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Author Topic: Australia by Tibrogargan January 2007 - present and 155216+ views later!  (Read 552216 times)
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Tibrogargan
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« Reply #420 on: April 18, 2007, 10:36:42 PM »

LATEST CUB PHOTOS





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« Reply #421 on: April 19, 2007, 06:12:07 AM »

McLEOD'S DAUGHTERS

WHERE IT ALL BEGAN......

McLeod's Daughters was launched on the Nine Network in August 2001 and was the third most watched Australian TV drama series in 2002.

Series one of McLeod's Daughters was sold to the giant American cable network Hallmark, who successfully debuted it in the UK in October 2001, and throughout Asia in March 2002.

The series was also been picked up by TVNZ in New Zealand, where it became an instant hit with viewers.

Creator Posie Graeme-Evans developed the original concept for McLeod's Daughters for a successful and high-rating 1996 Nine Network telemovie, and it has been in development since as a series.

Posie says a photograph depicting "blue skies and quintessentially Aussie girls' faces with big wide grins under the broad brim of a classic RM Williams hat" inspired her.

Anecdotes by country friends and Posie's love of South Australian landscapes, as depicted in Sir Hans Heysen paintings, also contributed to the McLeod's Daughters concept.

While the series was being developed, Kingsford, the property featured in the original telemovie, was put on the market. The Nine Network seized the opportunity to purchase the property in 1999, knowing that being able to film on a working farm would be fundamental to the success of the series.

Although the location remains the same as the telemovie, the characters in the series of McLeod's Daughters have been developed considerably and are played by a different cast.

Ex-cast member Bridie Carter, who played Tess Silverman McLeod, was a newcomer at the beginning of the series but became a household name along with fellow cast newcomer Rachael Carpani and ex-cast member Myles Pollard. Simmone Jade Mackinnon, who joined the cast at the end of 2003, has fast becoming a recognised name. The highly talented Michala Banas joined the core cast in 2004.

Sonia Todd and Aaron Jeffery complete the core cast and bring diverse experience in both television and features films — contributing immeasurably to what Posie refers to as "a well-balance cast". They are supported by experienced actors Marshall Napier and John Jarratt who play regular guest cast roles.

The four female leads carry the heart of each story throughout the series, which Posie believes reflects much of the truth of what's happening in Australia.

"The timing was right for this type of show - a rural-based series which showcases a predominately female cast and tells stories that reflect the lives and desires of contemporary Australian women," said Posie.

McLeod's Daughters is the first prime-time drama series to be filmed entirely in South Australia. The series, which is currently in its seventh series, is a co-production between Millennium Television and Nine Films and Television, produced with the assistance of the South Australian Film Corporation.

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« Reply #422 on: April 20, 2007, 01:41:37 AM »

McLEOD'S DAUGHTERS

ABOUT THE LOCATION AND PRODUCTION :

McLeod's Daughters is filmed on a working property located in the Light Regional District, between the townships of Gawler and Freeling, one hour north of Adelaide.

The property, Kingsford, is surrounded by 135 acres (55ha) of farming land, which Posie Graeme-Evans refers to as "our very own backlot".
Although originally part of a 30,000-acre (12,245ha) property, Kingsford has been used in recent years by the South Australian Government as a wheat research station. The Nine Network purchased the property in 1999.

The historical house was built from Edinburgh sandstone, transported to Australia as ship ballast. It took over 30 years to build and was finished in 1856.



Production Designer Tony Cronin (Shine, Innocence) says the position of the property is perfect for filming. "It is isolated among the hills and gives a clear 360 degree view."

Although Kingsford was a grand property in its day, it is now quite run down - a look that was important for the production design of the series, as the McLeod family has no money for maintenance.

"The character is something you would spend a million dollars trying to re-create. The old buildings have warm orange colours in the stone from years of dust and red dirt," Cronin said.

The interior scenes set at Drovers Run are all filmed inside the house. Not only does this add to the authenticity of the production, it is also convenient, as the large rooms and high ceilings are ideal for filming.

Additional buildings on the property are used for Meg's cottage and Becky's quarters. The property also includes a machinery shed, shearing shed and stockyards.



Kingsford was a working farm in its day. "Everything on the site was purpose-built for farming and adds an authenticity which would be hard to emulate on a set," said Cronin.

The yards and paddocks at Kingsford house the stock needed to create McLeod's Daughters. The property currently has 150 sheep, 100 cattle, 15 horses, working dogs and a team of stockmen headed by master animal wrangler Bill Willoughby.

Bill is resident at Kingsford with brother Jim and two other stockmen. The wranglers maintain the stock, double for stunts and teach the actors farming skills including riding, shearing, drenching and mustering.

"We know every aspect of station life," said Willoughby, who has worked in films for over 20 years. He worked on the telemovie of McLeod's Daughters in 1996 and plays an important role in authenticating the animal sequences in the series.

He says that keeping the stock on the property at Kingsford works well and helps the horses "to look like farm horses."




Although the actors had little riding experience before the series began, Bill is happy with their progress, noting that Lisa Chappell and Bridie Carter are doing particularly well with their riding skills and other farming abilities.

The cinematography for McLeod's Daughters is vast and the composition is beautiful. Director of Photography, Roger Dowling has masterfully created the illusion that the series is shot on a 20,000 acre property in the Australian bush, instead of on a heritage estate, the size of a hobby farm, just one hour north of Adelaide.

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« Reply #423 on: April 20, 2007, 01:44:24 AM »

McLEOD'S DAUGHTERS

FANS OF THE SHOW WILL BE FAMILIAR WITH THESE SCENES :





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« Reply #424 on: April 20, 2007, 02:00:46 AM »

McLEOD'S DAUGHTERS

MORE FAMILIAR SCENES :







.
My Note :

All photographs I have posted for these articles on McLeod's Daughters have been taken from the website of www.mcleodscountry.com.au and used with their kind permission.  Please visit their website for more photographs of their tours and tourists.

They organise custom designed tours where you can find out more about where many of the scenes are filmed for the television series McLeod's Daughters. You can also hear from those whose properties are used and also from those who have worked behind the scenes.
See the beautiful countryside and enjoy a country morning tea. You will be captivated by the history of the Light Region of South Australia.
You are sure to make some new Aussie friends and have plenty of time to chat about those memorable moments in the series.
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« Reply #425 on: April 21, 2007, 01:42:57 AM »

Thanks for posting all this info for us Tibro.  Tyler is right, maybe some of us are thinking of moving, lol!  

Of course I liked the dog breeds of Australia best and those breeds are just so popular in this country, too.  The Australian shepherd is very popular here as a working dog, sort of.  Lots of guys seem to prefer that breed because they will mind so well.  I have seen several "guarding" trucks and they seem to belong to men.

Silky Terriers are just like great big Yorkies!  Love em and also the Australian Terrier which is sort of like Yorkie Carin?

Most of all I like all the photos you post.   I like to look at them when I am too tired to think late at night they are soothing.  Fun to imagine a place so far away and what it would be like to live there.  A young country full of adventure.

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« Reply #426 on: April 21, 2007, 02:27:51 AM »

Hi Anna.  If you are thinking of moving - the bamboo grows well here too  Laughing  Laughing

Silky Terriers are supposed to be up to 10 inches at withers according to their standard.  The Aussie Terrier is about an inch shorter than the Scotties, Westies and Cairns.  Much wirier coat and a solid, no nonsense and tough little dog.

I left out the Aust Shepherd as they were not developed here but for the readers who are wondering what we are talking about here is their history. They are a recognised breed here now and can be shown.  Also I must find out more about those Basque Sheepherders.

SHORT HISTORICAL SURVEY - While there are many theories as to the origin of the Australian Shepherd, the breed as we know it today, developed exclusively in the United States.   The Australian Shepherd was given its name because of the association with Basque Sheepherders who came to the United States from Australia in the 1800's.

The Australian Shepherd's popularity rose steadily with the boom of western horseback riding after World War II which became known to the general public via rodeos, horse shows, movies and television shows.   Their inherent versatile and trainable personality made them assets to American farms and ranches.   The American stockman continued the development of the breed, maintaining its versatility, keen intelligence, strong herding instincts and eye-catching appearance that originally won their admiration.

Although each individual is unique in colour and markings, all Australian Shepherds show an unsurpassed devotion to their families.   Their many attributes have guaranteed the Australian Shepherd's continued popularity.

SHAME THEY DOCK THE TAILS :



HERE IS A NICE MATCHING QUARTET

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« Reply #427 on: April 21, 2007, 02:40:34 AM »

I just wanted to tell you how much I have enjoyed your postings, not only here but throughout.

I found this neat story, and enjoyed it.  Interesting, very interesting.

Fri Apr 20, 10:46 AM ET

SYDNEY (Reuters) - Australian rescuers were on Friday trying to solve the "Mary Celeste" style mystery of a yacht found floating off the coast with its engine running, food on its table ready to eat, but no crew.

 
The 12-meter (36 feet) catamaran was found 80 nautical miles off Townsville on the northeast coast, but there was no sign of the three crewmen who had set sail from Queensland state bound for Australia's west coast on Sunday.
"What they found was a bit strange in that everything was normal, there was just no sign of the crew," Jon Hall from emergency management in Queensland told local radio on Friday.

Hall said the yacht's sails were up but one was badly shredded. He said the engine was running, there was food on the table, a laptop was turned on, and the radio and global positioning satellite (GPS) were working.

Three life jackets and survival equipment, including an emergency beacon, were found on board, but no life rafts.

The Mary Celeste was an abandoned "ghost ship" found off the coast of Portugal in 1872. None of the Mary Celeste's crew or passengers were ever found.

The KAZ 11 was spotted adrift on the outer Great Barrier Reef on Wednesday. Rescue crews boarded the vessel on Friday but there was no sign of the three crew men, aged 56, 63 and 69.

Police said weather conditions at sea on Sunday and Monday were rough. "There was a fair sort of a wind out there but it's improved since then, so who knows what could've happened," said Police Chief Superintendent Roy Wall,.

Rescuers have retrieved the boat's GPS system to analyze data for clues to the mysterious disappearance of the crew.

"That will now enable us to track backwards where this yacht has actually been in the last few days, and we're hoping that can pinpoint the search area for the missing crew," said Hall
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« Reply #428 on: April 21, 2007, 02:41:18 AM »

KILKIVAN GREAT HORSE RIDE

Annually on a Saturday in April close to Easter up to 1100 horses, riders and horse-drawn vehicles start from five points around Kilkivan Shire, travel 20 - 30kms through some of the most picturesque country in South-East Queensland, then meet up for the grand parade through Kilkivan township at 4.00 pm.

KILKIVAN is one of the few towns actually situated on the Bi-Centennial National Trail, which runs from Cooktown to Victoria, and this was the inspiration for establishing the annual Kilkivan Great Horse Ride in 1986.
The Kilkivan Great Horse Ride was first suggested by Widgee grazier and former Kilkivan Shire councillor Fabian Webb, who wanted people of all ages and riding ability, from all walks of life, to get involved with a recreational ride through the scenic country which makes up Kilkivan Shire. In 1988 the Queensland opening of the National Trail was incorporated into the ride and legendary late R M Williams was among the riders who followed the trail.



Markets and street activities provide fun and entertainment in Kilkivan while spectators await the arrival of the horses. Following the parade, riders relax at the Tom Grady Campfire Concert at the Kilkivan showgrounds, with a fully licensed bar and catering by local community groups. The evening concert features the finals of the Toyota Kilkivan Country Talent Search sponsored by Toyota and Ken Mills Toyota. 2007 is the second year of this competition catering for up and coming country artists.

"Sunday is Funday" with  a wide range of horse-sports, a Team Penning Competition as well as Pony Club events for all ages and abilities, including Senior and Junior novelty events.

WAITING TO START ONE SECTION



ALONG THE HANGING ROCK TRAIL



THE GRAND PARADE

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« Reply #429 on: April 21, 2007, 02:49:44 AM »

Thanks for your interest Tyler.  I enjoy finding articles and hunting for suitable pictures.  I try to keep them varied and not just what I am most interested in.........
That is a mystery about the missing men on that boat.  Will try to see if there is any more up to date news in the morning.  Spooky.
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« Reply #430 on: April 21, 2007, 05:57:33 PM »



UPDATE FROM THE SUNDAY MAIL NEWSPAPER

WITHOUT A TRACE

Sonia Campbell, David Murray and Kay Dibben
April 22, 2007 12:00am

THE mystery deepened yesterday into the fate of the crew of a north Queensland ghost yacht with boating experts questioning whether they were victims of their own inexperience, piracy, a fatal swim or freak squall.

The chilling disappearance of skipper Des Batten, 56, Peter Tunstead, 69, and his brother James, 63 – all from Western Australia – has baffled emergency services and the yachting community. Their 9.8m catamaran, Kaz II, was found unmanned and adrift on Wednesday about 160km off Townsville, where it was towed for testing by police forensic officers. Helicopters and two boats joined a scaled-down search for the trio yesterday along the coastline between Airlie Beach, from where they set sail on their ill-fated voyage last Sunday morning, and north of Bowen, as hopes of finding the trio alive began to fade.

While police said the crew of Kaz II most likely had been washed overboard after hitting rough seas and strong winds last Sunday, rescuers reported finding the men's clothing in neat piles on the boat's rear deck – as if they had gone swimming.

As families of the victims arrived in Townsville yesterday searching for answers, police admitted they were baffled by the mystery of what happened.  "There is very little hope that they would have survived at this stage if they were still in the water, so we're concentrating on the coastline just in case they made it to shore," Chief Supt Roy Wall said.
Data collected from GPS systems on board the vessel indicated the yacht was on course last Sunday morning after departing Shute Harbour at Airlie Beach, but had struck trouble that afternoon.
"The vessel in the early part of Sunday was on course, but later on during the day it appears that it's just been tracking in a slightly different direction," Chief Supt Wall said.

When the yacht was boarded, its engine was running, a laptop computer sat switched on inside, navigational equipment and plotting gear were laid out and all safety gear was on board. Police denied previous reports that food was on a dining table ready to eat. Chief Supt Wall said the men could have been swept overboard in rough conditions. "We really don't know for sure and it's probably dangerous to speculate but obviously they've become separated from their vessel, it's as simple as that," he said.

"There's no indication whatsoever of anything untoward, no sign of a struggle or a fight. There doesn't appear to be any blood or anything like that. Everything seems to be quite intact.  We may never ever know exactly how it all unfolded. There are a number of scenarios. One of them could have been fishing and may have fallen in and the others might have tried to rescue him. Who knows? They were obviously long-term friends. It would be obvious that they would help each other if they were in strife."

But Emergency Management Queensland helicopter rescue crewman Phil Livingstone told The Sunday Mail clothes had been found neatly placed on the rear deck, suggesting the men may have gone for a swim. "There were neatly placed shorts, sunglasses, cap, sitting on the back deck, unruffled like they'd just gone for a swim," Mr Livingstone said. "Alongside the clothing was a fishing rod with its line in the water."

The only thing out of place aboard the catamaran was its badly ripped sail.
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« Reply #431 on: April 21, 2007, 06:40:48 PM »

The Travel Channel is featuring Australia this evening.

Should be interesting.

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« Reply #432 on: April 21, 2007, 07:38:54 PM »

Good viewing, Anna.
You can watch for familiar places or note any you need more info on for this thread  Wink  Wink
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« Reply #433 on: April 22, 2007, 02:57:59 AM »

TARGA TASMANIA

SOMETHING FOR THE MOTOR SPORT FANS
17 - 22 April 2007

In 2007 Targa Tasmania celebrates its 16th anniversary, hallmarking the historic staging of what has become one of the ‘must do’ tarmac rallies on the world’s motorsport calendar.

Targa Tasmania is an exciting International Classic. It is a tarmac rally with competitive stages on closed roads for the best touring, sports and GT cars in the world. Its inaugural year was in April 1992 when Tasmania hosted this distinguished International motoring classic.

The competition concept is drawn directly from the best features of the Mille Miglia, the Coupe des Alpes and the Tour de Corse. However, Targa Tasmania is not a slow-motion re-run. It is a genuine "red-blooded" motor sport competition. It is also a unique annual opportunity for the owners of sports cars and GTs to drive them the way they were designed to be driven, on some of the most exciting and challenging tarmac roads in the world.

Targa Tasmania caters for up to 300 select cars including many overseas competitors. Entries are selected from Applications to Compete, by a Vehicle Selection Committee. Invitations to Compete in each year's Event are announced on a progressive basis from August through to March (close of applications).  Targa Tasmania has quickly established itself as an annual event, conducted in April each year. The present format is to conduct the event over five days plus a Prologue on some 2,000 kilometers of tarmac roads.

Targa Tasmania entrants comprise a wide range of media-attracting personalities including former World Champions and other well-known motor sport competitors from both Australia and overseas, as well as national and international celebrities. In short, this is not only a competitive motor sport event. It is a unique commercial and tourist attraction capturing the imagination of the Australian public as well as the national and international motor sport fraternity.

Tourism Tasmania has announced that more than 200,000 people per annum watch Targa Tasmania each year over the five days, while an international viewing audience of over 480 millions has been estimated for each event.

Targa Tasmania has the support and backing of the Confederation of Australian Motor Sport (CAMS) as well as the Federation International de l' Automobile (FIA). The Tasmanian Government rates this special event as having a substantial commercial contribution as well and being a major tourist attraction to the State, and active support is provided by the Department of State Development. Thus, Targa Tasmania is another example of the successful partnership between Government and Motor Sport, attracting between $5 and $10 million new tourist dollars to Tasmania each year.

The goal of organisers, Octagon, and the Tasmanian Government has been achieved - to see Targa Tasmania develop into the premier motor sport event of its type in Australia, ranking alongside the Australian Grand Prix in Melbourne and Rally Australia in Perth.


QUADRIPLEGICS SET TO RACE IN TARGA TASMANIA

Contributor: AQA Victoria.Source: AQA Victoria.Posted: 11-04-2007
Targa Tasmania is an exciting international classic car race / rally drive held annually in Tasmania. The event in 2007 commences on Tuesday 17 April and includes the best sports and GT cars in the world.This year, the six day event will again see the entry of two drivers who have a spinal cord injury – SCI Team Targa Tasmania. In 2006, the team successfully overcame all odds to complete the Targa and become the first ever 'disabled entry' to achieve such a goal.Alan Stevenson, a quadriplegic since 2001 after an accident, had a vision for some time to participate in Targa Tasmania. With his motor racing skills, determination, ingenuity and knowledge of spinal cord injury, it all came to fruition.He is being joined by Nazim Erdem, also a quadriplegic caused by a diving accident. Nazim is a two time Paralympian in Wheelchair Rugby who works at AQA Victoria (a support organisation for people with spinal cord injury) has enlisted support from AQA to assist Alan fulfill this challenge.They both aim to show others, including the general public and others with disability, that 'life with a disability isn’t a dead end'. Hopefully by creating awareness they will be able to get their message across.
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« Reply #434 on: April 22, 2007, 03:46:06 AM »

TARGA TASMANIA

SOME OF THE 2007 COMPETITORS











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« Reply #435 on: April 24, 2007, 09:10:35 PM »

ANZAC DAY

Australian war historian C.E.W. Bean attributes the acronym ANZAC to a Lieutenant A.T. White, one of General Birdwood’s ‘English clerks’. The first official sanction for its use was at Birdwood’s request to denote where the Corps had established a bridgehead on the Gallipoli Peninsula. However, there is little argument that ANZAC was first used as a simple code in Egypt. A later historical work, Gallipoli, by the English historian Robert Rhodes James states:
Two Australian Sergeants, Little and Millington had cut a rubber stamp with the initials ‘A & NZAC’ for the purpose of registering papers at the Corps headquarters, situated in Shepheard’s Hotel, Cairo. When a code name was requested for the Corps, a British officer, a Lt. White, suggested ANZAC. Little later claimed that he made the original suggestion to White. It was in general use by January 1915.

Whatever its origin, the acronym ANZAC became famous with the landing of the Corps on the Gallipoli Peninsula at the Dardanelles, on 25 April 1915. It has since become synonymous with the determination and spirit of our armed forces. The significance of the day, and the acronym, in Australia’s heritage is probably best stated by Dr. Bean in the following excerpt from his official war history:
It was not merely that 7600 Australians and nearly 2500 New Zealanders had been killed or mortally wounded there, and 24,000 more (19,000 Australians and 5,000 New Zealanders) had been wounded, while fewer than 100 were prisoners. But the standards set by the first companies at the first call - by the stretcher-bearers, the medical officers, the staff, the company leaders, the privates, the defaulters on the water barges, the Light Horse at The Nek - this was already part of the tradition not only of ANZAC but of the Australian and New Zealand peoples. By dawn on 20 December, ANZAC had faded into a dim blue line lost amid other hills on the horizon as the ships took their human freight to Imbros, Lemnos and Egypt. But ANZAC stood, and still stands, for reckless valour in a good cause, for enterprise, resourcefulness, fidelity, comradeship and endurance that will never own defeat.

The acronym survived Gallipoli. I and II ANZAC Corps fought in France and the ANZAC Mounted Division fought in Palestine. The decision to separate the Australian and New Zealand components of the ANZAC Corps was taken on 14 November 1917 when it was announced that the Corps would cease to exist from January 1918. An Australian Corps was then created to absorb the Australian divisions.
There was a brief period during World War 2 when ANZAC was resurrected. On 12 April 1941 in Greece, General Blamey declared I Australian Corps to be the ANZAC Corps, much to the delight of its Australian and New Zealand formations.

ANZAC was again a reality during the Vietnam conflict where, in the late 1960s and early 1970s, an ANZAC battalion served in Phuoc Tuy Province. These battalions were created by absorbing two companies and supporting elements from The Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment into a battalion of the Royal Australian Regiment (RAR). Our 2nd, 4th and 6th Battalions held the distinction of being titled, for example, 2RAR/NZ (ANZAC) Battalion

The ANZAC Day Dawn Service has become an integral part of commemorations on 25 April. However, credit for its origin is divided between the Reverend Arthur Ernest White of Albany, WA and Captain George Harrington of Toowoomba, Queensland.
Reverend White was a padre of the earliest ANZACs to leave Australia with the First AIF in November 1914. The convoy assembled at Albany’s King George Sound in WA and at 4 am on the morning of their departure, he conducted a service for all men. After the war, White gathered some 20 men at dawn on 25 April 1923 on Mt Clarence overlooking King George Sound and silently watched a wreath floating out to sea. He then quietly recited the words ‘As the sun rises and goeth down we will remember them’. All were deeply moved and the news of the ceremony soon spread. White is quoted as saying that ‘Albany was the last sight of land these ANZAC troops saw after leaving Australian shores and some of them never returned. We should hold a service (here) at the first light of dawn each ANZAC Day to commemorate them.’
At 4 am on ANZAC morning 1919 in Toowoomba, Captain Harrington and a group of friends visited all known graves and memorials of men killed in action in World War 1 and placed flowers (not poppies) on the headstones. Afterwards they toasted their mates with a rum. In 1920 and 1921 these men followed a similar pattern but adjourned to Picnic Point at the top of the range and toasted their mates until the first rays of dawn appeared. A bugler sounded the ‘Last Post’ and ‘Reveille’




(Above) One of the few photos taken during the landing at ANZAC Cove, Gallipoli. (AWM J3022)  By kind permission of the Australian War Memorial, Canberra
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« Reply #436 on: April 24, 2007, 09:13:59 PM »

SIMPSON AND HIS DONKEY

Twenty-two years old, English-born and a trade union activist, John Simpson Kirkpatrick was an unlikely figure to become a national hero. Having deserted from the merchant navy in 1910, he tramped around Australia and worked in a variety of jobs. He enlisted in the AIF, expecting this would give him the chance to get back to England; instead, Private Simpson found himself at ANZAC Cove on 25 April 1915, and was killed less than four weeks later.

Simpson would not have made a good peacetime soldier, and he was recklessly independent in war. Instructed to recover and help the wounded he undertook this work enthusiastically. Famously, he used a small donkey called Duffy to carry men down from the front line, often exposing himself to fire. Simpson and his donkey became famous among the Australian soldiers at Gallipoli because of their bravery. Day after day Simpson and his donkey would wind their way through the hills and valleys looking for wounded soldiers. Even though it was very dangerous, Simpson would crawl on his belly and drag soldiers back to safety. He would then put the injured soldier on the donkey’s back and lead him down to the beach. One day Duffy came down to the beach with a soldier on his back, but without Simpson. Simpson had been killed trying to save another soldier. The donkey somehow knew that even though his friend was dead, Simpson would have wanted him to take the injured man to safety.

The bravery of this "man with the donkey" soon became the most prominent symbol of Australian courage and tenacity on Gallipoli. Although Simpson carried no arms and remains an enigmatic figure, the nature of his sacrifice made a vital contribution to the story of ANZAC. Simpson’s actions are regarded as the highest expression of mateship, and he remains one of Australia’s best known historical figures.



(Above) This photograph is the only authentic one of Simpson and Duffy in action in Shrapnel Gully, Gallipoli. (AWM A03114) By kind permission of the Australian War Memorial, Canberra
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« Reply #437 on: April 24, 2007, 09:17:52 PM »

ANZAC BISCUITS

1 Cup Flour
155 gms Butter
1 Cup Rolled Oats
1 Level Teaspoon Bicarb Soda
1 Cup Coconut
1 Tablespoon Golden Syrup
1 Cup Sugar
2 Tablespoons Water

Combine flour, oats, coconut and sugar. Add melted butter. Mix syrup, bicarb soda and hot water and add to other ingredients. Mix well. Drop in small pieces on greased tray. Bake in slow to moderate oven 10 - 20 minutes. Allow to cool slightly on tray before removing.



During World War 1, the wives, mothers and girlfriends of the Australian soldiers were concerned for the nutritional value of the food being supplied to their men. Here was a problem. Any food they sent to the fighting men had to be carried in the ships of the Merchant Navy. Most of these were lucky to maintain a speed of ten knots. Most had no refrigerated facilities, so any food sent had to be able to remain edible after periods in excess of two months. A body of women came up with the answer - a biscuit with all the nutritional value possible. The basis was a Scottish recipe using rolled oats. These oats were used extensively in Scotland, especially for a heavy porridge that helped counteract the extremely cold climate.
The ingredients they used were: rolled oats, sugar, plain flour, coconut, butter, golden syrup or treacle, bi-carbonate of soda and boiling water. All these items did not readily spoil. At first the biscuits were called Soldiers’ Biscuits, but after the landing on Gallipoli, they were renamed ANZAC Biscuits.
A point of interest is the lack of eggs to bind the ANZAC biscuit mixture together. Because of the war, many of the poultry farmers had joined the services, thus, eggs were scarce. The binding agent for the biscuits was golden syrup or treacle. Eggs that were sent long distances were coated with a product called ke peg (like Vaseline) then packed in air tight containers filled with sand to cushion the eggs and keep out the air.
As the war drew on, many groups like the CWA (Country Women’s Association), church groups, schools and other women’s organisations devoted a great deal of time to the making of ANZAC biscuits. To ensure that the biscuits remained crisp, they were packed in used tins, such as Billy Tea tins.
ANZAC biscuits are still made today. They can also be purchased from supermarkets and specialty biscuit shops. Around ANZAC Day, these biscuits are also often used by veterans’ organisations to raise funds for the care and welfare of aged war veterans.
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« Reply #438 on: April 25, 2007, 02:28:47 AM »

YACHT THREE "KIDNAPPED"

Christine Flatley ..April 25, 2007 12:00am .. Article from: The Courier-Mail

RELATIVES of the skipper of a mystery yacht found off the coast of north Queensland believe the three missing crew members may have been kidnapped.

Hope Himing, niece of Derek Batten, 56, said yesterday there were many unusual circumstances that suggested foul play in regard to the yacht, which was found adrift off the coast of Townsville last Wednesday.

Emergency service crews found the engine running, computers turned on and the GPS system operating but no sign of the boat's crew.

"It just doesn't all add up," Ms Himing said her family dismissed police suggestions that her uncle, known to the family as "Des", and his crew members – brothers Peter and James Tunstead, aged 69 and 63, all from Perth – were washed overboard in bad weather.

She said she strongly believed that the 9.8m catamaran Kaz II was boarded, and the trio may have been kidnapped.

"It looks like they've been boarded," she said.

Ms Himing said she held grave fears for the trio's safety, but believed they were still alive. She said the families would continue to search Airlie Beach and the surrounding islands until they had closure.

"My mum and I are both spiritualists. My mum's had a really strong feeling from Des that he's somewhere dark and he can't see and I don't feel that he's dead either," she said.

Ms Himing said the families of all three crew members felt that authorities had called off the search too quickly.
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« Reply #439 on: April 25, 2007, 02:35:38 AM »

LOGIES TO HONOUR IRWIN

April 25, 2007 02:00am...Article from: The Courier-Mail

CROCODILE Hunter Steve Irwin is to be posthumously honoured for revolutionising the wildlife documentary industry with induction into Australian TV's Hall of Fame at next month's Logie Awards.
The TV presenter built a loyal worldwide following as he shared his passion for wildlife conservation in his TV series and a feature film.

His widow Terri will accept the award while daughter Bindi, whose own wildlife series begins airing in the US in June, will present the award for most outstanding children's program.

The awards will be held in Melbourne on May 6.

"Our documentaries started airing in Australia, and we were only ever going to do one episode about crocodiles and, in a very short period of time, we'd done 10 episodes to tremendous ratings," Terri Irwin told TV Week.

She said people had become detached from wildlife in recent history and it was a "point of pride" for Steve that he was considered a pioneer of his genre.

"Changing the face of television and bringing wildlife back into people's living rooms in a hands-on way was so important to him," she said.

The Hall of Fame award goes to a nationally known individual or program for "an outstanding and sustained contribution to Australian television".

Terri and Bindi Irwin appear today on the cover of The Australian Women's Weekly wearing elegant gowns, and tell the magazine that fond memories of Steve were helping them overcome the grief of losing him.

"My grief comes easily, but I keep putting one foot in front of the other as there are so many things I want to accomplish," Terri tells the magazine.

She says Bindi and her brother Bob need her more than ever since their father's passing.

"I need to be there for them, and they need me to be there, too," she says.
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....And at night the wond’rous glory of the everlasting stars..  A.B (Banjo) Paterson
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