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Author Topic: Australia by Tibrogargan January 2007 - present and 155216+ views later!  (Read 536312 times)
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Tibrogargan
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« Reply #500 on: May 23, 2007, 02:09:25 AM »

None, I am so pleased you heard from the Robert Gordon family and that is a great deal they have given you.  You look like becoming their US outlet, which would be really really cool.

It would be difficult to choose favourites amongst their range.  You will have a hard time restraining yourself from ordering the whole lot!  The cup cakes are so dainty and colourful.  They would look lovely alongside your cookies.
I like the  Rooster ranges also - just something different and definitely colourful.  

I will post a little on their history in a few days as I think it is unusual these days to find a company still in the original family's hands where you can get personal attention.  I love the original pottery shed!  It would have looked great in my early Aust architecture article  Wink

There are several Japanese Gardens in Australia and they are just so peaceful to walk through.  Even little children seem to hush and enjoy the atmosphere instead of just running around.  I have spent a lot of time in a particularly nice one in Toowoomba.  Will scout around for any photos I can locate.
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« Reply #501 on: May 23, 2007, 02:31:57 AM »

COWRA, N.S.W

A large country town famous as a POW camp during World War II
Cowra is a town of 9500 people situated on the Lachlan River, 310m above sea-level and 320 km west of Sydney at the junction of the Mid Western and Olympic Highways. It is the commercial and administrative centre of a shire in which the major industries are livestock, wool scouring, vegetable growing and processing, vineyards, furniture making and tourism.

CANOLA FIELDS NEAR COWRA



Cowra is noted for its historical and natural attractions, the magnificent Japanese Garden and Cultural Centre, quality restaurants, wineries, galleries, craft shops and horse riding. The public identity of the town has become bound up with the Cowra breakout of 1944 (in which Japanese prisoners of war attempted to escape from a local camp during World War II) and the subsequent association with Japan. This history has led the town to focus on and promote the values of pacifism and internationalism, which are at the centre of the annual Festival of Understanding.

COWRA POW CAMP AND THE COWRA BREAKOUT
 
A large army training camp was established just outside Cowra in 1940 which trained some 70 000 personnel throughout World War II. The following year, a prisoner-of-war (POW) camp was built at the north-eastern outskirts of town. On 5 August, 1944, this camp became the site of the largest mass POW escape in British military history. It was also the only such escape attempt to occur in Australia.  At that time the camp contained about 4000 prisoners who were held in four separate compounds of 17 acres each. A thoroughfare 700 metres long and 45 metres wide, known as Broadway, divided Camps B and C from Camps A and D. Adjacent Broadway was a 10-metre strip known as No Man's Land, on each side of which was barbed-wire security fencing. Camp B, hopelessly overcrowded, held 1104 Japanese POWs.



AWM 064347. A general view of the race between the four compounds of the Cowra prisoner of war camp. “B” and “C” compounds are on the left while “A” and “D” compounds are on the right.

On 3 June, 1944, a Korean prisoner reported a conversation in which he heard about a plan among the Japanese to attack the garrison, seize arms and ammunition and escape. As a result security was stepped up. Consequently, on 4 August, the leader of Camp B was handed a list of internees to be transferred to the POW camp at Hay on 7 August. At 1.30 a.m. of 5 August a bugle sounded and the prisoners of Camp B opened the hut doors. Screaming furiously, two groups - armed with knives, chisels, forks, saws, axe handles and baseball bats - rushed the wire separating them from Broadway while two other groups headed for the perimeter wire on the other side of the camp. They threw blankets over the barbed wire, or crawled under it, while others dressed in heavy clothing, threw themselves on the wire for others to climb over. 20 buildings were burned down due to prisoners overturning heating braziers. The Australian Recruit Training Centre, 3 km away, was alerted by telephone and flares. Two privates, who manned one of the Vickers machine gun trailers, were overrun and murdered, although Private Hardy managed to sabotage his gun before his death. Another private was stabbed to death in the fracas and a lieutenant was killed during the round-up the following morning. Another four Australian personnel were wounded and a civilian from Blayney died after a gun discharged in his vehicle during the round-up. 378 Japanese POWs escaped although the media were kept entirely in the dark about the event and local civilians were given partial and at times false information.



AWM 064284. Looking west showing compounds of the Cowra prisoner of war camp with the group headquarter buildings in the foreground.

Within nine days 334 escapees were recaptured by the authorities and by civilians. One POW reached Eugowra, 50 km away. Others had been killed and some committed suicide - two by laying their heads on railroad tracks. In all 231 Japanese died and 108 were wounded - three dying subsequently of their wounds. The organisers of the break-out had ordered that civilians were to remain unharmed and this proved to be the case.  One charming story entailed a Mrs Weir who refused to hand over two escapees until she had given the men tea and scones as they had not eaten for days. The men in question returned to the Weir farm in the 1980s to thank the family.




Left, the Cowra War Cemetery and Right, the relic foundations of the POW camp. (Photographs courtesy Cowra Shire Council.)

Interestingly, the many Italian POWs were, for the most part, cheerful and cooperative and worked agreeably outside the camp while the Japanese POWs were surly, difficult and resentful. Attempts at employing them outside the camp had proved a failure due to their aggressive behaviour. Their lack of cooperation and the breakout itself arose from an overwhelming sense of shame engendered by a code of honour which viewed capture as a disgrace to themselves, their families and their country. Japanese soldiers were supposed to commit suicide rather than be humiliated by the subservience implicit in imprisonment. Indeed most of the prisoners were taken when they were too weak to offer resistance or they were merchant seamen scooped from the waters. They gave false names as they felt news of their capture would shame their families while the Japanese authorities reported all those missing in action as dead. When informed of the deaths during the breakout, the Japanese authorities asserted that those killed must have been Japanese civilians as, it contended, there was no such thing as a Japanese POW. When the internees returned many felt their 'shame' would render them unworthy of return to Japanese society (some expected to be executed) and half did not tell their families they had been POWs.  A Japanese war cemetery was established by agreement with the Japanese government in 1964. It now contains the remains of all Japanese POWs and civilian internees who died during their imprisonment in World War II.



A student exchange program was established in 1970 between Cowra High School and the Seikei High School in Kichijyouji in Tokyo. The Japanese Garden and Cultural Centre was set up with the aid of the Japanese government in 1978-79 to honour the dead on both sides.
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« Reply #502 on: May 23, 2007, 02:36:49 AM »

The Black and White photographs in the above article are from the Australian War Memorial collection, and reprinted with their kind permission.
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« Reply #503 on: May 23, 2007, 07:08:13 AM »

Quote from: "Tibrogargan"
None, I am so pleased you heard from the Robert Gordon family and that is a great deal they have given you.  You look like becoming their US outlet, which would be really really cool.

It would be difficult to choose favourites amongst their range.  You will have a hard time restraining yourself from ordering the whole lot!  The cup cakes are so dainty and colourful.  They would look lovely alongside your cookies.
I like the  Rooster ranges also - just something different and definitely colourful.  

I will post a little on their history in a few days as I think it is unusual these days to find a company still in the original family's hands where you can get personal attention.  I love the original pottery shed!  It would have looked great in my early Aust architecture article  Wink

There are several Japanese Gardens in Australia and they are just so peaceful to walk through.  Even little children seem to hush and enjoy the atmosphere instead of just running around.  I have spent a lot of time in a particularly nice one in Toowoomba.  Will scout around for any photos I can locate.


Tib I don't know where to draw the line with their products, ALL are so appealing to me !! Did you know they have an outlet also? The address is on their website, we have an outlet for Vietri closeby which is an importer for italian ceramics. My mother used to carry that line and another US based one MacKenzie-Childs in her art gallery. Neither are as reasonably priced as Gordon's and like you, I like that his family continues to drive their operation.

We do cupcakes now, we're updating our site with some new photos but as you can see, their wee cake stands and whimsical toppers are a great fit with our products?





I will email Mishy to send you my email address and weblinks, I really do think the RG line is perfect for our catered events?  Wink

My mother is a master gardener, she specializes in perennials and I was discussing with her last night perhaps she could join us in a trip down under. My brother also has a former roommate from AU who now runs his family's cattle operation, so perhaps we could also visit with Andrew.

AU really is an interesting place to live !
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« Reply #504 on: May 23, 2007, 11:45:48 PM »

Tibro you have done an oustanding job with this thread!!   The photos are GORGEOUS!!!   Maybe I should move to Australia   Wink
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« Reply #505 on: May 24, 2007, 03:09:48 AM »

None - those RG ceramics are just made for your cookies and cup cakes.  They go together like a horse and carriage as in the words of that old song. Their factory outlet is about 35 miles from Melbourne CBD, as the crow flies.
I see they have agents in 5 other states (none in Tas   Sad ) and NZ but I was intrigued by them having distributors in Dubai, Malaysia and Singapore and nothing in the UK or USA.  I am sure our local housewares specialist stores sell RG pottery and would be at a heavy mark-up too, I might add.

I am sure you would all find something of interest here for a visit.  There are some wonderful gardens and art galleries, and a visit to a cattle station would be quite an experience.  I can share more ideas with you through emails.
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« Reply #506 on: May 24, 2007, 03:17:47 AM »

Angie thank you for your appreciation.  It is a pleasure to present these items for my monkey friends to enjoy and learn about Australia.

The photos I find are very good - but there are a lot more out there that are copyrighted and it is a shame I cannot include those as well.  Maybe it will inspire some monkeys to search the internet for more information?  I have the benefit of an browser that allows me to restrict searches to Australian websites so that makes it easier for me.

Angie you would love it out here!
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« Reply #507 on: May 24, 2007, 03:26:17 AM »

SYDNEY OBSERVATORY

Early in 1797, the first windmill in New South Wales was completed on what became known as Windmill Hill. It was used to grind grain into flour and was one of the colony's first steps towards self sufficiency. The mill tower was built of stone and the machinery and grindstone were imported from England. But they did not work for long. The canvas sails were stolen, the machinery was damaged in a storm, and by 1800 the foundations were giving way. Before it was ten years old, the mill was useless. This brief slice of history is still echoed in the name 'Millers Point', the harbour landing where grain was unloaded.

In 1803 Governor Hunter ordered a fort to be built on the site of Windmill Hill to defend the colony from rebellious convicts and possible French attack. The fort called Fort Phillip, was never fully completed and never fired a single shot in anger. In 1825 the eastern wall of the fort was converted to a signal station. From here flags sent messages to ships in the harbour and the signal station on the South Head of the harbour.
In 1840 the fort was partially demolished. A new signal station, designed by the colonial architect Mortimer Lewis, was built on the east wall in 1848. This is now the oldest building on the hill.

OBSERVATORY IN 1860



Plans for Sydney Observatory began as a simple time-ball tower, to be built near the signal station. Every day at exactly 1.00pm, the time ball on top of the tower would drop to signal the correct time to the city and harbour below. At the same time a cannon on Fort Denison was fired. It was soon agreed to expand the tower into a full observatory.  Designed by Alexander Dawson, the observatory consisted of a domed chamber to house the equatorial telescope, a room with long, narrow windows for the transit telescope, a computing room or office, and a residence for the astronomer. In 1877, a western wing was added to provide office and library space and a second domed chamber for telescopes.

Under Henry Chamberlain Russell, in the 1880s Sydney Observatory gained international recognition. Russell took some of the first astronomical photographs in the world, and involved Sydney in one of the greatest international astronomy projects ever undertaken, The astrographic catalogue. The catalogue was the first completed atlas of the sky. The Sydney section alone took 80 years and 53 volumes to complete.
After federation in 1901, meteorological observations became a Commonwealth government responsibility, but astronomy remained with the states.

OBSERVATORY TIME BALL



Sydney Observatory continued working on The astrographic catalogue, keeping time, making observations and providing information to the public. Every day, for example, the Observatory supplied Sydney newspapers with the rising and setting times of the sun, moon and planets. By the mid 1970s the increasing problems of air pollution and city light made work at the Observatory more and more difficult. In 1982, the decision was made to convert Sydney Observatory into a museum of astronomy and related fields.
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« Reply #508 on: May 25, 2007, 01:46:54 AM »

INTRODUCING INDAH

One of Dreamworld’s gorgeous Sumatran tiger cubs received her name after a week long national naming competition on the Today Show.

Dreamworld received over 15, 000 entries and chose the name INDAH meaning beautiful or precious in Indonesian.

Indah



Nameless Cub



Cubs at 6 weeks - "Walkies"



The 2nd cub's name will be announced on Friday 18th May when The Wiggles visit Dreamworld and will be spend some one on one time with Indah and her sister.

THE PARENTS :

Soraya - the mother



Handler Quote :“Soraya is an extremely inquisitive tiger with an easy-going nature."
Unlike Dreamworld’s other tigers, Soraya was not hand-raised so she does not appear on Tiger Island. She lives in her purpose built, off-exhibit tiger facility at Tiger Island.

Raja - the father



Handler Quote: “Raja has had very limited human contact. He’s a little more temperamental and certainly likes to let us know who’s boss.”
Raja has not been hand-raised and can not be handled by Tiger Island staff. He lives in his purpose built, off-exhibit tiger facility at Tiger Island.

My note :  They are slow at updating their website as the second cub would be named by now.  Will post as soon as I see anything more.
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« Reply #509 on: May 26, 2007, 04:05:21 AM »



IN MEMORY OF ALL THE BRAVE MEN AND WOMEN
WHO HAVE GIVEN THEIR LIVES TO KEEP US ALL SAFE AND FREE
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« Reply #510 on: May 26, 2007, 04:20:18 AM »

TOOWOOMBA, QUEENSLAND



Situated on the crest of the Great Dividing Range at some 700 metres above sea level, Toowoomba enjoys panoramic views, rich volcanic soil and four wonderfully distinct seasons. Citizens and visitors enjoy any number of over 150 public parks throughout Toowoomba. Many of these parklands are being cultured to represent a variety of international themes and one can already visit a well established Japanese Garden, New Zealand themed park and lake area, and a wetlands of the world area.

MAIN STREET



Toowoomba city has built a reputation over many years to become known as the Garden City of Queensland. With fresh mountain air and rich volcanic soils it has been an ideal location for the cultivation of some of the most magnificent park and garden settings in Australia.

TOOWOOMBA FROM LOOKOUT



All four seasons are experienced in Toowoomba. Winter brings the crisp mountain air and warm, earthy tonings. Spring is the most colourful and playful time of the year in Toowoomba.

The arrival of the Spring season is celebrated every year by the Carnival of Flowers. Visitors flock to the city from far and wide to tour the award winning private gardens and experience this week-long event of fun and festivities.

FLOATS FROM THE CARNIVAL





From coffee shops to silver service restaurants, from international cuisine to hearty steakhouse menus, from a-la- carte to buffet as well as hotel meals and take-away outlets, Toowoomba offers all the dining choices one could ever desire. A selection of these restaurants operate from restored colonial homes, adding charm and atmosphere to any breakfast, lunch or evening meal.

GREAT DIVIDING RANGE HIGHWAY TOWARDS BRISBANE



The city of Toowoomba has achieved recognition as a centre for academic excellence. A number of private primary and secondary schools and Christian Colleges service the educational needs of young people from all throughout Queensland. With well established reputations to uphold, these schools offer the ultimate in academic as well as sporting opportunities.
Further studies are offered by both the Technical And Further Education (TAFE) and the University of Southern Queensland. The University is modern and rapidly growing, with 13,000 students enrolled in an ever-expanding range of career-oriented courses. High quality and innovative teaching programmes have also earned the University of Southern Queensland a reputation as a leader in Distance Education.

WELL PRESERVED BUILDINGS



The Performing Airs Centre at the University regularly hosts a wide range of outstanding music, choral and drama performances, showcasing the talent of students, staff and visiting professionals.

GRASS TREES

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« Reply #511 on: May 26, 2007, 09:07:19 AM »

Tibro

I love all the photos you post, but I especially love the Japanese garden ones. Since we have 13 acres of property, my dream has been to somehow have my own Japanese garden. The problem is, I don't think the raccoons and possums will accommodate my wishes.  Laughing
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« Reply #512 on: May 27, 2007, 04:11:28 AM »

TOOWOOMBA - THE JAPANESE GARDEN : JU RAKU EN

(Ju-Longevity, Raku - to enjoy, En - a place for public recreation)

One of the most peaceful and beautiful parks in Toowoomba is the University's Japanese Garden which is the largest, most complex and traditionally designed Japanese Garden in Australia. It was named Ju Raku En by the designer - roughly translated it means long life and happiness in a public garden.

The Garden is a joint project of the University of Southern Queensland and the Toowoomba City Council and was opened in 1989. It was designed by Professor Kinsaku Nakane - renowned as the modern day master of Japanese garden design and famous for the restoration of many of Japan's old gardens and the design and construction of gardens in Japan and throughout the western world.

Its elements of mountain stream and waterfall, Dry Garden, central lake, Azalea Hill, 3 kilometers of paths, many species of Japanese and Australian native trees and plants, and lawns combine in a seamless and restful harmony.

Japanese gardens emphasise the use of rocks to create three dimensional pictures in stone. All the large rocks in Ju Raku En were accurately placed so as to appear naturally dispersed in a random way.

Ju Raku is more than just a group of rocks stitched together by water and artificially created hills and forests. It is actually a presentation of Buddhist paradise with the celestial sea lapping the rocky shores of the three islands where the immortals are said to dwell. The material world is the outer edge of the lake and a symbolic journal to paradise may be made by crossing one of the four bridges to the islands. The Central Lake represents the celestial sea from the Buddhist legend where believers dwelt in bliss amongst fragrant flowers, lotus blossoms and sounds of celestial music. The northern edge of the lake is lined by a large pebble beach to remind viewers of a seascape.

Other parts of the lake edge are rocky and jagged just like the sea coast of Japan. The skill of miniaturising real life features and reconstructing them in a garden is a highly sophisticated garden form unique to Japanese gardens. Approximately 2,500 full sun Azaleas are planted on the northern face of Azalea Hill as a representation of hillsides in Japan where Azaleas grow wild. The pruning of these shrubs will eventually provide a wave like massed green mat which will burst into vivid colour in Spring. When fully grown the hedge behind the Azaleas, in combination with the uneven and irregularly spaced stepping stones will not allow the visitor a view until they reach the summit where the total garden unfolds before them.

The Rock Island is the pivotal point of the garden representing the sacred Mt Sumeru which is the centre of the Buddhist universe around which all life rotates. The remaining two islands are where it is said that immortals dwell who possess an elixir capable of giving eternal life. It can be viewed that the outer edge of the lake is the material world where we all live and crossing over the bridges to the mystical islands is symbolic of a religious journey from one world to the next. Over 450 tonnes of rock were used to create the five metre high waterfall. Both the mountain stream and waterfall were made to recreate a natural environment or to imitate nature.

The dry or Contemplation garden is a very important element in a Japanese Garden. The design of the dry garden makes suggestions to the viewer rather than spelling out the obvious. The dry garden is an abstract design depicting a seascape although no water is present - raked gravel constantly changes shape from the moving shadows. To sit and view the dry garden for a period of time is a form of meditation and to a Buddhist this exercise can clear the mind of all preconceived worldly ideas to reach what is described as "pure thoughts" or "nothingness". Behind the dry garden, shrubs and trees are being planted to eventually form a thick forest area to give an illusion of great height copying the steep mountains of Japan.

The three kilometres of stroll paths meander around the garden and when all plantings are completed will constantly unfold new vistas and a gradually changing perspective of the garden. The path material is decomposed granite which when walked over produces a pleasant rhythmic sound allowing the visitor to feel part of the garden. The outer edge of the garden contains many quick growing trees, both Australian native and exotic species which were planted to form a buffer from the harsh winds of Toowoomba. These plantings will also aid in creating a microclimate within the garden - virtually its own ecosystem.

Toowoomba’s climate has sufficient distinctive seasons allowing an excellent range of Japanese plants to grow.  Eventually 230 species totaling over 20,000 individual plants will be planted.  Some of these include Cherry Trees, Japanese Maples, Azaleas, Camellias, Bamboo, Japanese Black Pine (the delicate pruning and pinching of candles of the Black Pines has already commenced), Iris, Lotus Lilies and Moss. Upon completion of the plantings the garden will contain the largest and most important collection of Japanese plants in Australia.

The master plan for Ju Raku En and the design for the community building and tea house were prepared in Japan after site analysis and intensive background studies by staff of the Nakane Garden Research. Construction commenced in 1983 after 3 years of planning.  Ju Raku En was opened on 21 April 1989 by Mr Yoshiharu Araki from the Brisbane Consul-General of Japan, but it is still a comparatively young garden and it will take many years for it to be considered complete.

It is estimated that over 50,000 per year visit the gardens. Most visitors stroll through the garden or relax on the seat near the Dry Garden; it is not uncommon to see an artist quietly painting a scene or children feeding bread to the fish or birds, which include swans, ducks, geese and smaller natives.  It is a popular venue for weddings: spring weddings are often held under the mass of lilac blossoms hanging from the Wisteria Pergola, while other couples choose to be married in front of the waterfall or under the Viewing Pavilion on one of the islands.
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« Reply #513 on: May 27, 2007, 04:26:18 AM »

PICTURES AROUND JU RAKU EN















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« Reply #514 on: May 27, 2007, 04:52:31 PM »

Tibro - thank you so much for the Japanese garden description and the beautiful photos. Unfortunately, I don't have any sort of naturally occurring pond on my property, but as I was reading the list of plants that were being used in the Japanese garden, I was interested to see that most of them are plants that people use frequently in my area - especially, irises, cherry trees, and Japanese maples. I think I can have a least a minature version of one of the gardens some day.  Very Happy
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« Reply #515 on: May 27, 2007, 07:47:52 PM »

BT - I thought you would like that article!  I do not know anything about Raccoons but I know our Possums are very partial to flowers and shrubs as well as tree blossoms, even if their natural diet is fruits and bark.

I think that not having a natural pond on your land would not be a problem - you could have a small goldfish pond (remembering you have to have a certain number of fish and one has to be black) or even go for the dry garden which is really a Zen garden.  They are made from granite gravel, raked into swirls to represent the sea and streams and with rocks or plants placed in patterns.  I have seen similar designs but the gravel has been replaced with grass or lawn.  It is very effective and of course very peaceful.  There are lots of ideas on the internet and pictures of some very minimalist Zen gardens in Japan.  They also design mini gardens for patios or courtyards so the possibilities are endless.  I love Bonsai also and have seen miniature gardens in a tray using Bonsai and small interesting rocks, so you do not have to wait on a landscaping marathon to have your Japanese garden.
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« Reply #516 on: May 28, 2007, 02:43:59 AM »

NIC RIDES TALL

Sonia Campbell….May 27, 2007 12:00am….Article from: The Sunday Mail

IN two short weeks Nicole Kidman has gone from an immaculately dressed English aristocrat to weathered cattle drover, in a role she is clearly relishing. As Lady Sarah in Baz Luhrmann's epic Australia – which is being filmed in Bowen in north Queensland – Kidman has impressed many with her skills as a horsewoman.  In one recent scene, she thundered on horseback down Bowen's main street ahead of a herd of 750 cattle, as whips cracked and dust flew in the air.

An on-set source told The Sunday Mail Kidman was "loving" getting into her outback role and shows no fear when herding cattle. Co-star Hugh Jackman is equally commanding as a rugged stockman and every bit the part with his dirt-covered face and sweat-stained clothes. The daily cattleyard scenes are a far cry from when an impeccably dressed Kidman, as Lady Sarah, arrived at the town's jetty – which had been transformed into 1930s Darwin – holding a parasol for the first day of filming.

The 500 cast and crew get a break from filming today, but they may well need it to recover from a "thank you" concert put on by Jackman and Kidman at the Grand View Hotel last night. "Nicole is having a ball at the moment and she loves filming in Australia. She and Hugh just wanted to say thank you to everyone involved in the film," a crew member said. "It's a chance to relax and let their hair down for the first time."

Crates of champagne were ordered in to toast the night, which was to culminate in Keith Urban taking to the stage. Among those partying were actors Bryan Brown, David Wenham and Ben Mendelsohn. Kidman has confided to the crew that she is enjoying the action scenes, and said it was a delight to have her husband and son, Connor, 12, on set as well.

As Bowen comes to terms with its newfound national fame, the town is awash with rumours that Kidman, her horseriding notwithstanding, may be pregnant. "Ludicrous, absolutely not true," said a close source.

One indisputable fact is that every motel, hostel and even caravan park in the area is booked out. Locals have started billeting visitors in their homes, the retirement village is offering beds and the CWA is also cashing in, renting out its hall.

While Kidman's personal bodyguard is always at close hand, the stars are trying to mingle with locals. Kidman popped into the pub on Wednesday night for the State of Origin Rugby League Football match between Queensland and New South Wales.  Jackman took his son for a swim at Horseshoe Bay and Wenham posed for photos at the supermarket.



HEAD 'EM OUT: Nicole Kidman on horseback in Bowen for the making of Baz Luhrmann's new epic film, Australia. Picture: James Fisher.
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« Reply #517 on: May 28, 2007, 02:51:00 AM »

IRWIN LIVES ON IN BINDI'S TV SHOW

Neil Hickey….May 26, 2007 12:00am….Article from The Courier Mail

HUNDREDS of hours of never-before-seen footage of Steve Irwin will be the backbone of a new ABC series starring his daughter Bindi. Bindi: The Jungle Girl will premiere on the Discovery Channel in the United States on June 9 and will be syndicated worldwide before a global audience estimated to be as high as 300 million.

Irwin, who was killed filming a wildlife documentary in September last year, was filmed interacting with Bindi for the first seven episodes but his former manager John Stainton said yesterday there was enough material for the Crocodile Hunter to comprise "80 per cent" of the entire series.

The 26-episode series will debut on the ABC on July 18. The national broadcaster has only committed to the first series of the show. But at the official launch of the show at Australia Zoo on the Sunshine Coast yesterday, ABC managing director Mark Scott said he hoped the program would follow in the footsteps of other children's television icons. "We're absolutely thrilled that this family, loved and respected by all Australians, and the most famous eight-year-old in the country, will be able to join us on the ABC," he said.

"(The ABC has) a great family of famous Australian television icons, from Play School to the Bananas (In Pyjamas), to The Wiggles, and Bindi will be joining us as well." The program will be part of a boost in children's programming on the ABC. Mr Scott revealed plans for a third ABC channel dedicated exclusively to kids' shows.

Bindi: The Jungle Girl is based in Bindi's tree house but shot around the world, and will carry a strong environmental and wildlife message. Bindi said she wanted the show to teach children "that you should love animals, not fear them".

Her mother, Terri, said she was delighted that more Australian content would be on television. She said with Australian television increasingly showcasing American culture, it was important that phrases such as "crikey", "beauty, mate" and other "Australianisms" were on local screens.

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« Reply #518 on: May 29, 2007, 02:46:20 AM »

THE TRAVELLING POST OFFICE   

A B (Banjo) Paterson ....(1864 - 1941)
First published in The Bulletin, 10 March 1894

The roving breezes come and go, the reed-beds sweep and sway,
The sleepy river murmurs low, and loiters on its way,
It is the land of lots o'time along the Castlereagh.

The old man's son had left the farm, he found it full and slow,
He drifted to the great North-west, where all the rovers go.
"He's gone so long," the old man said, "he's dropped right out of mind,
But if you'd write a line to him I'd take it very kind;
He's shearing here and fencing there, a kind of waif and stray--
He's droving now with Conroy's sheep along the Castlereagh.

"The sheep are travelling for the grass, and travelling very slow;
They may be at Mundooran now, or past the Overflow,
Or tramping down the black-soil flats across by Waddiwong;
But all those little country towns would send the letter wrong.
The mailman, if he's extra tired, would pass them in his sleep;
It's safest to address the note to 'Care of Conroy's sheep,'
For five and twenty thousand head can scarcely go astray,
You write to 'Care of Conroy's sheep along the Castlereagh.'

" By rock and ridge and riverside the western mail has gone
Across the great Blue Mountain Range to take the letter on.
A moment on the topmost grade, while open fire-doors glare,
She pauses like a living thing to breathe the mountain air,
Then launches down the other side across the plains away
To bear that note to "Conroy's sheep along the Castlereagh,"

And now by coach and mailman's bag it goes from town to town,
And Conroy's Gap and Conroy's Creek have marked it "Further down."
Beneath a sky of deepest blue, where never cloud abides,
A speck upon the waste of plain the lonely mail-man rides.
Where fierce hot winds have set the pine and myall boughs asweep
He hails the shearers passing by for news of Conroy's sheep.
By big lagoons where wildfowl play and crested pigeons flock,
By camp-fires where the drovers ride around their restless stock,
And pass the teamster toiling down to fetch the wool away
My letter chases Conroy's sheep along the Castlereagh.  



The Castlereagh (pronouned Castle - Ray) is one of the main rivers in NSW.
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....And at night the wond’rous glory of the everlasting stars..  A.B (Banjo) Paterson
Tibrogargan
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« Reply #519 on: May 29, 2007, 03:02:31 AM »

'THE MAILMAN, IF HE'S EXTRA TIRED, WOULD PASS THEM IN HIS SLEEP'

Following on this advice, the outback dwellers fabricated mail boxes from whatever was available and being experts at making something from nothing,  some weird and wonderful designs are still to be found.

REFRIGERATOR



PIANO



TRIFFIDS



FLYING PIG



PIRANHA



OUTBOARD MOTOR



CASSOWARY



FLAMINGO

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....And at night the wond’rous glory of the everlasting stars..  A.B (Banjo) Paterson
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