July 23, 2019, 05:53:16 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: NEW CHILD BOARD CREATED IN THE POLITICAL SECTION FOR THE 2016 ELECTION
 
   Home   Help Login Register  
Pages: « 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 »   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Australia by Tibrogargan January 2007 - present and 155216+ views later!  (Read 573805 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Tibrogargan
Monkey All Star Jr.
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5315



« Reply #600 on: July 01, 2007, 03:17:12 AM »

NEWCASTLE HISTORICAL AREAS

FORT SCRATCHLEY

From this intersection a small driveway heads up the steep hill to Fort Scratchley which is perched atop a large knoll that lies immediately behind, and overlooking, Nobbys Beach, the headland and the river mouth. Called Braithwaite's Head by Lt. Shortland in 1797 this eminence was later known by various names (Fort Fiddlesticks to the convicts). Being an obvious place for a warning beacon, a signal mast was set up in 1804, earning it the name Signal Hill. It was replaced by a coal-fire beacon in 1813 which burned until Nobbys Lighthouse was set up in 1858.  The army gained use of the site from 1843 and it was, for some time, used as a training ground. When fear of a Russian invasion gripped the colony in the 1870s it was decided that Newcastle, because of its strategic importance as a coal and steel producer, needed to be properly fortified. The fort, designed by Lt-Col. Peter Scratchley, was built between 1881 and 1886 though it was, of course, upgraded in the twentieth century. The Heritage of Australia notes that Fort Scratchley 'is one of only two examples of late 19th-century military fortifications in New South Wales'. The fort's moment came in June 1942 when a Japanese submarine attacked Newcastle which, as a coal port, was an obvious target. The guns of the fort (which, at this point, had been waiting for action for sixty five years) then fired the only shots ever launched at an enemy vessel from the Australian mainland.  The military finally departed from the site in 1972.



NOBBYS

Immediately below Fort Scratchley, off the roundabout at the end of Nobbys Rd, is a kiosk and a large carpark adjacent Harbourside Park. From this point a very narrow finger of land extends out from the mainland to the knoll known as Nobbys Head whereon sits a lighthouse standing sentinel over the southern side of the Hunter estuary. Beyond the headland the rocky mass of the southern breakwater lends a sheltering arm to ships entering the harbour.  Captain Cook, passing up the coast in 1770 described Nobbys as a 'small round rock or Island, laying close under the land'. This refers to the fact that it was then disconnected entirely from the mainland.  Lieutenant Shortland sought shelter at Nobbys while searching for escaped convicts in 1797 and named it Hackings Point. There he found coal and this resulted in a subsequent visit by Lt James Grant who called it Coal Island. Coal was mined there until 1817 but the hillock was known as Nobbys by 1810.  Utilising convict labour and rock fill from the Fort Scratchley area, work began on the construction of a pier out to the island in 1818, thought to be the oldest rock-fill breakwater in the Southern Hemisphere. It was named Macquarie Pier after Governor Macquarie who laid the foundation stone. Work was halted in 1823, recommenced in 1836 using rocks from Nobbys, completed in 1846 and rebuilt in 1864. In 1855 Nobbys was reduced in size from 61 m to 27 m and the lighthouse erected in 1857 to replace the coal-fire beacon of Fort Scratchley. The original lighthouse was designed by Edmund Blacket though it has since been replaced  Not far from the northern breakwater, clearly visible on the shoreline of the beach, is the 1974 wreck of the Sygna.



BOGEY HOLE

One of the roadways which winds through the park leads down to the Bogey Hole at the very bottom of the cliffs below the fortifications. This large excavation in the rocks tells us something of the nature of Newcastle in the early 19th century. It is, in fact, a bathing pool which was built by convict labour for the personal pleasure of Major James T. Morriset, the military commandant from 1819-1822 who did much to improve the breakwater, roads and barracks in the settlement. Known for many years as Commandant's Bath it became a public pool in 1863. As one stands and watches the waves ceaselessly washing over the pool the extent of the achievement and the grossness of the indulgence becomes apparent, for the convicts must have dug this hole between waves, waist high in water.




.
Logged



....And at night the wond’rous glory of the everlasting stars..  A.B (Banjo) Paterson
Tibrogargan
Monkey All Star Jr.
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5315



« Reply #601 on: July 01, 2007, 03:31:48 AM »

AUSTRALIA'S BIGGEST SHIPWRECK


THE waters off the east coast of Australia are renowned for their often sudden, unpredictable and violent storms. Testimony to their power lies in the dozens of sunken ships that litter these waters, often in only a few metres. Typical of these is the 53,000-tonne Norwegian bulk carrier Sygna.

During May 1974 the NSW coast was battered by storm-force winds and heavy seas. The ports of Sydney and Newcastle were closed and Newcastle reported swells of more than 17m at the entrance. On May 26, Sygna, on her maiden voyage, was anchored four kilometres off Newcastle, waiting to enter port to load 50,000 tonnes of coal for Europe.



Synga aground - note 1970's beach buggy

As she waited, the Bureau of Meteorology issued a storm warning.  All ships anchored off the ports were advised to head to sea. Seven of the 10 ships anchored off Newcastle immediately did so, but Sygna remained at anchor. By 1am the following morning, the wind had increased in strength to 165km/h and, with the huge seas and a lee shore, the captain decided to sail. He weighed anchor and the ship got under way.

He was too late. Even with her engines full-ahead, Sygna was unable to make any headway and the force of the storm turned her parallel to the beach. Within 30 minutes she was aground on Stockton Beach. Heavy seas broke over the stricken ship and her captain radioed a Mayday and ordered his crew to prepare to abandon ship.



Close-up showing break in ships hull

Rescue authorities contacted RAAF Base Williamtown, which scrambled an Iroquois helicopter. Its crew was FLTLT Gary McFarlane, CPL Geoff Smith, LAC Maurie Summers and Army CAPT Brian Hayden, who acted as a second *******. FLTLT McFarlane and CPL Smith had flown together previously with 9SQN in Vietnam.

As they approached the stricken ship, they realised they were facing a significant problem. They would have to hover to rescue the crew and although the winds had dropped to about 50km/h, they faced a black night, total cloud cover with a base at only a few hundred feet, severe turbulence and a combination of driving rain and spray from the waves breaking over the ship driving 150m into the air, which severely reduced visibility. To effect a safe rescue they would have to close to within just a few metres of the ship and remain as stationary as possible to operate the winch.



Wreck as it appears today

As the Iroquois approached Sygna, FLTLT McFarlane noticed that the crew was huddled in the aft section of the ship, where the accommodation was. The wind was blowing most of the spray clear of that area, so he decided to make his approach there.  This presented him further hazards from the superstructure, masts and other fixtures, any of which placed the chopper at risk if it struck them or they fouled the rotors. For the next 75 minutes the crew winched the Sygna’s 28 men and two women from the deck in groups of two or three and flew them all without casualty some 200m to the safety of the nearby beach.  The storm passed and salvage operations began. However, after Sygna was swung round, the heavier stern section settled into deeper water and broke the ship’s back. The bow section was eventually recovered and taken to Japan but the stern remains, the largest shipwreck in Australia’s history.
Logged



....And at night the wond’rous glory of the everlasting stars..  A.B (Banjo) Paterson
Tibrogargan
Monkey All Star Jr.
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5315



« Reply #602 on: July 02, 2007, 02:32:11 AM »

NEW DANISH PRINCESS NAMED ISABELLA

This story is from our news.com.au network Source: AAP ..July 01, 2007

THE daughter of Princess Mary and Prince Frederik of Denmark has been named Isabella. According to the royal couple's official website, the princess has been christened Isabella Henrietta Ingrid Margrethe.  Born on April 21, Princess Isabella is third in line to the throne, after her father and older brother, two-year-old Prince Christian. The christening, taking place in Fredensborg Palace Church, north of Copenhagen, was expected to be a low-key affair compared to that of her brother. Christian's birth in October 2005 caused enormous fuss and excitement in Denmark and Australia.  He is second-in-line to the Danish throne behind his father Crown Prince Frederik, while his Australian mother was born and raised in Hobart.



Despite the christening being more of a family affair than a state occasion, it is being broadcast live across Denmark. One of the favourite names touted for the little princess was Henrietta after Princess Mary's mother, who died of a heart condition in 1997. But bookies had said the money was on Margrethe, after the Danish queen.  Princess Mary's sisters Jane Stephens and Patricia Bailey, who live in Hobart, and her brother John Donaldson, from Western Australia, did not attend the christening.  But her Scottish-born Australian father, John Donaldson, who now lives in Denmark, where he works as a mathematics lecturer at the University of Aarhus, was expected to be there.



The Tasmanian government has honoured the close link created when Crown Prince Frederik married Mary Donaldson in 2004 with gifts celebrating the birth of their children.  A beautiful custom-made white gold and red enamel charm bracelet, made to fit her daughter's tiny wrist at the christening, was last week sent express post from the state to Denmark.  It features the red and white colours of the Danish flag, depicted in small white-gold apple seeds and nine red hearts.  The government presented Copenhagen Zoo with two healthy Tasmanian Devils when Christian was born, along with some custom-made suede booties.

.
Logged



....And at night the wond’rous glory of the everlasting stars..  A.B (Banjo) Paterson
Tibrogargan
Monkey All Star Jr.
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5315



« Reply #603 on: July 02, 2007, 02:40:15 AM »

For all those who dream of meeting their Prince Charming, and all those who can remember .............

CROWN PRINCESS MARY OF DENMARK

Upon the announcement of her engagement to Danish Crown Prince Frederik, Australian-born marketing executive Mary Donaldson shared one of her early royal experiences – watching Lady Diana wed the Prince of Wales on TV in 1981. She admits she didn't necessarily see herself taking a similar trip down the aisle, however.
"My biggest memory is of Diana walking up the red carpet with a very, very long train," she says "but I don't recall wishing that one day I would be a princess. I wanted to be a veterinarian."

Mary Elizabeth Donaldson was born on February 5, 1972, in Hobart, Tasmania, the youngest of Scottish-born maths professor John Donaldson and university secretary Henrietta Clark Donaldson's four children. The princess-to-be's parents had emigrated from Edinburgh to Australia in the early Sixties, becoming citizens of the country in 1975. (Mum Henrietta passed away in 1997, and John married author Susan Elizabeth Moody four years later.)

An avid athlete at Taroona High School, Mary was captain of the girls' hockey and swimming teams and very involved in equestrian pursuits. She continued her education at Hobart Matriculation College – where she scored a spot on the basketball team – before wrapping up her studies at the University of Tasmania, from which she graduated in 1994 with a Bachelors degree in Commerce and Law.

The fresh-faced young graduate dived into professional life, moving to Melbourne, where she accepted a position at an international advertising agency. Her career would eventually lead her into the world of public relations, and culminate in her last pre-royal post as a project consultant for Microsoft Business Solutions in Denmark.



Her life was to change forever when she met a sporty young man who introduced himself as "Fred" at a Sydney hotel pub in October 2000. They'd each arrived with a separate group of friends – the king of Spain's nephew, Bruno Gomez-Acebo, was the link between the two cliques – but by the end of the evening Mary and Frederik were deep in conversation, seeming to have eyes only for each other. "The first time we met, we shook hands," she recalled. "I didn't know he was the prince of Denmark. Half an hour later someone came up to me and said, 'Do you know who these people are?'."

Over the next three years, the two were often seen together in both Australia and Denmark. "Frederik is one of those people who being around you makes you happy. His intelligence and kindness – and he's quite funny as well. We have a connection of the mind," says Mary. However, it wasn't until April 2003 that Queen Margrethe publicly acknowledged the relationship, fuelling rumours of a pending engagement. Six months later the palace announced a royal wedding would take place the following spring.

Despite having to fulfil a demanding series of requirements – she agreed to relinquish her Australian citizenship, convert from her Presbyterian faith to the Danish Lutheran Church, learn fluent Danish and agree to give up her rights to the couple's children in case of divorce – Mary tackled the challenge of her new position with aplomb. "Today is the first day of my new role," she said after appearing on the palace balcony as Frederik's fiancée for the first time. "It is something that will evolve over time and I have much to learn and experience."

On May 14, 2004, the pretty brunette with the captivating smile walked down the aisle with her prince in a wedding ensemble which encompassed both her Australian heritage and the history of the family she would now be joining. A gown by Danish designer Uffe Frank was topped off with a veil first used by Crown Princess Margret of Sweden in 1905, and Mary's bouquet consisted of Australian eucalyptus – known as Snow gum – sprinkled among flowers from the palace garden. Their first child, Prince Christian Valdemar Henri John, was born October 15, 2005.

Mary's grace, beauty and professionalism have won over her new homeland, with one poll finding that 75 per cent of Danes believed she would make a good queen. "Wow! Isn't she wonderful?" exclaimed one Copenhagen newspaper. "She's fantastic. It will be no wonder if in the future Danish schoolgirls choose to mimic Mary in the mirror instead of Britney Spears."

.
Logged



....And at night the wond’rous glory of the everlasting stars..  A.B (Banjo) Paterson
Tibrogargan
Monkey All Star Jr.
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5315



« Reply #604 on: July 03, 2007, 02:39:53 AM »

BRIDES ON THE WARPATH

Article from: The Courier Mail….Peter Mitchell….July 03, 2007 12:00am

HUNDREDS of elderly Australian war brides across the US have been left deflated and disappointed by the Immigration Department. The women, aged in their 80s and 90s, had yesterday circled on their calendars as the first day they could apply to the Federal Government to reclaim Australian citizenship.  But the Government's citizenship website did not offer the application form as expected.

"For the women, it's like being a kid and waking up on Christmas morning and finding out Santa Claus didn't come," Ken Lankard, whose 83-year-old Los Angeles-based mother, Nancy, is keen to re-claim her citizenship.
There were about 15,000 war brides who left Australia after World War II. They met US servicemen stationed in Australia during World War II and moved to the US with their new husbands. Many, like Mrs Lankard, became US citizens but did not realise they would lose their Australian citizenship. She found out she wasn't legally an Australian just a few years ago.

The new Australian Citizenship Act 2007, which came into force on July 1, allows the war brides and their children to apply to regain their Australian citizenship. Ken Lankard, a 58-year-old pilot, also based in LA, plans to move to Australia to retire. He has worked with the Southern Cross Group, which represents Australian expatriates, campaigning since 2000 to help the war brides reclaim their citizenship. He said the group understood the forms would be available on the Federal Government's citizenship website from midnight on Sunday when the new act came into law.

Applicants in the US need to fill out the forms and send them to the Australian embassy in Washington DC. With many of the women in their 80s and 90s, they want to apply as soon as possible. "I checked the website first thing this morning at 7am, which would have been midnight Australia time and there was nothing," Mr Lankard said. "Then I checked three hours later and still nothing. It's now the evening and there's still nothing. It's very disappointing for me and my mother and the other brides. A lot of the war brides have email and they said: 'We'll be on the internet to get the forms'. There's a lot of disappointed people today."



AN issue since the 1940s ... this clipping from a 1946 copy of The Courier-Mail shows how Australian women who married US servicemen were upset they had to surrender their Australian citizenship.

.
Logged



....And at night the wond’rous glory of the everlasting stars..  A.B (Banjo) Paterson
Tibrogargan
Monkey All Star Jr.
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5315



« Reply #605 on: July 03, 2007, 02:51:41 AM »

THE AUSTRALIAN BALLET

Versatility, technical excellence and a warm, friendly style are the trademarks of The Australian Ballet, qualities that have earned both critical and audience acclaim. For over four decades The Australian Ballet has been the defining the face of ballet in our country. It is one of the companies which have helped create the modern culture of Australia. But it is, by world standards, a new company. It gave its first performance in 1962, building on a strong and rich tradition of ballet in Australia, and on the efforts of many dedicated pioneers in ballet and dance. The company’s founding Artistic Director, Peggy van Praagh, brought with her initiative, astute direction, exacting standards and dedication, enabling The Australian Ballet to flourish and achieve international status early in life.

LUCINDA DUNN AND ROBERT CURRAN


 
The Australian Ballet’s first season had as Principal Dancers, Kathleen Gorham, Marilyn Jones and Garth Welch, all stars from the Borovansky Ballet; as Ballet Master, Ray Powell on loan from The Royal Ballet, and as Teacher, Leon Kellaway, who first came to Australia with the Pavlova company. The repertoire was firmly based on a mixture of the popular classics, other international works of proven quality and a proportion of ballets created especially for the company. Renowned dancers such as Sonia Arova, Erik Bruhn, Margot Fonteyn and Rudolf Nureyev were happy to be guests of the young company. Nureyev so enjoyed working with The Australian Ballet that not only did he regularly tour with the company, but in 1972 he directed and performed with them in a film said by many critics to be the finest classical ballet film ever produced, his Don Quixote.  

SWAN LAKE


 
The other requirements van Praagh laid down as essential were that the company must have its own school - which was established in 1964 under the direction of Margaret Scott - and that the dancers must be offered the security of year-round contracts. Through the consistent excellence of the Ballet School, and through the close-knit ensemble nature of the company, she and her successors have enjoyed the benefits of well-trained and highly motivated dancers.  Peggy van Praagh ran the company for its first 12 years, for much of the time with Robert Helpmann as Associate Director. Anne Woolliams was Artistic Director for 1976/77 during which time she produced two of John Cranko’s greatest works for the company, Romeo and Juliet and Onegin, which she brought with her from the Stuttgart Ballet. Dame Peggy van Praagh returned as Artistic Director for 12 months in 1978 and was followed by a former ballerina of the company, Marilyn Jones, in 1979. She founded The Dancers Company as a second company comprising graduating students of The Australian Ballet School and dancers from The Australian Ballet; it tours Australia annually. Maina Gielgud was The Australian Ballet’s Artistic Director from 1983 to 1996. Under her guidance the company extended its contemporary repertoire and grew in strength and international reputation. She also strongly encouraged works by Australian choreographers and appointed in 1995, Stephen Baynes and Stanton Welch as Resident Choreographers. Then in 1997 Ross Stretton returned to his alma mater after working in key artistic posts in the US, bringing with him a vision of creativity, energy and passion.

KIRSTY MARTIN AND DAMIEN WELCH .. "LES PRESAGES"


 
The company’s present Artistic Director, David McAllister, was appointed in 2001 following Ross Stretton’s move to The Royal Ballet, Covent Garden. A former student of The Australian Ballet School and Principal Artist with the company, David has moved from Principal Artist to Artistic Director with the same poise and enthusiasm which characterised his years as one of our leading dancers. All of these Artistic Directors have worked to make The Australian Ballet not only one of the busiest ballet companies in the world, but an outstanding ambassador for Australia on its visits to world ballet centres in Europe, Asia and America. Versatility, technical excellence and a warm, friendly style are the trademarks of The Australian Ballet, qualities that have earned both critical and audience acclaim here and overseas. These qualities keep the company in such demand that its ensemble of dancers present over 180 performances annually both in Australia and abroad.  

STEVEN HEATHCOTE ...'SPARTACUS'


 
The title of Principal Artist is the highest honour the company can bestow.  Our dancers are supported by professional and enthusiastic ballet, music and technical staff, and a company management team in which every member plays a part in taking ballet to the Australian and world stages. The secret of The Australian Ballet’s international reputation is not hard to find. It lies partly in a repertoire that gives scope to the many talents in the company as well as in the quality of its dancing. As John Percival, dance critic of The Times (London) and editor of Dance & Dancers stated, “This is a company with a spirit of its own, and one that is very easy to like and enjoy”.
Logged



....And at night the wond’rous glory of the everlasting stars..  A.B (Banjo) Paterson
Tibrogargan
Monkey All Star Jr.
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5315



« Reply #606 on: July 04, 2007, 02:31:14 AM »

WHITEHAVEN BEACH, QUEENSLAND COASTAL ISLANDS

Sixteen nautical miles from the mainland is a place which has become one of the world’s most famous beaches.  Whitehaven Beach is a pristine beach on Whitsunday Island, the largest of the 74 islands in the Whitsundays. Bordered by pristine water, which looks a mix of topaz, azure and even sometimes emerald, Whitehaven Beach stretches over nine kilometres, fringed by lush tropical rainforests. It is heralded as one of the most beautiful beaches in the world and the dazzling white sand is almost 99% pure silica.

WHITEHAVEN AND SURROUNDING ISLANDS



At the northern end of Whitehaven Beach is Hill Inlet, a stunning inlet where the tide shifts the sand and water to create a beautiful fusion of colours. Many people claim Hill Inlet and Whitehaven Beach are the most beautiful places they've ever seen.

HILL INLET



There's a lookout on Whitsunday Island where you can view both Whitehaven Beach and Hill Inlet. Most people moor their boats in Tongue Bay, take a dingy ashore and make the short walk to the lookout for the breathtaking views. If possible, try to reach the lookout when the tide is changing, as the golden sand and aqua water hues blend seamlessly into a mosaic of colours.

WHITEHAVEN BEACH



Tropical plants and palm trees round out the requirements for an isolated tropical island hideaway — perfect for the lone adventurer washed ashore, or for the day-tripper seeking a unique spot to bask in the sun and a leisurely splash.

DIVING WITH TURTLES AND CORAL



Getting to Whitehaven Beach is half the experience. Several crewed charter companies in the area offer services to escort you ashore Whitsunday Island, and on to Whitehaven Beach. You can jump aboard an ultra-sleek and fast Ferry or a cruising yacht for a day trip. For those who like to approach things from above, seaplanes and helicopter charter services are also available. This option allows you the opportunity to see overall the natural splendour of the Whitsundays and, in particular, the unique loveliness of Whitehaven Beach.



QUIRKY FACTS :

·   In the '60s the ultra fine sand of Whitehaven Beach, which is 99 percent quartz, was mined and exported to make high-quality glass, such as lenses in Japan.

·   The 99 percent quartz aspect of the sand makes it literally "squeaky".

·   About 14,000 people visit Whitehaven Beach every year.

·   At some points during the year, tiny, near invisible irukandji jellyfish appear in the water around Whitehaven Beach. Wearing a protective suit should allow unlimited and sting-free access to the water.
Logged



....And at night the wond’rous glory of the everlasting stars..  A.B (Banjo) Paterson
Tibrogargan
Monkey All Star Jr.
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5315



« Reply #607 on: July 04, 2007, 02:36:30 AM »

MAXI YACHT : RAGAMUFFIN

Maxi Ragamuffin was built by Kelly and Haugh boat builders in Mona Vale, Sydney, Australia. She was launched in 1979 as Bumblebee 4 for Sydney yachtsman John Kahlbetzer. At the time she was the worlds state of the art maxi yacht. The first offshore race that she entered was 1979 Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race in which she took out a convincing line honours victory.In 1980 she competed in the Long Island Sound Series and the New York Yacht Club Series and took out line and handicap honours in both events and line honours and 3rd on handicap in the Greenwich to Newport race on the East Coast of USA.



1981 saw Bumblebee take out line and handicap honours at the Mediterranean Maxi Championships and the World Cup in Sardinia. Other achievements that year included gaining Line Honours and 2nd on handicap in the Middle Sea Race.In 1982 she competed at the Southern Ocean Racing Conference in Florida  and gained 2nd place overall. The Maxi World Championships were held again in 1982 and Bumblebee was placed second.In 1983 Bumblebee was purchased by Australian yachtsman, Syd Fischer, and renamed Ragamuffin. Mr Fischer made alterations to the hull and incorporated a new longer stern, a new keel and added 3 metres (10 foot approx.) to the height of the mast. With the new configuration Ragamuffin took out line honours at Hamilton Island Race Week 1984, and line honours in the Sydney to Hobart 1988 and 1990. Other placings in the Sydney to Hobart include a 2nd in 1986 and two 3rds 1985 & 1989, giving her six placing from eight starts. In the two races that she did not gain a place she was retired due to gear failure.



Ragamuffin gained 4th place at the Clipper Cup in Hawaii in 1986. In 1988 the event was renamed the Kenwood Cup and Ragamuffin was placed 7th. Later that year she returned to Sydney to dominate the Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race.Anton Starling, of Joico Hair Care Products, purchased the vessel in 1993 and renamed her 'Maxi Ragamuffin'. He found that a then 14 year old maxi could not match the speed and agility of the newer, lighter maxis (up to half the weight of Maxi Ragamuffin) and put her up for sale having owned her for less than 12 months.In 1994, she was purchased by Whitsunday yachtsman Bernard Heimann and converted to being a day charter yacht. She now runs scheduled day trips sailing to glorious island destinations, offering snorkelling and SCUBA diving, and cruises to beautiful Whitehaven Beach and Blue Pearl Bay.Most recent racing achievements include Line Honours in The Great Whitsunday Fun Race, September 1996, 1997, 1998, 2000 and 2003 and achieving the coveted Line and Handicap double in the 1998 Whitsunday Vista Cup.



.
Logged



....And at night the wond’rous glory of the everlasting stars..  A.B (Banjo) Paterson
Tibrogargan
Monkey All Star Jr.
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5315



« Reply #608 on: July 05, 2007, 03:05:49 AM »

SYDNEY SALUTES USS KITTY HAWK

Thursday 5 July 2007

The Prime Minister John Howard has today officially welcomed the crew of the USS Kitty Hawk to Sydney.  Mr Howard addressed about 200 members of the crew inside the ship's hanger, saying that America and Australia share a common outlook. "You come as the sailors of a great nation, a nation that shares so much with Australia, so much by way of a common set of values, a common history, but most importantly in this part of the world, a common future," he said. "Australians and Americans have fought together in defence of freedom and against threats to our way of life on many occasions.  We continue to do it today and work together around the world defending our way of life and fighting terrorism.'' Directly after the speech, Mr Howard spoke with a number of the sailors who surrounded him and responded to his speech with an enthusiastic round of applause.




The ship and its 5,300-strong crew came through the Sydney Heads this morning and docked at Garden Island. One of the largest warships ever to visit the city, the Kitty Hawk is longer than three football fields and sits 61 metres above the water level at its highest point It operates 70 aircraft, and displaces around 80,000 tonnes of water. Commissioned in 1961, it is the oldest active service warship in the US Navy.




The Kitty Hawk has been part of a joint operation with the Australian Defence Force over the past few weeks. The aircraft carrier has just completed the Talisman Saber 2007 Exercise and was accompanied into the harbour by the USS Juneau, the USS Tortuga, the USS Cowpens and the USS Stethem. It is likely to be the final visit of the Kitty Hawk, which last came to Sydney in 2005. While the public will not be allowed on board, Mrs Macquarie's Chair and The Domain will provide the best vantage points for one last look at the boat before it returns to the US to be decommissioned next year.




Mrs Macquarie's Chair, otherwise known as Lady Macquarie's Chair, provides one of the best vantage points in Sydney. The historic chair was carved out of a rock ledge for Governor Lachlan Macquarie's wife, Elizabeth, as she was known to visit the area and sit enjoying the panoramic views of the harbour.  Mrs Macquarie's Point, directly east of the Opera House on the eastern edge of the Royal Botanic Gardens, provides excellent views west across the harbour to the Bridge and the Mountains in the far distance. Looking north and east you can see Kirribilli House, Pinchgut Island and the Navy dockyards at Wooloomooloo. The views from Mrs Macquarie's Chair are still enjoyed today, over 150 years later, by hundreds of Sydney siders and tourists each day.
Logged



....And at night the wond’rous glory of the everlasting stars..  A.B (Banjo) Paterson
Tibrogargan
Monkey All Star Jr.
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5315



« Reply #609 on: July 05, 2007, 03:29:32 AM »

NAVAL HISTORY OF GARDEN ISLAND

1778-1810 Garden Island and produce  

Ø   The log of HMS SIRIUS records under the date of 11 February 1788:
Sent an officer and party ashore to the Garden Island to clear it for a garden for the ships company’
Ø   In the first garden corn and onions were planted.  The garden was situation between the hummocks on the island and was probably near the museum and chapel.
Ø   While the exact identity of the first gardeners remains unclear they were no doubt a combination of convicts and sailors.  Interestingly on the knoll area to be opened to the public is the oldest white graffiti in Australia – consisting of carved initials – ‘FM’, ‘IR’ and ‘WB’ that have the year 1788 engraved beneath them. ‘FM’ was most likely Frederick Meredith who belonged to the Sirius and went on to become a police constable.
Ø   These initials were lost to public consciousness until 1920.  At that time newspapers speculated that the rock on which they were cut was said to be the tomb of Judge Advocate Ellis Bent and of Major John Ovens.  You should note that this may not be correct and that the remains were removed to the cemetery in the grounds of St Thomas’ Church North Sydney sometime after 1886
Ø   The identity of one of the early gardeners is known.  He was Australia’s first bushranger called ‘Black Caesar’ a Jamacian negro who was transported and sentenced to seven years of penal servitude in 1785
Ø   The island continued as a vegetable garden until about 1810 – although one of the problems for the garden was a lack of fresh water.

NAVY DOCKYARDS WITH GUIDED MISSILE FRIGATES



1810-1856 Garden Island-the picnic area for Sydney residents

Ø   From 1810 until 1856 Garden Island was used essentially as a picnic area for the residents of Sydney – today it is returned to that purpose.
Ø   In the 1850s there were rumours that the Island was the favoured place for Naval Officers of various ships to fight their duels

1856-Garden Island as the dedicated Naval Base

Ø   In 1856 the NSW Government suggested that the Island be given over to use by the Royal Navy as a Naval Base and in 1858 the admiralty approved an outlay between 200 and 300 pounds to render the Island available for repair of ships.
Ø   On 10 July 1911 the title Royal Australian Navy was granted by King George V to the Naval Forces of the Commonwealth of Australia. On 1 July 1913 all naval establishments in the Australia Station were handed over by the Admiralty to the RAN.  These facilities included Garden Island and the buildings that had been erected by the Government of NSW in the years before federation
Ø   Considerable litigation followed when in 1923 the NSW Government claimed the island as its property.  After seven years the High Court and the Privy Council ruled that the NSW claim as valid.
Ø   This was somewhat unfortunate for the Commonwealth as in the meantime the naval installation on the island had been greatly extended
Ø   With the outbreak of WW II in 1939 the Commonwealth Government resumed the island under wartime powers and in 1945 purchased it from NSW for the sum of 638,000 pounds.

GARDEN ISLAND WITH SYDNEY CBD IN BACKGROUND



1940’s-Joining Garden Island to Potts Point

Ø   During the War Garden Island started to take on the shape visible today.  The Captain Cook Engraving Dock – the largest in the Southern Hemisphere was built as a matter of wartime emergency.  Work proceeded in shifts, round the clock employing between 3000 and 4000 workers for four years.  It opened in early 1945.  The principal feature of the plan for the dry dock was the reclamation of 33 acres of sea bed between Potts Point and the southern shore of Garden Island that effectively joined the island to the shore.

Not within the public access but within sight of the public access area is the site when HMAS KUTTABUL was sunk on 1 June 1942 by a torpedo from a Japanese Midget submarine impacting the wharf below her.  This resulted in the deaths of 21 sailors and was the time that war came to Sydney. Hundreds of war ships have berthed at Garden Island over the past two hundred years, including many that have docked for repairs and maintenance.

USS KITTY HAWK AT GARDEN ISLAND DOCKYARDS


 
The two main users of Garden Island are the Navy and Thales Australia. Garden Island is the main base for the Navy Fleet on Australia's East Coast. Thales Australia manages and operates a graving dock (dry dock), a floating dock and a range of ship engineering and maintenance facilities at Garden Island. Garden Island is part of the rich fabric of the Port of Sydney and one element fulfilling the stated desire of the State Government to have a working harbour.  The general population at Garden Island varies depending on the work that is being done and the number of ships that are in port, including visiting foreign war ships, at any one time. The normal workforce consisting of Naval and non-Naval personnel can vary between 3000 and 4000 people. Where a number of visiting ships arrive at the same time the population can increase by a further 5000 to 6000. Activities on Garden Island make a significant economic contribution to the local and state economy.

.
Logged



....And at night the wond’rous glory of the everlasting stars..  A.B (Banjo) Paterson
Tibrogargan
Monkey All Star Jr.
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5315



« Reply #610 on: July 06, 2007, 03:04:25 AM »

MUSIC'S CULTURAL MERGER

Article from: The Courier Mail….Tonya Turner….July 06, 2007 12:00am

DIDGERIDOO player William Barton is changing the world of classical music. The 26-year-old indigenous musician and composer originally from Mount Isa will perform his own compositions written for string quartet and didgeridoo tonight to kick off the Australian Festival of Chamber Music in Townsville. Playing at the biggest chamber music festival in the southern hemisphere for the fifth time, Barton is largely responsible for building the profile of the didgeridoo in classical music around the world and sharing a message of reconciliation.



"The didgeridoo is part of a very significant and magical culture," he said. "My elders always taught me that playing is about sharing the culture and connecting with people from all walks of life, whether it's in the concert hall of London or New York or the pub down the road.  If you connect with just one person you can change their perception of Aboriginal people or music. You always come up against resistance but that's your job to change it. If you think about defeat you've already lost the battle before you've started."

Tonight's concert will open with Barton playing the didgeridoo with four indigenous players from Townsville's Cowboys rugby league team. He will then be joined on stage by Melbourne's Hamer String Quartet and his mother, indigenous opera singer Delmae Barton.



Violinist Rebecca Chan, 25, said she has played in orchestras where the didgeridoo has been featured in a small segment but playing with Mr Barton was unlike anything else she had done. "We try to produce sounds the didgeridoo can make and make sounds that are compatible with it. It's amazing what William can do and the sounds he can produce he's just such a wonderful musician," Chan said.

Based in the Brisbane suburb of Moorooka, Barton has played with world-leading orchestras including the London Philharmonic, Bavarian Radio Symphony and Brooklyn Philharmonic in New York.  This year he will travel to Paris, Italy and the US to perform.
Logged



....And at night the wond’rous glory of the everlasting stars..  A.B (Banjo) Paterson
Tibrogargan
Monkey All Star Jr.
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5315



« Reply #611 on: July 06, 2007, 03:07:50 AM »

DELMAE BARTON'S DREAMTIME

Delmae Barton is widely recognized as Australia’s Dreamtime Opera Diva, performing as a solo artist and collaborating with her son William Barton in the group DREAM TIME SPIRIT. She also works with national and international artists and is involved in a number of recording/performance projects with unique concepts.

DREAMTIME SPIRIT has created and performed pieces including "DREAM TIME OPERA" and "DREAM TIME SPIRIT". These combine mystically woven lyrical harmonies and operatic harmonies with traditional didgeridoo, guitar and percussion, taking the listener on a spiritual and inspirational journey into ancient song lines of the universe.

Included among Delmae’s many career highlights is representing Australia and New Zealand with William at the Canadian Arts Festival in 2002. She has performed at numerous festivals including collaborating with Sean O'Boyle for River Festival's River Symphony 2000; Millennium eve rhythm festival and world link up, Woodford Folk Festival; Goanna Band, Melbourne International Festival of the Arts the National Didgeridoo Festival, Melbourne 1998 and the International Cultural Festival, Laura.
Delmae has collaborated in prestigious performances with the Queensland Ballet Company and Eclectic Light Orchestra. She aided with the compositions, advised on traditional cultures and performed both with traditional and contemporary styles.


 
She has acted and sung in a number of plays and films including ‘”10 Great Characters of Queensland”, - Greg Granger of "Maynard Productions" and  “Jail Bird Run” filmed by Village Roadshow.

Delmae did studio work for Federation Centenary Celebrations Barambah collections and has recorded numerous radio and tv interviews throughout Australia. “Delmae’s Song”, has played on JJJ Sydney on the World Music Program. She has also played an integral part in many sound installations, including at the newly opened Judith Wright Centre of contemporary Art Brisbane.  

Delmae has also had notable success with her poetry. One of the highlights was in MT ISA Irish Club, penning and reciting the Welcome poem for the former Prime Minister Bob Hawke.
Logged



....And at night the wond’rous glory of the everlasting stars..  A.B (Banjo) Paterson
Tibrogargan
Monkey All Star Jr.
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5315



« Reply #612 on: July 06, 2007, 03:18:00 AM »

AUNTY DELMAE BARTON - CULTURAL ADVISOR

Aunty Delmae Barton is an Aboriginal Cultural Advisor in the Office for Community Partnerships and works closely with the Professor of Indigenous Policy.  Aunty Delmae was born in Emerald on Christmas Day in 1942 and went to school in Emerald where she completed a commercial education.  Aunty Delmae has led a diverse life and has worked as a cook, a cleaner, an assistant nurse and even a dingo trapper.

A gifted artist, Aunty Delmae is world renowned singer and composer.  Aunty Delmae has performed throughout Australia and Europe and is the mother of William Barton, one of Australia's most prominent didgeridoo performers.  Aunty Delmae's strong spirit inspires her singing and traditional singing and she a traditional Aboriginal song woman.  

Aunty Delmae also takes pride in her painting, which she considers 'tactile art'.  While growing up, Aunty Delmae's father was blind, and her painting style, using her fingers rather then brushes is both therapeutic and provides a tactile.

An inspirational speaker and poet, Aunty Delmae has a strong commitment to education and believes that for indigenous people education includes both conventional western-style education and also involves traditional wisdom and knowledge. Aunty Delmae is an ambassador of the Kidney Support Network and has donated several artworks that are on display at the Royal Brisbane and Women's hospital.
"Art is from the heart and soul.  I paint at night when it is silent and I become lost in a world of my own"

In 2005 Aunty Delmae was appointed as an Elder in Residence under Griffith University's innovative Elder-in-Residence Program.  Aunty Delmae provides inspiration and leadership through culturally-based mentoring, counselling and advice to staff and students.

My note : I have had the privilege of meeting both Delmae and William in a private setting where they were both kind enough to perform for us.  Delmae has the most beautiful contralto voice and her renditions of aboriginal songs were spellbinding.  The songs although sung in her native dialect were so expressive that it was possible to follow the story they told without understanding the words. Most of our small gathering were in tears by the end of her songs.
All respected older women of aboriginal tribes are called "Aunty".

.
Logged



....And at night the wond’rous glory of the everlasting stars..  A.B (Banjo) Paterson
Tibrogargan
Monkey All Star Jr.
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5315



« Reply #613 on: July 06, 2007, 03:29:41 AM »

MOUNT ISA - WESTERN QUEENSLAND

Mount Isa is the largest and most impressive township in western Queensland. Unlike Longreach (its only competitor), which has a very rural feel, Mount Isa is a mining town with an air of self-confidence and sophistication which is rare in outback Queensland. Thus, although the mining complex is the town's raison d'etre and though it dominates the skyline and the local economy, Mount Isa does not feel like a settlement nestling under 'dark satanic mills'. It is a centre with high quality accommodation, good restaurants, excellent facilities, and enough activities to keep even the most enthusiastic visitor busy for a week. Located 1829 km from Brisbane, 883 km from Townsville and 356 m above sea-level, Mount Isa proudly claims to be the largest city in the world; a fact born out by its accreditation in the Guinness Book of Records. The argument is that the city extends for 40 977 sq. km, and that the road from Mount Isa to Camooweal, a distance of 189 km, is the longest city road in the world.



Prior to white settlement the area was occupied by the Kalkadoon Aborigines, who produced large numbers of axes and other tools in the area, using them as trade. They fiercely resisted the encroachment of pastoralists in the 1870s and early 1880s but their resistance and raids were effectively ended when native police and white settlers retaliated with a bloody massacre in 1884. Copper was mined in the area from the 1880s but a price slump in the early 1920s saw the venture collapse. However, in February 1923 vast silver-lead-zinc deposits were discovered by the prospector John Campbell Miles. Miles named the site after Mount Ida, a Western Australian goldmine. Within months over 500 claims had been lodged in Cloncurry but slowly these claims were amalgamated into two major companies. Mount Isa Mines Ltd was formed in 1924 and by 1925 it had taken over all the leases to the field. Isolation and lack of facilities proved an early problem so MIM began to build a company town with low-rent housing and amenities in 1927. Matters were further aided when the railway arrived from Townsville in 1929.



The cost of developing the mine in such a remote location proved too much for the original Australian and British shareholders and, in mid-1930, the American Smelting and Refining Company (now ASARCO Incorporated) rescued the operation by providing millions of dollars to complete the treatment plant and commence the production of lead, although profits did not emerge until 1937.  When a partcularly large copper deposit was proven to exist in 1942 the Australian government, enduring wartime shortages of the strategic material, encouraged its expoitation. Copper would prove the main source of revenue in the 1950s.



In 1958 the Leichhardt River was dammed to provide a guaranteed water supply for the town and mine. Mount Isa was declared a city in 1968.  The novelist Vance Palmer wrote a trilogy of books about Mount Isa (Golconda, Seedtime, and The Big Fellow) and his descriptions of the town are a reminder of its harsh beginnings. In Golconda he writes of the town: 'There's nothing much to catch the eye at the first glance. It's bone-dry country, twisted shrubs and spinifex, and the hills are mostly humps of rock where a goat would find it hard to pick up a feed. But there's a life about the air of a morning that makes you feel that the few trees there are might pull up their roots and float away while you're looking at them.'



Today Mount Isa Mines Ltd is one of the most highly mechanised and cost efficient mines in the world. It's the world's biggest single producer of silver and lead and is amongst the world's top ten for copper and zinc. It is also one of the few areas in the world where the four minerals are found in close proximity. As Australia's largest underground mine, it has a daily output of around 35 000 tonnes of ore. The underground workings extend approximately 4.5 km in length and 1.3 km in width. Inevitably the mine has had its problems. In the early 1960s large sections of Mount Isa's residential area were removed because they were located on useful ore bodies. Major industrial action occurred in 1964-65. The dispute became so heated that the Queensland government actually declared martial law in the town.
Logged



....And at night the wond’rous glory of the everlasting stars..  A.B (Banjo) Paterson
Tibrogargan
Monkey All Star Jr.
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5315



« Reply #614 on: July 07, 2007, 03:28:06 AM »

ALPACAS IN AUSTRALIA

Alpacas are rare and precious animals. Treasured by the ancient Inca civilisation, their fine fleeces were reserved for Incan royalty. Together with their close relatives, the llamas, alpacas provided clothing, food, fuel and, no doubt, companionship as domesticated animals as long ago as 5,000 years.  Alpacas were close to annihilation after the Spanish conquest of the Incas. That they survived was due to their importance to the Indian people, and SURIto the animals' ability to tolerate extraordinarily harsh climatic conditions. It was not until the mid 1800s that the beauty and resilience of alpaca fleece was 'rediscovered' and re-awoke the world's interest.  Today, alpaca farming is concentrated in the Altiplano - the high altitude regions of Southern Peru, Bolivia and Chile where life is difficult. Alpacas not only battle a harsh climate - burning sun by day, freezing conditions at night - but also receive few of the benefits of modern animal husbandry. Yet, they survive, although in relatively small numbers. In their homeland of South America, Peru has approximately 2.5 million, Bolivia around 500,000 and there are only some 50,000 in Chile and Argentina combined.



In 1984, the United States and Canada imported their first alpacas, followed by Australia and New Zealand in 1989. These countries, with their (relatively) more temperate climates and more sophisticated animal husbandry techniques, have proven beneficial for the species.  In the year 2001 there were approximately 40,000 alpacas in Australia and increasing rapidly. While the outlook for fibre sales is excellent, the emphasis in this young Australian industry will be on breeding for the foreseeable future. To increase alpaca numbers is a 'home grown' challenge that will not be met by importing from South America. Limited imports may arrive from Peru and Bolivia, however some quarantine restrictions and export limits control the number of animals leaving South America.  We are fortunate that our own interest in alpacas is mirrored by that of New Zealand. There is already significant information sharing between the two countries and mutual access to research results. This is particularly valuable for the accumulation of information on breeding, fibre production and various aspects of the 'Australianisation' of alpacas.



Again, Australia finds itself in the forefront of new rural industry development. Alpacas, for a whole host of reasons, are one of the most exciting herd options available in this country today Most major agricultural shows now feature alpaca judging, in addition fleece classes have been introduced to Royal Shows in Melbourne, Sydney, Canberra, Adelaide, Perth, Hobart, Brisbane and major regional centres.  In 1991, Dalgety Farmers conducted the first Classic Auction of alpacas, which attracted great interest and excellent sale prices. It is now an annual event that attracts a large crowd of enthusiastic buyers, quality animals and strong prices. The Australian Alpaca Association trains judges, conducts field days and seminars. Its aim is to promote the industry by providing information and advice to its members and on a broader scale, to educate the public about these amazing animals.



Although still young, the alpaca industry is one of the most progressive and energetic in Australia. That there is a place in the Australian fibre production scene for alpacas is beyond dispute. The Australian Alpaca Association aims to ensure that the potential of the alpaca is developed to the full. Already, our talent for efficient fibre production is being channelled into the development of strong, Australian bred alpacas. Eventually there will be top quality fleece in quantities sufficient to supply both local and international demand.



The Alpaca fibre comes in a wide range of natural colours including: white, off-white, shades of grey, fawn, silver, champagne, red brown, deep chocolate brown and jet black. Although the fibre can be dyed, the use of the natural colours means an absence of dye products and minimal exposure to allergens, for even the most sensitive of wearers. The silkiness and luxury of the alpaca yarn and finished knitwear is comparable to cashmere wool and the all time classic fashion clothing favourite the "cashmere sweater". The less sought after portions of the fleece are used to make some of the lightest and warmest duvets (or doonas) available anywhere in the world. The light touch of a doona (duvet, comforter or doonah) made with alpaca fleece, combined with its high insulation properties, make it one of the warmest bedding products available.

ALPACAS AS THERAPY



In medical research, there's growing evidence that patting an animal e.g a dog, can help you recover after an operation. So what about an alpaca? What role might it play in therapy for the elderly, the disabled or disadvantaged? Glen Riley visits such groups with his alpaca and we found The Rough Diamonds group loved the experience. And even though some with disabilities can't speak, you can see they're moved by patting the alpaca.

HUACAYA

Pronounced wua'ki'ya, this is the most common alpaca type in both South America and Australia.



It has a soft bonnet of fibre on the forehead and its cheeks boast 'mutton chops' whilst the dense body fibre grows straight out from the body, not unlike Merino fleece. Ideally, fleece coverage is even and extends down the legs. Its fleece should show a uniform crimp along the length of the staple

SURI

As a type, the suri (soo'ree) is very much less common than the huacaya, and in Australia only a small percentage of alpacas are suris.



This alpaca has fleece with a strongly defined lock. The suri is covered in long, pencil fine locks, not unlike dreadlocks, that hang straight down from the body. The fleece has lustre and its feel is more slippery and silky than that of the huacaya. The predominant suri colours are white or light fawn. Suri numbers continue to grow in Australia, and like the huacaya, the suri responds well to our gentler climate and husbandry practices.
Logged



....And at night the wond’rous glory of the everlasting stars..  A.B (Banjo) Paterson
Tibrogargan
Monkey All Star Jr.
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5315



« Reply #615 on: July 07, 2007, 03:36:43 AM »

Here is a popular song we all like to sing, with appropriate actions.  I am sure Sleuth has heard this many times when she lived here.

HOME AMONG THE GUM TREES




I've been around the world a couple
of times or maybe more
I've seen the sights, I've had delights
On every foreign shore
But when my friends all ask me
the place that I adore
I tell them right away

(Chorus)
Give me a home among the gum trees
With lots of plum trees
A sheep or two, and a kangaroo
A clothes-line out the back
Verandah out the front
And an old rocking chair

You can see me in the kitchen
Cookin' up a roast
Or Vegemite on toast
Just you and me, a cup of tea
Later on we'll settle down
And mull up on the porch
And watch the possums play

(Chorus)

Some people like their houses
With fences all around
Others live in mansions
And some beneath the ground
But me, I like the bush, you know
With rabbits running 'round
And a pumpkin vine out the back

(Chorus Twice)
Logged



....And at night the wond’rous glory of the everlasting stars..  A.B (Banjo) Paterson
Tibrogargan
Monkey All Star Jr.
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5315



« Reply #616 on: July 08, 2007, 02:32:27 AM »

WEST AUSTRALIAN WILDFLOWERS

Mention wildflowers and most people think of Western Australia - and it is no wonder. With up to 12,000 species found within its borders and many unique to the State, Western Australia's wildflower season draws visitors from all over the world.

The wildflower season ranks as one of Western Australia's most fascinating and precious natural treasures. For several months of each year wildflowers are scattered across 2.5 million square kilometres of mysterious terrain. As diverse and colourful as the locals, the uniqueness and natural beauty of the wildflowers attract thousands of tourists and scientists every year.

Rains and sunshine greatly influence the timing of the wildflower season, causing it to span several months and regions. In the north of the State, wildflowers will appear in July with early rains hastening their arrival. As late as November a blaze of wildflower colour will take over the south where the warmer weather produces a totally different collage of species.

Many varieties are still being discovered and many already identified are as yet unnamed.  Here is a small selection :

BRIGHT PODOLEPIS



BLUE FAIRY ORCHID



SOUTHERN CROSS



MULLA MULLA



DAVIESIA TRIFLORA



.
Logged



....And at night the wond’rous glory of the everlasting stars..  A.B (Banjo) Paterson
Tibrogargan
Monkey All Star Jr.
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5315



« Reply #617 on: July 08, 2007, 02:38:01 AM »

ROADSIDE EVERLASTINGS



STAR OF BETHLEHEM



CATS PAW



SILVER EYE ON BANKSIA



PINK ENAMEL ORCHID



.
Logged



....And at night the wond’rous glory of the everlasting stars..  A.B (Banjo) Paterson
Tibrogargan
Monkey All Star Jr.
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5315



« Reply #618 on: July 08, 2007, 02:41:14 AM »

WILDFLOWER FLORAL DISPLAYS

An exhibitor provided about ten species of verticordia which were included in vases such as this. The species present are V. monadelpha var. monadelpha, and var. callitricha, dichroma var. syntoma, muelleriana ssp. minor, lepidophylla var. lepidophylla, comosa, albida, blepharophylla hybrid, helmsii, × eurardyensis.



Another exhibitor provided  fresh blooms of at least eleven species of Western Australian banksias (B. attenuata, baxteri, caleyi, coccinea, grandis, ilicifolia, lemanniana, nutans, petiolaris, praemorsa, speciosa. Here they are used as part of the stage decoration together with yellow kangaroo paw  Anigozanthos pulcherrimus,  hybrid red kangaroo paws, the silvery-grey leaves of E. rhodantha, bright-red bottle-brush (Callistemon phoeniceus) and  Barrens Regelia (Regelia velutina) with its crimson flowers and silky leaves



.
Logged



....And at night the wond’rous glory of the everlasting stars..  A.B (Banjo) Paterson
CJ1
Guest
« Reply #619 on: July 08, 2007, 02:24:06 PM »

I love wildflowers.  These are beautiful.
Logged
Pages: « 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 »   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Use of this web site in any manner signifies unconditional acceptance, without exception, of our terms of use.
Powered by SMF 1.1.13 | SMF © 2006-2011, Simple Machines LLC
 
Page created in 2.709 seconds with 19 queries.