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Author Topic: Blackspot, cercepspora, anthracose and botrytis blight  (Read 3646 times)
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Tylergal
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« on: July 16, 2006, 07:47:54 PM »

All of these maladies roses suffer when it heats up, the rain falls followed by night before the light has time to dry up the dampness.  This is not to say drought does not bright its unique problems, but most southerners know about fungi.

My spray program is one of year-round battle, or maybe not.

In late winter when I prune, I spray with lime sulfur.  Then I fertilize.

A week later, I spray with Daconil before the weather heats up.  Then I spray every two weeks with Daconil until the daytime temperatures exceed 70 degrees.

At that point, I use Mancozeb three sprays in a week.

Two weeks later I follow this with Banner Maxx or Compass.

Depending on weather, if it is fairly dry I follow the Banner Maxx or Compass in three weeks with one spray of Mancozeb and do that every three weeks until fall when I start using Daconil until the first frost.

I do NOT use a spreader sticker such as Indicate 5 with either of my fungicides, but Wilt-Pruf because it protects roses better from the elements and serves as an antid-desiccant.  Wilt-Pruf or Cloud Cover is a must for my garden in which swings of temperature can go from 80 to 15 in a few days' time in the winter, and back to 80 in just the same amount.  Wilt-Pruf (or Cloud Cover) mixed in my spray program that I continue from first late-winter pruning to first frost is a must.

Even when I discontinue spraying for fungi in about November, I spray with Wilt-Pruf once every 4-6 weeks to protect my roses against the dry cold of winter.

One advantage to a lot of moisture is spider mites hate moisture and spider mites can do a lot more damage than fungus, left untreated.

It is imperative that YOU DO NOT let your roses go into winter with blackspot and/or any fungus, lest they are likely to die from deterioration of their immune system.
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Peaches
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~WE LOVE YOU PEACHES~


« Reply #1 on: July 21, 2006, 04:57:11 PM »

Talk crepe myrtles for me, TG.  I have a few who seem to have white powdery stuff on the leaves.  Hubby tried spraying an anti-fungal but I don't think it worked.  Some of them have it and some don't.  Very weird.

I would appreciate any hints you might have as your thumb is certainly greener than mine.
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cp405
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« Reply #2 on: July 21, 2006, 06:24:59 PM »

I have a question Tyler.  Remember I told you I had some Knockout Roses?  Well the one I put in last year is huge and round.  I never did cut it back.  I got two more this Spring and one of them has this huge center stalk that is about 3 ft. higher than the rest of the plant.  Should I cut this stalk back?  It has so many roses on it I hated to, but it looks very odd.  

Thanks for your help.
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Tylergal
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« Reply #3 on: July 23, 2006, 12:26:42 PM »

Peaches, you have powdery mildew, caused from hot days and cool nights, with little rain.

You can spray your crape myrtles with a little baking soda, a tiny bit of skim milk and water.  I use about 1/2 teaspoon of baking soda, about 1/2 teaspoon skim milk to a 3-gallon sprayer.  It will not dissipate until you have new growth, but this will stop it from the new growth.  You can repeat this once per week or every 10 days as you see fit, but other than that you will need to resort to some more drastic measures, like using more expensive and more toxic sprays, but if this does not take care of the problem, I can give you names of some other fungicides that might work better.  It's a form of fungus.
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Tylergal
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« Reply #4 on: July 23, 2006, 12:30:12 PM »

Quote from: "cp405"
I have a question Tyler.  Remember I told you I had some Knockout Roses?  Well the one I put in last year is huge and round.  I never did cut it back.  I got two more this Spring and one of them has this huge center stalk that is about 3 ft. higher than the rest of the plant.  Should I cut this stalk back?  It has so many roses on it I hated to, but it looks very odd.  

Thanks for your help.


CP, I am a little concerned about this growth.  Can you tell me more about it?  It could be something, could be nothing except the rose showing you what it wants to do next year as far as height, but in your area there has been an epidemic of rose rosette disease, and I would like to be sure you do not have that, as it can wipe out all your roses if not dealt with.  

If your growth does not look like a witches broom or is not hyperthorny growth, it is probably not rose rosette disease, in which case I would just cut that one cane back to fit in with the size of the rest of the bush.

Sometimes roses just throw these "jack in the beanstalk canes," as a way of bragging about how big and tall they can get.

If the growth does not look like a witches broom at the terminal point and if it does not have hyperthorny growth, it is just "bragging" a little.
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Tylergal
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« Reply #5 on: July 23, 2006, 12:33:04 PM »

Peaches, the only thing good for powdery mildew, basically is a fungicide, such as your husband used but I have found in addition to that, the above recipe works well, but to get rid of it is to use the fungicide in addition to what I told you earlier and to keep the plants well watered.

This is a malady not often suffered by southerners, but more likely Californians as they have exceedingly hot days and very cool nights, which are dry.  This year Southern California has had more rain and now their problem is becoming what we have had in the past, blackspot.
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Ono
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« Reply #6 on: July 23, 2006, 01:17:35 PM »

At first glance, one could wonder if the title of this thread was describing Paulus, Joran, Deepak, and Satish. Laughing
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cp405
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« Reply #7 on: July 23, 2006, 06:57:37 PM »

Thanks for the reply Tyler, I guess it does look kind of like a broom.  Maybe when I get around to it I will take a picture for you.
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Tylergal
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« Reply #8 on: July 23, 2006, 07:12:54 PM »

Quote from: "cp405"
Thanks for the reply Tyler, I guess it does look kind of like a broom.  Maybe when I get around to it I will take a picture for you.


That will be good.
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tidycat
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« Reply #9 on: July 24, 2006, 07:28:33 PM »

Hi Tyler,

I was laughing at all the long technical terms in the title of this thread!  I know nothing about any of that!

When I went to a new dentist last Thursday, I filled out all the paperwork, and where it asked what things I was being treated for, I put "hypercholesteremia" (as you know, high cholesterol).  When the lady dentist came in she asked if I was in medicine.  I said no, why?  She said, well you wrote hypercholesteremia, and not many people know that term.  (And fewer could spell it!)  I thought that was funny!!


 Laughing
tidycat
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Sigh.  I'll always be behind.
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