December 05, 2016, 04:47:48 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: NEW CHILD BOARD CREATED IN THE POLITICAL SECTION FOR THE 2016 ELECTION
 
   Home   Help Login Register  
Pages: « 1 2   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Pakistani girl Malala Yousufzai shot by Taliban being treated in England  (Read 4841 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
MuffyBee
Former Moderator
Monkey Mega Star
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 44556



« Reply #20 on: September 27, 2013, 08:40:48 PM »

I hope ya'll don't mind this update.  I believe it's very important for girls/women to have access to an education.  Sometimes I fear we are going back to the dark ages.     What we in the U.S. consider the norm can be considered daring and dangerous in other places.  Sometimes this strikes me as a bit of pr from Pakistan, making her a poster child, when there are so many girls and women being denied education and other things we take for granted here in the U.S. Malala is the exception.  What about all the other girls in Pakistan?  While I admire Malala for pursuing her education despiete the risks there are so many others in the shadows.  One step at a time....  JMHO

http://www.myfoxlubbock.com/news/world/story/Pakistani-girl-shot-by-Taliban-honored-at-Harvard/aywGZbc8I0ebLKU-c98EYw.cspx
Pakistani girl shot by Taliban honored at Harvard
September 2,7 2013


Malala Yousafzai (Christopher Furlong, Getty Images)

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (AP) — A Pakistani girl who survived an assassination attempt by the Taliban is being honored as Harvard's 2013 humanitarian of the year.

Malala Yousafzai, an outspoken proponent for girls' education, was at Harvard on Friday to accept the Peter J. Gomes Humanitarian Award. Harvard President Drew Gilpin Faust said she was pleased to welcome Malala because of their shared interest in education.

The 16-year-old Malala said in a media availability that she is hoping to become a politician, because politicians can have influence on a broad scale. She also spoke nostalgically about her home region, the Swat Valley, and said she hopes to return some day.
 
Logged

  " Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not his own facts."  - Daniel Moynihan
MuffyBee
Former Moderator
Monkey Mega Star
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 44556



« Reply #21 on: October 07, 2013, 07:32:47 PM »

Very sad, but not surprising.  I saw her photo on the front of "Parade" magazine that came with my newspaper, and I thought to myself "they're going to come after her again".   

http://www.foxnews.com/world/2013/10/07/malala-yousafzai-pakistani-girl-shot-by-taliban-under-new-threat/
Malala Yousafzai, Pakistani girl shot by Taliban, under new death threat
October 7, 2013


Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani girl who inspired the world after surviving a Taliban bullet to the head, has again been targeted for death by the militant group.

Nearly a year after Malala was almost murdered by the Pakistan Taliban for defying a ban on female education, one of its leaders told the Daily Telegraph she’s still not safe.

“We are not against Malala herself but we are against her ideology,” Shahidullah Shahid told The Telegraph by telephone from an unknown location.

“Anyone who campaigns against our religion and criticizes Islam, like she is doing with her secular ideology, is our enemy and so we will target her again, and again,” Shahid added.

Malala, who is now 16, was shot in the head on October 9, 2012, while riding a bus from school in her home town of Mingora. A fierce supporter of girls’ education, she chronicled Taliban abuses and the challenges of daily life under Islamic rule in a blog, which made her a target.

"She accepted that she attacked Islam so we tried to kill her, and if we get another chance we will definitely kill her and that will make us feel proud. Islam prohibits killing women, but except those that support the infidels in their war against our religion," Shahid said, according to a Sky News report.

Malala was flown to England after the shooting for extensive surgeries to repair her skull. Joined by her family, she now lives in Birmingham, England, where she returned to school in March and has been writing a book.

“I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up For Education And Was Shot By The Taliban,” will be released Tuesday, a day before the anniversary of her attack.

The teenager has received worldwide attention and praise from human rights groups for her outspoken stand on education. The latest Taliban comments follow efforts by Islamic militants to limit public criticism with a series of lengthy press releases attempting to justify why they shot a 15-year-old girl and two of her friends.

A senior Taliban commander wrote an open letter to Malala in July, expressing regret that he hadn’t warned her to end her campaign. “When you were attacked it was shocking for me. I wished it would never happened and I had advised you before,” wrote Adnan Rasheed, according to the Telegraph.

More...
Logged

  " Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not his own facts."  - Daniel Moynihan
MuffyBee
Former Moderator
Monkey Mega Star
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 44556



« Reply #22 on: October 09, 2013, 07:47:00 AM »

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/asia/malala-yousufzai-pakistanis-publicly-wonder-whether-taliban-shooting-was-staged-to-create-hero-for-the-west-to-embrace-8868459.html
Malala Yousufzai: Pakistanis publicly wonder whether Taliban shooting was staged to create hero for the West to embrace
October 9, 2013

One year after a Taliban bullet tried to silence Malala Yousufzai's demand for girls' education, she has published a book and is a contender for the Nobel Peace Prize. But the militants threaten to kill her should she dare return home to Pakistan, and the principal at her old school says that as Malala's fame has grown, so has fear in her classrooms.
 
But the many awards that have since been bestowed on Malala, including a nomination for the Nobel Peace Prize, which is to be announced on Friday, have stirred anti-Western sentiments in Pakistan, where a brutal insurgency has killed thousands of civilians and more than 4,000 soldiers.

Frustrated by the relentless demands by the West "to do more," many Pakistanis see Malala's international acclaim as a Western drama played out to heap more criticism on their country.

Last December, students at a school in the Swat Valley protested a government decision to rename it the Malala Yousufzai Girls College. Eventually Malala's name was removed and the school returned to its original name.

Malala's battle for girls' education began when she was barely 11 years old and at a time when the Taliban roamed freely throughout the valley, blowing up schools, beheading security forces and leaving their dismembered bodies in the town square.

"It was a very, very hard time. Malala spoke out on TV and in newspapers. She was threatened, her father was threatened," said Ahmed Shah, a family friend and educator, whose battle for girls' education has also brought death threats from the Taliban. He said the Pakistan government was the first to recognize her bravery with a National Peace Award in 2011, a year before the shooting.

Shah said Malala, who is now 16 and has just published a book about the assassination attempt, also is paying a price for her notoriety.

"I was talking to Malala's father the other day and he said Malala is weeping and saying, 'When will I study? I am going to America, to Austria, to Spain and for so many days I have not even had one class of geography."'

Naz, who started as school principal three months ago, said it doesn't help that Malala's assailant is still at large.

The attacker will likely never be caught, said Shah, noting that police rarely even investigate an incident if the Taliban take credit for it.

Fear among judges generally leads to acquittals anyway, said Swat lawyer Aftab Alam.

"No one can dare to appear before the court, even the police cannot dare to investigate" an attack by the Taliban because of fear of retaliation, said Alam. "It is just impossible."

Military officials say Malala's assailant, identified as Attaullah, has fled to Afghanistan, while the police say the case is closed.
 
The militants remain unrepentant for the attack on Malala. Last weekend the Taliban again vowed to try to kill Malala if she returned from Britain to Pakistan, which she has repeatedly said is her dream.

"If we found her again, then we would definitely try to kill her," Taliban spokesman Shahidullah Shahid told the AP in an interview. "We will feel proud upon her death."
Logged

  " Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not his own facts."  - Daniel Moynihan
MuffyBee
Former Moderator
Monkey Mega Star
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 44556



« Reply #23 on: October 10, 2013, 04:49:31 PM »

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-24475305
Malala Yousafzai wins EU's Sakharov human rights prize
October 10, 2013

Logged

  " Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not his own facts."  - Daniel Moynihan
MuffyBee
Former Moderator
Monkey Mega Star
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 44556



« Reply #24 on: October 10, 2014, 09:02:37 AM »

http://www.kvue.com/story/news/world/2014/10/10/nobel-peace-prize-kailash-satyarthi-malala-yousafzai/16899569/
Malala Yousafzai, Kailash Satyarthi win Nobel Peace Prize
October 10, 2014


(Photo: AFP/Getty Images)

Malala Yousafzai and Kailash Satyarthi won the 95th Nobel Peace Prize on Friday for their work promoting education rights for children in a year that has been anything but peaceful.

The Norwegian Nobel Committee cited the two "for their struggle against the suppression of children and young people and for the right of all children to education."

Yousafzai, 17 and the youngest-ever Nobel winner, is from Pakistan and Satyarthi, 60, is from India — facts that bring added significance to the award given the tumultuous history between those two nations.

The committee "regards it as an important point for a Hindu and a Muslim, an Indian and a Pakistani, to join in a common struggle for education and against extremism," it said.

In 2012, Yousafzai was shot in the head by Taliban gunmen, but recovered to advocate for education for girls around the world. In school at the time of Friday's announcement, she is expected to make a statement later Friday.

Satyarthi, the Nobel committee said, has spent a lifetime "focusing on the grave exploitation of children for financial gain." The committee said Satyarthi was "maintaining (Mahatma) Gandhi's tradition."
 

Video
Logged

  " Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not his own facts."  - Daniel Moynihan
MuffyBee
Former Moderator
Monkey Mega Star
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 44556



« Reply #25 on: April 30, 2015, 06:13:57 PM »

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-04-30/life-sentences-for-10-involved-in-malala-yousafzai-shooting/6435732
Malala Yousafzai: Pakistan court hands down life sentences to men involved in shooting of teenage activist
April 31, 2015

Logged

  " Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not his own facts."  - Daniel Moynihan
Pages: « 1 2   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Use of this web site in any manner signifies unconditional acceptance, without exception, of our terms of use.
Powered by SMF 1.1.13 | SMF © 2006-2011, Simple Machines LLC
 
Page created in 0.228 seconds with 20 queries.