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Author Topic: Australia by Tibrogargan January 2007 - present and 155216+ views later!  (Read 543830 times)
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Tibrogargan
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« Reply #760 on: December 15, 2007, 01:30:28 AM »

CHRISTMAS SEASON CELEBRATIONS IN AUSTRALIA

Christmas is celebrated in many parts of the world on 25 December. Protestant and Roman Catholic churches hold Christmas Day services on 25 December. The Eastern churches - the Ethiopian Orthodox church, Russian Orthodox church and the Armenian church - celebrate Christmas on 6 or 7 January. There have been rituals, parties and celebrations at this time of year for thousands of years

The birth of Jesus
Christmas is the celebration of the birth of Jesus Christ. Christians believe that Jesus is 'the son of God', the Messiah sent from Heaven to save the world.
The 'Christmas story' tells of the birth of Jesus in a stable in Bethlehem, the angels announcing the birth to the shepherds in the fields, and the Magi (wise men from the East) visiting the stable and offering gifts to the newborn child.

The origins of Christmas
A Roman almanac confirms that 25 December was used to celebrate Christmas in 336 AD, although it was nearly 600 years later that the churches created a liturgy - a service for public worship - for the occasion.
The choice of date is believed to have been influenced by the northern hemisphere winter solstice, as well as ancient pagan rituals that coincided with the solstice. These rituals included the Halcyon Days in Greece, a period of calm and goodwill when it was believed the sea was calm for birds to lay their eggs; and the Roman celebration of Saturnalia, a celebration of the god Saturn, which involved wild parties, the exchange of gifts and the temporary suspension of social divisions between slaves and masters.

Christmas traditions and symbols
Christmas trees are part of a long tradition of greenery being taken into the home at Christmas to brighten the dreary winter. Mistletoe was popular with Druid priests because it remained green throughout winter. Holly placed over the doorway was believed to drive away evil. Placing branches from trees in the home was first recorded in 1494, and by the beginning of the 1600s there are records of fir trees being decorated with apples.
The story of Santa Claus has its origins in the legends surrounding the humble generosity of Saint Nicholas, whose feast day is celebrated on 6th December. Saint Nicholas was a 4th century Christian Bishop from Myra (in modern-day Turkey) who became the Patron Saint of Children. In Germany and Poland, boys dressed up as bishops begging alms for the poor. Later, the Christ child 'Christkindlein' was said to have accompanied Nicholas-like figures on their travels. The 1822 poem Twas the Night before Christmas forged the link and Saint Nicholas (Father Christmas, Pere Noel, Christ Kind, Kriss Kringle or Sinter Klass) became known as Santa Claus.

Christmas in the southern hemisphere

The heat of early summer in Australia has an impact on the way that Australians celebrate Christmas and on which northern hemisphere Christmas traditions are followed.
In the weeks leading up to Christmas houses are decorated; greetings cards sent out; carols sung; Christmas trees installed in homes, schools and public places; and children delight in anticipating a visit from Santa Claus. On Christmas Day family and friends gather to exchange gifts and enjoy special Christmas food.
Many Australians spend Christmas out of doors, going to the beach for the day, or heading to camping grounds for a longer break over the Christmas holiday period. It has become traditional for international visitors who are in Sydney at Christmas time to go to Bondi Beach where up to 40,000 people visit on Christmas Day

Carols and music
The tradition of an Australian Christmas Eve carol service lit by candles was started in 1937 by radio announcer Norman Banks. This outdoor service has now been held in Melbourne every year since then.
Carols by Candlelight events today range from huge gatherings, which are televised live throughout the country, to smaller local community and church events. Sydney's Carols in the Domain has become a popular platform for the stars of stage and music.
Some uniquely Australian Christmas carols have become popular and are included alongside the more traditional carols sung at carol services and at Christmas church services: John Wheeler's The Three Drovers is perhaps the best known of these.
Many light hearted Australian Christmas songs have become an essential part of the Australian Christmas experience. These include Rolf Harris's Six White Boomers, Colin Buchanan's Aussie Jingle Bells and the Australian Twelve Days of Christmas.

Christmas plants
There are many native Australian plants in flower over the Christmas season. A number of these have become known as 'Christmas plants' in various parts of the country, including christmas bells, christmas bush and the christmas orchid.
When Europeans first arrived in Australia they were delighted that they could pick wildflowers resembling bells and bright green foliage covered in red or white flowers to use as Christmas decorations. This was a huge contrast to the bare trees and dormant gardens they had left behind in Europe.

Food
Christmas in Australia comes at the beginning of summer and many people no longer serve a traditional hot roast dinner. Cold turkey and ham, seafood and salads are often served instead. It has even become acceptable to serve the traditional christmas plum pudding with cold custard, ice cream or cream. Pavlova, a meringue base topped with whipped cream and fresh fruit, and various versions of the festive ice cream pudding have also become popular Christmas desserts.

The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) and the Coles company are engaged in a project to cultivate native foods. They are working with Mandawuy Yunupingu (of the band Yothu Yindi) and Aboriginal communities to grow sufficient quantities for sale in supermarkets across Australia. The aim is to offer all Australians a Bush Tucker Christmas

Film and television
The films Bush Christmas (1947) starring Chips Rafferty and the remake Prince and the Great Race in 1983 (with Nicole Kidman), and Miracle Down Under starring John Waters (telecast as Bushfire Moon) are insights into the early Australian Christmas culture. Many television series have used Christmas episodes to explore the changing culture of Christmas in Australia.

Children's stories
Australian children grow up enjoying traditional Christmas stories such as Clement Clarke Moore's 'Twas the Night Before Christmas and Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol, but children's authors and illustrators are beginning to create truly Australian children's Christmas literature. One favourite is Wombat Divine by Mem Fox, while a more recent addition is Aussie Night Before Christmas by Yvonne Morrison.

Major sporting events

The Christmas break is an opportunity for sports fans to enjoy two major sporting events. 26 December is the opening day of the 'Boxing Day Test' between the Australian Cricket Team and an international touring side at the Melbourne Cricket Ground. This has been well attended since the first match in 1950, and watched by many others on television. In Sydney one of the world's most prestigious ocean races, the Sydney-to-Hobart Yacht Race, starts on Boxing Day from Sydney Harbour.

Indigenous Australians
Indigenous Dreamtime stories obviously do not include Christmas. However, this date in the calendar coincides with other seasonal changes. In Arnhem Land, Northern Territory, Yolngu Aboriginal people will observe the last season of their six-season cycle. Gudjewg, the wet season, begins in late December.
Many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities include Christian groups within them which celebrate Christmas. The Ntaria Choir at Hermannsburg, via Alice Springs, Northern Territory, has a unique musical language from mixing the traditional vocals of the Ntaria women with Lutheran chorales - the hymn tunes that were the basis of much of J.S. Bach's music.

Baba Waiyar, a popular traditional Torres Strait Islander hymn, is featured on Lexine Solomon's debut album This is Woman (2003) - showing the influence of gospel music mixed with traditionally strong Torres Strait Islander vocals and country music. Significantly, Torres Strait Islanders celebrate the 'Coming of the Light' on 1 July, the day the London Missionary Society landed at Erub Island in 1871.
Modern Indigenous Christmas celebrations are beginning to take on elements of traditional Indigenous culture. The Department of Conservation and Land Management in Western Australia offers a Christmas celebration by organising activities which encourages people to join in Christmas bush activities with Nyoongar guides.

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« Reply #761 on: December 15, 2007, 01:39:32 AM »

CAROLS BY CANDLELIGHT



It is generally agreed that "Carols by Candlelight" was started in Melbourne, Australia by radio announcer Norman Banks in 1937 after he saw a woman listening to carols alone by candlelight. Banks decided to do something to relieve the loneliness and isolation some feel during the Christmas period. He announced community carol singing for anyone who wanted to join in. The concept has grown in popularity over the years, and the recorded program is now broadcast the world over.



From Carol, January 2005 :Norman Banks is indeed the creator of the Carols by Candlelight which is enjoyed all around Australia - I know this because he was my grandfather and he promoted the first few Carols through the radio station he worked at. He was also famous for his radio programs and a short period on television. Every year when we sit down to enjoy the Carols we remember him. In case you are wondering why it is used by the Victorian Institute for the Blind as a major fundraiser, it is probably because Norman was blind for most of the time I remember him. I was 21 when he died in September 1985 so I remember only some of his career. He also wrote a carol, which he named the 'Melbourne Carol'.



Carols by Candlelight is held every year in the week before Christmas, when thousands of people gather in the parks of the larger towns and cities to sing their favourite Christmas carols. A stage is the center of attraction for the event and may consist of a temporary stage using the flat tray of a semi-trailer truck or a permanent facility such as the Sidney Myer Music Bowl in Melbourne where it is an annual fund raising event for the Royal Victorian Institute for the Blind. Available are carol sheets and candles, with candle holders to protect tiny fingers from hot candle wax. Food and drink stalls are usually staffed by local Rotary or Lions Clubs. Many people bring blankets or portable chairs for seating.



Entertainment and carols singing commences before darkness falls. At about half light the person comparing the evening announces the time has come to light the candles causing much excitement among the children and older participants. The lighting is turn off and the park is lit by many candles while families and friends continue singing carols under a clear night sky with its Southern Cross stars. The fact that this time of year is also the longest day of the year in the southern hemisphere ensures warm weather which allows Australians to enjoy this tradition. Occasionally rain will cause the event to be moved indoors provided there is time to publicise the change of venue, if time is not available it often continues in the rain with all wearing wet weather covering. Even though it is raining it is not cold at this time of the year. Christmas in Australia is often very hot.



Well known entertainers sing solos and lead the audience in singing. There is usually a band or orchestra and Father Christmas often appears. At some Carols by Candlelight a Nativity scene may also be on display, and some also end the evening with a fireworks display. The function commences before dark and runs until about 10.00 pm depending on the latitude of the location. As Australia spans from above the Tropic of Capricorn to 40 degrees south, sunset is at a later time the further south you go. State capital cities usually telecast and/or broadcast the major Carols by Candlelight evening in the state which features musical stars who sing their favourite carols as seen in this early. Most towns over about 2,000 population hold a Carols by Candlelight in their local park with local businesses usually provide some sponsorship for the evening. The program features local artists, plenty of community Carol singing, and now days large screen TV monitors may be available. In summary Carols by Candlelight is hundreds of happy faces of children of all ages, mothers, fathers and grandparents all enjoying a fun night of entertainment, singing carols by candlelight and rejoicing in the Message of Christmas.



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« Reply #762 on: December 15, 2007, 01:48:13 AM »

AUSTRALIAN CHRISTMAS TRADITIONS

Christmas is always the most exciting time of the year. School children get six weeks holiday, and many professionals close their office from Christmas eve to the Australia Day Public Holiday on 26th January, so many families are in a holiday season over this period.

Christmas in Australia
Businesses and shops close on Christmas day and Boxing Day, however the major retail centres open after Christmas for clearance sales on all Christmas stock that did not sell. This has become an important part of Christmas for many bargain shoppers. Some people now wait to buy their gifts after Christmas at the sales. Those families that can afford it head for coastal resorts and beachside caravan parks for the holiday period.
December is one of the hottest months in Australia so outdoors sports like swimming, surfing and fishing are common and easy cold meat & salad dominates most meals.

Most Australian Christmas traditions have derived from our British beginnings, European influences and later the American commercial influences.

Typical Christmas traditions include:-
From December 1st, we decorate the house with our Christmas table ornaments collection, ribbons and bows. Set up the Christmas tree and decorate with our collection of hanging Christmas ornaments. (This can take 2-3 days for some serious collectors). Some people also put up house and yard lights. ( a few of these become local tourist attractions).
Shopping commences to buy all close friends and family a Christmas gift which is wrapped and placed under the Christmas tree.
Visits to friends homes, for Christmas drinks.
Christmas parties or Christmas drinks at work.
Children's letters sent to Santa Clause before Christmas.
Christmas cards sent to friends and relatives, some of whom you have not contacted since last Christmas. Children leaving out the Christmas stocking, or pillow case (because you can't fit much into a stocking in this commercial world).
Church services, both on Christmas eve and Christmas Day, although this has developed into midnight services on Christmas eve which covers both in recent years.
Santa still comes silently down the chimney and eats a piece of cake and takes a drink left out for him before he goes.
Santa rides 'a miniature sleigh', with 'eight tiny reindeer". (although in the Australian outback it is too hot for the reindeer and Santa is pulled by Six White Boomers.
The small children are brimming with so much excitement that they can't get to sleep on Christmas eve, and then wake you Christmas morning, when you have hardly closed your eyes, with excitement and wonder as they rip the wrappings to pieces.
A gathering around the Christmas tree as the presents from each other are handed out by the patriarch of the family, wearing a Santa suit or at least a Santa cap and a "tinnie". (can of beer)
Christmas dinner, served at lunchtime on Christmas day, is at Grandmas home, while she is still able bodied.
The dinner table has a special Christmas tablecloth, Christmas napkins and napkin rings that you didn't know she had. Also bonbons or Christmas crackers, streamers and balloons are added to the dining room and lollies and soft drinks are already on the table. Often the kids are on a separate table on the verandah.
The traditional Australian Christmas dinner had been the English style roast Beef or lamb sometimes also a turkey, with Gravy and baked potatoes & pumpkin followed by plum pudding and custard, which grandma used to fill with little silver threepences.
Occasionally Dinner would also include Christmas Damper down under, a throw-back to colonial days when times were tough, or white Christmas, a white coloured sweet snack bar made with Rice Bubbles and icing sugar, or even apple pie with cloves and home made ice cream, when she had a large crowd to cater for.
In recent years more and more busy mothers are not subjecting themselves, and the family, to the heavy baked dinner on hot days and go for the cold meat and salads. Cold turkey with cranberry sauce and ham with apple sauce are now the leading Australian meat dishes for Christmas. But the steaming Christmas pudding with hot custard is still common and much, much, beer is consumed in the delirious heat.

Tradition Variations
Australia also has a large number of people down under from other parts of Europe and Asia which make up our population, so many other dishes have become second nature in our Christmas cuisine. European families are also more inclined to have baked pork, have the main Christmas meal on Christmas eve and believe Santa arrives through the window and rings a bell when he has left.

The Boxing Day Tradition
Boxing day is a Great Australian tradition at Christmas time. Boxing Day is the day after Christmas day. It's a commemoration day we inherited from the British for a reason we have forgotten about and never cared about anyway. It's a big day out. It's always a public holiday and always much cherished. It is a sports day, but we don't fight.
Two great Australian sporting traditions always capture us on Boxing day.
The Cricket and the spectacular Sydney to Hobart yacht race. Many families hang around at home on boxing day and snooze whilst they watch these events on the TV, whilst the kids play cricket in the backyard. Others pack up for a picnic or a trip to the beach. There is always boating and fishing, also great family outings.

An extract from a poem, "Tangmalangmaloo" by John O'Brien, perhaps captures the way many Australians feel about Boxing day. The poem describes the day the bishop called in at an outback school and questioned the class about religion.
"And oh, how pleased his lordship was, and how he smiled to say,
'That's good, my boy. Come tell me now; and what is Christmas Day?'
The ready answer bared a fact no bishop ever knew -
'It's the day before the races out at Tangmalangmaloo.' "

Christmas Cards
Over 100 million Christmas cards are posted within Australia each year which is a high portion of the 450 million articles handled by Australia Post during December. The first printed Christmas card was in England by Sir Henry Cole in 1843. The first Australian Christmas card was produced in 1881 by John Sands. In 1957 The first Christmas stamp was issued by Australia Post which has since issued more than 100 Christmas designs. The volume of mail sent by Australian children to Santa during 2004 was approximately 120,000 letters. In the Aussie spirit of "a fair go", Postage on Christmas cards is at a reduced rates, 45c for local standard size Christmas cards or $1 to send cards overseas.
Another emerging form of Christmas greeting common today is the Christmas E-Card usually available to send FREE a personalised greeting by email on Australian websites like Free Australian Christmas e-cards from christmas-e-cards.com

Carols by Candlelight
Great December weather allows Aussies to enjoy a tradition which commenced in 1937. Carols By Candlelight is held every year during the week before Christmas Day. They are held out in the open in the cool of the evenings in nearly every town and city in Australia.
Families arrive with rugs to sit on, picnic hampers, and folding chairs, hail rain or shine. Thousands gather to sing Christmas carols whilst holding candles.
It's a celebration of "peace on earth and goodwill towards all men" a theme which most Australians are very sincere about.

Santa Appearances
Other traditions leading up to an Aussie Christmas include kids photos in the Shopping centre on Santa's Knee, Santa arriving at kids parties with bags of lollies, and a special tradition on Lake Macquarie just north of Sydney. On Christmas eve on the majestic Lake Macquarie, Santa Clause travels around the great lake on a big old ferry the famous Wangi Queen Show Boat. (Lake Macquarie is a huge lake over 4 times the size of Sydney Harbor). The stylish old ferry's loud speaker blasts out the Christmas carols as it chugs it's way along, and all of the lakeside communities get involved.
Santa stops off at all of the public jetties around the shoreline and brings a big bag of lollies out sharing smaller bags out for every small child, who gather around the lake in huge throngs giggling and cheering in wonder. It is a spectacular and exciting annual event to see Santa Clause arrive at each local jetty.

Christmas in July
Another Aussie Christmas tradition is Christmas in July where a traditional Christmas dinner with all the trimmings and decorations is served to those who, miss the northern hemisphere's 'White Christmas', feel or simply enjoy another reason to celebrate.

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....And at night the wond’rous glory of the everlasting stars..  A.B (Banjo) Paterson
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« Reply #763 on: December 15, 2007, 02:01:56 AM »


My Christmas wishes for my Monkey friends include good health, happiness and serenity throughout the Holiday season.  I look forward to chatting with you in 2008.

We have all come together to seek for justice for Natalee and peace of mind for Beth and all of her family.

May we extend these wishes to all with whom we come in contact whether it be through the internet or in our daily lives.

God Bless


And for some more Christmas fun : 

http://www.thekoala.com/christmas.htm

http://tww.id.au/c/index.html

Enjoy   

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« Reply #764 on: December 15, 2007, 06:59:46 PM »

Thanks Tib, Merry Christmas!   santa
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« Reply #765 on: December 15, 2007, 09:40:15 PM »

Thank you for sharing your Aussie Christmas with us Tib.   
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« Reply #766 on: December 16, 2007, 04:14:52 PM »

 Cool Tibro.    back at yah !!   Wink
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« Reply #767 on: December 21, 2007, 06:55:54 PM »

Thank you CJ, Muffy and Angie.

I know many of our monkeys are great cooks and the rest just love food so I have found another food recipes site.  If you follow the green coloured header strip it will take you to Christmas recipes suitable for our summer holiday season.

http://www.taste.com.au/

and just to help those unfamiliar with metric measurements :


Conversion Tables for Cooking


 
U.S. to Metric

Capacity

1/5 teaspoon = 1 ml
1 teaspoon = 5 ml
1 tablespoon = 15 ml
1 fluid oz. = 30 ml
1/5 cup = 50 ml
1 cup = 240 ml
2 cups (1 pint) = 470 ml
4 cups (1 quart) = .95 liter
4 quarts (1 gal.) = 3.8 liters

Weight

1 oz. = 28 grams
1 pound = 454 grams

 
Metric to U.S.

Capacity


1 militers = 1/5 teaspoon
5 ml = 1 teaspoon
15 ml = 1 tablespoon
30 ml = 1 fluid oz.
100 ml = 3.4 fluid oz.
240 ml = 1 cup
1 liter = 34 fluid oz.
1 liter = 4.2 cups
1 liter = 2.1 pints
1 liter = 1.06 quarts
1 liter = .26 gallon

Weight


1 gram = .035 ounce
100 grams = 3.5 ounces
500 grams = 1.10 pounds
1 kilogram = 2.205 pounds
1 kilogram = 35 oz.

 
Cooking Measurement Equivalents

16 tablespoons = 1 cup
12 tablespoons = 3/4 cup
10 tablespoons + 2 teaspoons = 2/3 cup
8 tablespoons = 1/2 cup
6 tablespoons = 3/8 cup
5 tablespoons + 1 teaspoon = 1/3 cup
4 tablespoons = 1/4 cup
2 tablespoons = 1/8 cup
2 tablespoons + 2 teaspoons = 1/6 cup
1 tablespoon = 1/16 cup
2 cups = 1 pint
2 pints = 1 quart
3 teaspoons = 1 tablespoon
48 teaspoons = 1 cup
 
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« Reply #768 on: December 24, 2007, 07:02:59 AM »

Merry Christmas Tib! Merry Christmas Australia! Keep an eye out for those Boomers!
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« Reply #769 on: December 31, 2007, 04:16:56 AM »

NEW YEAR'S EVE IN AUSTRALIA

We celebrate New Year's Eve here in much the same way as everyone else.  We have parties, discos, bush dances, barbecues, beach parties, concerts, yacht and ferry cruises and of course fireworks.  The lucky folk who live in the border towns of Tweed Heads/Coolangatta celebrate at midnight in NSW and then walk across into Queensland where they do not have daylight saving and celebrate again an hour later.
The biggest fire works display is on Sydney Harbour and here are some pictures from last year.










The Sydney to Hobart Ocean Yacht Race which began on Boxing Day (26 Dec)  ends with all the yachts moored in Constitution Dock right in the city of Hobart and there is a big celebration held on the waterfront.  The last yacht to finish arrived last night and  here is a picture of the Line Honours Winner  "Wild Oats" :



and the Handicap Winner the American yacht "Rosebud" :




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« Reply #770 on: December 31, 2007, 04:42:51 AM »

YACHTING STORIES

While browsing the official race website  I found two human interest stories about entrants in this year's race.  I hope you enjoy them.


SAILORS WITH DISABILITIES MUST SIT AND WAIT


 
The yacht Sailors with disABILITIES, always a crowd favourite in the Rolex Sydney Hobart, has to sit and wait in Hobart’s King’s Pier marina to find out whether it is going to win the Performance Handicap System (PHS) division of the race.

The PHS boats are not contenders for overall honours in the race. Their handicap is assessed on past performance rather than hull, sail and standing rigging measurement.
“Right now we’re looking pretty flash on handicap, but Helsal’s out there and she’s going to give us a run,” said David Pescud, skipper of the yacht partially crewed by disabled sailors.

In past years, she has sailed to Hobart seven times under different guises – Aspect Computing, Kaz and now Sailors with disABILITIES. This year she sailed with 13 crew, of whom two were dyslexic, one was vision impaired and one hearing impaired, which made things interesting, according to Pescud.

One night down at the chart table when they were trying to tune the radio, those who couldn’t see the numbers recited to those who could and who could press the buttons.
Shortly after mooring in Hobart, Pescud said it would be a waiting game.”It’s all down to the wind. It’s a bit of a lottery, isn’t it? Everyone’s on tenterhooks for the next 24 hours.”

While Sailors with disABILITIES leads in the clubhouse (the boat to beat), Rick Scott-Murphy’s Canberra Ocean Racing Club boat Namadgi is the leading boat at sea. It has until 4pm tomorrow to finish but is due in at about 9.30am.

By the way, Canberra is no impediment to ocean racing. Their boats normally sail out of Sydney.
Pescud need not have feared Tasmanian entry Helsal IV. She appears to have run out of time.

Pescud said he hoped to compete with disabled sailors next year, but was looking for sponsorship since most of the money for the campaign this year came out of his own pocket.

“We’re hoping like crazy we can find a sponsor,” he said.



LIVING TO SAIL, SAILING TO LIVE




Her boat, Global Yacht Racing – Kioni may have parked at Cape Raoul for five hours this morning, pushing her finishing time out to 4pm this afternoon and her handicap ranking further south than she would like, but the British professional yachtswoman Emma Pontin is just thrilled to be in Hobart at the end of her first Rolex Sydney Hobart Yacht Race.

“This is a fabulous race. The weather patterns are just amazing, the wind swings around everywhere. It does challenge you a lot. We had a great crew on board, lots of laughs, frustrating at times but that’s racing isn’t it?”

Emma has another reason to be delighted to be in Hobart. Twelve months ago she didn’t believe she would be alive now.

In November 2006 she was in Gibraltar, preparing for the 2,700 mile ARC trans-Atlantic race. It is a race she had done many times, but this time was to be special.  She would be crewing on a yacht skippered by the man she is soon to marry, Richard Falk.  But it all fell apart when she was diagnosed with breast cancer.  She would have to rush back to England for surgery. To lift her spirits Falk told her that if she wanted to she could skipper the boat in the 2007 ARC. 

Emma, who did not believe that she would still be alive in a year’s time nevertheless agreed. “To be honest I really wasn’t desperate to do the (2006) race. It was only because Richard had come all the way from Australia for it. I had already crossed the Atlantic 13 times,” she says, “but when it was taken away from me, skippering that boat in the 2007 ARC became the only thing I wanted to do. It became my holy grail.”

Over the next three months Emma underwent a mastectomy followed by intensive chemo and radio therapy, all the while focused on that November deadline. It was what kept her going, she says. Incredibly she was back on the water in February. “I did two one week training sails, then chemo and a week of boredom in London while the chemo worked, and on the Monday I was back at work on the boat.

“I think it was because my mindset for a long time was that if I sat still I was going to die.”

Emma admits that it was a long time before she realised how lucky she was in the way her body reacted to the chemo therapy. “It didn’t make me sick. It was only when I saw how badly it affected other women in the cancer ward, what the chemo did to them, that I realised how lucky I was.”

Emma made that deadline. In November she skippered a Global Yacht Racing boat in the 2007 ARC and straight after that she flew to Australia, to join Falk on the Beneteau 47.7 Global Yacht Racing – Kioni in the 2007 Rolex Sydney Hobart.

And she has even more adventures in mind. “I need a challenge. I want to do a double handed circumnavigation the wrong way round. I much prefer up-wind to down-wind sailing and a friend of mine who has had cancer as well wants to do it too.  And I’d like to go round the world along the Tropic of Cancer.  A different mode of transport in each country and sail between them. I tried to do that eight years ago but I failed to get sponsorship because people were saying ‘why?’ but I think I can go back now and say ‘this is why’. Life has become very precious, and a part of me says whoa, you’ve just fought for your life, don’t put yourself in silly situations.  But the other half says go for it, because what happens if this cancer comes back to bite me in the bottom in a year’s time?  The two weeks after my mastectomy while I waited for the results were hell I wrote my everything-to-do-before-I-die list. When they told me that they had got all the cancer I looked at the list and thought do I file it, or do I start doing it?” 
 
And having ticked of the Rolex Sydney Hobart from her to do list, is that it?

“I’d like to do the Hobart again, but not on a cruiser-racer like Kioni. I’d prefer something faster like a Volvo 70, something designed for straight racing because I’m competitive and I’d like to have a real go at blasting it.”


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« Reply #771 on: December 31, 2007, 04:47:34 AM »


Wishing my monkey friends a very Happy New Year and may 2008 bring you everything you wish for.

 flower flower flower flower
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« Reply #772 on: December 31, 2007, 09:37:59 AM »

Happy New Year to you Tib 
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« Reply #773 on: January 01, 2008, 10:07:50 PM »

Tib....I feel so bad...I came over to say I hope you had a great New Year and realized that I'd missed half the last page when I came to wish you Merry Christmas! Thanks for everything! And you too Peaches...will have to wait until the morning to do the youtube...DH is sleeping and he has to get up at 3AM. So I'll be here for coffee!

Bookmarked a lot of your links, thanks again Tib!

I keep 'My Country' on my nightstand and my Golden Wattle cookery book in my kitchen cupboard. Darn, would I love some pavlova! (and Cherry Ripes,and Polly Waffles and Violet Crumbles....and I'm not a big candy eater)LOL
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« Reply #774 on: January 04, 2008, 08:14:33 AM »

Hey Tib...thanks to you and Peaches for the youtubes....

I followed the related ones on Peaches and watched Sadie, The Cleaning Lady Laughing, then went to the Johnny Farnham remastered one Laughing Laughing I swear it was the one I used to watch when I was a teen on that first VHS type show which was on Saturday mornings. Can't for the life of me remember what it was called, but my poor Mum hated it. Especially Mick Jaguar with those tight pants.



Translations....Lol

Rice Bubbles...Rice Krispies
Caravan Park....RV Park
Custard...not from Dairy Queen.....Yellow sauce made with milk and a boxed yellow powder(please no lumps), served over puddings, ie plum, not like pudding here, LOL, I had better quit!

Tib I still say 'mutton dressed up as lamb' all the time!

Thanks for the memories....off to see if I can find some Johnny Young Laughing

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« Reply #775 on: January 12, 2008, 12:37:26 AM »

No worries, Mum.  It is a busy time of the year and I am know I have been busier since the New Year than I was leading up to it.

On my next trip to the shops I had to check to see if those bars were still available  as I am not a big sweet eater either.  I know when Hoadleys sold out to Nestles the Violet Crumble Bars chocolate coating changed in flavour but the filling is still just as good! Worked with a girl who used to eat a Polly Waffle every day and we used to tease her about it so much that she became known as the Polly Waffle Kid.
Don't know the Golden Wattle cookbook, but still have a copy of the CWA cookbook, and use it frequently.

The music reminisces gave me a few ideas for this post and found more for next time.  I remember all the usual TV shows : Bandstand, Six O'Clock Rock, Young Talent Time ......
A lot of the "old" rockers are still going with tours and other pursuits.  Billy Thorpe just passed away, Normie Rowe campaigns for recognition of Vietnam Veterans, Angry Anderson does a lot of charity work, Peter Garrett (who boasts he has never cast a vote in any election - which is compulsory here) is now the Minister for Environment in the new Federal Government and just earned himself a seat on the first flight Hobart to Antarctica, Ronnie Burns has a property here in Tasmania where he and his wife run a non-profit organisation for children in crisis or distress and John Paul Young pops up almost everywhere still singing "Love is in the air". (wish he would learn a new song LOL)

I see you are posting again so you must have cleared those nasties from your computer.   They can be a worry and give you a feeling of invasion of privacy.
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« Reply #776 on: January 12, 2008, 12:43:46 AM »

Australian pop music

Like rock music, popular, or pop music had its origins in the 1950s and 1960s. Popular music is different to rock in that it uses simple melodies, harmonies and words to create catchy songs or ballads that are easy to remember and have wide appeal. Pop songs are more likely to be influenced by fashions and are more short lived in their popularity than, for example, rock music.

Early Australian pop is a story about immigrants doing well on an ongoing basis, of female singers, songwriters and performers as well as popular activities and events. Australian pop is one of our most successful Australian musical exports.

The 1960s and 1970s - Surfing, love and feminist ballads

Australian pop music has been going strong since the 1960s, with stars such as Little Pattie, who made it big after she was spotted by talent scouts at the Bronte Surf Club in 1963. Her first hit was He's My Blonde Headed Stompie Wompie Real Gone Surfer Boy. In 1966, at just 17 years of age, she was the youngest entertainer to play to Australian troops in Vietnam. On the evening of the battle of Long Tan she was singing in nearby Nui Dat; soldiers later reported being able to hear her music as they patrolled in the jungle.

During the 1960s other performers, such as Col Joye, the Bee Gees, Normie Rowe and The Seekers, also became well known for their tunes and (mostly) clean-cut images. Many of these bands or individual performers are still performing today. Helen Reddy rose to international success with her the pop anthem, I Am Woman. When she wrote the song in 1972 she tapped into the growing feminist movement of the early 1970s. Like so many Australian artists of the time, and since, Helen Reddy moved to the United States before finding the fame she sought.

Dance and disco songs in the 1970s

The Bee Gees are an example of an Australian pop group that achieved international success as singers, songwriters and performers. The brothers Gibb emigrated to Australia from Britain as children. They lived in Brisbane as young boys and recorded many of their early singles and albums in Sydney. After they re-located to the UK in 1967, they produced dozens of songs that made it to the top of the charts in the US, England and Australia. These songs included their late '70s hits How Deep is Your Love, Stayin' Alive, Night Fever or Tragedy. They also wrote many hits for other successful artists.

Enduring appeal - John Farnham and Olivia Newton-John

Two Australian pop musicians who may be considered ambassadors for our pop industry are John Farnham and Olivia Newton-John. Whilst both were born in England they are two of our most loved and popular singers.

John Farnham's first notable recording was Sadie the Cleaning Lady (1968). It was the largest-selling single by an Australian artist of the 1960s. In 1981 John Farnham joined the Little River Band as lead singer. In 1986 he recorded the album Whispering Jack which became the biggest-selling album in the Australian market of the 1980s, and sold over one million copies. His 1990 album Chain Reaction was the biggest selling album in Australia that year. John Farnham has continued to record albums and tour extensively.

Olivia Newton-John's first major success was in 1974 with the single I Honestly Love You, which was a hit in the UK and the USA. In the USA, Olivia Newton-John branched off into country music. In 1974 she was awarded the Country Music Association's Female Vocalist of the Year. She then starred in Grease and Xanadu. In 1981 she had a number one pop hit in the USA with the single Physical. Olivia Newton-John continues to record albums and perform to audiences around the world.

Soap star = pop star

Since the 1980s, Australia has produced a number of local and internationally popular TV soap operas. These in turn, have spawned a large number of pop stars.

In 1986, the pop group The Chantoozies was formed. The members were a number of ex-soap actors including David Reyne, Tottie Goldsmith and Ally Fowler.

Most notably, many Neighbours and Home and Away actors have tried to leap from small screen to studio stardom. Actors such as Kylie Minogue, Jason Donovan, Craig McLachlan, Toni Pearen, Holly Valance, Natalie Bassingthwaighte, Bec Cartwright, Natalie Imbruglia, Delta Goodrem and Melissa Tkautz all transferred their acting skills into the studio. Some, like Delta Goodrem and Natalie Imbruglia have enjoyed more success than others.

Delta Goodrem has made the international charts with her piano-based ballads such as Mistaken Identity, Born to Try and Innocent Eyes. She remains most popular in Australia where her albums have sold in high numbers and she has received many industry and popular awards.

By far the most famous and successful of these converts from soap operas has been Kylie Minogue. Kylie Minogue's music career kicked off in 1987 when she released her first single, a version of the '60s hit Locomotion. The song was number 1 on Australian charts for seven weeks, and was the biggest selling Australian single of the decade. Many more hits have followed.

Her career has included collaborations with internationally recognised artists, topping charts and winning awards from Italy to the USA. In addition to her catchy music, Kylie is well known for her looks and ability to transform her image. One of the world's most well-known pop stars, Madonna, sealed Kylie's fame when she wore a t-shirt emblazoned with the words 'Kylie Minogue'.

Alternative and indie pop - the 1980s and beyond

In the 1980s and 1990s, pop went beyond the images of surfer boys, romance and dancing to where punk met folk and digital sounds blended with rap overtones. In more recent years, alternative pop music (also known as independently produced or 'indie' music) has become popular.

Influential groups of the 1980s, like the Go-Betweens and Nick Cave's The Birthday Party, were critically and commercially successful in Britain and the USA underground. In 2005, the Go-Betweens ninth album, Oceans Apart, earned them their first ARIA award for best contemporary album, consolidating their influence on two generations of Australian, British and American groups, including the Australian group, The Whitlams.
A critic for the New York based Village Voice once wrote that Grant McLennan and Robert Foster of the Go-Betweens were the greatest song writing partnership working today. McLennan's song, Cattle and Cane, about growing up in Queensland, was named in the Australasian Performing Rights Association's top ten greatest Australian songs. The British music magazine, NME described them as 'a real pop group ... haunted by the ghosts of long-lost lovers, musty attic rooms, and Cash and Dylan on Nashville Skyline'.

In the 1990s some Australian artists reflected international fashions for more off-beat pop music with a folksy feel. Ben Lee's sparse indie tunes have an eccentric touch and have made charts around the world. The Whitlams, a Sydney-based pop band with folk influences are known for their haunting singles such as No Aphrodisiac, less serious songs such as I Make Hamburgers and those with a political motivation like Blow up the Pokies.

Since 2000, indie artists such as george, Kisschasy and Missy Higgins have produced toe-tapping songs and ballads, while Rogue Traders, and Butterfingers have embraced digital, rap and punk sounds with enthusiasm.

Australian pop has now developed its own unique sound that echoes international trends but is firmly rooted in local experiences.

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« Reply #777 on: January 12, 2008, 12:49:43 AM »

A couple of interesting web sites and some more nostalgia for Mum  :

About Australian products :

http://www.aussiefavourites.com.au/


More about pop music and the singers :

http://www.abc.net.au/longway/

click on the faint dates shown under "The Series" title.


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« Reply #778 on: January 12, 2008, 12:53:51 AM »

Australian rock music

Australian rock music has its roots in the 1950s and '60s when the style of music was growing in popularity around the world.

In the 1970s Australian rock bands became well known for classic hard rock. By the 1980s Australian music developed its own distinctive rock sound and became popular the world over.

First appearing in the United States of America, rock music was a fusion of white country and western music with black rhythm and blues music. These days, rock music is harder to define. Over the years it has influenced and been influenced by many other styles - elements of pop, funk, folk and world music can all be heard in many songs that are classified as rock songs

The first Australian rock 'n rollers


In these early days, performers like Johnny O'Keefe and The Easybeats were easy to categorise as rockers, with songs such as Wild One, Shout and Friday on My Mind mimicking the heavy-guitar sound and strong beat produced by rock performers in the USA and Britain.

Johnny O'Keefe went on to become the first Australian artist to appear in the Australian Top 40 (Wild One), the first to be signed and record for an international label (US Liberty) and was the first rock and roll artist to host his own radio program (Rockville Junction on ABC Radio).

The Easybeats, who met as immigrants at Sydney's Villawood Migrant Hostel in 1964, became famous worldwide. Other Australian rock bands to hit the big time during the 1960s and the 1970s included The Masters Apprentices, Billy Thorpe and the Aztecs, Daddy Cool and Skyhooks.

Classic Australian rock

Cold Chisel formed in Adelaide in 1973 under the name of Orange. Their music was characterised by meaningful lyrics, catchy tune and the aggressive singing style of their lead singer, Jimmy Barnes. One of their classic songs, Khe Sanh, tells the story of a Vietnam veteran and his struggles after the war. Cold Chisel is also responsible for many other Australian rock anthems.

Perhaps the most internationally well known hard rock band Australia has produced is AC/DC. Formed in 1973, the band began with brothers Angus and Malcolm Young and Dave Evans. Although the band's lead singer Bon Scott died in 1980, AC/DC has lived on for over three decades, performing to packed halls and rapt fans around the world. They deliver no-nonsense, hard rock - the oddity being the school boy uniform worn by now legendary guitarist Angus Young.

Intriguing Australian rock and the 1980s

The 1980s was a decade when Australian rock gained confidence and world-wide attention. Nick Cave, Melbourne musician and lead singer of alternative rock band The Bad Seeds, said that before the 1980s 'Australia still needed America or England to tell them what was good.'

The 'Aussie Assault' on the world rock stage included bands such as Men At Work, Midnight Oil, INXS, Crowded House and New Zealand's Split Enz. Alternative Australian rock bands such as The Triffids, The Church, Hunters and Collectors, Celibate Rifles, The Saints and Laughing Clowns also contributed a great deal to the unique sound evolving in Australian music.

'The fickle European rock press devoured the unusual sounds and, intriguing lyrics that captured Australia's intimidating landscape' that belonged to The Triffids and other bands. The Triffids were big business in England, Holland, Germany, France and particularly Scandinavia, particularly with their album Born Sandy Devotional. In Belgium, they played to 70,000 fans. Midnight Oil, then one of the biggest names in Australia, was billed below the band. Bernard Zuel wrote (Sydney Morning Herald, 26 Jun 2006); 'the band that was seen internationally as capturing the Australian landscape and personality better than anyone else couldn't get past the myopic radio and mainstream media back home'. A remastered Born Sandy Devotional described by Uncut magazine as 'a desolate masterpiece from one of the great lost bands of the 80's' was released in July 2006.

In the 1980s, The Church, with their paisley shirts and catchy melodies, built a devoted fan base in both Europe and America. The commercial high point for The Church was in 1988 with the album Starfish and the single Under the Milky Way which was a hit in the USA, and sold more than a million copies. On the back of Starfish, The Church toured Europe and the US relentlessly.

Australian band Men At Work were part of the worldwide popularity of Australian rock in the early 1980s, with their anthem Down Under introducing listeners around the world to Vegemite sandwiches. Their sound was an interesting mix of styles, with a slight reggae beat, very Australian lyrics and the shrill sounds of a flute. Other hits they produced included Who Can it be Now? and It's a Mistake. Men At Work are still the only Australian artists with No.1 singles and albums in both America and England.

Hunters and Collectors carved a path and place for themselves in Australian rock culture as 'the thinking man's pub band'. Many of their songs, such as Throw Your Arms Around Me are Australian rock classics.

Midnight Oil used rock music to tell a story and send a message. Songs such as Put Down that Weapon, Blue Sky Mining, Beds are Burning and River Runs Red made popular music charts around the world.

The band's lead singer Peter Garrett said, 'Rock and Roll has traditionally been about cars and girls and now we were... trying to make it about something else as well.' The band used music to raise awareness of environmental and political issues, often performing with Aboriginal rock bands such as Warumpi.

INXS toured around the world, to huge crowds. Their lead singer Michael Hutchence had rock-star attitude, looks and a voice to match. In Australia alone, over a period of 25 years, INXS had 38 Top 40 hits. On top of this they received Grammy nominations and MTV music awards in the USA, six consecutive top ten UK and US albums, 17 Billboard hits and 23 UK Top 40 songs. In 2005 they launched a worldwide search for a permanent new lead singer, replacing Michael Hutchence who died in 1997.

Female led bands such as The Divinyls, The Baby Animals, Do-Re-Mi and more recently Spiderbait and Killing Heidi are also responsible for many Australian and international hits. Chrissie Amphlett, lead singer of The Divinyls said of the 1980s, 'You didn't have to be a really slick singer but you could develop your style. Everything was very possible again and it was raw... it was a really great period that bred a lot of creativity.'

The new generation

The lines where rock music ends and other styles begin is blurring today. Bands like Regurgitator use heavy guitar and electronic music to create their own unique sound, while Yothu Yindi, who had hits in the 1990s, use traditional Aboriginal music and language as the basis for their songs.

The new generation band Spiderbait had their first Australian number one hit in 2004. Black Betty, an African American work song first recorded in 1933, was later recorded by various artists including Ram Jam (1977), Nick Cave (1986) and Tom Jones (2002). Spiderbait's version has a fast beat and heavy guitar rock sound. Other bands such as Jet, Bodyrockers, Magic Dirt, Powderfinger and Jebediah are just a few of the latest batch of Aussie rock bands that are charting hits in the new millennium, many of them, like Spiderbait, coming back to the heavy rock sound that was forged in the 1970s and '80s.

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« Reply #779 on: January 12, 2008, 12:55:56 AM »

Koala blue eyes is one of a kind

Article from: The Courier Mail…..Jeremy Pierce….January 11, 2008 11:00pm

WITH his piercing blue eyes, tiny Frankie is one of a kind - the world's only blue-eyed koala.

His striking peepers have dumbfounded animal carers at his Dreamworld home on the Gold Coast.

Initially worried, staff ran tests but found that apart from some reduced pigmentation, Frankie, dubbed after ol' blue eyes Frank Sinatra, had perfect vision.

Dreamworld supervisor Michelle Barnes said she doubted her own vision when she first saw Frankie's eyes.

While Frankie, now nine months old, was the centre of media attention yesterday, the general public will have to wait a couple of months before he is ready to face the public for the first time.




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....And at night the wond’rous glory of the everlasting stars..  A.B (Banjo) Paterson
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