submarine parked off his beach. A Victorian State Court officially declared the Prime Minister dead, presumed drowned. Nothing, not even a piece of clothing, was ever found of the PM's body. There were always rumours of an official cover-up because the public had been falsely led to believe that only one person had been with Holt - a Mr Alan Stewart, who was chief of the local quarantine station. But, in fact, the PM had been on the beach with an alleged lover, Ms Marjorie Gillespie, and other young women. There were also rumours that the PM might have suicided because of the recent death of his brother and threats to his leadership. His then press secretary, Tony Eggleton, pooh-poohed such claims at the time, saying his boss was quite happy. The cop in charge of the investigation, then Inspector Lawrence Newell, told the Melbourne Age in 1992 that he thinks Holt fell for his own publicity about his swimming prowess, and in fact the PM, "believed he couldn't drown. Remember, he wasn't a young man anymore. When you are 59 years old you don't have the reserves to draw on that you used to have. And he had a bad shoulder. He got into trouble and couldn't get himself out." And so, that's the end of the matter...or is it? We discount the wilder claims surrounding this mystery, but that still leaves many questions unanswered.          
Ross Coulthart, Reporter
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« Reply #344 on: March 25, 2007, 06:48:49 AM »

After a very busy and tiring day catching up with relatives I am going to cheat a little tonight and just post some of the photos I have already stored in my Photobucket of Sydney Harbour and two of the many beautiful beaches near there.  Enjoy :

SYDNEY COVE AND OPERA HOUSE



SYDNEY HARBOUR BRIDGE SHADOWS



NORTH SYDNEY

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« Reply #345 on: March 25, 2007, 06:50:58 AM »

THE ROCKS AREA



MANLY FERRY

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« Reply #346 on: March 25, 2007, 06:53:35 AM »

MANLY BEACH



BONDI BEACH



GROUND LEVEL VIEW OF BRIDGE

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« Reply #347 on: March 25, 2007, 08:42:35 AM »

Tibro.....Hi...I woke up early this morning and started on page 18...reading back to where I left off last time...vegemite...!
This thread could be a travel brochure...thank you for the articles
and the pictures....your country is gorgeous.... Very Happy   Mere
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« Reply #348 on: March 26, 2007, 03:47:56 AM »

MeMere I am so glad you are enjoying this thread.  Please let me know if there is anything you would like to know more about or any place or subject I have not yet covered.  Thank you for your appreciation.
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« Reply #349 on: March 26, 2007, 04:08:11 AM »

Now something for the dog loving monkeys.  I will feature the four dog breeds that have evolved here in Australia, apart from the Dingo.  I will not include the Australian Shepherd as that breed did not originate here and has only been recognised in local Show breed standards recently.

THE AUSTRALIAN TERRIER

As his name implies, the 'Aussie' is essentially Australian. The only true terrier to be evolved outside the British Isles, he must never be confused with the Australian Silky, which is a Toy breed.  Early free settlers in Australia needed a small, hardy, alert dog, keen enough to hunt and kill its own food, for killing vermin, such as snakes, rats and rabbits, and to act as a guard dog.  Several terrier breeds were combined over a number of years to produce the hard bitten Aussie. Those used are believed to include the old Scotch (not to be confused with today's Scottish Terrier), Dandie Dinmont, Black and Tan and Yorkshire Terriers. By the late 1800s a definite new breed type had emerged and a standard was set in 1896.

The Australian Terrier is a lowset, sturdy, rough coated dog. His double coat is extremely well adapted for Australia's changing climates and provides protection when hunting.  He is an even tempered dog, very agile in movement, good company for young and old and delights in human companionship. Small and tough, he is equally at home on a farm or in a suburban backyard and makes a good house dog. The Aussie normally barks only when there is something amiss.

A GOOD EXAMPLE OF THE AUST TERRIER



PUPPY

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« Reply #350 on: March 26, 2007, 04:14:22 AM »

AUSTRALIAN CATTLE DOG

Bred as a knock-about farm dog. the Australian Cattle Dog has become one of Australia's national symbols. Nicknamed the 'blue heeler', this dog is renowned for its outstanding loyalty and physical endurance.  In search of a good cattle dog - a silent biter that could be easily trained - squatter Thomas Hall mated his two blue merle, smooth-coated Collies to a Dingo in 1840. The progeny, Hall's Heelers, were mated to Timmon's Biters (a Dingo-Smithfield Collie cross made 10 years earlier). Its breeding was continually refined - adding Dalmatian blood improved its loyalty and rapport with horses, Kelpie crosses gave intelligence and Bull Terriers were used for toughness. All this stopped in 1893 and since then the breed has remained pure. It has a hard, flat coat that is either blue or red speckle.
Loyalty and protective instincts are the hallmarks of this breed. It has been said the Cattle Dog "will eat anything that doesn't eat him first" but the breed is not naturally aggressive. Although naturally suspicious of strangers, a dog that trusts his owner will not react with fear or aggression towards others. Cattle Dogs have great intelligence, a strong will and endless energy. Their alertness and vigilance make them wonderful guard dogs while their protective instincts extend to the family's children. As it was bred for the outback, the Australian Cattle Dog likes the wide open spaces and while suitable for the backyard, it still requires plenty of exercise.



AT WORK GUARDING THE HERD



TWO RED HEADS



PUPPY HEELER

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« Reply #351 on: March 27, 2007, 01:07:11 AM »

LATEST NEWS :

CORBY STRIPPED OF PROFITS
Leanne Edmiston and Amanda Watt
March 27, 2007 02:21pm  Article from: The Courier-Mail

SCHAPELLE Corby has been stripped of any proceeds from her tell-all book about her conviction and jailing for smuggling marijuana into Bali.

In a unanimous judgment this afternoon,  the Queensland Court of Appeal has ordered that the money not be spent until the courts have decided whether the Commonwealth has any legal claim to it. The three-judge panel also moved to stop Schapelle's sister Mercedes from spending the $15,000 paid to her for an exclusive interview with New Idea magazine. However, the judges said the move was only an interim measure and the family had the right to appeal the ruling.

The Commonwealth Director of Public Prosections brought the matter before the Queensland Court of Appeal after an application under the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002 to the Brisbane District Court was refused on February 15. Both hearings were held in secret and without the knowledge of the Corby family, lest the money be spent before the court could intervene. "The application is brought ex parte . . . because the moneys (sic) in question might be easily disposed of before any order could be made if notice of the application were to be given to the respondent," the judgment stated.

It does not detail how much money Schapelle received from the book, but indicated publishers Pan McMillan Australia wired funds to her Indonesian-based brother-in-law. It was suspected by federal agents, in affidavits submitted to the court, that the money was held on her behalf. It reported that it was not known whether the $15,000 payment intended for Mercedes Corby – for an exclusive interview, photographs and excerpts from Schapelle's diary – had been paid; and if so, to whom. Mercedes lives in Bali, where Schapelle is serving 20 years for trying to smuggle 4.1kg of cannabis into Indonesia in a surfing bodyboard bag in October 2004.

Tom Gilliat of Pan MacMillan, which published My Story, by Schapelle Corby with Kathryn Bonella, has previously stated that Schapelle wanted to use the money from her best-selling book to fund her ongoing legal battle. The book, published last November, has been constantly on the best-seller list.

Justices Pat Keane, Glenn Williams and John Helman ordered that any further legal action arising from their order be brought before the Brisbane Supreme Court.The order was made on March 2, 2007, and the Corby family has since been notified of the action. The judgment could not be made public until certain terms of the order were met.  The judgment did not indicate whether dates had been set for further hearings of related matters, including final determination of the distribution of the funds.
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« Reply #352 on: March 27, 2007, 02:23:42 AM »

AUSTRALIAN SILKY TERRIER

The Australian Silky Terrier is an alert, friendly companion dog. He was originally developed to hunt domestic rodents and pursues this today when opportunities arise. Because the Silky is single coated he does not shed coat and makes a great little household pet for asthmatics and allergy prone people.  The development of the Silky began in the 1800s when it is said that the Skye, Dandie Dinmont, Clydesdale, Scotch, Waterside and Paisley Terriers were all interbred. There were many theories as to the Silky's origin after this, however, the most common theory in Australia is that the Australian and Yorkshire Terriers were crossed to develop better colour. From this cross breeding litters were sorted into three types - the Australian, Yorkshire and Silky. In 1932 the Kennel Control Council prohibited cross breeding between the three types so as to protect each breed identity, as small Silkys were becoming increasingly difficult to separate from large Yorkshire Terriers.

The Australian Silky Terrier is a toy breed with terrier characteristics. When groomed properly, his blue coat lies flat against his body and has a glossy silk like appearance that feels like satin. Puppies are born black and tan and it takes up to 18 months for the mature colour to develop. The Silky may be small in stature but his brave, outgoing terrier-type temperament leads one to think he believes he is much larger than he is. An intelligent breed, the Silky is loyal to his family, easy to train and an excellent watchdog.



SILKY PUPPY

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« Reply #353 on: March 27, 2007, 02:31:46 AM »

KELPIES

Drovers say a good Australian Kelpie is worth two men on horseback. It is the workaholic of the canine family and an estimated 80,000 are employed on farms in Australia. In the 1800s thousands of immigrants and their working dogs travelled to Australia from Europe to take part in the wool boom. It was survival of the fittest and the Kelpie was one of those few survivors. In the 1870s a NSW grazier imported two 'Rutherford fox collies' and a Victorian shipped over two Collies (collie was the Scottish term for sheepdog), and through selective breeding farmers produced an ideal working dog, many claiming "a dash of Dingo" was best for the breed.
Kelpies are intelligent, good natured and alert. Their energy is inexhaustible and they have a natural aptitude for herding sheep.

A one man dog, the Kelpie shows marked loyalty and will work for his master under any circumstances.  A courageous breed, they are equally as willing to take on a one tonne bull as they are a sheep flock. Despite its loyalty, the Kelpie is an independent thinker and graziers claim their dogs know what has to be done to the flock just as much as they do. Kelpies are easy to care for, with a water-proof coat and great heat tolerance. They do not suit indoor living and even with a backyard need plenty of exercise each day.

KELPIE RUNNING ON SHEEP'S BACKS, A TYPICAL WAY TO AVOID BEING TRAMPLED BY THE FLOCK



TWO KELPIE PUPS



KELPIE "WORKING" HEWY, DEWY AND LOUIE AT A FUN DAY

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« Reply #354 on: March 27, 2007, 05:58:28 AM »

Beautiful dogs. I love to read about the backgrounds of the breeds.
 Those kelpies are very handsome dogs, they also look like they are full of character.
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« Reply #355 on: March 28, 2007, 04:21:55 AM »

FLYNN OF THE INLAND

The Very Reverend John Flynn, O.B.E., D.D., 'Flynn of the Inland', was born at Moliagul, Victoria, 45 kilometres west of Bendigo, on the 25th of November, 1880. He was the third child, and second son of Thomas and Rosetta and his mother died in childbirth, causing him to be raised in Sydney, until he was five, by his mother's 18 year old sister. Flynn was around 16 when he decided to join the ministry and studied theology at Ormond College, at the University of Melbourne. He was ordained into the Presbyterian Church on 24th of January, 1911, and arrived at Beltana, in northern South Australia, to take up missionary work in early February.

An energetic worker, Flynn already had some training in missionary work in Victoria and was a keen writer and photographer. In 1910 he had published a book of hints for outback people on the proceeds of lectures he had given using his collection of lantern slides, and at Beltana he began publishing a quarterly newsletter,'The Outback Battler', in addition to his missionary work. In 1912 he was asked by the Church Home Mission Directors to prepare a report on religious conditions in the Northern Territory. After conferences in Melbourne and Sydney, he travelled by ship to Darwin where he visited Katherine, Bathurst Island and Adelaide River researching his paper. His report prompted the committee to authorise the implementation of his proposals for Inland Missions, and later that year the name Australian Inland Missions (A.I.M.) was adopted for the scheme. He was appointed Superintendent of the new body, a position he held all his life.

During the formative years of the AIM, Flynn became interested in the possibility of establishing an aerial medical service in outback areas. Several articles appeared in newspapers and magazines around the country recommending such a service, and Flynn pushed the idea through his own magazine,' The Inlander', which he began in 1913. He worked tirelessly at organising people and resources until in 1928, the first medical flight of what was to become the Royal Flying Doctor Service, was made from Cloncurry in Queensland. Radio was still more of a novelty than a fact in Australia at this time, but Flynn saw the potential of using it for outback communications. ( The A.B.C. in Australia had only begun broadcasting 5 years earlier.) In 1929 Alfred Traeger, who worked with Flynn as his radio expert. launched a pedal radio set at a cost of only $65, and another of Flynn's visions became reality. Flynn had been made a member of the Wireless Institute of Australia in 1925. In 1931, aged 51, Flynn married Jean Baird, a secretary with the AIM, and in 1933 he was admitted to the Order of the British Empire. By November 1939, all states had their own Aerial Medical Service, and the Australian Inland Mission operated hospital-hostels in remote areas over most of the country. At this time there were 200 outpost radios and six aircraft with pilots and doctors attached to the Aerial Medical Service.

Flynn was appointed Moderator-General of the Prebyterian Church in Australia in 1939, a position he held until 1942. In May 1950, Flynn attended what was to be his last Flying Doctor Council meeting, he died of cancer in Sydney on May 25th, 1951. His body was cremated and the ashes rest under the Flynn Memorial just west of Alice Springs in the shadow of Mt. Gillen. In 1976, the ashes of his wife, Jean, were also placed there. The burial service for Flynn on the 23rd, May, 1951 was linked up to the Flying Doctor network and was heard at remote stations and settlements all over the outback.

Flynn's work is perpetuated throughout the outback in many ways. The Royal Flying Doctor Service and the Australian Inland Mission are working testimonials to his drive and vision. In 1956 the Flynn Memorial Church was dedicated in Alice Springs; at Threeways, north of Tennant Creek a massive monument marks the junction of the Barkly Highway from Queensland and the Stuart Highway to Darwin, it is called the Flynn Memorial. Flynn once said. ' If you start something worthwhile - nothing can stop it.' A former Governor General of Australia, Sir William Slim once said of Flynn.' His hands are stretched out like a benediction over the Inland.' The outback owes much to 'Flynn of the Inland', and he will long be remembered by the hundreds of thousands of people who have benefited by his work.

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« Reply #356 on: March 28, 2007, 04:29:05 AM »

FLYNN'S GRAVE




The Rev John Flynn died on 5 May 1951 and his ashes together with those of his wife Jean are buried at this site in Alice Springs. In 1952 a large eight ton boulder, from the Devils Marbles area, was put on a low loader and driven 480 kilometres south to Alice Springs by George Nicholls and placed here as a marker for his grave.

Unfortunately the stone had been taken from the highly sacred women's site of Karlu Karlu at the Devils Marbles. It has taken more than 45 years of negotiations between the Arrernte Aborigines and the White custodians before the original stone was returned to its sacred site and replaced by the present one on 4 September 1999.

 While the new grave stone was dedicated and blessed with a Christian service at Alice Springs, the Warumungu and Kaytej women celebrated the return of their granite boulder at Karlu Karlu.

PART OF THE DEVIL'S MARBLES

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« Reply #357 on: March 28, 2007, 08:29:53 AM »

Tib I love all you have shared with us here, my brother had a roommate from Australia whose family is in cattle ranching, he returned post college to take over the ranch from his grandfather. Thank you for sharing so much of your life and country with us.

Our dog is an adoptee from the pound but resembles a dingo in part? The photos of the red's you posted resemble him greatly? He's the sweetest dog we've ever had, but we were told he was an assimilation of carolina walking dog with even some pitbull but seeing that photo I do think he has some of the red lineage in him? I'll post a good photo later to see what you think?
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« Reply #358 on: March 29, 2007, 08:21:14 AM »

Hi None - glad you are enjoying this thread.  I have fun putting it together and like to hear my monkey friends are learning something about my wonderful country.  It must be very similar to America and your lifestyle.
The two reds are taken from a Heeler Fan Club site.  The one on the left has a more correct broad head for show qualities and the one on the right looks a little fine in the head.  Maybe a female but they still are supposed to have the broad head.  They are very solidly built dogs and tremendously strong for their size.  I would love to see the photo of your dog.  They say that there is some dingo in the best of the Heelers and Kelpies.  Frowned on now of course by the ANKC for show registration but who knows what happens on the outback stations?   A Dingo head for comparison :

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« Reply #359 on: March 29, 2007, 08:34:42 AM »

RED PANDAMONIUM AT TARONGA ZOO, SYDNEY, N.S.W.

Taronga Zoo is seeing red after twin Red Panda cubs have started to emerge from of their warm nestbox to explore their outdoor exhibit with their mum.  The two male cubs, named ‘Jishnu' (meaning bright or triumphant) and ‘Tenzin' (after the famous Nepalese Mountain climber Tenzin Norgay) were born on 8 January this year. Their mum ‘Wanmei' (meaning beautiful) and called “Winnie”, came to Taronga from Erie Zoo in America last year to breed with the Zoo's male Joshi, called “Mayhem” and to establish an important new bloodline in the Australasian breeding program.  

The Red Pandas at Taronga Zoo are part of the international breeding program for this endangered species and including the two new arrivals, 43 cubs have been born at Taronga since the program commenced in 1977. Red Pandas are also known as Chitwas or Wahs in their native Nepal. The size of a small dog, they move like a bear and act like a cat. Discovered 48 years before their Giant Panda relatives, Red Pandas also love bamboo, eating up to 200,000 leaves in one day.

Senior Carnivore Keeper Louise Ginman said: "It is always a time of great celebration when an endangered species is born at Taronga Zoo, especially when they are as charismatic as Red Panda cubs. ‘Wanmei' is a very experienced mother and she is doing a fantastic job rearing her cubs.  
"The cubs are now 12 weeks old and on their last weigh-in they weighed 1.04kg and 871 grams. Red Pandas are excellent climbers and even though their coat is rusty red in colour, they camouflage extremely well high up in the branches and canopy of the trees. Visitors will need to look carefully to try and spot them", said Louise.

‘Jishnu' and ‘Tenzin' will start eating a huge variety of fresh fruit and vegetables soon including apple, pear, melon, kiwi and sweet potato. Fresh browse and leaves such as bamboo will also take up a large part of their diet.  Taronga's veterinarians have also given the cubs a clean-bill of health after they quickly checked the cubs in their nestbox at eight weeks. The cubs received a general examination which included a vaccination, weigh-in and the insertion of a small micro chip.

Taronga Zoo's Red Panda breeding program is supported by a regional education program in Nepal to teach locals about the devastating effect of harvesting forests for firewood. This reduces the amount of forest available to the Red Pandas for food and refuge.  

Red Pandas, which range across the Himalayan mountains and foothills of northern India, China, Nepal and Bhutan are listed as endangered. It is uncertain how many Red Pandas remain in the wild today, but estimates suggest numbers may be as low as 2500 individuals. They are threatened by illegal hunting and deforestation of their wild habitat.  Remaining populations are fast becoming fragmented and isolated from each other.

TENZIN AND JISHNU :



CLOSE-UP OF TENZIN :

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....And at night the wond’rous glory of the everlasting stars..  A.B (Banjo) Paterson
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