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Author Topic: Australia by Tibrogargan January 2007 - present and 155216+ views later!  (Read 566968 times)
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MuffyBee
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« Reply #980 on: January 11, 2011, 01:42:11 PM »

I've been reading and following the news reports.  So much water   
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« Reply #981 on: January 11, 2011, 05:34:38 PM »

4 Donks and Muffy it is pleasing to read comments from monkeys who are following this thread.  There is very little other news from here apart from these devastating floods from the massive rains which are now also moving into New South Wales and areas of Victoria.  Remember that most of the outer areas have been suffering drought for many years.

The news flash reports and the regular emergency services press conferences I see just have even more dire predictions with each broadcast.  I was not living in Brisbane for the 1974 floods, the extent of which had become the benchmark for any insurance or mortgage accessibility, but something the "old timers" used to reminisce about.  I have seen a lot of pictures of the extent of the water then and amazed at how far it spread into the suburbs. Since then Brisbane has grown immensely from a extra large country town to a sophisticated modern city with all the urban development and buildings associated with this.  It has been estimated by the experts that these current floods will equal and most likely exceed those levels.

The latest is that the Brisbane CBD is like a ghost town with most workers being sensible and staying home or engaged in emergency rescue assistance.  A big percentage of the business there are closed and the electrical supplier Energex has announced it will shut off power to areas as they expect the water to contact generators and cause a dangerous situation.  Grocery outlets are reporting all bottled water and perishables such as bread having been sold out.  The biggest worry is the high total of missing persons which everyone hopes is just because they are sheltering in other areas and not able to contact their families.

Today and tomorrow's high tides will be the main concern.

Many reports and items at this link :

http://www.couriermail.com.au/
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« Reply #982 on: January 12, 2011, 05:19:53 PM »

Mixed news this morning.  On the good side the river did not rise to the expected high level overnight so to date the 1974 record still stands.  Rain eased in Brisbane and more importantly stopped in the catchment areas.  If the rain stays away the river level should start to drop in a few days.  Authorities are still on high alert for the next high tide this afternoon. I have been watching live news helicopter pictures and it is staggering to see how much has been affected.  The Brisbane River twists and turns through the whole area like a big snake so it covers so many more suburbs than a straight river would do. On a very tragic note 11 of the 12 people declared deceased are from just two families. One commentator mentioned that because we are a civilised country most of our people will have no idea of how to deal with the putrid flood waters. Also police are being kept busy protecting evacuated properties from thieves and looters, where they could be better employed helping in the rescue efforts. Some looters have already been captured and jailed. How awful that any disaster has its criminal element ready to take advantage.

The RSPCA (animal protection group) property had to be evacuated and nearly all the domestic animals and wildlife they were caring for have been "fostered" by volunteer residents.  There are animal shelters provided at the evacuation shelters so people can take their pets with them to these centres.

Our foreign minister has said that he has received messages from more than 100 world countries offering support and assistance if needed.  This is so unusual to us as we are nearly always in the position of offering help to other countries.  Emergency service personnel from all other Australia states and New Zealand are in Queensland already, as well as our defence forces.  New Zealand has also offered their defence forces if needed.

There is a long haul ahead for Queensland residents when the clean up commences.  Experts are predicting many months and possibly years to return the city and surrounding areas and country towns to their original state.  The cost will be staggering and the economic impact will be far reaching.
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« Reply #983 on: January 12, 2011, 05:24:13 PM »

Brisbane floods reach their peak, and it's lower than 1974

    * From: The Courier-Mail
    * January 13, 2011 7:08AM

BRISBANE is waking up to a mighty river peaking lower than 1974 levels, but nevertheless devastating for dozens of suburbs and tens of thousands of homes.

According to Queensland Police , the river has reached its peak and will remain high for the rest of the day.

"... The Brisbane River has now reached its peak," police said in a statement at 5.11am, without providing a level.

Just before 5.30am, a Bureau of Meteorology spokesman told the ABC the river was current "at or near it's peak".

"Hydrologists, they do believe it is at or near its peak currently," forecaster Brett Harrison said.

It's currently at 4.46 metres and is expected to remain at or near that level for about an hour, before slowly receding.

"We still expect it to be above major flood levels until sometime during Friday and remain high over the weekend," Mr Harrison said.

Lord Mayor Campbell Newman said there was a lot of water in the CBD, but the lower than expected peak had saved many businesses and high-rise apartment buildings.

He said revised figures, based on a 4.6 metre peak, suggested 11,900 properties would be fully flooded "with water across the whole property footprint", and 14,700 partially affected.

At that level 2500 businesses would be fully affected, and another 2500 partially affected, Mr Newman said.

"We all now have to rally together to help these people clean up, the ones that have suffered impacts," he told the ABC.

He said drinking water supplies in the Brisbane City Council local government area were safe and secure.

Overnight the Bureau of Meteorology  revised down the expected peak three times, from the original estimate of 5.5m. It was revised to 5.2m, then less than 5m, before the latest estimate of 4.6m at 4am.

It was expected to remain at 4.6m for four to five hours, before falling slightly and then rising again in the afternoon, but not exceeding 4.6m.

This is below the 1974 flood peak of 5.45m as releases at Wivenhoe Dam were reduced quickly during Tuesday night, according to the Bureau of Meteorology.

In comparison, the 1841 flood reached a peak of 8.43m and the 1893 flood 8.35m.

However while this latest flood is technically at a lower level than in 1974, its impact will be felt harder in today's more highly developed, densely populated city.

About 4.45am water was almost knee-deep at the intersection of Charlotte and Albert streets in the inner city, with water coming up through drains and swamping basements.

City SES and electrical workers were at the ready.

Police are requesting that all Brisbane residents to avoid travel to the CBD unless absolutely necessary and stay away from the river as sightseers can cause more trouble for emergency service workers.

Water has broken through into the historic Breakfast Creek Hotel.

The entire hotel is inundated with water, which began to flow through into the hotel at about 12.45am.

Kingsford Smith Drive has not yet flooded, but the river is just centimetres from reaching up to the edge of the road.

Several onlookers remained at the river's edge waiting for the high tide at 4am.

In a rare piece of good news, Archerfield Airport has escaped flooding by 30cm.

Authorities overnight were worried the river would breach a bank and flood the airport's electrics, which would have cost millions to repair.

They await further rises in the Brisbane river, saying they were not out of the woods yet.

The airport remains closed.

On Wednesday, Brisbane's central business district dodged a major flood bullet but there were still plenty of problems.

It had been expected the 3pm high tide, combined with the mass of water in the river, would cause major flooding in the CBD but the situation was helped by no rain falling in the city all day.

Lord Mayor Campbell Newman, while welcoming the relative lack of damage on Wednesday, warned that the worst of the flooding was still ahead of the city.

``I'm feeling a sense of history. I am feeling a sense of horror and awe about the power of the river and I am just constantly thinking about the people whose livelihoods are going down that river in front of our eyes,” Cr Newman said

``At the moment we are seeing pontoons and people's boats...sadly in coming hours we might be seeing bits of people's houses...and that breaks my heart.''

On Wednesday thousands of people ignored pleas from police to stay out of the CBD as they gathered at vantage points to watch the rampaging Brisbane River.

Public transport problems and cut roads meant they arrived on foot, bicycles, skateboards, and even scooters.

At every vantage point, sightseers were taking photographs.

There was flooding in the lower southern end of the CBD at Alice St, Mary St, Creek St, Eagle St and Margaret St, but not to the depth that had been predicted.

The walkway at the Eagle Street Pier and Waterfront Place was underwater in most parts, but the river did not reach the high levels.

Police patrolled the area keeping sightseers behind lines.

Across the river in South Brisbane, coffee shops and businesses in Boundary and Melbourne Streets sandbagged desperately as floodwaters spread more than 1km into the suburb.

Businesses and industrial workshops in access streets to the river were inundated.

Worst affected as the flood neared its predicted afternoon peak were in Kurilpa, Victoria, Beesley and Jane Streets - and further downstream access to the Go Between Bridge was cut off when Montague Road become flooded.

Floodwater entered houses and units in riverside streets at West End from early morning.

Police went door to door advising residents.

South Brisbane and West End resembled suburbs under siege, as police set up roadblocks to turn back sightseers.

Popular Orleigh Park at West End and the Davies Park rugby league ground at South Brisbane disappeared as floodwaters rose.

The river lapped at the floor of the historic South Brisbane Sailing Club, and inundated the nearby Brisbane & GPS Rowing Club boatshed and a cluster of school and club boatsheds near Davies Park.

The large Brisbane City Council pontoon used by kayakers at Orleigh Park broke away from its moorings and was swept down the river about 1pm.

More than 100,000 people in the southeast are without power as Energex continues to disconnect suburbs inundated by floodwaters.

Around 115,000 people state-wide are without power, including 60,000 customers in the CBD.

Cr Newman said there had been ``a number of furphies and rumours going around'' about the safety of the city's drinkng water, but said there was no problem with the water supply.

``There is capacity in the hilltop reservoirs around the city of Brisbane for two to three days should the power go out,'' Cr Newman said. ``I want to stress that we would like people in case of power outages to be careful with the use of water.

``Please don't go and fill up the bath. Just be very prudent in the way you use water.''

- Mark Oberhardt, Peter Howard, Rikki-Lee Arnold and Sophie Elsworth

http://www.couriermail.com.au/news/queensland/brisbanes-central-business-district-survived-its-first-high-tide-test-with-floodwaters-failing-to-hit-predicted-levels/story-e6freoof-1225986458412
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« Reply #984 on: January 12, 2011, 05:28:54 PM »

Tibro - I hope you are safe from the floods.  It's just horrible what is happening.
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« Reply #985 on: January 12, 2011, 05:29:30 PM »

Brisbane suburbs start to count the cost after flood

    * James O'Loan and Greg Stolz
    * From: The Courier-Mail
    * January 13, 2011 7:28AM

PREMIER Anna Bligh says some Brisbane residents are waking up a ``post-war zone'' this morning after the devastating floods that have destroyed a number of suburbs.

While the Brisbane River peak was lower than first feared, and well below the record levels of the 1974 floods, thousands of homes and businesses have been wiped out, and the Premier says more heartbreak still lay ahead for more of the city's residents.

"All the briefings in the world don't really prepare you for what you're going to see," Ms Bligh said. ``This is still a very dangerous sitaution, thousands of people are waiting for the total devastation of their homes and businesses, and for some people it's both.

''The task ahead for these people is massive.

``We should be very mindful that mother nature has done shocking and devastating damage.

``People are living, at the moment, in what I would call a post-war zone.

``I look across my state right now and there is three-quarters of the state that has experienced what people are seeing on their TV screens.''

Many Brisbane suburbs remain under water despite the Brisbane River not reaching an expected peak of 5.2m earlier.

Rocklea was almost 3m underwater and eerily quiet as the sun rose this morning.

If it wasn't for the odd kayaker paddling next to power lines it would be a ghost town.

The Rocklea Markets have now been submerged for 24 hours.

Shell-shocked locals have just arrived to the edge of flooded streets.

They are quiet and already counting the cost.

The suburb's large industrial sector, sustaining thousands of families, is virtually invisible.

Only the roofs of factories and hundreds of homes can be seen.

Late last night some locals chose to stay in two-storey homes.

It is not yet known how they fared but police have not reported any casualties.

The Courier-Mail surveyed the damage from a boat and witnessed water lapping 1m below the roofs of two-storey houses.

Boats, kayaks and canoes are the only mode of transport today.

This morning's high tide swallowed about five more blocks in three directions.

Nearby Oxley Creek and its tributaries wrought more havoc as the tide rose for hours.

Many who self-evacuated yesterday will soon return to the edge of floodwaters and watch their possessions floating by.

Nearby hotels and motels are full and trucks that should be ferrying fresh produce from the markets line Beaudesert Rd.

On the other side of town,  St Lucia was one of the suburbs hardest hit by the flood, but many residents were today breathing a sigh of relief that things were not much, much worse.

Homes and businesses were inundated but locals said the flooding was nowhere near as bad as they had feared.

"I was expecting the water to come up a lot higher," said Samford St resident Pete Traynor-Boyland, whose three-storey unit block was flooded.

"It definitely could have been a lot worse. The water came up to the second floor and my unit is on the third floor, so I'm one of the lucky ones."

Samford St was one of the worst-affected streets, along with Macquarie St and Brisbane St where businesses including a Shell service station were partially submerged.

The University of Queensland's sporting facilities also suffered major flooding.

On Sir Fred Schonell Drive, a 40m tree crashed through a flooded backyard and onto the road after it's roots gave way.

Another St Lucia resident Joe Erpf said the water had risen only about 500mm since yesterday - a lot less than he had been expecting.

Some Toowong residents partied last night and there were celebrations of sorts this morning with the realisation the flooding was not as dire as 1974.

Local James Fowler said he saw young men having a street party last night as they waited for the flood peak.

"They had a fire burning, a couple of beers and were taking it in good spirit," he said.

"Our main concern was how far up the street the water would come, but I'm relieved to see it hasn't come nearly as far as we had anticipated.

"Whilst a lot of people are suffering of course, a lot of people will be relieved that they still have a dry home to live in.

"So we'll fire up the barbie and have a cup of tea I think."

 As dawn broke, residents of Taringa and Indooropilly who stayed behind began trickling into the streets to assess the grim damage.

They found large parts of their suburbs submerged under brown water littered with debris.

In Westerham St at Taringa, a lone woman paused in the middle of the road which resembled a dirty lake. In heavily flooded Whitmore Street between the two suburbs, a mother showed her young son a submerged car and water inundating a group of workshops.

"We live up on the hill in Taringa and couldn't see anything from up there, so we came down for a closer look," the woman said.

http://www.couriermail.com.au/news/queensland/brisbane-suburbs-start-to-count-the-cost-after-flood/story-e6freoof-1225986893883
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« Reply #986 on: January 12, 2011, 05:35:11 PM »

Gateway Bridges are open again after being closed three times this morning because of concerns about debris

    * From: The Courier-Mail
    * January 13, 2011 6:13AM

THE debris from the broken city riverwalk that nearly collided with the Gateway Bridges this morning is being moored safely behind the Brisbane airport.

A tugboat safely steered the debris past the pylons of the Gateways Bridges, and is steering the section beyond the coal and port areas at the mouth of the river, and trying to move it on to the mudflats opposite the Fisherman's Islands.

A part of the riverwalk, about 300 tonnes of concrete,  broke away from the banks of the raging river about 11pm on Wednesday, police say.

It was reportedly about 300 metres long, and gathered debris as it went.

Queensland Police said the Gateway Bridge was closed for the third time as part of the boardwalk made its way down the river. It has now cleared the bridge.

The spokesman said police would be monitoring the debris coming down the river.

The bridges earlier in the night had been closed temporarily after a 300m section of the Riverwalk at New Farm broke off and hurtled towards the bridge at high speed.

The police launch Vigilant was utilised to escort the platform down the river.

The officers on board managed to manoeuvre their vessel through rapidly flowing waters to ensure the board walk was kept away from structures and cleared the Gateway Bridge supports.

Water police manoeuvred their vessel and guided the board walk in dangerous fast flowing flood water and steered it away from colliding with a large commercial vessel at Doboy Creek near the mouth of the river.

The boardwalk drifted into Moreton Bay and caused no damage to structure or vessels along the river.

Another debris alert just after 3am resulted in the bridges being temporarily closed again, but they were soon reopened.

Premier Anna Bligh said emergency services had been planning on breaking down the Riverwalk themselves but it had broken away before they could get to it.

Witnesses said they heard a loud bang before seeing the large block of concrete floating down the river.

Police said the huge section was moving at 21 knots. A witness told ABC Radio she had seen the huge section passing Bretts Wharf at Hamilton.

Also during the night the Walter Taylor Bridge at Indooroopilly was closed due to flood debris, but later reopened.

The Riverwalk was one of three large, potentially dangerous objects in the river authorities were concerned about.

A 1.5-tonne anchor will be used to secure the Moggill Ferry as it floats down the Brisbane River, to minimise damage to bridges.

The anchor was to be brought in by helicopters at first light on Thursday.

And navy clearance divers overnight assessed the Island party boat to establish the likelihood it would break from its moorings, and whether it should be secured or destroyed.

The decision was made to chain it up rather than sink it.

Of the Riverwalk, Ms Bligh earlier said that while the object looked light, it was actually very heavy and made of concrete.

There were plans to sink the Riverwalk but these were delayed due to the dangerous conditions.

Lord Mayor Campbell Newman said most of the CityCat pontoons and terminals had been damaged or destroyed by the floodwaters and debris.

"The CityCat service is substantially destroyed," he said.

"It will take many months I imagine to repair."

http://www.couriermail.com.au/news/queensland/moggil-ferry-island-party-boat-may-be-sunk-if-they-a-considered-a-risk-of-being-a-danger-to-the-public/story-e6freoof-12259863
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« Reply #987 on: January 12, 2011, 10:22:04 PM »

Tibro, I'm hoping and praying for your countrymen to have some relief soon.   an angelic monkey
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« Reply #988 on: January 13, 2011, 12:18:24 AM »

Tibro - I hope you are safe from the floods.  It's just horrible what is happening.

Yes Klaas we are safe.  We live in Tasmania which is the island state, just south of the continent of Australia, which is what we call "the mainland".

We lived in an inner suburb of Brisbane for 20 years and that is why this disaster is particularly heart breaking to us.  We know all the affected areas very well.  We have yet to be able to contact some of the folk we knew up there but they all live in suburbs close to but not in the actual flooded suburbs so should only be affected by power outages and the transport disruptions.

These floods are the result of monsoonal rains as Queensland is in a Tropical latitude and their rains come in the summer.  The floods are now spreading into the adjoining state of New South Wales and then expected to spread into Victoria.  So they will affect all our eastern, or Pacific coast, states.  I hope they moderate as they spread south.

I wish there was more cheerful events to post about here, but I appreciate the concern of monkeys.
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« Reply #989 on: January 13, 2011, 12:25:15 AM »

Tibro, I'm hoping and praying for your countrymen to have some relief soon.   an angelic monkey

Muffy thank you.  The latest weather report is that the rain has stopped over Brisbane and everyone is hoping that the river level will fall gradually.  Then will begin the big clean up.  Already they are providing man power to help in some areas that have had the waters recede a little.  They are also very mindful of mental health needs of those who have been traumatised in any way and possibly made homeless and possibly lost family or friends so counsellors are travelling from other states to assist the local ones.  It is unknown just what will have to be faced in the days and weeks ahead as people come grips with the reality of what has happened.  Australians are strong and will get through this as they have faced and overcome all manner of natural disasters.
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« Reply #990 on: January 13, 2011, 08:06:35 AM »

Tib, I am so relieved to see your posts about the flooding, just to know that you personally are okay and out of harm's way. It's been heartbreaking to see the loss of life and the video's of the flooding. As you posted so often the stories are accompanied by remarks about the resilience of your country and it's citizens. God bless.......
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« Reply #991 on: January 13, 2011, 05:15:04 PM »

Tib, I am so relieved to see your posts about the flooding, just to know that you personally are okay and out of harm's way. It's been heartbreaking to see the loss of life and the video's of the flooding. As you posted so often the stories are accompanied by remarks about the resilience of your country and it's citizens. God bless.......

Nonesy, I appreciate your post and hope all is well with you and your family.  It is heartbreaking to see the extent of the floodwaters and the fortitude of the people who have lost their homes, jobs and livelihood.  Many tales of heroism are emerging but are brushed off by the hero when interviewed as "just doing what anyone would do"

Fortunately the river levels are very slowly falling and although it is distressing to see pictures of the water levels I think it is going to be much more horrifying to see the effects once the water has receded.

Other states are becoming affected and even here in Tasmania we have had flash flooding and damage on our east coast affecting some of the tourist towns. Floods are also affecting South Australia.  Possibility of a cyclone forming in far north Queensland.Water, water everywhere.

If they have shown pictures there of the horses in the floodwaters who were resting their weary heads on house roofs after swimming for so long, it has been reported they were rescued and although they have large lacerations from debris in the raging waters they have received veterinary treatment, and were shown on TV happily grazing in a paddock of lush green grass, tended by several animal lovers.

There are some good stories to come out of the chaos.



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« Reply #992 on: January 13, 2011, 05:19:01 PM »

Southeast Queensland begins gruelling task of rebuilding after floods

    * Anna Caldwell, Sarah Vogler and Sophie Elsworth
    * From: The Courier-Mail
    * January 14, 2011 7:22AM

HUNDREDS of flood-affected residents will not be able to return home for months as the ravaged southeast begins the biggest clean-up in its history.

The Brisbane River is continuing to fall with the latest Bureau of Meteorology recording showing it was 2.75m at 4.01am.

It is continuing to drop bringing relief to many thousands of residents who are beginning to return to what is left of their destroyed homes.

Some will never live in their homes again amid warnings it could take years for the state to recover from the catastrophe.

Almost 40,000 Queenslanders have been forced out since Monday, and authorities today move into the gruelling task of rebuilding the state's capital.

More than 66,000 southeast Queensland premises remained without power at 5.25am today.

Premier Anna Bligh is steeling herself for flood affected residents to begin getting emotional as the clean-up gets slowly under way with some areas taking longer than others.

"I do understand there will be a lot of pain and frustration and that can manifest as anger and I'm ready to absorb that in my role," she told Channel 9.

Ms Bligh is asking everyone for their patience, saying the worst affected areas would be first in line for assistance and the clean-up would be one step at a time.

"When you have to eat an elephant you eat one chunk at a time," she said.

"We are still very much in the middle of this incident."

"I think it's inevitable we will see people very frustrated and people in a lot of grief and loss and people will be very emotional.

"I do ask people to be a little bit patient. The size and scale of this incident is absolutely putting every resource we have to the test."

She said it was unlikely supermarkets would be stocked with full supplies for a number of days.

 From first light, surveillance aircraft will take to the sky to systematically piece together an understanding of the huge scale of the devastation.

They will decide where to begin what Ms Bligh has labelled a recovery of "post-war proportions".

The death toll rose to 15 yesterday as authorities continued to comb through the shredded Lockyer Valley.

Brisbane recorded its first death from the crisis when a 24-year-old man was sucked into a stormwater drain while checking his father's property at Durack.

Anger was last night brewing in Brisbane's western suburbs where more than 25,000 people were cut off for a fourth day and in desperate need of items including food, nappies, infant formula and other supplies.

Member for Moggill Bruce Flegg was trying to organise an emergency drop of essentials, but it was impossible last night.

This morning Brisbane flood levels are expected to have dropped to 3.2m and will continue to recede over the weekend, leaving behind a stinking trail of destruction.

Volunteers from bobcat drivers to electricians, plumbers and the unskilled who just want to help will begin to sign up.

Council recovery experts plan to cut the city into five flashpoint sectors, with helpers spread across the north, south, east, west and central districts.

The Government is sourcing demountable homes to distribute throughout the state to provide temporary accommodation during the painstaking task of rebuilding homes.

Ms Bligh on Thursday issued a strong message to the dozens of communities from Theodore to Rockhampton and Dalby: "You will not be forgotten."

To the west, Goondiwindi and Condamine remained flashpoints as their major rivers continued rising.

And in Rockhampton major supply problems were emerging as the river failed to fall at the expected rate.

Disaster recovery co-ordinator Major-General Mick Slater has the task of making sure recovery in the regions continues despite the massive destruction in the southeast.

Ms Bligh signalled she would consider appointing additional military personnel to assist Gen Slater.

"The task for Gen Slater, the task for all levels of government and the task of recovery has increased exponentially in the last four days," she said.

"It doesn't seem that long ago to me that I was standing at a press conference saying the situation was stabilising.

"Well one week later what we've seen is that the rebuilding effort has more than doubled in its enormity."

A special taskforce of 200 people will be deployed across the pummelled Brisbane, Ipswich and Lockyer Valley regions to prevent looting.

By Thursday night, Brisbane City Council estimated nearly 26,000 homes and businesses had been flooded in Brisbane. Another 3000 had been flooded in Ipswich.

Electricity was cut to 70,000 homes. For 30,000 people in the worst-affected areas, power will not return for days.

Despite the river engulfing almost whole suburbs, Brisbane residents have been urged to conserve water.

All this as Queenslanders were spooked by news a cyclone was forming off far north Queensland. Forecasters don't expect it to cross the coast, but are closely monitoring the low-pressure system.

Brisbane City Council staff are working hard to clear major roads.

"The clean-up effort, ultimately, will take many, many months," Lord Mayor Campbell Newman said.

"The reconstruction effort on people's homes is going to take much longer than that that will take a year and a half to two years."

Council will stockpile waste in local parks, and send garbage trucks down flooded streets.

Ms Bligh said the recovery effort would need "every single person to be part of this".

Prime Minister Julia Gillard and Opposition Leader Tony Abbott both toured the flood- ravaged region yesterday.

The raging Brisbane River is still awash with debris, including whole furniture settings, fridges, seeping fuel tanks, tree trunks, pontoons and battered boats.

Those items became missiles in the fast river and will now head out to Moreton Bay, creating a major logistical challenge for Maritime Safety Queensland.

Regional harbourmaster Richard Johnson said the Port of Brisbane would remain closed for days.

Mr Johnson said search teams would need to identify sunken debris as well as clear massive items floating on the river's surface.

The Island party boat and the Moggill ferry are now safe, but are being monitored.

The Island, a 50m steel barge, was secured yesterday, as was the Moggill ferry after authorities had feared they could break loose.

http://www.couriermail.com.au/news/southeast-queensland-begins-gruelling-task-of-rebuilding-after-floods/story-e6freon6-1225987472419
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« Reply #993 on: January 14, 2011, 12:29:37 AM »

Tib, I am so relieved to see your posts about the flooding, just to know that you personally are okay and out of harm's way. It's been heartbreaking to see the loss of life and the video's of the flooding. As you posted so often the stories are accompanied by remarks about the resilience of your country and it's citizens. God bless.......

Nonesy, I appreciate your post and hope all is well with you and your family.  It is heartbreaking to see the extent of the floodwaters and the fortitude of the people who have lost their homes, jobs and livelihood.  Many tales of heroism are emerging but are brushed off by the hero when interviewed as "just doing what anyone would do"

Fortunately the river levels are very slowly falling and although it is distressing to see pictures of the water levels I think it is going to be much more horrifying to see the effects once the water has receded.

Other states are becoming affected and even here in Tasmania we have had flash flooding and damage on our east coast affecting some of the tourist towns. Floods are also affecting South Australia.  Possibility of a cyclone forming in far north Queensland.Water, water everywhere.

If they have shown pictures there of the horses in the floodwaters who were resting their weary heads on house roofs after swimming for so long, it has been reported they were rescued and although they have large lacerations from debris in the raging waters they have received veterinary treatment, and were shown on TV happily grazing in a paddock of lush green grass, tended by several animal lovers.

There are some good stories to come out of the chaos.





Thanks for responding so quickly Tib, I am much relieved to know you and yours are okay. ABC Nightline had a bit on the climate changes we're seeing and it seems the experts are saying we need to get used to it? Not a good sign, is it? That said, the summer I turned 16 my father opened a resort hotel at the beach. Within 5 years the tides changed and a channel emerged beneath the hotel. Thankfully it was built upon piers drilled into the sandstone beneath but the hotel still had to be relocated eventually.

I lived through one flood the year I turned 40, actually I ended up fleeing to higher ground for a month with family, until it finally receded. Daughter was riding a great deal then and we did help to find places to relocate horses beyond hers. It is such a wide-impact when these disasters occur and I am glad to hear the horses are surviving this.

Aussies are so resilient, that will be a godsend in dealing with the aftermath. Some of the video of the small tsunami-like rushes of water were terrifying to watch and heartbreaking to know lives were lost.

Please take good care of you.
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« Reply #994 on: January 14, 2011, 03:30:54 AM »


Thanks for responding so quickly Tib, I am much relieved to know you and yours are okay. ABC Nightline had a bit on the climate changes we're seeing and it seems the experts are saying we need to get used to it? Not a good sign, is it? That said, the summer I turned 16 my father opened a resort hotel at the beach. Within 5 years the tides changed and a channel emerged beneath the hotel. Thankfully it was built upon piers drilled into the sandstone beneath but the hotel still had to be relocated eventually.

I lived through one flood the year I turned 40, actually I ended up fleeing to higher ground for a month with family, until it finally receded. Daughter was riding a great deal then and we did help to find places to relocate horses beyond hers. It is such a wide-impact when these disasters occur and I am glad to hear the horses are surviving this.

Aussies are so resilient, that will be a godsend in dealing with the aftermath. Some of the video of the small tsunami-like rushes of water were terrifying to watch and heartbreaking to know lives were lost.

Please take good care of you.

There have been a lot of stories also about animals who have not been able to be rescued, and nothing yet about any wildlife.   

I do remember many years ago when I was school age, scientists were warning us that we were approaching another ice age.  Seems they have changed their minds.

The tsunami like conditions that decimated several towns and transformed Toowoomba resulted in most of the casualties.  One man's body was found 80 km (50 miles) down stream from where he was seen being swept away.

The access roads in Brisbane are slowly being opened and as each one is cleared there are many hundreds of vehicles slowly making their way into the area with people from unaffected areas arriving to assist the local residents with cleaning up.

Unfortunately there are looters and the police are being very strict with them and also bringing in several hundred more police from other states to help secure vacant properties.  They have also warned that in times of natural disasters the jail time for theft is doubled from 5 years to 10 years.

Nice to talk to you again.  Take care.
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« Reply #995 on: January 14, 2011, 03:33:09 AM »

Queensland's flood crisis has taken a sinister turn, with incidents of looting on the rise

    * Anthony Templeton, Des Houghton and Mark Oberhardt
    * From: The Courier-Mail
    * January 14, 2011 5:49PM

LOOTING is on the rise in the south-east, with two brazen thieves making a slow-speed getaway in a canoe after being sprung trying to break into a convenience store in Brisbane's southside.

Police Commissioner Bob Atkinson was straight-forward today in expressing his disgust with "low-life" alleged looters.

"You will be caught," he said.

About 10am this morning, two men in a bright red canoe attempted to break into the Fairfield 7-Eleven when security staff spotted them and waded into the water after them.

Unfortunately, the water was too deep for security staff to continue the chase and the thieves made their escape by paddling up Fairfield Road.

Store owner Roy Meng said he may not be able to enter his store for another week to see if anything was taken.

``The water is just still too high right now,'' he said.

``We have to wait maybe another week before it is safe to go inside and check.''

Trident security spokeswoman Lauren Parker said that her company had put on extra staff to deal with looters in Brisbane's suburban shopping centre.

``Right now we have six guards patrolling Fairfield Gardens 24 hours a day,'' she said.

``At the moment the best thing we can do now is act like a deterrent because even if we apprehend someone committing an act of looting the police are so stretched that we have no idea how long they will take to process anyone we catch.''

Looters in a boat also ransacked an engineering works at Rocklea which provides alternators used in army vehicles deployed in Afghanistan.

Police believe the ``pirates'' forced a window of the factory in Dollis St as the flood peaked on Wednesday night.

Owner Mark Roberts said valuable coils of copper wire and tools were taken, with loses running to tens of thousands of dollars.

He said the alternators were also used widely in Australia in emergency services vehicles and fire engines.

He said it was the second time his factory had been looted.

``During the Christmas break, thieves got in by removing iron cladding from the rear of the building,'' Mr Roberts said.

Mr Roberts said the plant was inundated by 1.5m of water. The only way in was by boat.

``We stacked a lot of valuable electrical equipment on top of shipping containers and we are hoping it wont be affected,'' he said.

``We won't know until power goes on next week if other equipment has been damaged.

``If it has, it will be a serious blow to production and losses will be heavy.''

Police have now arrested 10 people on a total of 18 looting charges during the current flood crisis.

Two men, aged 33 and 37, of North Stradbroke Island, appeared in the Wynnum Magistrates Court this morning on stealing by looting charges after a high drama overnight.

A woman, 43, also of North Stradbroke, who was with them, faced charges of assaulting police and entering premises with intent to commit an indictable offence.

A Justice Department spokesperson said all three had their cases adjourned until January 24.

Earlier, a police spokesman said officers on board the police boat G J Olive intercepted the trio in a dinghy at the Port of Brisbane.

Police were attending reports at Fisherman's Island a dingy had a quanity of property which had allegedly been stolen from unattended boats.

The spokesman said while the dingy was being towed to one of the men jumped into the Brisbane River and had to be rescued.

He was later treated at hospital after collapsing when back abaord the police vessel.

The majority of other charges involve stealing by looting but several people have been charged with acting in a dangerous manner.

Three people were charged with trying to steal from a restaurant at Oxley but most offences involve looting of boats on the Brisbane River.

Police Commissioner Bob Atkinson warned the maximum penalty for looting doubled to 10 years in the time of natural disaster .

He said there was a subsection of the criminal code which allowed authorities to double penalties.

"Looting goes against the great character of the great recovery effort. But I must emphasise we have only 10 people out of millions of people," he said.

http://www.couriermail.com.au/news/queensland/queenslands-flood-crisis-has-taken-a-sinister-turn-with-incidents-of-looting-on-the-rise/story-e6freoof-1225987762797
 
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« Reply #996 on: January 14, 2011, 03:37:06 AM »

Bull sharks have been spotted swimming down the main street in Goodna - 30km from the coast

    * From: AAP
    * January 14, 2011 1:23PM

BUTCHER Steven Bateman spotted two bull sharks swimming near his Goodna shop yesterday - one of several reports of a sharks in Goodna's main street.

The Queensland Times reported the shark sightings, 30km from the coast, with Ipswich local councillor Paul Tully confirming it was a bizarre but true story out of Queensland's flood disaster.

``It would have swum several kilometres in from the river, across Evan Marginson Park and the motorway,'' Cr Tully said.

``It's definitely a first for Goodna, to have a shark in the main street.

``I know Steve (Bateman) and he wouldn't say he saw a shark unless he really saw one.

``It's not like there have been polar bears or crocodiles spotted.''
 
Meanwhile, Gympie Pines golf course owner Mike Towler is offering $1000 reward to anyone who can help catch the person who carved the outline of a huge penis into one of the course's greens while others battled the flood disaster elsewhere.

``People's emotions are bound to be pretty raw at the moment and to do this sort of damage to people is absolutely woeful,'' he told The Gympie Times.

``It costs $20,000 to build one of these greens and $2000 to $3000 to repair this sort of damage.

He said he was angry that people would take advantage of disaster to hurt others.

``I'm offering the money to anyone who gives information to police leading to this person being convicted,'' he said.

Graffiti tags were also painted on the Quick N Easy Car and Dog Wash, and vandals also struck the Lands Office building and numerous structures at One Mile sports fields.

http://www.couriermail.com.au/news/queensland/bull-sharks-have-been-spotted-swimming-down-the-main-street-in-goodna-30km-from-the-coast/story-fn7knuy7-1225987826953

30 km is about 18 miles
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« Reply #997 on: January 14, 2011, 05:19:34 PM »

Tibro, I continue to keep you and your fellow countrymen in prayer. What a horrid thing...
Has anyone heard from Nightowl? Is she close to the flooding?
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« Reply #998 on: January 14, 2011, 07:08:54 PM »

Nana thank you for your post.  I had been concerned about Nightowl also, thinking she lived in Queensland by her knowledge in Zahra's thread, but just checked her profile and see she is in New South Wales so she should be well away from any flooding.  I would like to hear from her nonetheless.

The rain has stopped in Brisbane and the massive clean-up has begun.  It is very emotional to watch on live television to see the thousands of volunteers arriving at the registration points and then being loaded into buses and taken to the needy areas.  These people of all ages came armed with all manner of cleaning equipment and the organisation of the whole project is phenomenal.

They also showed one house which had been emptied of furniture and belongings which had been piled outside on the street awaiting trucks to take it away and the family were indoors helping to totally strip all the inside walls of gyprock/plasterboard (dry wall?) so that there was only the frame work left. Heartbreaking.

The authorities have requested defence force mine sweepers to search for debris and then clear the river and Moreton Bay of all manner of objects such as motor vehicles, yachts and small boats, refrigerators and other household appliances all of which have been swept down stream and eventually could cause a hazard on the main shipping routes along the coast.
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« Reply #999 on: January 14, 2011, 07:12:43 PM »

Here is what you need to know in Queensland's flood clean-up - and how you can help

    * Tanya Chilcott, Anthony Templeton
    * From: The Courier-Mail
    * January 15, 2011 9:05AM

AN ARMY of more than 22,000 volunteers are set to march into action and continue Queensland's mammoth flood cleanup efforts.

More than 22,000 people have registered with Volunteering Queensland to help. There will be 1200 defence force personnel involved.

Volunteer registration centres have been set up at Doomben Racecourse, Boondall Entertainment Centre, Mount Coot-tha Botanic Gardens and the MacGregor High School Assembly Hall.

Flooding has affected more than 26,000 Brisbane homes, with 11,900 completely submerged and another 14,700 partially flooded.

Volunteer registration will take place at 12.30am.

Lord Mayor Campbell Newman has asked people who go to the centres to be self-sufficient and bring shovels and brooms.

Volunteers should also wear long shirts, pants, a hat, bring sunscreen and mosquito repellent and have enough food and water to last them through a four or eight-hour shift.

To register, go to the main foyer of the Boondall Entertainment Centre, the main gate of the Doomben Race Course, the auditorium at the Mt Coot-tha Botanic Gardens or the MacGregor State High School auditorium.

Bulk bins rolled out

More than 180 large bulk bins will start to be rolled out from Saturday in flood-affected suburbs.

Spoiled food, flood-damaged furniture and general rubbish should be placed in the bulk bins.

Residents should not put hazardous materials such as pesticides, herbicides, pool chemicals, fuel cans or gas cylinders into the bulk bins.

Cr Newman also unveiled a battle plan for the city's flood victims to begin the huge task of cleaning up, but they are guidelines all Queenslanders can use to repair their damaged homes.

Cr Newman had several tips for people going back into flood-ravaged homes.

- Seek out precious items like jewellery that might have been forgotten during the evacuation to make sure it is not thrown out.

- Bag up and take out all perishable food out.

- Decide what furniture you want to save and take the rest out to the pavement. Pile it up there and take a digital record for insurance purposes.

- Finally, start to clean the place out from the top down.

The Courier-Mail has compiled its own guide to the clean up process. It has advice on areas of concern for flood victims such as money, insurance, drinking water, power, roads and the availability of fresh food.

There is also advice and contact numbers for people looking for ways to help their fellow Queenslanders, either through donations or volunteer work.

Health concerns - Dr Jeanette Young, Queensland's Chief Health Officer, said there were several things to remember for flooded residents to avoid health problems.

- Flood water could be dirty or toxic, so where possible stay out of the water.

- Residents need to try to get rid of stagnant water; throw away perishable goods if the power supply has been off for more than 24 hours; and immediately throw away any food that has come into contact with river or flood water.

If you are looking to help, cash donations are still needed to help sustain the many flood victims forced out of their homes.

Volunteers helping out everywhere, but generally more resources and equipment are needed than people. How you can help.

In the Grantham area and Lockyer Valley, there is an urgent need for clean drinking water, as well as heavy machinery to assist with the clean up of devastated areas.

Cr Newman said Brisbane will be divided into five zones for the clean-up.

Power will be restored to the area once roads are cleared.

Rallying points will be set up from Saturday where volunteers can sign up and will be directed to areas where they can help out.

Sludge sticking to concrete around the city will be tough to move but Cr Newman said residents should resist the temptation to use fire hoses.

Flood-affected Brisbane residents and business will be able access $100 payments and rebates to assist in the clean-up efforts.

Cr Newman said food waste would be the first in a round of disposals.

http://www.couriermail.com.au/news/floodbound-residents-of-brisbanes-western-suburbs-await-supplies/story-e6freon6-1225987482889
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